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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
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Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover
Australasian Journal of Early Childhood
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.535
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1836-9391
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Young children and digital technology: Australian
           early childhood education and care sector adults' perspectives
    • Abstract: Zabatiero, Juliana; Straker, Leon; Mantilla, Ana; Edwards, Susan; Danby, Susan
      This paper reports on the findings of a sector-wide survey conducted as part of a multi-component process in Early Childhood Australia's development of a national 'Statement on young children and digital technology' for those working within early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings. The survey sought broad comment and feedback from the Australian ECEC sector regarding adult perspectives on young children and digital technology. The cross-sectional online survey included 12 Likert scale items and three open-ended questions. Five hundred and fifteen participants representing various roles, ages and locations completed the survey. Findings suggest the sector holds diverse and complex perspectives, including appreciation for the learning and teaching opportunities afforded via technology, and concerns for children's health and digital citizenship. Findings also highlight the need for evidence-based practices and sector-wide support in the pedagogical use of technology that enhances children's physical, emotional and social health and development.

      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 15:33:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Mapping the policy landscape of Australian early
           childhood education policy through document analysis
    • Abstract: Hard, Natasha; Lee, Paige; Dockett, Sue
      While much has been written about recent reforms in Australian early childhood education (birth to five) policy, less attention has been directed towards the changes across the whole early childhood period (birth to eight) and potential links between policy covering the prior-to-school and early school years. The near-concurrent introduction of two national curriculum documents covering these sectors has provided opportunities to explore such links.

      Recognising that such national approaches do not emerge from a vacuum, we identified a wide range of additional documents that contributed to the history, development, implementation and evaluation of the national curriculum documents, with the aim of exploring the links across these and the policy imperatives guiding these. Qualitative Document Analysis was used to manage the overwhelming number of related documents that were identified. In this paper, we share the processes used in the descriptive coding of a large corpus of documents, and reflect on the advantages and challenges encountered. We share these reflections not only as a means of contributing to discussions about the nature and impact of early childhood policy, but also to provide a transparent basis for future analyses.

      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 15:33:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Nyland, Berenice
      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 15:33:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Playgroups: Moving in from the margins of history,
           policy and feminism
    • Abstract: Townley, Cris
      Playgroups began in Australia in the early 1970s, at the same time as significant changes in early childhood education and care (ECEC) began taking place. This paper explores how early playgroups were positioned in the ECEC policy, and the experiences of playgroup organisers in New South Wales. Methods used were documentary analysis of 'Project Care' (Social Welfare Commission, 1974) and interviews with key players. Findings were that playgroups grew rapidly in response to grassroots demand from mothers wanting their children to learn through quality play, besides the demand for adult social support. Since 'Project Care' was strongly influenced by feminist lobbying and the objective of enabling women to engage in paid work - and playgroups relied on mothers to deliver the service - playgroups were an uneasy fit in the ECEC policy. Although 'Project Care' integrated playgroups into its recommendations for ECEC services, subsequent funding was at a low level. Today, ECEC services would benefit from a strengthening of the community playgroups model.

      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 15:33:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Advancing Australia's agenda for young children's
           health and wellbeing: Empirical insights into educator knowledge,
           confidence and intentions in promoting children's Learning, Eating, active
           play and sleep (LEAPS)
    • Abstract: Cleland, Phoebe; Byrne, Rebecca; Vidgen, Helen; Irvine, Susan; Farrell, Ann; Gallegos, Danielle
      Educators in early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings play a critical role in advancing Australia's agenda for children's health and wellbeing. The LEAPS (Learning, Eating, Active Play, Sleep) professional development program was designed to acknowledge and improve educator knowledge of national healthy eating and physical activity guidelines, as a critical foundation for health and wellbeing of children and families. The program consisted of online reading and face-to-face professional development. Change in educator knowledge and confidence was assessed via pre- and post-questionnaire, with two additional open-ended questions regarding intention to change practice post-program.

      Educators (n = 765) participating in LEAPS increased their knowledge of nutrition and physical activity guidelines, and planned to implement practice changes as a result - namely communication of healthy eating and physical activity messages with colleagues, parents and children; and engaging parents in these areas within their service. Professional development regarding health guidelines is important to support evidence-based communication between educators and parents.

      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 15:33:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Parent-child interactions around television and other
           on-screen content: Considering communication and social skills
    • Abstract: Lusted, Claire; Joffe, Beverly
      This study investigated parent-child interactions around on-screen content. Associated and predictive factors impacting quality of interactions were considered in relation to development of communication and social skills. A quantitative approach was used to analyse online survey responses of 162 Australian parents/carers. Descriptive statistics, correlations, evaluation of differences between groups, and multiple regression analyses were conducted. Children viewed an average of 17.86 hours of on-screen content (SD = 9.03) per week, with their viewing time most strongly predicted by parents' viewing time, and frequency of unsupervised viewing. Parents did not always ask questions, make comments or conduct follow-on activities around on-screen content in a manner conducive to communication and social skills development. Findings from this study may be useful in informing realistic recommendations made to parents about using on-screen content to assist their children in developing communication and social skills.

      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 15:33:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - What keeps early childhood teachers working in long
           day care': Tackling the crisis for Australia's reform agenda in early
           childhood education and care
    • Abstract: McKinlay, Sharon; Irvine, Susan; Farrell, Ann
      Retaining early childhood teachers in long day care (LDC) is a pressing challenge for Australia's reform agenda in early childhood education and care (ECEC). Case study research with five early childhood teachers in LDC revealed individual and contextual factors that enabled and challenged the teachers to stay in LDC. Drawing on social constructivist approaches, the research contributes empirically based insights that support the recruitment and retention of early childhood teachers in LDC.

      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 15:33:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Young children's language uses during play and
           implications for classroom assessment
    • Abstract: Peterson, Shelley Stagg; Eisazadeh, Nazila; Rajendram, Shakina; Portier, Christine
      This paper reports on research examining children's use of language in dramatic play and play with construction materials in kindergarten classrooms within three Indigenous and two non-Indigenous northern Canadian rural communities. Underpinned by sociolinguistic theory, the research involves inductive analysis of video-recorded interactions of five-year-old children during play. Participating children used language for 36 different purposes. Children's construction play talk often involved purposes within the categories of 'Language for learning and Language for own needs'. Children often used language for purposes associated with the 'Language for learning and Language for imagining' categories in dramatic play. As part of collaborative action research, teachers and researchers used these findings to develop a formative oral language observation tool. Using the tool, information gathered can inform practice and communication with parents and speech-language pathologists working with identified children.

      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 15:33:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - An analysis of the Australian government's 'jobs for
           families child care package: The utility of Bacchi's WPR methodology to
           identify potential influences on parents' childcare choice
    • Abstract: Beutler, Danica; Fenech, Marianne
      Issues of childcare affordability, availability and flexibility in Australia have long restricted choice for parents wanting to use formal child care. To address these issues, the Australian Government developed the Jobs for Families Child Care Package, which passed through the Australian Parliament in 2017. This paper reports findings from a study that employed Bacchi's 'What's the Problem Represented to be' (WPR) methodology to analyse the potential impact of the Package on parents' childcare choices. Consistent with submissions from peak bodies and policy analysts, Bacchi's WPR analysis uncovered potential lived and subjectification effects, which are likely to diminish the choices of disadvantaged families. Additionally, the analysis identified three discursive effects that complicate workforce participation and childcare choice. Utilising a WPR approach and disrupting the Australian Government's positioning of child care as a means to support workforce participation can inform advocacy that aims to re-centre childcare policy onto the rights of the child.

      PubDate: Tue, 1 May 2018 01:17:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Support to enhance level of implementation in physical
           activity interventions: An observational study
    • Abstract: Strooband, Karel FB; Stanley, Rebecca M; Okely, Anthony D; Jones, Rachel A
      This article aims to describe the level of implementation (LOI) of the Jump Start study, and examine the relationship between LOI changes and the support types provided to early childhood education and care (ECEC) centres. Direct observations were conducted in 21 ECEC centres at six months and 12 months after the start of the intervention. Each centre's LOI percentage was calculated and classified into high, medium or low implementers using objective criteria. Support strategies were determined by LOI at first observation. Pearson correlations between the support types and LOI were calculated using SPSS Statistics (version 23.0). In most cases (86%), ongoing support led to an increase in LOI, 17.5% on average. Phone calls were the only type of support significantly related to the positive LOI change (r = 0.532, p = 0.013). It was difficult to detect other effective support types due to the combined and small variance in support types provided to each centre.

      PubDate: Tue, 1 May 2018 01:17:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - What's in a dream': Natural elements, risk and
           loose parts in children's dream playspace drawings
    • Abstract: Ward, Kumara
      In this paper, children's idealised playspace drawings, arising from their participation in planning a children's playground in a local shopping centre, are examined. This examination is conducted by engaging with theories of human/nature connection, significance of place, and children as agents in co-construction of playspaces. Analysis of the drawings - through a combination of iterative visual methods and children's narratives - highlights the value children place on being outdoors and on natural elements, loose parts and activity in their play. The playspaces imagined/drawn by the children are in stark contrast to the design of play environments in many schools and early childhood settings where safety and supervision are the dominant focus. These conflicting views are examined in the context of international discourse on playspace design, and the concluding discussion adds to the growing number of voices affirming that children should be actively engaged in the planning process and become co-constructors in spaces that are designed for their use.

      PubDate: Tue, 1 May 2018 01:17:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Individual and collective reflection: Deepening early
           childhood pre-service teachers' reflective thinking during practicum
    • Abstract: Foong, Lydia; Md Nor, Mariani Binti; Nolan, Andrea
      This study explored individual and collective reflection as pedagogical approaches to support early childhood pre-service teachers' reflection during practicum. Current trends in the literature show a shift from individual reflection to collective reflection, with an emphasis on social constructivist perspectives. This qualitative study focused on a Malaysian teacher education institution conducting an undergraduate early years program from the UK as the selected case. Sources of evidence came from interviews, direct observations and documents such as student teachers' teaching portfolios, their reflection journals and assessment forms. The results show that collective reflection supported higher levels of reflective thinking during practicum at the integration, validation and appropriation levels of reflection, compared to when they reflected individually. Collective reflection provided Malaysian teachers with a new platform for problem-solving, connecting theory to practice, as well as the sharing and consideration of multiple perspectives, resulting in a deeper understanding of classroom practices.

      PubDate: Tue, 1 May 2018 01:17:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Parents' perspective on early childhood education in
           New Zealand: Voices from Pacifika families
    • Abstract: Singh, Pratika; Zhang, Kaili C
      Aotearoa/New Zealand has a reputation for being a world leader in early childhood education. However, research indicates that many early childhood teachers in New Zealand encounter difficulties when working with children and families from diverse backgrounds. In addition, though a plethora of research has been done on early childhood teachers' partnership with parents of multicultural backgrounds, little attention has been given by researchers to Pacifika parents' perspective on early childhood education in New Zealand. This article draws on findings from an interpretative study on three Pacifika families' views about their cultural practice at home and their views about early childhood education in New Zealand. It is believed that investigating parents' views on early childhood education and early childhood services in New Zealand can provide better support for families and children from Pacifika backgrounds.

      PubDate: Tue, 1 May 2018 01:17:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Barblett, Lennie
      PubDate: Tue, 1 May 2018 01:17:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Early childhood educators' perceptions of parent-child
           relationships: A qualitative study
    • Abstract: O'Connor, Amanda; Nolan, Andrea; Bergmeier, Heidi; Williams-Smith, Janet; Skouteris, Helen
      Parent-child relationships are the most critical for children's social and emotional development and wellbeing. While parent-child relationship support programs are well documented, there are none designed for educators' use within early education and care settings. To inform development of an educator program, an understanding of educators' everyday practices, their role in supporting parent-child relationships and children's social and emotional development was sought. Educators reported the importance of parent-child relationships, yet were hesitant to engage with parents. Educators' knowledge was primarily implicit - drawing on observations and practical experiences to build their knowledge of relationships and social and emotional development - which contributed to reluctance in sharing their knowledge with parents. Educators requested theoretical, evidence-based approaches to build further knowledge and inform everyday practices in supporting parent-child relationships. These findings are critical to the development of an educator-led parent-child relationship program for use within education and care settings.

      PubDate: Tue, 1 May 2018 01:17:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - Trust, empathy and time: Relationship building with
           families experiencing vulnerability and disadvantage in early childhood
           education and care services
    • Abstract: Roberts, Wendy
      This article identifies some key enablers and barriers in early childhood education and care (ECEC) environments in Australia encountered by early childhood educators and professionals (ECEPs) and by the children and their families experiencing vulnerability and disadvantage. Improving educational outcomes can change the cycle of disadvantage for children and their families. This research asks both the providers and users of services concurrently about what they think is important and effective. This qualitative case study used Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to analyse semi-structured interview data gathered from 30 families and their children and 33 qualified ECEPs. The research focused on the enablers and barriers around social inclusion, access, participation and engagement at the different levels of system, service, children and their families, and ECEPs. The study found that the participant groups shared an understanding that empathy, trust and time proved key to relationship building as a starting point in addressing some of the key barriers. Social inclusion, access, participation and engagement are key to early learning success in early childhood - a time integral to overall health, wellbeing and future role in society. This study has led to the development of a new model for engagement and relationship building.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Barblett, Lennie
      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - Working with teachers' pedagogical strengths: The
           design of executive function activities for play-based programs
    • Abstract: Fleer, Marilyn; Veresov, Nikolai; Harrison, Linda; Walker, Sue
      Evidence for the predictive effect of Executive Functions (EF) on school readiness and later school achievement has been noted. However, some studies show that EF activities are not sustained beyond the study period due to limited engagement by teachers and children. In light of this problem, this paper presents the pedagogical outcomes of a pilot study where teachers used 'playworlds' (Lindqvist, 1995) to embed EF into their programs. Five preschool teachers and five assistant teachers participated in the study over 10 weeks. Focus group interviews of all participants were conducted. A cultural-historical analysis showed that teachers developed motivating activities that promoted the sustainable development of EF in contexts of high child-engagement and motivation. The pedagogical features and implications for early childhood education are reported.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - 'I belong here; I been coming a big time': An
           exploration of belonging that includes the voice of children
    • Abstract: Wastell, Selma Jo; Degotardi, Sheila
      Belonging, as a term and a concept, has entered popular lexicon and is being extensively referred to in a variety of everyday and academic contexts. The word presumes a shared understanding, yet despite its common usage, theoretical literature suggests that this is not an accurate assumption. This research investigated what belonging meant to a group of young children aged between three and five years in an early care and education service, and the implications of their understandings. The core concepts of belonging to people and to place had been identified in the literature but what emerged was that children identified new elements, which were powerful determinants of belonging for them. The research confirmed that young children are indeed capable of conceptualising and expressing complex cognitive concepts like belonging when provided with a context conducive to this.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - Engaging vulnerable children and families: Learning
           from a new model of education and care
    • Abstract: Fordham, Loraine; Kennedy, Anne
      Over the past decade, researchers and policy-makers have increasingly affirmed universal early childhood education and care (ECEC) services as the best way to provide equitable ECEC to all children. While evidence suggests that Australian ECEC services are trying to engage vulnerable children and their families, some of the most vulnerable do not avail themselves of universal services. ECEC programs that specifically focus on vulnerable families may provide two solutions to the problem of at-risk children not participating in universal ECEC services. They may ensure that some of the most vulnerable will connect with services designed to support them and they may assist the sector by sharing how they successfully engage vulnerable families. This paper appraises universal and targeted ECEC services and suggests how both can be combined. It then describes a recent ethnographic study into an Australian ECEC program designed to support vulnerable children and families. It shares some of the study's findings as well as implications that may be helpful for universal ECEC service providers.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - Developing a 'classroom as community' approach to
           supporting young children's wellbeing
    • Abstract: Whitington, Victoria; McInnes, Elspeth
      Introducing the idea of the 'classroom as community', a class of six- to eight-yearold children engaged with a project, The Wellbeing Classroom (McInnes, Diamond & Whitington, 2014), which intended to support and advance their social and emotional development. This paper examines how the notion of 'classroom as community' informed the thinking and actions of the adults involved, and identifies six key elements of the approach employed. The teacher employed five strategies over a year: professional learning and reflection; building trust with children and modelling emotional self-regulation; teaching social skills across the day; accessing regular outreach worker support; and involving parents. Led by an upskilled teacher, the 'classroom as community' approach was found to have successfully supported children's social and emotional development, particularly those with difficulties. The project's reach included parents, thus extending its effects. This article reports on the significance of the concept of classroom as community to the project's success.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - What's the story': Exploring parent - teacher
           communication through eportfolios
    • Abstract: Higgins, Amanda; Cherrington, Sue
      Electronic portfolios (ePortfolios) are a relatively new phenomenon in early childhood education (ECE) with minimal existing research available on their use and effectiveness as a learning and communication tool in ECE. This article reports on a study examining the influence of ePortfolios on parent - teacher communication in one early childhood (EC) service. Reported data has been drawn from online surveys, document analysis of ePortfolios, individual interviews and focus group interviews with parents and teachers. Thematic analysis identified two main themes: the benefits and drawbacks of communicating via the ePortfolio, and the types of communication that were evident.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - The starting school study: Mothers' perspectives of
           transition to school
    • Abstract: Kaplun, Cathy; Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob
      The starting school study explored the transition to school from the perspectives of parents living in a disadvantaged area of Sydney, Australia. Fifty-seven parents participated in semi-structured interviews about their child's transition to school between 2009 and 2011. Topics discussed included: preparation for school, the first day, school relationships, supports and barriers to involvement and aspirations. A team of researchers working collaboratively in 2011 consolidated national and international research and theory of transition to school, to develop and publish an aspirational document entitled Transition to school: Position statement. The statement recognised and promoted the importance of transition to school using four constructs: opportunities, expectations, entitlements and aspirations. The results of the Starting School Study are discussed using these constructs. Overall, mothers in the study valued education, wanted their children to achieve and be successful, and hoped their children would have positive experiences of school; better than their own. The pivotal role of the teacher is discussed.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - Early childhood educator mental health: Performing the
           'National quality Standard'
    • Abstract: Corr, Lara; Cook, Kay; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Davis, Elise; Waters, Elizabeth
      In early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings, the mental wellbeing of educators is likely to be crucial to delivering high-quality care. Hence, this paper uses a contextual understanding of educators' mental health, and its evaluation by both educators and management, to reveal areas of the 'National Quality Framework' that require critical revision. Drawing on Hochschild's (2012) theory of emotional labour, we report on the analysis of semi-structured interviews with family day care educators ('n' = 16) and ECEC sector key informants ('n' = 18). Results demonstrate widespread belief that educator mental wellbeing affects care quality and the children attending care. In response to job stressors and perceived surveillance, educators use emotional labour to hide negative feelings and manage risks associated with low mental wellbeing. In this context, making individual educators fully responsible for performing good mental health to meet the 'National Quality Standard' may increase job stress and emotional labour, further distancing the aims of high-quality care. Our findings suggest that revising the NQS to improve working conditions, and addressing educator mental wellbeing are essential approaches for supporting high-quality ECEC practice.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - Civic action and learning with a community of
           aboriginal Australian young children
    • Abstract: Phillips, Louise Gwenneth; Moroney, Kerryn
      Civics and citizenship are increasingly used in early childhood education policy, but what citizenship and civic learning can be for young children is under-researched and lacking definition. Drawing from the Australian findings of the major study Civic action and learning with young children: Comparing approaches in Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, this article shares evidence of civic capacities that a community of young Aboriginal Australian children demonstrate in an early childhood education and care centre. Communitarian citizenship theory provides a framework for citizenship that is accessible for young children by focusing on families, communities and neighbourhoods. Cultural readings of illustrative examples on how young Aboriginal children express civic identity, collective responsibility, civic agency, civic deliberation and civic participation are discussed, highlighting how cultural values shape civic action. Links to state and national early childhood curricula are provided to guide others to further support civic learning in early childhood education.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - All children have the best start in life to create a
           better future for themselves and for the nation
    • Abstract: Deans, Jan; Klarin, Suzana; Liang, Rachel; Frydenberg, Erica
      This paper reports on a social emotional learning (SEL) program entitled COPE-R and the role of the teacher in supporting young children's developing social and emotional understandings, particularly around caring and empathy. Thirty-eight four- and five-yearold children and their teacher from an inner-Melbourne city long day preschool program participated in the research. The teacher was also a member of the research team hence the study falls within the realm of practitioner-research, which aims to shed further light on the role of the teacher in designing, implementing and evaluating challenging programs for young children. A qualitative case study methodology was employed to ensure that the voices of the children and the teacher-researcher were centrally located in the research. The data included the teacher-researcher's program plans and reflective journal notes, children's drawing-tellings and transcribed child interview data. Findings highlight the capacities of the participating children to engage in the COPE-R program and to demonstrate increased social emotional skill development - as evidenced through being able to identify and give voice to social emotional issues, enact relational empathy, demonstrate care for others and the environment, and recognise emotions in self and others. Also, the findings provide insight into the role of the teacher in implementing the COPE-R program, which enabled the participating children to give voice to a range of social and emotional issues including empathy, reciprocity, generosity, kindness and joy.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 4 - Parental knowledge and use of the national quality
           framework in their childcare decision making: Informed believers, informed
           dismissers and indifferent disregarders
    • Abstract: Hinton, Amber; Degotardi, Sheila; Fenech, Marianne
      The introduction of the 'National Quality Framework' (NQF) aimed to improve the quality of formal early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings across Australia, and enable parents to make informed childcare choices. Since this Framework was only introduced in 2012, research has yet to determine if these intended outcomes have been achieved. The impact of this policy on the choices of prospective parents is explored. Findings suggest that prospective parents' knowledge of the Framework is low and their use of NQF quality ratings to inform ECEC decision making even lower. Various influences on prospective parents' ECEC choices appeared to prevent those who knew about the ratings from using them effectively. Notwithstanding efforts to promote the NQF and quality ratings as tools for parents when choosing ECEC for their children, findings suggest that the use of these tools is highly influenced by market failures.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 01:58:23 GMT
       
 
 
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