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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australasian Journal of Early Childhood
  [SJR: 0.174]   [H-I: 1]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1836-9391
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Strategies that support kindergarten children's social
           and emotional development: One teacher's approach
    • Abstract: Kirk, Gillian; MacCallum, Judith
      This article examines the strategies employed by one kindergarten teacher, Kyra, to create a classroom where the relationships, play situations and environments worked synergistically to support children's social and emotional competencies. The data is drawn from a larger study, undertaken in 2009, that used qualitative methodology to examine how teachers were supporting kindergarten children's social and emotional development. Out of the eight participants from the original study, Kyra's pedagogical approach was found to be unique in that it provided increased opportunities for the development and consolidation of strategic processes that are essential for independent thinking and learning. It was found that these opportunities were fostered through a balanced provision of relationships, play and environments. Collectively, these elements created a context in which scientific and everyday concepts could connect. The children in this classroom were observed to demonstrate higher order thinking skills more often and seemingly more independently than the children in the other classrooms.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Jun 2017 15:20:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Between the big trees: A project-based approach to
           investigating shape and spatial thinking in a kindergarten program
    • Abstract: Cohrssen, Caroline; de Quadros-Wander, Ben; Page, Jane; Klarin, Suzana
      Support for children's emerging mathematical thinking is a characteristic of high-quality early childhood education. Young children's spatial thinking, an important component of mathematical thinking, is both innate and influenced by experience. Since spatial thinking contributes to children's mathematical thinking, it is important for children to engage in activities that support this learning. Early childhood educators are calling for guidance in how to support children's mathematical thinking in the context of an informal curriculum. In this paper, we describe how a project-based approach to mathematics teaching and learning provided a range of opportunities for children to investigate and rehearse understandings of two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) shapes and spatial thinking within the context of a project that was of 'real world' interest to the children. By intentionally embedding multiple opportunities for children to explore shapes and spatial thinking in a sequence of core learning experiences and complementary experiences, educators provided children with opportunities to rehearse shape and spatial concepts and related language in differing ways. Opportunities for formative assessment of children's learning are also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Establishing agreement between parent-reported and
           directly-measured behaviours
    • Abstract: Bennetts, Shannon K; Westrupp, Elizabeth M; Nicholson, Jan M; Mensah, Fiona K; Hackworth, Naomi J; Reilly, Sheena
      The quality and accuracy of research findings relies on the use of appropriate and sensitive research methods. To date, few studies have directly compared quantitative measurement methods in the early childhood field and the extent to which parentreported and directly-measured behaviours agree is unclear. Existing studies are hampered by small sample sizes and the use of statistical techniques which quantify the magnitude of association between measures (e.g. correlations), but not agreement. Here we review the limitations of existing method comparisons and suggest how alternative statistical approaches such as the Bland-Altman Method and ordinary least products regression can be readily applied in the early childhood context. Understanding agreement (and disagreement) between measurement methods has potential to reduce research costs and improve data quality, with important implications for researchers, clinicians and policy-makers.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Supported playgroups for health promotion activity for
           healthy eating and active living: A social ecological perspective
    • Abstract: Lloyd, Beverley; Buffett, Kym M; Innes-Hughes, Christine; Powell, Libby; Jackson, Dianne; Qi, Jing
      Childhood overweight problems and obesity is a significant problem in Australia, with 19 per cent of children commencing kindergarten either overweight or obese. The issue is increasingly recognised within both health promotion and the early childhood education and care sectors. The purpose of this paper is to identify a health promotion approach appropriate for supported playgroups - facilitated playgroups targeting vulnerable families. Primary research included individual interviews with managers, facilitators and parents/carers and observations within four non-specialist supported playgroups in urban and regional locations in NSW. Our findings show that supported playgroups lend themselves to the integration of healthy eating and active play with current practice, building on the existing methods and strengths of supported playgroups rather than additional intensive programming. They provide a 'soft entry' vehicle to deliver a health promoting environment, play-based learning activities for children and context-specific participatory and implicit learning for parents and carers.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Enhancing the effectiveness of early childhood
           educators and researchers working together to achieve common aims
    • Abstract: Jones, Rachel A; Gowers, Fay; Stanley, Rebecca M; Okely, Anthony D
      The early childhood sector within Australia has experienced significant changes over the past decade. During this period the quantity of early childhood research has also escalated. However, educators continue to remain cautious about the value of research as it is currently operationalised and its potential application. Establishing collaborative relationships between researchers and educators could be beneficial in ensuring research is conducted and applied as intended within the ECEC setting. The aim of this paper is to share four key lessons learnt from a professional collaboration that was established between researchers and educators within New South Wales, Australia. The paper highlights the need for researchers to have a thorough understanding of the early childhood environment, the importance of relationships within the early childhood sector and the need for researchers to include educators in all stages of the research process. Child and educator outcomes have the potential to be enhanced from professional collaborations established between researchers and educators.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - 'The color of heart is more important': Korean
           kindergarteners exploring racial diversity through poem writing
    • Abstract: Kim, So Jung; Wee, Su-Jeong; Lee, Youngmi
      Although the benefits of poem writing have been emphasised in a variety of contexts, there has been an understandable lack of knowledge about how to promote young children's multicultural/multiracial awareness using poetry writing. Adopting a qualitative case study approach, the current article explores how poem writing after reading and discussing multicultural picture books helps Korean kindergarten children develop an understanding of racial diversity and equality. As part of a large-scale research project on multicultural education in South Korea, this study focuses on data collected over a five-month period including participatory observations, in-depth interviews and written materials. Findings suggest that writing poetry can function as a means to foster children's critical awareness of racial diversity and equality and can help them find their own identities. How to make poetry-writing activities more meaningful and effective in the early childhood classroom is discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Gender differences in early literacy and mathematics
           achievement and self-regulatory behaviours in the first year of school: An
           Australian study
    • Abstract: Walker, Sue; Berthelsen, Donna
      This paper presents analyses of gender differences in classroom behaviours (e.g. attentiveness and task persistence) and early academic outcomes. Data is drawn from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian children (LSAC). In these analyses, data from Wave 1 data collection (2004) and Wave 2 data collection (2006) for the Kindergarten Cohort are used. A sample of 2315 children who were in Year 1 of school at Wave 2 data collection are the focus for the analyses reported. The analyses draw on teacher ratings of children's literacy and language competence and mathematical thinking in Year 1 of school; as well as ratings of children's self-regulatory behaviour in the classroom and level of problem behaviours. Girls were rated by their teachers as having better literacy and language outcomes that were predicted by more positive classroom behaviours. Results are discussed with respect to the influence of children's classroom behaviours on academic learning at the beginning of formal schooling.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Childcare teachers' attitudes toward the integration
           of care and education in Korea
    • Abstract: Park, Soyeon; Yang, Sungeun; Sims, Margaret
      This study explores Korean childcare teachers' attitudes toward the integration of care and education and the primary issues related to such integration. Ninety-three childcare teachers (91 females and two males) residing in the Seoul metropolitan areas of South Korea participated in this study. Most teachers in this study believed that combining care and education would enhance the professionalisation of the early care and education field and enable better services for children. The teachers expected the following fundamental elements from the integration: heightened criteria for teacher certifications; better work conditions for teachers; age-specific standardised curricula; and improvements to the quality of facilities because of consolidated administration and management. However, the teachers were concerned with possible challenges in the childcare field after integration and its impact on childcare teachers' job opportunities. The teachers' perspectives voiced in this study offer timely data that may facilitate the development of specific guidelines and directives for the integration of care and education. Implications from this study may also contribute valuable information to other countries experiencing similar challenges in combining early education and care.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Play: Challenging educators' beliefs about play in the
           indoor and outdoor environment
    • Abstract: Leggett, Nicole; Newman, Linda
      Western discourses of Early childhood pedagogy promote a play-based approach to learning, growth and development. However, play is a contested concept. Educators' understandings can vary from allowing freedom for children to play without interference, through to a range of adult engagement levels. The Australian Early Years Learning Framework adopts a play-based approach to children's growth and development, though says little about adult roles or intentionality in play. This paper draws from recent research that explored educators' beliefs and understandings of their roles as intentional teachers within indoor and outdoor learning environments. Findings highlighted differences between role and responsibility perceptions whereby educators shifted roles from teacher to supervisor between contexts. Drawing on Vygotsky's sociocultural approach that regards play as a social event and the leading source of development, promoting cognitive, emotional and social development in young children (Connery, John-Steiner and Marjanovic-Shane, 2010), we believe that a re-examination of the role of the educator in children's play requires specific attention. Finally, based on the research, we contest the notion of 'free play'. This paper suggests that by acknowledging the role of the educator as an intentional teacher both indoors and outdoors, and emphasising the complexity of the educator role, a more robust definition of play that is reflective of contemporary early childhood contexts and curricula can evolve to strengthen educator understanding and practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Young children's learning of literacies in
           transnational and sociocultural contexts in families with immigrant
           mothers in Taiwan
    • Abstract: Hsin, Ching-Ting
      Because of presumptions of educational deficiency, little was known about the education-related resources of new-immigrant families in Taiwan (i.e. one parent is a marriage immigrant and the other is from Taiwan). This study therefore aimed to investigate the household resources and knowledge that promote literacy in these families. Four Vietnamese immigrant mothers with children aged four-six years, their husbands and their children were recruited in this ethnographic study. It was found that the children learned oral language, literacy and cultural knowledge through literacy practices in various transnational contexts, including visiting Vietnam, making telephone calls to Vietnamese relatives, listening to Vietnamese songs and stories, going to Vietnamese restaurants and stores and socialising with their mothers' Vietnamese friends. Moreover, their literacy learning was intertwined with their engagement in parents' jobs, hobbies and life experiences and with their learning of Vietnamese cultural values and multiple languages. The understanding of these children's experiences provides insight into the incorporation of such resources into literacy curricula. For example, teachers could expand children's knowledge of Vietnamese food by reading books about Vietnamese agriculture.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Including playful aggression in early childhood
           curriculum and pedagogy
    • Abstract: Hart, Jennifer L; Nagel, Michael C
      The appropriateness of young children's playful aggression within early childhood settings continues to be debated among early childhood professionals. Research suggests that children's play - all types of play - should be the foundation of early childhood practice; however, playful aggression continues to be a neglected aspect of early childhood curricula. While decades of research identify the significant developmental benefits within multiple domains of learning as derived from various aspects of play, strict policies prohibiting playful aggression remain. With a growing number of young children enrolled in preschool programs it is important for educators to provide beneficial and inclusive experiences conducive to fostering optimal development of young children in all learning domains. This article suggests that the intolerance of children's playful aggression may reduce their optimal development; more specifically, their cognitive, social, physical and communicative development may be limited or hindered due to the omission and/or exclusion of playfully aggressive opportunities.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Risk burden, participation in early childhood
           education and care, and child outcomes
    • Abstract: Biddle, Nicholas; Crawford, Heather; Seth-Purdie, Robyn
      In 2008, Australian commonwealth and state and territory governments signed a National Partnership Agreement on Early Childhood Education, committing to provide universal access to quality early childhood education in the year before full-time schooling. The agreement noted that early childhood is a critical development period and quality early childhood education programs particularly benefit children at risk of poorer outcomes. Using the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, we show that for children aged four to five years in 2008, baseline risk factors were significantly associated with a range of poorer outcomes in the early school years and these associations were not offset by participation in a preschool program or attendance at day care without a preschool program. These results serve as a benchmark for the success of subsequent initiatives to provide children with universal access to quality preschool programs.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - The combined bachelor of education early childhood and
           primary degree: Student perceptions of value
    • Abstract: Harrison, Cathie; Joerdens, Sarah Heinrich
      The field of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) in Australia is a highly dynamic one. Increased government interest and funding during the years of the Labor Governments from 2008-2012 strengthened the sector in terms of increased funding, policy development, level of staff qualification and measures of quality. While this support resulted in increased numbers of children enrolled in ECEC settings and greater numbers of students enrolled in early childhood teacher education degrees, it also contributed to increased workforce pressures and a shortage of qualified early childhood teachers. In this paper we report on a quantitative study that investigated the nature of student experience in a combined Bachelor of Education Early Childhood and Primary degree, and student perceptions of value. The results of the study indicate positive responses to the inclusion of both early childhood and primary content and professional experience undertaken in both prior to school and school settings.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Nichols, Susan
      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 22:33:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Barblett, Lennie
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Effects of an evidence-based intervention on the
           Australian English language development of a vulnerable group of young
           Aboriginal children
    • Abstract: Brookes, Isabel; Tayler, Collette
      Learning in both informal and formal settings is vital to each child's sense of wellbeing and achievement, particularly for children identified as experiencing high levels of disadvantage and having markedly increased risk of poor educational attainment, health and development. National data indicates that Aboriginal children are especially vulnerable to low levels of engagement with education systems, including preschool. Recent reforms in early childhood education and care provision draw attention to focused educational strategies to promote early learning, since high-quality early learning experiences help to ameliorate early disadvantage.

      This paper describes an experimental study designed to assess the effect of an evidence-based early learning intervention that targets both toddler language development and their capacity to attend to tasks with an adult (in this study, an early childhood educator and/or allied health professional). Aboriginal children aged 23 to 36 months participated in this intervention that was implemented by the educators at an Aboriginal long day care service over four months. The children were assessed pre-, post- and three-months following the intervention. The significant increase in their expressive and receptive language, and their initiation of joint attention behaviours, illustrates the potential of this intervention to change the language growth trajectories of very young children who live in similar circumstances. The study findings provide direction for program improvement across the centre, and set the scene for achieving practice change that may close gaps in development and achievement for children experiencing high levels of disadvantage early - long before school. Further research on the effectiveness of a larger-scale program improvement strategy is underway.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Tablet technology and cloud storage as evidence of
           pedagogic development in pre-service teacher education
    • Abstract: Highfield, Kate; De Gioia, Katey; Lane, Rod
      Increasingly, educators and pre-service teachers studying to become educators are called to present evidence of their teaching practice and the development of their pedagogic skills. Traditionally this evidence was likely to be printed, with pen and paper notes or typed examples. However, technology such as mobile and tablet devices and cloud storage is enabling new forms of evidence. This study was designed to examine how pre-service teachers develop a digital teaching portfolio incorporating multi-modal evidence linked to accreditation standards. This paper examines survey data, focus group responses and work samples to explore how 213 pre-service teachers use technology to document their work and pedagogic engagement. In examining the nature of 'evidence' we have adapted Bronfenbrenner's ecological framework (1979, 1993) to investigate pre-service teachers' perceptions of evidence of learning and explore their concerns with using technology to document learning and facilitate teacher accreditation.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - The pushes and pulls of pedagogy in the early years:
           Competing knowledges and the erosion of play-based learning
    • Abstract: Barblett, Lennie; Knaus, Marianne; Barratt-Pugh, Caroline
      In Western Australia, early childhood educators have been asking whose agenda does early childhood knowledge serve and for what purpose? This has come to the forefront of debate as play as a pedagogical tool is disappearing from programs for four- and five-year-old children in favour of early academics through a pushdown curriculum. Such a trend was confirmed from research conducted with 200 Western Australian early years educators (mainly teachers) to discuss their most concerning early childhood pedagogical issue. This paper describes the educators' most significant concern, which was the erosion of play-based learning and the tension about the use of play as a legitimate pedagogical tool in early years programs. The analysis revealed competing knowledge about current moves in early childhood education. The knowledge shared by educators has implications for quality learning and teaching in the early years and impacts on children, educators, parents and schools, and in particular, early childhood pedagogy.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Building pedagogical leadership knowledge in early
           childhood education
    • Abstract: Carroll-Lind, Janis; Smorti, Sue; Ord, Kate; Robinson, Lesley
      This paper describes a research and development project that trialled a coaching and mentoring methodology with pedagogical leaders in early childhood settings in Aotearoa New Zealand. The methodology, which drew on 'third-generation' cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) was taught to leaders who were coached and mentored to use it as a mediating tool to identify connections between everyday leadership tensions and systemic contradictions (as identified within CHAT). The paper elaborates on the way in which participants came to understand the centre as an activity system and learned to 'play the system' rather than the person in the exploration and resolution of contradictions. They did so through engaging in productive change conversations with colleagues within their workplace settings. The paper concludes by confirming the potential of CHAT as a tool for building pedagogical leadership capacity through using tension and/or conflicting views as starting points in developing shared meanings and practices.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - The selection of ECEC programs by Australian families:
           Quality, availability, usage and family demographics
    • Abstract: Cloney, Dan; Tayler, Collette; Hattie, John; Cleveland, Gordon; Adams, Ray
      High-quality early childhood education and care (ECEC) programs have the potential to ameliorate socioeconomic status (SES) gradients. In the Australian ECEC market, however, there is no guarantee that children from low SES backgrounds access high-quality ECEC programs. This study tested the influence of family SES on the selection of ECEC program quality. Participants were 2494 children enrolled in up to 1427 ECEC classrooms (mean age at entry = 43 months, SD = eight months). The study controlled for a range of child, family, home and community-level background factors. Both cross-sectional (linear regression) and longitudinal (growth models) methods are used.

      The study confirmed that children from lower SES families were more likely to attend lower quality programs. Longitudinal modelling showed the largest quality gap before kindergarten.

      To narrow SES-related achievement gaps there is a need to significantly improve aspects of program quality that influence children's development, and specifically to do so in programs for younger children. There is a particular need to target ECEC programs in lower SES areas to ameliorate the observed SES quality gradient. The findings further challenge current policy directions from the Productivity Commission inquiry into child care and early learning.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Childcare educators' understandings of early
           communication and attachment
    • Abstract: Jovanovic, Jessie; Brebner, Chris; Lawless, Angela; Young, Jessica
      Giving voice to the discipline-specific knowledge and pedagogical practices of childcare educators, this paper attempts to explore new ways of defining educators' work with young children, given the post-structural turn in Australian and international early childhood policy. Three focus groups (n = 8 children's education and care services; n = 19 educators) were held in metropolitan Adelaide (South Australia) to explore their professional understandings of early communication and attachment development. Childcare educators described the relational and communicative elements of their work that supported or constrained their capacity to understand individual children's socioemotional needs at enrolment, during transitions and in day-to-day routines. Whether attachment relationships were forged or being built, these educators explained how emotional reciprocity and an understanding of the child through secure attachment relationships enabled them to notice young children's communication abilities and needs, and vice versa. While the findings illuminate the expertise childcare educators bring to their work, we argue that there is a need to further explore how this expertise shapes their programs, practices and professional development needs.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Parent perspectives on the implementation of a digital
           documentation portal in an early learning centre
    • Abstract: McFadden, Amanda; Thomas, Kerrin
      The transfer from paper-based systems to digital documentation portals is revolutionising how information is delivered to parents in early childhood education and care settings. This study used a mixed-method approach to document the implementation and use of a digital portal in a large early learning centre from the perspectives of parents. Findings revealed a number of concerns for parents such as privacy, ethical use of images, storage of data and documentation content. However, the significant uptake of the portal by parents, attributed to a desire for greater connections with their child and with other parents, and the facilitation of these connections via the digital portal, was a key finding of this study.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Re-thinking professional development: Positioning
           educational documentation as everyday professional learning
    • Abstract: Harcourt, Deborah; Jones, Lesley
      The intent of this paper is to explore the ways in which educational documentation - one of the many important key principles that challenge and sustain the educational theories and teaching practice of the Reggio Emilia Educational Project in Italy - supports the practice, principles and pedagogy of early years educators. In this particular context, documentation is positioned as both a strategy and a tool for examining the work of the individual and of the group, for both children and educators, with the aim of questioning the role documentation might play in supporting educators' professional learning. This commentary paper will examine the concept of documenting as a process that enables an educator's work to become visible and therefore support their evolving capacity as an educator, through ongoing reflective practice, as indicated in the Australian Early Years Learning Framework (DEEWR, 2009).

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - The view from the helicopter: Examining the Australian
           early childhood workforce using the national census of population and
           housing
    • Abstract: Jackson, Jen
      This study used data from the 2011 Australian Census of Population and Housing to examine differences between Australian early childhood educators at different qualification levels: certificate/unqualified, diploma-qualified and degree-qualified. The study's theoretical framework is informed by the work of Pierre Bourdieu and views qualifications as markers of broader differences in social and cultural capital. This paper describes how early childhood educators were identified in the Census data, and presents some preliminary findings, showing differences in educators' schooling, engagement in further study, income, employment arrangements and family responsibilities. These findings suggest that educators' qualifications are related to broader social differences, which have implications for how different groups of educators might experience current policy efforts to improve workforce qualifications and professionalism. Of particular concern is a group of educators whose educational background and employment circumstances place them at risk of marginalisation in the labour market and in the early childhood education and care professionalisation agenda.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Noisy neighbours: A construction of collective
           knowledge in toddlers' shared play space
    • Abstract: Li, Liang; Quinones, Gloria; Ridgway, Avis
      Evidence from a larger project 'Studying babies and toddlers: Cultural worlds and transitory relationships' in Australian long day care settings is gathered. We argue that toddlers co-construct collective knowledge through expressive play activities with peers and educators. We analyse how educators enter play, taking the toddlers' perspective to develop collective knowledge. We investigate how toddlers creatively produce knowledge through educators' awareness of their play spaces, aiming to find the different ways they affectively participate in processes of producing knowledge. Vygotsky's cultural-historical concepts of the social situation of development and play form the research foundation. Using visual narrative methodology and reflective dialogue to explore toddlers' everyday play activity, one play episode of an educator entering shared collective play with toddlers is analysed. We find educators' involvement and peer interaction significant for learning and social production of collective knowledge in toddlers' play spaces. Responding to toddlers' active expressions by entering play develops collective knowledge.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Infant-toddler educators' language support practices
           during snack-time
    • Abstract: Degotardi, Sheila; Torr, Jane; Nguyen, Nga Thanh
      This study investigates the quantity and quality of infant-toddler educators' language-support practices during morning or afternoon snack-time short episodes. Infants' participation in, and the quality of their interactions with adults plays a critical role in their language development. However, while mealtimes with older children have been identified as providing rich opportunities for language development, research suggests that infant educators may overlook the pedagogical significance of this context.

      The participants comprised 26 focus educators whose video-recorded snack-time interactions were extracted from a three-hour observation of their normal duties with the children. The recording and associated transcript of focus educator talk was analysed to determine measures of language-promoting talk characteristics and teaching strategies. Overall results illustrate that educators' language-promoting practices were limited in their potential to promote language development. Individual differences were positively related to qualification level, and to whether or not the educator predominantly sat with the children, and were negatively related to infant-educator ratios. Findings suggest the need for an increased focus on educators' pedagogical knowledge and skills related to supporting language development with these very young children.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Transition to school anxiety for mothers of children
           with food allergy: Implications for educators
    • Abstract: Sanagavarapu, Prathyusha; Said, Maria; Katelaris, Constance
      Parental concerns for the safety of their children with food allergy greatly increase once they reach 'school age', yet those concerns have not been investigated to date, despite the increasing attendance of children with food allergy in schools in Australia and globally. This pilot study explored 10 affected Australian mothers' feelings and perspectives of their children's transition to school.

      The results from Photo Elicitation Interviews revealed that mothers were anxious, concerned about their children's safety, and they perceived food allergy risks to be comparatively greater in schools than in prior-to-school settings, especially in the school playground. Mothers had a myriad of concerns relating to trusting and transferring the responsibility for their children's safety to school staff, as well as to the children themselves. Additionally, they were concerned about other parents' negative attitudes towards food allergy or affected children and families, and normalising children's school life with food allergy. Although based on a small sample, the findings have important implications for educators to ease parental anxiety and facilitate their child's positive start to school.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 4 - Work 'with' me: Learning prosocial behaviours
    • Abstract: Carter, Margaret Anne; Ellis, Carmel
      This article reports research findings from a descriptive study, identifying the perceptions of 33 staff in one early childhood Montessori centre in south-east Queensland, Australia. The authors report on the instructional practices associated with young children learning prosocial behaviours in this centre. Social understanding and skill acquisition communicated with authoritative practices were ranked favourably, compared with punitive practices of ordering and bribing children to behave. Engaging in respectful limit setting involving teaching children baseline social rules was preferred over telling, blaming and punishing children to behave. Our findings provide preliminary support for the importance of educators purposefully teaching young children the minimal level prosocial behaviours expected within early childhood education contexts.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 01:52:17 GMT
       
 
 
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