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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 398 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 398 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Journal Cover
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.36
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2078-9947
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [398 journals]
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Premorbid adjustment in predicting symptom severity
           and social cognitive deficits in schizophrenia
    • Abstract: Dewangan, RL; Singh, P
      Objective: Schizophrenia patients have deficits in premorbid adjustment (PMA) and social cognition (SC); both deficits are associated with symptom severity, neuro-cognitive deficits, and prognosis. This study aimed to determine symptom severity and two domains of SC deficit by assessing specific areas of PMA in schizophrenia patients.

      Methods: This cross-sectional study included 60 male and 60 female patients with paranoid schizophrenia aged 20 to 35 years from two psychiatric inpatient departments of Chhattisgarh state of India. They were assessed using the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms, Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms, Premorbid Adjustment Scale, Recognition of Facial Expression Task, and Picture Arrangement Test.

      Results: Deficits in premorbid sociability and in scholastic performance were the best predictors of severity of positive symptoms, social knowledge, and negative emotion recognition deficit in schizophrenia patients.

      Conclusion: Given the important role of SC and PMA, assessing premorbid functioning can help in deciding early and appropriate intervention for schizophrenia.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Nov 2018 22:11:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Aripiprazole versus lithium in management of acute
           mania: A randomized clinical trial
    • Abstract: Shafti, SS
      Objective: This study aimed to compare aripiprazole with lithium for the effectiveness of treating Iranian male patients with acute mania.

      Methods: A total of 30 male in-patients with bipolar I disorder who presented with relapse or new emergence of an episode of acute mania were equally randomised to receive 4 weeks of aripiprazole (5 mg uncoated tablets) or lithium carbonate (300 mg uncoated tablets) according to standard practice guidelines and titration protocols. The Manic State Rating Scale (MSRS) was used to determine the severity of manic symptoms at baseline (week 0) and up to week 4. The Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Scale (BRMS), Schedule for Assessment of Insight (SAI), and Clinical Global Impressions-Global Improvement scale (CGI-G) were used to determine the severity of manic symptoms, insight, and overall illness severity, respectively. All outcome measures were recorded by a single experienced psychiatrist.

      Results: The frequency and intensity of manic symptoms (MSRS score) in both groups decreased significantly from baseline to week 4. In the aripiprazole and lithium groups, the intensity of manic symptoms decreased by >/= 25% in 5 and 7 patients and by >50% in 1 and 5 patients, respectively. Between-group analysis showed that lithium was more effective at weeks 3 and 4 in decreasing the frequency and intensity of manic symptoms. The lithium group achieved greater improvement in symptoms than the aripiprazole group in terms of BRMS score, SAI score, and CGI-G.

      Conclusion: Lithium is more effective than aripiprazole in improving manic symptoms.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Nov 2018 22:11:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Association of suicidal ideation with demographic,
           lifestyle and health factors in Malaysians
    • Abstract: Cheah, YK; Azahadi, M; Phang, SN; Abd Manaf, N H
      Objective: To determine the association of suicidal ideation with demographic, lifestyle, and health factors, using data from National Health and Morbidity Survey 2011 (NHMS 2011) of Malaysia.

      Methods: The NHMS 2011 included 10,141 respondents. Independent variables of suicidal ideation were income, age, household size, sex, ethnicity, education, marital status, smoking, physical activity, and self-rated health. The risk factors of suicidal ideation were determined using logistic regression analysis.

      Results: In the pooled sample, suicidal ideation was associated with age, sex, ethnicity, and self-rated health, but not associated with income, household size, education, physical activity, or smoking.

      Conclusion: The likelihood of having suicidal ideation is positively associated with young adults, women, Indians, and those with poor self-rated health.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Nov 2018 22:11:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Audit of mental capacity assessment by primary care
           physicians versus consultation-liaison psychiatrists
    • Abstract: Chan, CYW; Yong, SWL; Mhaisalkar, AS; Sin, G L; Poon, S H; Tan, S M
      Objective: To review the mental capacity assessment of in-patients referred to consultation-liaison psychiatrists and to compare the assessment first made by primary care physicians.

      Methods: Medical records of in-patients who were referred to consultation-liaison psychiatrists for mental capacity assessment between May and October 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Assessment was first made by a primary care physician; complex cases were referred to a consultation-liaison psychiatrist. Audit of each case note was conducted independently by at least two of the authors.

      Results: Medical records of 37 female and 26 male in-patients aged 24 to 91 (mean, 68.2) years were audited. Only 33.3% of these patients had no psychiatric diagnosis. Overall, assessments by primary care physicians were suboptimal. Assessments by consultation-liaison psychiatrists were more detailed, with documentation of mental capacity (93.7%) and psychiatric diagnosis (88.9%). Nonetheless, patient wishes and beliefs were poorly documented (19.0%), as were whether the patient had a lasting power of attorney or a court-appointed deputy (6.3%) and whether the patient had made advance care planning (0%).

      Conclusion: Overall, mental capacity assessment was inadequately performed by primary care physicians and consultation-liaison psychiatrists. More work needs to be done to engage, educate, and empower all stakeholders involved.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Nov 2018 22:11:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Attitude of medical students in Paraguay towards
           homosexuality
    • Abstract: Torales, J; Barrios, I; Torres, A; Dunjo, N; Benitez, M G; Villalba, J; Ventriglio, A; Bhugra, D
      Introduction: The attitude of medical students towards homosexuality may affect the quality of care for homosexual patients. This study aimed to describe the attitude of medical students at the National University of Asuncion, Paraguay towards homosexuality.

      Methods: This observational, cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2016 in consecutive medical students from the National University of Asuncion (Santa Rosa del Aguaray branch), Paraguay. The 10-item attitude towards homosexuality scale (EAH-10) was used to assess participants' acceptance/ rejection of homosexuals as individuals, homosexuality as a sexual orientation, and public manifestations of homosexuality.

      Results: A total of 48 female and 29 male participants (mean age, 21 +- 2 years) were included. Most were Catholic (71.4%), followed by non-Catholic Christian (10.4%), agnostic (9.1%), atheist (2.6%), and other (6.5%). 71.4% reported having at least one homosexual friend. The mean EAH-10 score was 27.23 +- 9.379. 42.9% of participants were indifferent or undecided in their attitude towards homosexuality and 28.6% were discriminatory. Having homosexual friends was associated with a lower EAH-10 score (t = -3.447 [75], p = 0.001).

      Conclusion: Education about health issues of homosexuals is needed for medical students in Paraguay.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Nov 2018 22:11:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Postvention in action: The international handbook of
           suicide bereavement support [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Wu, Kitty K
      Review(s) of: Postvention in Action: The international handbook of suicide bereavement support, Edited by Karl Andriessen, Karolina Krysinska, Onja T Grad, Hogrefe Publishing, ISBN 0889374937.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Nov 2018 22:11:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Video feedback on mother-child interactions in
           perinatal psychiatric service in Hong Kong
    • PubDate: Fri, 23 Nov 2018 22:11:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Posttraumatic stress after treatment in an intensive
           care unit
    • Abstract: Wu, KK; Cho, VW; Chow, FL; Tsang, AP Y; Tse, DM
      Objective: To study posttraumatic stress in patients after treatment in an intensive care unit (ICU).

      Methods: This prospective cohort study included 136 adult patients with critical medical and surgical problems who were discharged from the ICU of the Caritas Medical Centre, Hong Kong. Their occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression after ICU treatment were measured using the Impact of Event Scale - Revised and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Patient ICU experience was measured using the ICU Memory Tool. Multivariable analyses were conducted to examine the predictors of PTSD symptoms, anxiety, and depression.

      Results: Symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression were reported in 10% to 17% of patients. Symptom severity was associated with less factual memory, more vivid memory of feelings about and more delusional memory of the ICU experience, low emotional support, and high perceived life threat.

      Conclusions: Symptoms of posttraumatic stress, anxiety, and depression may occur after ICU treatment. Early identification and appropriate intervention for PTSD are important for rehabilitation.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 22:42:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Association between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor
           subunit 2B gene polymorphisms and personality traits in a young Japanese
           population
    • Abstract: Narita, S; Onozawa, Y; Yoshihara, E; Nishizawa, D; Numajiri, M; Ikeda, K; K, Iwahashi
      Objective: The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B) is involved in regulation of anxiety and depression and nervous activity in the brain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the GluN2B gene (GRIN2B) are associated with human mental function and behaviour. We investigated whether four GRIN2B polymorphisms (rs7301328, rs1806201, rs1805247, and rs1805502) affect characterisation of personality traits.

      Methods: In 248 young people, GRIN2B polymorphisms were analysed, and personality traits were assessed using the Neuroticism Extraversion Openness-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI).

      Results: There was no main effect of the GRIN2B polymorphisms on the NEO-FFI and STAI dimension scores. Interaction between polymorphism and sex was found in rs1805247 (p = 0.034) and rs1805502 (p = 0.040) in terms of the conscientiousness score of the NEO-FFI. However, post hoc simple main effect analysis showed no significant effect. The preliminary haplotype analysis indicated that haplotype CTT (rs1806201-rs1805247-rs1805502) in the haplotype block was associated with the extraversion score of the NEO-FFI in female participants (p = 0.044), but the significance was lost on correction for multiple testing.

      Conclusion: There was no significant association between selected GRIN2B polymorphisms and personality traits, but this may be due to low statistical power. Further studies involving a larger study population are needed to clarify this.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 22:42:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Clozapine-related paroxysmal supraventricular
           tachycardia: A case report
    • Abstract: Kim, SJ; Gim, MS
      Clozapine is considered to be more effective than other antipsychotic drugs for treating treatmentresistant schizophrenia. However, side effects of clozapine include agranulocytosis and, less commonly, cardiovascular disease, which is occasionally fatal. We describe a 56-year-old woman who developed clozapine-related paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia during clozapine dose titration and had a recurrence despite being treated with verapamil. For treatment-resistant schizophrenia, a slow titration of the clozapine dose is necessary, and potential cardiac side-effects should be monitored.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 22:42:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio and C-reactive protein
           level in patients with major depressive disorder before and after
           pharmacotherapy
    • Abstract: Adhikari, A; Dikshit, R; Karia, S; Sonavane, S; Shah, N; De Sousa, A
      Background: Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) level are useful biomarkers of inflammation. This study aimed to assess NLR and CRP level in patients with major depressive disorder before and after pharmacotherapy to determine whether NLR or CRP could be used as biomarkers of severity of major depression and whether there was any sex difference.

      Methodology: Patients with major depression who received no pharmacotherapy 1 month prior to the study were included. Their haemoglobin, total white blood cell count, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, NLR, and CRP levels were evaluated at baseline and 12 weeks post pharmacotherapy, as were the Montgomery Asberg Rating Scale for Depression, the Scale for Impact of Suicidality Management and Assessment and Planning of Care (SIS-MAP), and the Clinical Global Impression Scale - Severity.

      Results: 24 male and 26 female patients were included. At 12 weeks after pharmacotherapy, males had a higher haemoglobin level (p = 0.025), higher total white blood cell count (p = 0.018), and lower percentage of neutrophils (p = 0.019) than females. There was no sex difference in NLR or CRP. From baseline to 12 weeks, males had no significant change in any blood parameter, but females had a significantly greater increase in the percentage of neutrophils (p = 0.0001) and decrease in the percentage of lymphocytes (p = 0.012), resulting in a significantly increased NLR (p = 0.001). Both males and females had significant improvement on all 3 scales (p < 0.001). At 12 weeks, in males, the increase in NLR positively correlated with CRP as well as the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the SIS-MAP, but not the Clinical Global Impression - Severity Scale. In females, the increase in NLR did not correlate with CRP or any of the scales.

      Conclusion: In female patients, the NLR increased in response to antidepressant therapy while CRP remained unchanged. This indicated that inflammation has a role in the pathogenesis of major depression.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 22:42:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Attitude of Indian medical students towards
           homosexuality
    • Abstract: Kar, A; Mukherjee, S; Ventriglio, A; Bhugra, D
      Introduction: It is important to understand the attitude of medical students towards homosexuality, as this may affect patient care.

      Methods: Year 2 and 3 students at Calcutta National Medical College, Kolkata, India were asked to selfadminister an 18-item questionnaire anonymously. Internal consistency of the questionnaire statements was high (Cronbach's alpha of 0.91). There were five responses for each statement: strongly agree, generally agree, unsure, generally disagree, and strongly disagree.

      Results: Of 290 students, 270 (93.1%) [148 males and 122 females] completed the questionnaire and were included in the analysis. Overall, 55.6% strongly disagreed that homosexuality was an illness; 70.8% agreed that homosexuals were capable of forming stable relationships. Only 31.1% believed that homosexual doctors would better understand homosexual patients. About 71.8% reported that talking about homosexuality did not embarrass them, and 81.8% believed that problems associated with homosexuality could be reduced if society was more liberal. Nonetheless, negative attitudes were reflected in the stereotypical image of homosexuality. About 15.9% of respondents believed that homosexuality was an illness; 24.8% considered homosexuals neurotic, 28.1% considered homosexuals promiscuous; and 8.2% thought that they posed a danger to children.

      Conclusion: Although the overall attitude of Indian medical students towards homosexuality is positive, the percentage of students with negative attitudes remains quite high. Further work on the medical curriculum is needed to change these negative attitudes so that patients receive appropriate care.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 22:42:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Arachnoid cyst causing depression and neuropsychiatric
           symptoms: A case report
    • Abstract: Shettar, M; Karkal, R; Misra, R; Kakunje, A; Chandran, V V Mohan; Mendonsa, RD
      Arachnoid cysts are benign space-occupying brain lesions that contain cerebrospinal fluid. Most cases are congenital in origin, caused by failed fusion of the arachnoid membrane early in fetal development. Cases are often incidentally detected on neuroimaging; however, rarely patients present with neuropsychiatric manifestations when cysts expand and cause a midline shift, compression of nearby brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid compartments or both. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with no past history or family history of psychiatric illness who developed acute-onset right-sided weakness, depressive symptoms, and other neuropsychiatric deficits. A diagnosis of organic mood disorder caused by an arachnoid cyst was made. Her symptoms and neuropsychiatric deficits remitted after cyst marsupialisation by open craniotomy. Therefore, it is important to investigate the organic aetiology in elderly patients who present with simultaneous mood disorder and cognitive dysfunction.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 22:42:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Sexual dysfunction in patients with
           antidepressant-treated anxiety or depressive disorders: A pragmatic
           multivariablelongitudinal study
    • Abstract: Preeti, S; Jayaram, SD; Chittaranjan, A
      Objective: To investigate early evolution, tolerability, and predictors of antidepressant-emergent sexual dysfunction in patients with anxiety or depressive disorder. Methods: Patients with anxiety or depressive disorders who were prescribed antidepressant monotherapy (mirtazapine, sertraline, desvenlafaxine, escitalopram, or fluoxetine) at the discretion of the treating clinician were recruited from July 2012 to June 2014 from a hospital outpatient service. All were free of psychotropic medication for least 1 month. Sexual function was assessed at baseline, week 2, and week 6 using the Psychotropic-Related Sexual Dysfunction Questionnaire (PRSexDQ). A PRSexDQ score of ≥2 was considered to indicate sexual dysfunction. Sexual function was dichotomised to 'favourable' or 'impaired'. Results: Of 230 patients recruited, 209 were assessed at baseline of whom 184 were assessed at week 2; of these, 154 were also assessed at week 6. At baseline, 138 (66%) of the 209 patients were diagnosed with depressive disorder and 71 (34%) with anxiety disorder; 29% of patients had sexual dysfunction (in any domain of PRSexDQ). By week 6, the percentage had increased to 41%, although the change in the mean PRSexDQ score was only marginal (from 1.04 at baseline to 1.55 at week 6). With regard to individual questionnaire items, by week 6, sexual desire improved, but erectile and ejaculatory function in men and orgasmic function in women worsened. Fluoxetine and sertraline were associated with impaired sexual function, whereas mirtazapine was associated with favourable sexual function. In a logistic regression analysis, at week 2, mirtazapine and desvenlafaxine were predictors of favourable sexual outcome, whereas fluoxetine and higher baseline PRSexDQ score were predictors of impaired sexual outcome. At week 6, mirtazapine remained a predictor of favourable sexual outcome, whereas fluoxetine, higher 2-week PRSexDQ score, and adequate dose were predictors of impaired sexual outcome. Conclusions: In patients with anxiety or depressive disorder, the risk of antidepressant-emergent sexual dysfunction at 6 weeks is low when drug doses are initially low with gradual up-titration. Baseline sexual dysfunction was independently associated with impaired sexual outcome. Men may be more likely than women to experience impaired sexual outcome. In patients with baseline sexual dysfunction, prescription of mirtazapine might be preferable to fluoxetine.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:01:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Symptoms of anxiety and depression in obese
           Singaporeans: A preliminary study
    • Abstract: Lu, Y; Chew, MWP; Shabbir, A; So, JBY; Ho, RCM; Ndukwe, N
      Background: Obesity is a major component of metabolic syndrome and an independent risk factor for various chronic diseases. It is also closely associated with mental illness, and the interaction is complex and multifactorial. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among obese Singaporeans. Methods: Cross-sectional data of 36 male and 47 female obese Singaporeans who had been referred to the weight management clinic of National University Hospital, Singapore, between January 2010 and November 2011 were collected. Obesity was classified according to criteria of the World Health Organization. The extents of anxiety and depressive symptoms were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results: In obese Singaporeans attending the weight management clinic, the prevalence of anxiety symptoms was higher than that of depressive symptoms (28% vs 11%). There was no major socioeconomic difference between obese patients with and without anxiety, or with and without depressive symptoms. Conclusion: In obese Singaporeans, anxiety symptoms may be more common than depressive symptoms. Weight management programmes should incorporate anxiety management as part of standard treatment. Early detection and pharmacological and psychological interventions should be implemented.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:01:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Frontal theta asymmetry as a biomarker of depression
    • Abstract: Dharmadhikari, AS; Tandle, AL; Jaiswal, SV; Sawant, VA; Vahia, VN; Jog, N
      Introduction: Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used extensively to study affective disorders. Quantitative spectral analysis of an EEG scan has been used to assess the biological basis of emotional disorders such as depression as well as to investigate biomarkers of affective disorders. Inter-hemispheric asymmetries in both baseline and stimulus-evoked frequencies (alpha, beta, theta, and delta) are potential biomarkers of depression. The role of frontal alpha asymmetry has been established, but other spectral frequencies such as frontal theta remain elusive. We compared the hemispheric differences in frontal theta power in depressed patients and controls before and during listening to music to study the correlation of frontal theta asymmetry with depression. Methods: To determine whether stimulus-evoked frontal theta asymmetry is a biomarker of depression, we compared 23 patients with mild depression (based on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) with 17 age- and sex-matched controls by conducting EEG at rest and after listening to Indian classical music. Results: In controls without depression, the mean frontal theta power of the left hemisphere and frontal theta asymmetry increased significantly during music listening. In depressed patients, frontal theta asymmetry was reversed during music listening. Conclusion: Frontal theta asymmetry is a potential biomarker of depression.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:01:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Self-harm and suicide attempts in a Japanese
           psychiatric hospital
    • Abstract: Tanimoto, C; Yayama, S; Suto, S; Matoba, K; Kajiwara, T; Inoue, M; Endo, Y; Yamakawa, M; Makimoto, K
      Objective: Self-harm and attempted suicide are risk factors for suicide in psychiatric hospital in-patients. This study aimed to analyse the circumstances of self-harm and suicide attempts in a Japanese psychiatric hospital so as to improve management and care. Methods: Incident reports of self-harm and suicide attempts during a 12.4-year period from November 2000 to March 2013 were reviewed. A descriptive analysis was conducted in terms of age, sex, and diagnosis of patients, as well as level, ward, situations, and causes of incidents. Results: During the study period, 90 cases of self-harm and attempted suicide involving 58 patients were reported. The rate of self-harm and suicide attempts was 0.05 per 1000 patient-days. The types of self harm and suicide attempts included hanging (n = 25), wrist cutting (n = 19), ingestion of foreign objects (n = 17), and others (n = 29). The single case of completed suicide involved hanging, in a patient with schizophrenia. Among 55 patients with relevant data, the most common clinical diagnosis was mood disorder (41.8%), followed by schizophrenia (36.4%). Mood disorder was 3.5 times as prevalent in females as in males (14 vs. 4). Fourteen patients with mood disorder (n = 8) or schizophrenia (n = 6) were repeatedly involved in 46 of 89 cases of self-harm or attempted suicide; 11 were female. One woman with mood disorder attempted suicide 9 times within the same year. The top 3 management and care factors related to self-harm and suicide attempts were failure to adhere to preventive procedures (28%), insufficient therapeutic communication (28%), and difficulty in predicting suicide (20%). Conclusion: Self-harm and suicide attempts at this psychiatric hospital occurred at a rate of 0.05 per 1000 patient-days between late 2000 and early 2013. Efforts are needed to increase compliance with suicide prevention procedures and therapeutic communication, so as to improve management and care of psychiatric in-patients and prevent them from committing suicide.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:01:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Clinical handbook of psychotropic drugs (22nd edition)
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Chiang, TP
      Review(s) of: Clinical handbook of psychotropic drugs (22nd edition), by Ric M Procyshyn, Kalyna Z Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J Joel Jeffries, Hogrefe Publishing Group ISBN: 978-0-88937-496-6

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:01:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Mindfulness [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tsang, Alfert WK
      Review(s) of: Mindfulness, by Katie Witkiewitz, Corey R Roos, Dana Dharmakaya Colgan, Sarah Bowen Hogrefe Publishing GroupUS$ 29.8; pp76; ISBN: 978-0-88937-414-0

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:01:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Electrocardiographic monitoring of psychiatric
           in-patients taking antipsychotic medications
    • Abstract: Kwan, MM; Nguyen, DGH; Ng, RMK
      Objective: To assess the adherence to guidelines for electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring in Hong Kong psychiatric in-patients who have been prescribed antipsychotic medications. Methods: In-patients who had been prescribed antipsychotic drugs on hospital admission during the baseline audit period of 15 April 2015 to 16 July 2015 and the re-audit period of 28 January 2016 to 30 April 2016 were included. Quality improvement interventions were delivered after the baseline audit. ECG monitoring adherence was categorised as full adherence (ECG before taking antipsychotics), partial adherence (ECG after taking antipsychotics), or non-adherence (no ECG during hospital stay). Overall compliance was defined as full adherence plus partial adherence. Results: The baseline audit and re-audit included 378 and 422 patients, respectively. Overall compliance with ECG monitoring increased significantly from the baseline audit to re-audit (40.2% vs. 69.9%; p < 0.001). Case-doctors having the grade of resident was associated with stronger adherence to ECG monitoring in both audits. Conclusion: Adherence to ECG monitoring guidelines for in-patients who are prescribed antipsychotic drugs is low in Hong Kong, and junior doctors (residents) demonstrate stronger adherence than moresenior doctors.

      PubDate: Fri, 13 Apr 2018 09:01:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Management for psychiatrists, fourth edition [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Ng, Roger
      Review(s) of: Management for psychiatrists, fourth edition, edited by Dinesh Bhugra, Stuart Bell, Alistair Burns, RCPsych Publications, 90.00 pounds, pp544, ISBN: 978-1909726659.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 17:14:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Bipolar disorder 2017 (Advances in psychotherapy:
           Evidence based practice) [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tang, Wayne
      Review(s) of: Bipolar disorder 2017 (Advances in psychotherapy: Evidence based practice), by Robert P. Reiser, Larry W. Thompson, Sheri L. Johnson, Trisha Suppes, Hogrefe Publishing, 19.90 pounds, pp128, ISBN: 978-0-88937-410-2.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 17:14:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Antidepressants for depression associated with
           traumatic brain injury: A meta-analytical study of randomised controlled
           trials
    • Abstract: Paraschakis, Antonios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H
      Introduction: Depression following traumatic brain injury is experienced by 16% to 60% of affected patients. The present study aimed to update the best evidence-based pharmacological treatments for tackling such chronic and debilitating disorders.

      Methods: We systematically reviewed and meta-analysed randomised controlled trials published from 1990 until August 2017 that compared the efficacy of antidepressants with placebo in the treatment of post-traumatic brain injury depression. We searched MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL).

      Results: Four studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. The antidepressants studied were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors sertraline and citalopram. The rate of non-responders at the end of the followup period was lower in the treatment groups compared with placebo (odds ratio = 0.42, 95% confidence interval: 0.15-1.17); this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). In subgroup analysis of the studies that reported mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score differences between treatment and control groups in both baseline and endpoint evaluations, the pooled mean difference was reduced from 2.11 (95% confidence interval: -1.25 to 5.46) to -2.36 (95% confidence interval: -5.59 to 0.87), in favour of the treatment group, though not statistically significant (p = 0.06). No evidence of heterogeneity was detected. In the subgroup analysis according to the antidepressant used in the included studies, there was a trend towards statistical significance for sertraline only (odds ratio = 0.28, 95% confidence interval: 0.08-1.03; p = 0.05); this was not evident in the study that reported the use of citalopram (odds ratio = 0.83; 95% confidence interval: 0.15-4.64; p = 0.84).

      Conclusions: Sertraline might be effective, though not statistically significant, in treating patients with post-traumatic brain injury depression. Adequately powered randomised controlled trials - extended to the plethora of newer antidepressants aiming to prove their non-inferiority to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors studied - are needed to confirm our results. The dearth of quality studies of this devastating problem of public health is rather impressive.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 17:14:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Positive aspects of caregiving and its correlates
           among caregivers of bipolar affective disorder
    • Abstract: Grover, Sandeep; Kate, Natasha; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit
      Objective: To evaluate the positive aspects of caregiving and its correlates (socio-demographic and clinical variables, caregiver burden, coping, quality of life, psychological morbidity) in the primary caregivers of patients with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD).

      Methods: A total of 60 primary caregivers of patients with a diagnosis of BPAD were evaluated on the Scale for Positive Aspects of Caregiving Experience (SPACE) and the Hindi version of Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire, Family Burden Interview Schedule (FBIS), modified Hindi version of Coping Checklist, shorter Hindi version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF), and Hindi translated version of 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12).

      Results: Caregivers of patients with BPAD had the highest mean score in the SPACE domain of Motivation for caregiving role (2.45), followed by Caregiver satisfaction (2.38) and Caregiving personal gains (2.20). The mean score was the lowest for the domain of Self-esteem and social aspect of caring (2.01). In terms of correlations, age of onset of BPAD had a negative correlation with various domains of SPACE. The mean number of total lifetime affective and depressive episodes correlated positively with Self-esteem and social aspect of caring. Caregiver satisfaction correlated negatively with FBIS domains of Disruption of routine family activities, Effect on mental health of others, and subjective burden. Coercion as a coping mechanism correlated positively with domains of Caregiving personal gains, Caregiver satisfaction, and the total score on SPACE. Three (Physical health, Psychological health, Environment) out of 5 domains of the WHOQOL-BREF correlated positively with the total SPACE score. No association was noted between GHQ-12 and SPACE scores.

      Conclusion: Positive caregiving experience in primary caregivers of patients with BPAD is associated with better quality of life of the caregivers.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 17:14:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Feasibility and clinical utility of high-definition
           transcranial direct current stimulation in the treatment of persistent
           hallucinations in Schizophrenia
    • Abstract: Bose, Anushree; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Chhabra, Harleen; Parlikar, Rujuta; Sreeraj, Vanteemar S; Dinakaran, Damodharan; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan
      Persistent auditory verbal hallucination is a clinically significant problem in schizophrenia. Recent studies suggest a promising role for add-on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in treatment. An optimised version of tDCS, namely high-definition tDCS (HD-tDCS), uses smaller electrodes arranged in a 4x1 ring configuration and may offer more focal and predictable neuromodulation than conventional tDCS. This case report illustrates the feasibility and clinical utility of add-on HD-tDCS over the left temporoparietal junction in a 4x1 ring configuration to treat persistent auditory verbal hallucination in schizophrenia.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 17:14:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Increasing the continuity of care between primary care
           provider and a psychiatric hospital in Singapore
    • Abstract: Huang, Hannah; Poremski, Daniel; Goh, Yen-Li; Hendriks, Margaret; Fung, Daniel
      Introduction: People who have a mental illness and who are stable on their current treatment may be suitable for follow-up care with a community-based general practitioner. A general practitioner- partnership programme was designed in an institute in Singapore to facilitate the transition to community services. However, the rates of successful referrals were low.

      Methods: Our study followed the format of a quality improvement project, and used administrative data from April 2014 to June 2016 to gauge the impact of the interventions chosen to improve uptake of referrals. Three potential areas of improvement were found based on interviews with 25 service users.

      Results: During the 11 months of pre-intervention period (April 2014 to February 2015), 64% of potentially suitable service users (152 of 238 referrals) transitioned to community services. Low transition was linked to 3 identified causes and consequently, case managers developed personalised financial counselling for service users, assisted in the application for financial supports, and dispelled misconceptions about service provider inability to treat mental illness. Over the 16 months of intervention period (March 2015 to June 2016), the follow-up rate for referrals rose to 92% (260 / 283 referrals).

      Conclusion: Given that financial support entitlements change, it is important for case managers to remain aware of changing policy. Misconceptions of service provider qualifications may have a great impact on service user's willingness to seek services from primary care providers.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 17:14:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Fear of fear and broad dimensions of psychopathology
           over the course of cognitive behavioural therapy for panic disorder with
           Agoraphobia in Japan
    • Abstract: Ogawa, Sei; Kondo, Masaki; Ino, Keiko; Ii, Toshitaka; Imai, Risa; Akechi, Tatsuo; Furukawa, Toshi A
      Objective: To examine the relationship of fear of fear and broad dimensions of psychopathology in panic disorder with agoraphobia over the course of cognitive behavioural therapy in Japan.

      Methods: A total of 177 Japanese patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia were treated with group cognitive behavioural therapy between 2001 and 2015. We examined associations between the change scores in Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire or Body Sensations Questionnaire and the changes in subscales of Symptom Checklist-90 Revised during cognitive behavioural therapy controlling the change in panic disorder severity using multiple regression analysis.

      Results: Reduction in Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire score was related to a decrease in all Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R) subscale scores. Reduction in Body Sensations Questionnaire score was associated with a decrease in anxiety. Reduction in Panic Disorder Severity Scale score was not related to any SCL-90-R subscale changes.

      Conclusions: Changes in fear of fear, especially maladaptive cognitions, may predict broad dimensions of psychopathology reductions in patients of panic disorder with agoraphobia over the course of cognitive behavioural therapy. For the sake of improving a broader range of psychiatric symptoms in patients of panic disorder with agoraphobia, more attention to maladaptive cognition changes during cognitive behavioural therapy is warranted.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 17:14:46 GMT
       
 
 
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