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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Breastfeeding Review
  [SJR: 0.31]   [H-I: 19]   [14 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0729-2759
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - 'He was teaching us': Responsive breastfeeding in a
           baby with laryngomalacia
    • Abstract: McGuire, Elizabeth; Bollella, Daniella
      Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of stridor in children. In most cases it is relatively benign, needs no medical intervention and resolves as the infant grows. This report of a case study records the experience of a family whose first child had laryngomalacia and how they learned from him to manage it.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 16:54:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Infant reflux - not as simple as we might think
    • Abstract: Anderson, Joy C
      Many Australian infants are being diagnosed as having 'reflux' based on symptoms alone, rather than on diagnostic tests. They are then prescribed medication. Research has clearly demonstrated that these medications are ineffective in infants and pose significant risks. Observation has suggested that there are many possible causes of irritability and vomiting in infants, including lactose overload, food sensitivity, tongue-tie and Eustachian-tube irritation, although there is little in the literature to guide practice. However, after medical issues have been ruled out, each of these might be considered, and appropriate referrals made, to assist parents and unsettled infants.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 16:54:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Italian women who did not intend to breastfeed: A
           descriptive study
    • Abstract: Mauri, Paola Agnese; Soldi, Marta; Cortinovis, Ivan; Bertora, Francesca; Contini, Norma Nilde Guerrini
      The aim of this study is to identify some characteristics of women who, before having delivered their babies, decide not to breastfeed. To date there are no Italian studies trying to understand characteristics and reasons of mothers who do not want to breastfeed.

      In Italy at the time of discharge from hospitals 2 - 3% of women have already made the decision to inhibit the onset of lactation. In this descriptive study women suppressed their milk supply with some medication straight after delivery as they did not wish to breastfeed. One hundred and ninety-two mothers from a hospital in Northern Italy, taking Cabergoline 1 mg by mouth after delivery, were studied with Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Cluster Analysis. Variables analysed were taken from clinical records and by interviewing each woman once.

      Five clusters were found: each group describes a different profile of women who intended not to breastfeed.

      This study revealed that variables linked to the choice of inhibiting the onset of lactation are complex. Each woman is unique and some factors, which have emerged from clusters, can help health professionals to target appropriate interventions, as it is very important to counsel mothers about the best way of feeding newborns.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 16:54:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Modes of breastfeeding mother support after hospital
           discharge
    • Abstract: Thorley, Virginia
      Breastfeeding is important for providing optimal infant nutrition and protection from many infectious and non-infectious conditions (Allen, Perrin, and Fogleman, 2013; Eidelman and Schanler, 2012). It is an ancient, but simple, public health measure for infants and young children, while also benefiting the mother, the family and the community. It is also important economically. This was demonstrated in a recent paper that examined the costs of not breastfeeding against the cost of providing support for breastfeeding (Holla, lellamo, Gupta, Dadhich, and Smith, 2013). Yet, few countries have achieved their national breastfeeding goals. The objectives of this commentary are to describe why mothers need support to continue breastfeeding and the kinds of support that exist.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 16:54:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Bringing babies and breasts into workplaces: Support
           for breastfeeding mothers in workplaces and childcare services at the
           Australian National University
    • Abstract: Smith, Julie; Javanparast, Sara; Craig, Lyn
      In 1999, two leading Australian academics challenged Australian universities to lead moves to better manage employees' maternity and breastfeeding needs, and 'bring babies and breasts into workplaces This paper addresses the question of how universities cope with the need for women to breastfeed, by exploring barriers facing women who combine breastfeeding and paid work at the Australian National University (ANU). Data were collected through online surveys in 2013 using mixed method, case study design, nested within a larger national study. Participants were 64 working mothers of children aged 0-2 years from the ANU community of employees and users of on-campus child care. Responses highlighted the ad hoc nature of support for breastfeeding at ANU. Lack of organisational support for breastfeeding resulted in adverse consequences for some ANU staff. These included high work-related stresses and premature cessation of breastfeeding among women who had intended to breastfeed their infants in line with health recommendations.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:23:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Three experienced lactation consultants reflect upon
           the oral tie phenomenon
    • Abstract: Wattis, Lois; Kam, Renee; Douglas, Pamela
      I've dashed into a coffee shop and ordered my take-away flat white. While waiting I observe a group of three mothers sitting outdoors with prams carefully arranged not to obstruct the flow of customers, enjoying a coffee and chat with babes in arms.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:23:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Cleft lip and palates and breastfeeding
    • Abstract: McGuire, Elizabeth
      Cleft palate and cleft lip and palate are relatively common birth anomalies which complicate infant feeding and may render at-the-breast feeding impossible. There is little experimental evidence to guide mothers who want to breastfeed babies with oral clefts, so expert opinion and adaptation to individual babies' needs comprise best practice. Mother/infant dyads will vary in their capacity to feed breastmilk and health professionals helping them must balance encouragement with a realistic understanding of what may be possible. This paper seeks to compare the parental experience of two Australian mothers with the published literature.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:23:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Perspectives of key stakeholders and experts in infant
           feeding on the implementation of the Australian National Breastfeeding
           Strategy 2010-2015
    • Abstract:
      Breastfeeding is widely accepted as an important public health issue for babies and their mothers. Yet, despite this, Australia continues to struggle with reaching global targets for breastfeeding indicators. In 2007, the Best Start Parliamentary Inquiry Report was released and set the stage for the Australian National Breastfeeding Strategy [2010-2015), which was announced in November 2009, with the vision to increase Australia's breastfeeding rates of infants at 6 months of age and beyond. The aim of this research project was to explore the perspectives of key stakeholders in the field of infant feeding in Australia on the implementation of the strategy, barriers and enablers to its successful implementation and actions that were still needed. Using qualitative research methods of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis, this study identifies main themes of these perceptions about the strategy implementation and some recommendations for future strategies and further research. The main themes identified were initial opinions of the strategy as a blueprint for action, the strategy as a driver for action, lessons learned and recommendations for the future. For success in improving implementation of national breastfeeding strategies, it is recommended that Australia establish an independent breastfeeding/infant feeding committee, increase the political prioritisation of issues surrounding infant feeding and strengthen the regulation of the marketing of breastmilk substitutes.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:23:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - New Zealand women talk about breastfeeding support
           from male family members
    • Abstract: Alianmoghaddam, Narges; Phibbs, Suzanne; Benn, Cheryl
      Aim: Little research has been done to investigate the influence of male family members' support for breastfeeding. This article considers the influence of male partners and other male family members on the initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding.

      Methods: Thirty heterosexual New Zealand women who had identified in a short antenatal questionnaire that they intended to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months were recruited. The qualitative research included a face-to-face postpartum interview followed by monthly audio-recorded telephone interviews that stopped at 6 months. The participants' narratives were analysed using thematic analysis.

      Key findings: Five key themes related to breastfeeding support from male family members were identified: a) male partners did not have enough knowledge about breastfeeding, b) male partners wanted to share infant feeding, c) participants received emotional and practical support from their male partners, d) male partners supported breastfeeding in public, e) some women received crucial breastfeeding support from male family members who were not the father of the baby.

      Conclusion: Comments from participants suggest that some New Zealand men are actively involved in supporting breastfeeding in their nuclear and extended families. Several participants suggested that male support was as effective as support from female family members.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:23:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Breastfeeding policy: The foundation for improving
           Australia's health
    • Abstract: James, Jennifer; Binns, Colin
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:23:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Selection criteria for wet-nurses: Ancient
           recommendations that survived across time
    • Abstract: Thorley, Virginia; Sioda, Tomasz
      This article will describe the content of the key criteria for the selection of wet nurses that persisted across time and the authors who transmitted this advice. Where relevant, it will include variations, such as additional recommendations or a different weighting being given to one or other criterion by a particular author. The focus is on the selection of a wet nurse for the employer's baby. The factors that led a woman to enter this employment and the consequences for her own baby will not be addressed here as they will be discussed elsewhere.

      The article is an historical one, drawing on primary sources, where possible, and important secondary sources.

      Guidelines for the selection of wet-nurses have existed from antiquity to the early 20th century. The key recommendations managed to survive across the centuries because they were considered useful by influential ancient and Early Modern and later authors who passed them on through copying and translations. It is tempting to assume that the prescriptive advice was followed by physicians and mothers. However, the discussion will raise doubts about whether the criteria were adhered to by physicians and parents, particularly when wet nurses were in scarce supply.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 23:42:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - A partnership between researchers and breastfeeding
           advocates to support safe alcohol consumption during breastfeeding
    • Abstract: Giglia, Roslyn
      In 2009 the first national and international guideline providing direction for breastfeeding women on drinking alcohol was included in the National Health and Medical Research Council Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol. In the absence of an accompanying education campaign for the guidelines, the Australian Breastfeeding Association was able to fill this gap and work in partnership with a breastfeeding researcher to develop an education resource for Australian women that was also a national and international first. This commentary outlines the journey of the research that informed the development of the resource and the integral involvement of the Australian Breastfeeding Association throughout.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 23:42:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Tongue-tie in the newborn: Follow-up in the first 6
           months
    • Abstract: McGoldrick, Russell; Solari, Donna; Hogan, Monica; Corrigan, Irene; Cutting, Allison; Shadbolt, Bruce; Todd, David A
      Background: Over the last decade, a number of studies have demonstrated that early division of tongue-tie (TT) is associated with significant feeding benefits to both mother and baby. Notwithstanding, it remains a controversial procedure. We examined the breastfeeding outcomes of a cohort of babies at 1-2 weeks (follow-up 1) and 3-5 months (follow-up 2), post-TT division.

      Methods: We undertook a cohort study on all mother/baby dyads who had a TT divided at Canberra Hospital between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2014. We contacted the mothers of both follow-up groups by telephone, focusing on breastfeeding and maternal pain.

      Results: Follow-up 1 consisted of 116/182 (63.7%) of mothers in the study; contacted at 12.4+-7.8 days post-division. Of these, 107/116 (92.2%) were still breastfeeding, with 11/15 (73.3%) of the mothers who had ceased breastfeeding before division having re-established it at the time of follow-up (p < 0.00l). Additionally, 90/101 (89.1%) valid responses reported decreased nipple pain following TT division. Follow-up 2 consisted of 112/182 (61.5%) of all mothers in the study; contacted at 3.7+-1.8 months of age. Of these, 86/112 (76.8%) were still breastfeeding, with 11/15 (73.3%) of mothers who had ceased breastfeeding before division having re-established it at follow-up (p < 0.001). Conclusion: A divided TT was associated with benefits at both periods of follow-up. There was (i) an increase in overall breastfeeding rates and (ii) a decrease in maternal pain.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 23:42:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - From royal wet nurses to facebook: The evolution of
           breastmilk sharing
    • Abstract: Baumgartel, Kelley L; Sneeringer, Larissa; Cohen, Susa M
      Wet-nursing was an essential practice that allowed for infant survival after many mothers died in childbirth. The story of wet-nursing is complicated by both religious pressures and cultural expectations of women. It is likely that these historical practices have shaped our current social, political and legislative environments regarding breastfeeding. The aim of this article is to provide a historical perspective on the practice of wet-nursing, with a focus on: 1) social views of wet nurses, 2) breastmilk evaluation and 3) the ideal wet nurse. Historical perspectives from Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece and Rome, 19th and 20th century America and current practices are examined. An appreciation for the evolution of breastmilk sharing provides clinicians and lactation advocates with the historical origins which provided the template for current practice as it relates to donor milk, breastfeeding culture and relevant legislation.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 23:42:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - The roles of zinc in lactation
    • Abstract: McGuire, Elizabeth; Kam, Renee
      Zinc is a mineral which has many important functions in the body. Its role in human health has been appreciated only relatively recently and there is still research to be done to reveal the ways in which it functions. Zinc is important at the cellular level, in every organ and body system. It is said to play three major biological roles: catalytic, structural and regulatory.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 23:42:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Meet our head office teams
    • PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - News and views
    • PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Research summaries
    • PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Childhood obesity and being breastfed
    • Abstract: Tawia, Susan
      Over the last 30 years there have been dramatic changes in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children in developed countries. In Australia, between 1985 and 1996, the percentage of obese boys increased from 1% to 5.4% and the percentage of obese girls increased from 0.8% to 5.9%. Over the same period, the prevalence of overweight plus obesity increased from 10.2% to 21.6% for boys and 11.6% to 24.8% for girls. Interestingly, the prevalence of obesity and overweight plus obesity in boys and girls did not continue to increase between 1996 and 2008 (Olds et al 2010). At the time, there was great concern that if overweight and obesity rates continued to increase, at the rates seen between 1985 and 1996, huge numbers of children and adults would be overweight or obese by the 2050s.

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Maternal and infant sleep postpartum
    • Abstract: McGuire, Elizabeth
      There is no doubt that tiredness can be a major stress for new parents. Typically women's sleep is disrupted in late pregnancy (Signal etal 2007), labour predominantly happens at night (Olcese et al 2013) and infant needs disrupt parental sleep in the postpartum period (Signal et al 2007). In adults generally, lack of sleep or fragmented sleep is associated with daytime sleepiness, poor cognitive function and low mood. Around 25-30% of parents of infants (
      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Breastfeeding information in pharmacology textbooks: A
           content analysis
    • Abstract: Amir, Lisa H; Raval, Manjri; Hussainy, Safeera Y
      Women often need to take medicines while breastfeeding and pharmacists need to provide accurate information in order to avoid undue caution about the compatibility of medicines and breastfeeding. The objective of this study was to review information provided about breastfeeding in commonly used pharmacology textbooks. We asked 15 Australian universities teaching pharmacy courses to provide a list of recommended pharmacology textbooks in 2011. Ten universities responded, generating a list of 11 textbooks that we analysed for content relating to breastfeeding. Pharmacology textbooks outline the mechanisms of actions of medicines and their use: however, only a small emphasis is placed on the safety/compatibility of medicines for women during breastfeeding. Current pharmacology textbooks recommended by Australian universities have significant gaps in their coverage of medicine use in breastfeeding.
      Authors of textbooks should address this gap, so academic staff can recommend texts with the best lactation content.

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Breastfeeding mothers returning to work: experiences
           of women at one university in Victoria, Australia
    • Abstract: Gilmour, Carole; Monk, Hilary; Hall, Helen
      Working women need to juggle work, child care and family to continue to breastfeed. This qualitative study's aim was to explore women's experiences of returning to work following the birth of their baby. Focus groups were held with women within one multi-campus university, who had commenced breastfeeding at birth and had returned to work or study within 12 months. In addition, educators working with babies in childcare centres on two of the campuses were interviewed. Thematic analysis was employed used Rogoff's (2003) three planes of analysis, the individual, the interpersonal and the cultural-institutional. Three themes, proximity, flexibility, and communication, were identified relating to the factors impacting on women and their choices to breastfeed or wean on returning to work. From a socio-cultural perspective these themes can be understood as situated within the interrelated contexts of workplace, child care and family. Limitations of the study include the small number of participants and recruitment from one university.

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - The impact of the baby friendly health initiative in
           the Australian health care system: A critical narrative review of the
           evidence
    • Abstract: Atchan, Marjorie; Davis, Deborah; Foureur, Maralyn
      Studies have identified that the practices of maternity facilities and health professionals are crucial to women's experience of support and breastfeeding 'success'. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was launched globally in 1991 to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. While a direct causal effect has not been established and critics suggest the rhetoric conflicts with women's lived experiences as new mothers, a positive association between the Initiative and breastfeeding prevalence is apparent. Internationally, impact studies have demonstrated that where the Initiative is well integrated, there is an increase in rates of breastfeeding initiation and, to a lesser extent, duration. In consideration of the known health risks associated with the use of artificial baby milks this would suggest that BFHI implementation and accreditation should be a desirable strategy for committed health facilities. However, a variation in both BFHI uptake and breastfeeding prevalence between nations has been reported. This narrative review critically discusses a variety of issues relevant to the uptake and support of breastfeeding and the BFHI, utilising Australia as a case study. Whilst it enjoys 'in principle'policy support, Australia also suffers from a lack of uniformity in uptake and perception of the benefits of BFHI at all levels of the health system. Australian and international studies have identified similar enablers and barriers to implementation.

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - The 10th step and beyond: Mother support for
           breastfeding [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: The 10th step and beyond: Mother support for breastfeding, Edited by Virginia Thorley, OAM PhD IBCLC FILCA and Melissa Clark Vickers, MEd IBCLC Hale, 2012, RRP $49.95, ISBN 978 0 9847746 8 5.

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Breastfeeding and the developing brain
    • Abstract: Binns, Colin; James, Jennifer; Lee, Mi Kyung
      In past ages success was measured by physical strength and prowess as a warrior. But in the modern age maximising intelligence, cognitive development and language skills at the community and individual level is paramount. The influence of early nutrition and particularly breastfeeding, in cognitive development has been of research interest over the past century The first modern study published in the medical literature was in 1929 and reported on a study of 338 children aged between 7 and 11 years and found that breastfed infants performed better at school (Hoefer and Crumpton Hardy 1929). In common with many subsequent studies, exposure to breastfeeding was ascertained retrospectively with the reporting errors and risk of misclassification this is likely to bring (Binns et al 2012). A typical example of cohort studies of infant feeding and cognitive development was the Dunedin multidisciplinary health and development study, a 15- year longitudinal study that commenced in 1972 (Silva 1990). However, assessment of breastfeeding status was obtained retrospectively at the age of 3 years and breastfeeding was recorded as grouped data and not as a continuous variable (
      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Infant and young child feeding: Solid facts
    • Abstract: Cattaneo, Adriano
      The debate on infant and young child feeding (when, where, how, by whom, why) is often very heated and tends to confuse parents and health workers, as well as the public. Different positions come up against each other time and again, to the point that it becomes difficult to tell science from opinion. This would be understandable for debates occurring in popular media. The problem is that fierce discussions, ending up at times in diametrically opposed views, take place in scientific journals too, adding confusion to confusion. In this commentary I would like to establish some solid facts that I consider as undisputable (which therefore do not require references).

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - From the editor
    • Abstract: James, Jennifer
      PubDate: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:02:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - From the LRC
    • Abstract: Mortensen, Kate
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:37:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Research summaries
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:37:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Letters to the editor
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:37:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Understanding breastfeeding and how to succeed [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: ABA Book Review Working Group
      Review(s) of: Understanding breastfeeding and how to succeed, by Elisabet Helsing and Anna, Pia Haggkvist, Hale Publishing, 2012, ISBN 9780984774609, RRP: $69.95.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:37:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Beyond health, beyond choice: Breastfeeding
           constraints and realities [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Carroll, Katherine
      Review(s) of: Beyond health, beyond choice: Breastfeeding constraints and real, Edited by Paige Hall Smith, Bernice L. Hausman, and Miriam Labbok, 2012, Rutgers, University Press, ISBN: 9780813553047.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:37:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Sustained breastfeeding
    • Abstract: Mortensen, Kate; Tawia, Susan
      This paper reviews the research on breastfeeding duration of 1-2 years or beyond. Until the widespread introduction of Western artificial feeding products, children throughout the world were commonly breastfed for 2-3 years (Dettwyler 1995). In the 21st century in Australia, mothers find themselves in the position of having to justify breastfeeding their non- infant child to friends, family, social workers, and to legal and health professionals.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:37:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Food-chemical intolerance in the breastfed infant
    • Abstract: Anderson, Joy
      It is increasingly recognised that adverse reactions to food can cause symptoms that impact quality of life in adults. Dietitians are also aware that children and infants can suffer distress caused by reactions to food. Even exclusively breastfed infants are not exempt. Establishing the cause of infant distress and managing the infant's diet through maternal diet is complex and can be difficult. However, it can make a major contribution to infant and family wellbeing.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:37:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Experiences of birth and breastfeeding following
           assisted conception
    • Abstract: Barnes, Margaret
      The short and long-term benefits that breastfeeding has for both infant and mother are well recognised. With births increasingly occurring as a result of assisted conception (AC) technologies, the impact that these treatments have on a woman's experience of breastfeeding is an important issue to explore. This paper reports findings from a qualitative study exploring this association. Women who had undergone AC and planned to give birth at one private institution in regional Queensland, Australia, were approached to participate in this study (n12). Utilising narrative enquiry in the form of pre and post-birth interviews, participants' accounts of their experiences of breastfeeding were analysed as a means of understanding and representing their journeys. Findings demonstrated that during pregnancy the women were focused on healthy outcomes, showing ambivalence towards the mode of birth. There was a determination to breastfeed that was seen as one way to counteract the intervention and medicalisation they had undergone to conceive. Postnatally, for a number of women in the study breastfeeding difficulties were experienced - a finding that supports recent research. Further mixed method investigation into the impact that assisted conception has on breastfeeding intention, initiation and ability is indicated.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:37:53 GMT
       
 
 
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