for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Australian Orthoptic Journal
  [0 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0814-0936
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 47 Presidents of Orthoptics Australia and editors of the Australian
           orthoptic journal
    • PubDate: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 10:20:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Presidents of Orthoptics Australia and editors of the Australian
           orthoptic journal
    • PubDate: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 10:20:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Orthoptics Australia office bearers, state committees and
           university training programs
    • PubDate: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 10:06:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Amblyopia in older patients: Can treatment work'
    • Abstract: Pat, Eyal; Jolly, Neryla
      Aim: This paper aims to review the clinical outcomes of three patients with amblyopia who were treated beyond the critical period of 6 to 8 years of age.

      Method: Three case studies are presented of patients with previously untreated monocular amblyopia, aged between 9 and 17 years. Guided by the active management and monitoring skill of an orthoptist, each patient undertook a combination of regular clinical visits for sensory and motor visual training, combined with home occlusion treatment.

      Results: Each patient achieved improved visual acuity; the fastest and best result occurred in the oldest patient. All patients demonstrated the use of bifoveal fixation with a good level of sensory and motor fusion, with stereopsis in free space. Decompensation of orthophoria in one patient followed the occlusion treatment, however this then returned to binocular single vision following fusion training. Conclusions: Amblyopia treatment in older children can result in improvement of visual acuity. Integral to the success of the process is the role of the orthoptist in motivating the patient to activate the amblyopic eye during the treatment procedures, including individual choice of the time and place for the use of the occlusion.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 10:01:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Reporting for the National Disability Insurance Scheme:
           Incorporating the functional impact of vision impairment
    • Abstract: Silveira, Sue
      The Commonwealth of Australia has recently adopted a new innovative system of supporting people with disability; the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). Its objectives are grounded in a disability rights framework that endeavours to support people with permanent and significant disability in improved independence, community involvement, education, employment, health and well-being. To align with NDIS objectives, a major shift in perspective has occurred that moves disability service provision from a traditional funding scheme based entirely on the presence of a health condition, to one focussed on the functional impact of the person's health condition. However, despite this new approach, the capacity of a person with vision impairment to meet NDIS eligibility criteria for funding will not be judged by measures that indicate the functional impact of their vision impairment. Rather, the person's clinical measurements such as visual acuity and visual fields will be applied to predetermined criteria that have been deemed as suitable indicators of vision impairment.

      This paper examined the existing professional literature that questions the application of clinical measurements to determine the functional impact of a person's vision impairment. Several models that recognise vision as a more complex entity were discussed. It is suggested that a broader approach to the assessment of a person's vision inclusive of both the clinical and functional domains, will assist ophthalmic reporting to more closely align with NDIS objectives, to enhance the support of Australians with vision impairment.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 09:59:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Use of MAIA microperimetry in routine tertiary retinal practice
    • Abstract: Mack, Heather; Boyle, Jessica; Vukicevic, Meri; Heriot, Wilson
      Background: Microperimetry is well established as a psychophysical outcome measure in clinical trials and is increasingly used in routine retinal practice for patients with visual symptoms. However, there is sparse evidence indicating the value of microperimetry in the clinical setting as distinct from the research setting. The aim of this study was to describe the usefulness of the MAIA microperimeter in tertiary retinal practice.

      Method: A total of 80 eyes of 48 patients presenting to a private tertiary medical and surgical retina practice were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty-two eyes had retinal or macular pathology and nine had no retinal or macular pathology clinically present. Diagnosis classification information was missing for nine eyes. Visual acuity, clinical examination, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Macular Integrity Assessment (MAIA) microperimetry were performed, and presenting symptoms recorded. Primary outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA; LogMAR letters), macular integrity index (MII), average threshold sensitivity (ATS; dB) and test duration (minutes). Secondary outcome measures were pattern of visual field loss and fixation stability.

      Results: MII was strongly related to BCVA and ATS (Spearman's rho = -0.305, p = 0.006; r = -0.767, p < 0.0001 respectively). Four groups were identified, including three abnormal groups and one normal group: i) focal scotoma (21 eyes); ii) reduced average threshold with poor fixation (31 eyes); iii) reduced average threshold with normal fixation (20 eyes); and iv) normal (8 eyes). MII (p < 0.0001) and ATS (p < 0.0001) were significantly different between abnormal and normal eyes. Overlap was present in results of abnormal and normal eyes, and no sole microperimetry outcome measure was unequivocally able to distinguish between the three abnormal groups, or between normal and abnormal eyes.

      Conclusions: MAIA MII is strongly related to ATS and BCVA. Different patterns of visual field loss are described, but no single microperimetry parameter distinguished normal from abnormal patients. It is crucial to interpret microperimetry results appropriately in the clinical context.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 09:53:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Manifest strabismus in children previously diagnosed with
           pseudostrabismus
    • Abstract: Bloch, Edward; Orlans, Harry O; Uddin, Nabil; Jones, Alistair; Jain, Saurabh
      PubDate: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 09:47:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Blended learning strategy: Application for orthoptic teaching
    • Abstract: Vukicevic, Meri
      PubDate: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 09:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Named lectures, prizes and awards of Orthoptics Australia
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 20:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Selected abstracts from the Orthoptics Australia 72nd annual
           scientific conference held in Wellington 1 to 4 November 2015
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 20:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Profile of the Australian orthoptic workforce 2012/13
    • Abstract: Koklanis, Konstandina; Vukicevic, Meri
      Purpose: This paper presents the findings of the Orthoptics Australia 2012/13 orthoptic workforce study.

      Methods: An online survey was sent to Orthoptics Australia members and promoted to non-members by colleagues, via social media and at various continuing education events. Data was collected from October 2012 to April 2013 using the online survey tool Survey Monkey.

      Results: Four-hundred-and-fifteen orthoptists completed the online survey. Results indicate that the female to male ratio is 9.6:1 with the average age of orthoptists 37 years and 61.5% of orthoptists under the age of 40. The majority (81.7%) of orthoptists reside in New South Wales or Victoria and most (81.1%) work in metropolitan areas. Orthoptists work in a diverse range of clinical areas, including advanced practice, with 91.8% working in specialist public or private eye clinics, 52.8% working full-time and 42% having a career interruption at some point. Overall 27.2% of orthoptists indicated that they would be leaving the profession within the next five years.

      Conclusions: This study provides a valuable dataset which should be further explored with finer analysis of the workforce.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 14:07:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Reframing vision impairment for the Australian National
           Disability Insurance Scheme
    • Abstract: Silveira, Sue
      Australia has recently undergone a major shift in the way people with disability are supported, with the implementation in 2013 of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). Disability support including people with vision impairment will be determined using a series of validated tools to develop a negotiated plan between the NDIS and the person. Due to the immediate roll-out of the NDIS, an urgent need exists for access to suitable tools for the planning process. Discussions in 2014 between the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) and key stakeholder organisations revealed that a tool to measure the severity of a person's vision impairment is not currently available.

      It is vital that eye health professionals become aware of the NDIS process and the reporting requirements. It is also crucial that eye health professionals as experts support the development of the NDIS tools, to ensure the outcome considers the person's broad visual function rather than relying exclusively on clinical measurements to best define the person's support needs. This paper aims to report on a preliminary method rather than a tool that has been developed and recommended to the NDIA. The method has drawn on the Model of Visual Functioning, proposed by Corn (1983) that portrays vision as a multifactorial and complex entity. The method reflects the model's approach by adjusting the severity of a person's vision impairment when additional factors are present that impact on the person's visual function. The strengths and limitations of the method are also discussed.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 14:02:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Selected abstracts from the Orthoptics Australia 71st Annual
           Scientific Conference held in Brisbane 23 to 26 November 2014
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 13:58:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Indication for anti-VEGF treatment for neovascular age-related
           macular degeneration based on optical coherence tomography interpretation:
           Decision agreement rate between orthoptist and ophthalmologist
    • Abstract: Lim, Yong Ern; Vukicevic, Meri; Koklanis, Konstandina; Boyle, Jessica
      Objective: Although orthoptists play an integral role in the care of patients with chronic eye diseases, the clinical decision making of orthoptists within this setting has not often been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-rater agreement between orthoptists and an ophthalmologist in determining whether anti-VEGF treatment for neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is required based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) interpretation.

      Methods: A retrospective audit was conducted of patient data from a private ophthalmology practice. Data collected included details pertaining to patient demographics and clinical assessment, OCT retinal thickness, and the treatment decisions of five orthoptists and one senior vitreoretinal ophthalmologist when interpreting OCT scans. The inter-rater agreement between the orthoptists and the ophthalmologist was calculated as a percentage and the kappa (κ) statistic computed.

      Results: Of a total 669 treatment decisions made, on 619 occasions (92.5%) agreement was found between the orthoptists and the ophthalmologist (κ = 0.85; 95%CI 3.43 - 1.26, p < 0.001) representing an almost perfect agreement.

      Conclusion: Agreement between the orthoptists and ophthalmologist in AMD clinical decision making is very high suggesting that orthoptists could potentially have a greater involvement in shared-care models within specialist eye clinics.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 13:38:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Orthoptic education in NSW: New beginnings
    • Abstract: Rose, Kathryn
      PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 13:23:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Orthoptics Australia office bearers, state branches and
           university training programs
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 13:23:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Named lectures, prizes and awards of Orthoptics Australia
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 13:23:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Issue 1 - The Development of Aphakic Glaucoma Following
           Lensectomy in Congenital Cataract in a NSW Children's Hospital
    • Abstract: Crofts, Stephanie; Geering, Katie
      Congenital cataract affects children and their vision from an early age and as such early diagnosis and treatment is vital. Following surgical lensectomy, children with congenital cataract will either have an intraocular lens inserted, be fitted with an aphakic contact lens or be prescribed aphakic spectacles. One possible complication of lensectomy in these children is aphakic glaucoma. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of aphakic glaucoma in children with congenital cataract following lensectomy. A retrospective review of children presenting to the eye clinic at The Children's Hospital at Westmead NSW with congenital cataracts between 2008 and 2010 was performed.

      PubDate: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 17:32:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 46 Issue 1 - Laser Pointer Retinal Injury: A Case Report
    • Abstract: Vukicevic, Meri; Gin, Trevor; Keel, Stuart
      A healthy 15-year-old boy presented with decreased visual acuity and central blur in the right eye following the misapplication of a green laser pointer. Focal retinal pigment epithelial disturbance at the fovea was revealed on optical coherence tomography and ophthalmoscopy examination. Visual function remained impaired 9 weeks following the incident, however it is unclear whether the misuse of laser pointers results in a permanent decrease in vision. This case emphasises that laser pointer devices may cause macular injury when used inappropriately.

      PubDate: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 17:32:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - Orthoptics Australia office bearers, state branches
           and university training programs
    • PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - Presidents of Orthoptics Australia and editors of the
           Australian Orthoptic Journal
    • PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - Named lectures, prizes and awards of Orthoptics
           Australia
    • PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - Selected abstracts from the Orthoptics Australia 70th
           annual scientific conference held in Hobart 3 to 6 November 2013
    • PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - Charles Bonnet visual hallucinations in children: A
           systematic review
    • Abstract: Vukicevic, Meri; Keel, Stuart
      Visual pathway lesions are known to cause visual hallucinations and when they are complex, are described as Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS). CBS hallucinations are common in adults and prevalence rates may be up to 40%. Very little is known about the prevalence and characteristics of CBS in children. If the postulated theories as to the cause of CBS are correct, 'sensory deprivation' or 'release', then it stands to reason that children also suffer from this disorder. A systematic review was conducted to identify reports of CBS in children and compare the findings to that reported in the literature concerning adults.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - A case report: Complicated traumatic hyphaema
    • Abstract: Khuat, Khoi; Dickeson, Elaina
      A 72-year-old male presented with a left traumatic hyphaema due to blunt trauma. Clinical examination found a 60% hyphaema and a mild increase in intraocular pressure. The hyphaema was slowly resolving with the patient suffering a secondary haemorrhage and a reduction in visual acuity. The patient was taking anticoagulant medication, which predisposed him to developing a secondary haemorrhage. The secondary haemorrhage was surgically cleared but an improvement in visual acuity was not seen. A traumatic cataract was found upon slit lamp examination and was surgically removed resulting in an improvement in vision.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - The multidisciplinary glaucoma monitoring clinic at
           the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital
    • Abstract: Gleeson, Debra
      An ageing population worldwide is and will increasingly overburden existing eye health services due to an associated increase in age-related ocular disease. This has necessitated the development of different eye care schemes to alleviate this problem, particularly in the area of glaucoma. These schemes utilise community optometrists, and hospital-based optometrists, orthoptists and ophthalmic nurses. The various schemes have aided in a range of ways, from reducing false-positive glaucoma referrals to hospital clinics, to diagnosing, monitoring and in some cases treating suitable glaucoma patients. The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital (RVEEH) Glaucoma Monitoring Clinic (EGMON) which started in 2007 utilises a multidisciplinary team of ophthalmic consultants, optometrists, orthoptists and ophthalmic nurses. The EGMON Clinic was set up in response to increasing numbers attending the RVEEH glaucoma clinics, the largest tertiary glaucoma service in Victoria. This was affecting the availability of appointments for new and review patients. Orthoptists have the theoretical knowledge and the clinical background to play an important role in the provision of services to patients with glaucoma and other types of chronic eye disease. This study describes the establishment of the multidisciplinary EGMON Clinic at the RVEEH and the clinical protocols and processes used in the clinic. The outcomes and the results of the patient survey on the effectiveness of the clinic are also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - A case study and literature review of coexisting
           dissociated vertical and horizontal deviations
    • Abstract: Norris, Cassandra; Santamaria, Linda
      Adequate treatment of dissociated deviations has eluded eye care professionals since its discovery in 1895. This case-based investigation presents a review of the various treatment methods that have been advocated for both dissociated vertical and dissociated horizontal deviations, particularly in the presence of a consecutive exotropia and inferior oblique overaction. This difficult case provided an excellent opportunity to elucidate how surgery options change in the presence of multiple ocular anomalies.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - The relationship between the clinical assessment,
           
    • Abstract: Duffy, Natalie
      Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the clinical assessment, histology report and the positive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. Methods: In 2011, a retrospective study (2005-2011) of 40 diagnosed temporal artery biopsy patients was conducted at an ophthalmic practice in Sydney, NSW. All patients had been consulted by the same neuro-ophthalmologist prior to the biopsy. Relevant data was extracted from patients' records and entered into a database for statistical analysis. A scoring system was developed for each sign and symptom to facilitate analysis. Patients with incomplete or inaccurate records were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 40 patients were included in the study. The average age of participants was 78 years (range 55 to 92). At initial presentation, common signs included headache (87%), jaw claudication (45%) and a change in vision (50%). Blood testing revealed raised inflammatory markers of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (55%) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (90%) at presentation. A positive final diagnosis of temporal arteritis was made in 72.5% of all patients, despite only 52.5% of cases returning a positive temporal artery biopsy result. Conclusion: This study has supported the importance of a temporal artery biopsy in combination with a detailed clinical assessment in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. In an ophthalmic setting a temporal artery biopsy is a useful tool to assist diagnosis, however with a false-negative risk careful clinical evaluation by the orthoptist and neuro-ophthalmologist will ensure that giant cell arteritis is promptly detected in patients.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 45 Issue 1 - Orthoptics at the crossroads: Matching future
           workforce needs
    • Abstract: Scheetz, Jane; Koklanis, Konstandina; Long, Maureen; Morris, Meg E
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 2 - Orthoptics Australia office bearers, state branches
           and university training programs
    • PubDate: Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:53:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 2 - Presidents of Orthoptics Australia and editors of the
           Australian Orthoptic Journal
    • PubDate: Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:52:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 2 - Predictors of retinal vascular calibre: A review
    • Abstract: Keel, Stuart; Koklanis, Konstandina; Vukicevic, Meri; Istiopoulos, Catherine; Brazionis, Laima
      Retinal vascular calibre assessment offers a unique, non-invasive research tool to better understand the pathophysiology of the body's microvasculature and aid in the prediction of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and metabolic related diseases. However, to fully understand the relationship between the microvascular alterations that occur in the retina and the role they play in human disease it is important to recognise the impact of genes, ethnicity, prenatal, perinatal and postnatal factors on retinal vascular calibre. This review highlights a range of genetic, ocular, systemic and birth parameters, most notably that of ethnicity and birth size, that appear to have a profound effect on retinal vascular calibre and therefore must be taken into account as a source of variation when determining the clinical significance systemic factors have on retinal vasculature.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:52:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 2 - 'Culture in the clinic': A review of the public health
           challenge of preventing age-related low vision or blindness in African
           Americans: With implications for eye health care in Australia
    • Abstract: Fitzpatrick, Julie
      There is a body of evidence indicating African Americans are at a higher risk of developing blindness or low vision from ageing-related eye conditions, largely due to lack of attendance at eye screenings or non-compliance with treatment. Three eye conditions which will be discussed in this context are cataract, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this literature review is to demonstrate that, when planning programs such as eye screenings, it is important to consider the cultural needs of the client group under study. This paper attempts to demonstrate how addressing cultural needs and culturally-determined barriers to eye screening attendance could greatly enhance program success. Australia's cultural mix indicates there is a need to consider all races when planning programs. Using this holistic approach in a similar manner but applied to more local populations, such as indigenous Australians could also enhance eye screening attendance rates for these subjects. The literature suggests the health issue of low vision or blindness in African Americans is largely attributable to geographic and culturally-determined behavioural factors posing a barrier to seeking professional eye screening and treatment. Also, culturally determined barriers to modifying diet and lifestyle habits influence control of sight-threatening diabetes resulting in poorer vision, which generally deteriorates with age. It has been reported that African Americans would benefit from public health intervention to help prevent or minimise low vision. If this health issue is successfully addressed, there could be significant reductions in the economic health care burden in regions where this population resides, and patients could enjoy a better quality of life.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:50:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 2 - Improved visual acuity in patients with congenital
           nystagmus following Anderson-Kestenbaum procedures
    • Abstract: Norman, Stephanie C; Green, Julie F; Elder, James E
      This retrospective study conducted within a large paediatric clinical practice identified eleven patients who were operated on during the period of 1996-2011, using the Anderson-Kestenbaum procedure. These patients, aged 4 to 17 years, were operated on by the same surgeon. Visual acuity was measured using age-appropriate linear or single optotypes and results were compared pre- and post-operatively. Observations of head posture by ophthalmologist, orthoptist and parent were recorded pre- and post-operatively. Results showed the Anderson-Kestenbaum procedure reduced the compensatory head posture and improved visual acuity in 75% of patients, with a mean improvement in visual acuity of 3.75 letters. Patients showed minimal residual head posture. This study is limited by its retrospective nature and small subject numbers.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:49:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 2 - Named lectures, prizes and awards of Orthoptics
           Australia
    • PubDate: Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:44:47 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 2 - Selected abstracts from the Orthoptics Australia 69th
           annual scientific conference held in Melbourne 25 to 28 November 2012
    • PubDate: Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:44:47 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.166.188.64
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016