for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Australian Orthoptic Journal
  [0 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0814-0936
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 44 Issue 1 - Orthoptics Australia office bearers, state branches
           and university training programs
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 1 - Presidents of orthoptics Australia and editors of the
           Australian orthoptic journal
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 1 - Named lectures, prizes and awards of orthoptics
           Australia
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 1 - A case study: Management options for a patient with
           congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles
    • Abstract: Vogrin, Frances; Zhang, Kailin Karen
      Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles is a relatively static congenital disorder leading to restrictive extraocular movements. The need for early intervention is vital to alleviate the development of an abnormal head posture and to lower the risk of amblyopia. A case of an 18-year-old male with congenital fibrosis, bilateral blepharoptosis, chin-up head posture, and external ophthalmoplegia is presented. His mother and older brother also exhibited similar clinical signs, thereby suggesting a familial pattern. Surgical management is discussed in light of the patient's presentation.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 1 - Ocular Myositis: A case study
    • Abstract: Lai, Melanie
      Orbital myositis is an uncommon inflammatory condition resulting in variable degrees of restriction of the extraocular muscles. A case of a 15-year-old girl is presented, highlighting the importance of differential diagnosis from other ocular conditions that can cause extraocular muscle restrictions.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 1 - Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and uveitis in a
           paediatric Sydney population
    • Abstract: Geering, Katie; Crofts, Stephanie
      Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an inflammatory condition that affects 1 in 1,000 children in Australia. JIA can be defined by inflammation in one or more joints for a period of at least six weeks, with an onset younger than 16 years of age. JIA is sub-classified into different types depending on the number of joints affected, the rheumatoid factor and whether other systemic conditions are present. JIA can be associated with uveitis, a serious and chronic ocular complication which is often difficult to manage and can result in visual loss. The risk of development of uveitis differs dependent on the type of JIA present. An ophthalmology assessment forms a vital part of the assessment for children with JIA. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of visual complications associated with children who have a diagnosis of JIA. A retrospective review of children presenting to the Eye Clinic at The Children's Hospital Westmead with JIA over a twelve-month period between 2009 and 2010 was performed. This paper emphasises the need for ophthalmology review in this cohort of children.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 44 Issue 1 - Ocular complications of Mucopolysaccharidoses
    • Abstract: Ramlee, Azura; Flaherty, Maree; Silveira, Sue; Sillence, David
      Purpose: To study the extent of ocular involvement among children with mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia. Methods: This study consists of a retrospective consecutive case series, with review of medical records of children with confirmed diagnosis of MPS from 1997 to 2009. Results: Forty-five children had MPS but only 29 had a record of previous formal ocular assessment. Of these, more than half had documented ocular involvement, including corneal clouding, common among the MPS I subtypes and MPS VI (Maroteaux-Lamy) patients. Posterior segment changes, including pigmentary retinopathy, epiretinal membranes and optic disc changes were more common in MPS II (Hunter). Two children with MPS VI were also noted to have epiretinal membranes and this is likely to be a previously unrecognised association of MPS VI. Only 7 out of 18 children with MPS III (Sanfilippo) were examined, and clinically none were found to have retinopathy. Among those who were cooperative for vision assessment, four were found to see 6/12 or better, while the majority had best corrected vision between 6/15 and 6/60. Three patients had documented disease progression leading to blindness. All four MPS VI patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) had stable visual acuity with no ocular progression (6.5 years mean follow-up). However progression of corneal clouding was noted in the only MPS I patient receiving ERT. Conclusion: Ocular involvement in MPS may cause significant vision impairment. Formal ophthalmic review is important for early detection and treatment to help achieve the best visual outcome.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Orthoptics Australia office bearers, state branches
           and university training programs
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Presidents of orthoptics Australia and editors of the
           Australian orthoptic journal
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Named lectures, prizes and awards of orthoptics
           Australia
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Selected abstracts from the orthoptics Australia 68th
           annual scientific conference held in Canberra 20 to 22 November 2011
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Effect of vertical interline spacing on word
           recognition and reading speed using the peripheral retina
    • Abstract: O'Connor, Alannah; Vukicevic, Meri
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of increasing the spacing between sentences upon word recognition speed and word recognition accuracy when using the peripheral retina. By identifying optimal interline spacing for patients with central field loss, this could determine guidelines for best presentation of written materials in the presence of central scotoma. Seventeen participants with no ocular pathology were recruited and asked to read words with their fovea and peripheral retina (at 6 degrees from the fovea) whilst their fixation was monitored using an infra-red eye tracker. Whilst improvement in reading speed can be gained by increasing interline spacing to 1.5x when reading with the fovea, there is no effect (or detriment) of manipulating interline spacing when reading with the peripheral retina. There is also no effect on word recognition accuracy.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - Visual Screening Competencies Questionnaire (VSCQ) and
           orthoptic practice
    • Abstract: Lanca, Carla Costa; Carolino, Elisabete; Nunes, Carla
      The identification of core competencies which are important for undertaking accurate visual screening by orthoptists is considered in this study. The aim was to construct and validate a questionnaire for orthoptists to assess visual screening competency. This study comprised three steps. The first step involved a 69-item self-assessment questionnaire constructed to assess orthoptists' perception of their competencies in visual screening programs for children. This questionnaire was constructed with statements from the Orthoptic Benchmark Statement for Health Care Programmes (Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, United Kingdom) and included three competency dimensions: interpersonal (IP), instrumental (IT) and systemic (ST). The second step involved questionnaire translation. Statements were translated into Portuguese and survey items were then reviewed by two experts. The third step involved questionnaire validation for internal consistency (n = 36 orthoptists) and factorial dimension analysis (n = 58 orthoptists). Questionnaire dimensions presented the following internal consistency: alpha (ST) = 0.916; alpha (IP) = 0.949; alpha (IT) = 0.892. After performing the factorial analysis of principal components, results showed a total explained variance of 61.21% (KMO = 0.795). The IP dimension demonstrated 35.88% of the variance and IT 14.45% of the variance. Each dimension item was shown to be a good measure of ST, IP and IT. The questionnaire provides a method of measurement of orthoptists' perception of their competencies in the visual screening of children.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 2 - A child with myasthenia gravis and defective
           accommodation: A case study
    • Abstract: Pedemont, Karen; Jolly, Neryla; Rose, Loreto
      Background: This case details a 14-year old female with myasthenia gravis (MG) who on presentation had ocular symptoms, which included bilateral ptosis and vertical diplopia. Four weeks after the onset of the MG she developed accommodative insufficiency. This condition has not been reported before in childhood MG, but has been documented in adult onset MG. The onset in this case was later in the course of the disease, not initially, as found in the adult cases reviewed in the literature. Method: Measurements were taken at different stages over an 18-month period to determine the impact of medication and fatigue. Tests for near vision, accommodation, convergence, bar reading and near deviation were performed. Results: All measurements were reduced and further affected by fatigue with the exception of the size of the near deviation. The patient was symptom-free by 15 weeks post onset. Eighteen months later the patient remained symptom-free with all measurements normal with the exception of accommodation, which remained below normal and affected by fatigue after reading. Conclusion: This single case highlights the occurrence of smooth muscle involvement in MG and its debilitating effect. It is recommended that testing of accommodation function becomes standard practice in patients with MG and the use of additional plus lenses considered if required.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:34:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 2 - Minimising Sun-related Damage to Australian Children's
           Eyes
    • Abstract: Silveira, Sue
      Australian children and their families live and enjoy an outdoor lifestyle in an environment with variable and at times, high ultraviolet radiation levels. Generally they have been successfully educated to care for their skin against sun damage. However a similar message regarding the need for eye care has not been as forthcoming. Recent research has shown evidence of sun damage in young Australian children's eyes and indicates the need for eye sun protection. Developing strategies such as wearing hats and sunglasses which aim to minimise eye damage are indicated. In doing this the link between sun avoidance and vitamin D deficiency-related disease needs to be considered. This paper presents a review of the scientific literature which reports on the prevalence of sun-related eye changes and damage in children's eyes. Possible prevention strategies which offer protection to Australian children's eyes such as sunscreen, sunglasses and hats will be discussed. The need for research in this area will also be highlighted.

      PubDate: Sat, 6 Oct 2012 14:39:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Are Clinical Measures Good Indicators of Performance
           of Daily Activities in Vision-impaired Children
    • Abstract: Dawson, Natalia; Fitzmaurice, Kerry
      Purpose: The aim of the study was to identify whether clinical measures of visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were good indicators of self-perceived performance of activities of daily living (ADL) tasks in vision-impaired school aged children. Methods: Clinical measures and performance of visual function were assessed in 22 participants (11 fully sighted and 11 vision-impaired children), aged 5 to 15 years. Distance acuity was assessed by LogMAR chart and contrast sensitivity was measured by Vistech grating contrast sensitivity. Additionally, colour vision was also assessed using Ishihara plates as a control. Performance of visual function was evaluated by completion of one of two modified Visual Acuity Questionnaires (VAQ). This questionnaire measured self-perceived level of difficulty in undertaking specified activities graded on a five-point Likert scale. Results of clinical measures were correlated against VAQ scores. Results: Vision impaired participants reported greater difficulty performing VAQ visual functions than sighted participants. There was an overall trend of a weak to moderate positive correlation between visual acuity and difficulty in performing daily activities measured on the VAQ and a weak to moderate negative correlation between contrast sensitivity and performing daily activities measured on the VAQ. Conclusion: Data from this study indicated that visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were weak indicators of general performance of visual function. Whilst this represents pilot data the trends demonstrated were similar to others reported in the literature. Further investigation should be undertaken in this domain of low vision, as many intervention programs are directed by clinical measures.

      PubDate: Sat, 6 Oct 2012 14:39:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - A Case of Diplopia Following Monovision with Contact
           Lenses
    • Abstract: Haynes, Barbara
      A 46-year old woman presented with a 12-month history of diplopia after being prescribed monovision contact lenses. The iatrogenic anisometropia caused decompensation of an esophoria, resulting in diplopia. A normal binocular state was reinstated with glasses, but it was necessary to incorporate prisms to achieve single vision.

      PubDate: Sat, 6 Oct 2012 14:19:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Selected Abstracts from the OAA 64th Annual Scientific
           Conference, Held in Perth, 25 - 28 November 2007
    • PubDate: Sat, 6 Oct 2012 14:19:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 2 - Vision Screening of Individuals with Mild Intellectual
           Disability
    • Abstract: Hanman, Kate; Suda, Kaori; Koklanis, Konstandina; Georgievski, Zoran
      A pilot vision screening of secondary school students with mild intellectual disability was conducted as part of the La Trobe University orthoptic clinical education program. The screening included a visual acuity assessment, cover testing, examination of ocular motility, stereo acuity and convergence near point. Two hundred and nineteen participants (n = 219) aged 12 - 18 years participated. Of these, 73 (33.3%) failed the screening on the basis of reduced vision, strabismus and or nystagmus. This suggests a great prevalence of ocular disorders in children with mild intellectual disability and highlights the importance of vision screening within this community.

      PubDate: Sat, 6 Oct 2012 13:28:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Orthoptic interventions in stroke patients
    • Abstract: Macfarlane, Ann; Jolly, Neryla; Thompson, Kate
      Patients admitted to hospital following a stroke, as part of the recovery process may require active intervention to relieve visual symptoms. The interventions include therapy, correct use of or modification to spectacles (including use of prisms), appropriate occlusion or the adoption of compensatory strategies to support ocular comfort. This paper falls into two sections. It initially provides an overview of the strategies currently used for vision problems found in patients who have had a stroke. It refers to the general indictors for intervention and the possible strategies that can be used. The second part of the paper looks at outcomes citing patient responses from a 2008 report to the Statewide Ophthalmology Service of the Greater Metropolitan Clinical Taskforce. The strategies reported include therapy, correct optical use, occlusion and diplopia relief and strategies to maximise ocular comfort. Approaches used are often simple and very effective in terms of patient comfort or educating other team members about the need to support a compensatory strategy. Some strategies require active follow-up with variable outcomes. The outcomes support the benefits of orthoptic intervention in the care of patients recovering from stroke.

      PubDate: Sat, 6 Oct 2012 13:27:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Diurnal Variation of Central Corneal Thickness and
           Intra-ocular Pressure in Normal and Suspect Glaucomatous Eyes: A Review
    • Abstract: Keel, Stuart; Malesic, Linda
      Normal physiological variations in central corneal thickness (CCT) are important as they provide a reference parameter for experimental and clinical research particularly in the field of glaucoma prediction and assessment. The literature has established that significant diurnal fluctuations in CCT occur in persons with no ocular pathology when CCT has been assessed over a 12-48 hour period. The consensus in the literature is that CCT is thickest in the morning upon awakening and gradually thins as the day progresses, with the greatest proportion of this variation occurring in the first three hours after awakening. Studies that have attempted to establish whether a diurnal variation in CCT exists in glaucomatous eyes have not been successful. To date, significant developments, although variable, have been made to better understand diurnal variation in CCT in individuals with no ocular pathology. This signifies the importance of monitoring CCT throughout the day in those individuals who may be at risk of developing glaucoma, as opposed to those individuals who already suffer from glaucoma, as it will ensure that the timing of glaucoma treatment will not be overlooked. This review discusses the current opinion on diurnal CCT in those individuals who have no ocular pathology and in those who are glaucoma suspects. It will also focus on the significance of diurnal variability with CCT and its relationship to intra-ocular pressure (IOP) diurnal variation.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 09:31:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Orthoptics Australia office bearers, state branches
           and University training programs
    • PubDate: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 10:04:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Presidents of orthoptics Australia and editors of the
           Australian orthoptic journal
    • PubDate: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 10:04:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Named lectures, prizes and awards of orthoptics
           Australia
    • PubDate: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 10:04:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Two case studies: Eccentric fixation and amblyopia - a
           challenge to the treating practitioner
    • Abstract: Boyle, Jessica; Santamaria, Linda
      Two cases of eccentric fixation in the presence of strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia are presented, both of which failed to respond to therapeutic efforts. A brief account of past and present treatment modalities used in the management of eccentric fixation is provided, including a discussion as to the limitations and efficacy of each. Analysis of the literature reveals that regardless of the treatment method employed, a population of "incurable" patients exist who fail to improve despite treatment efforts. Treatment outcome is dependent upon a multitude of factors and the potential reasons as to why this sub-group of patients with eccentric fixation fail to show improvement are discussed. This paper serves to highlight the challenges that such cases pose to the treating eye care practitioner and encourages the need for further research in this area; an area where little is known even today.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 10:04:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - 'Does size matter'': An investigation of
           Anisometropia, Aniseikonia and Anisophoria
    • Abstract: Saba, Kristen L; Fitzsimons, Ross
      Aim: To examine how acquired anisometropia commonly gives rise to symptoms of diplopia in patients and to differentiate the cause of these symptoms in terms of aniseikonia and anisophoria. Method: Twenty-one patients with acquired anisometropia >1.00 D and astigmatism
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 10:04:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Clinical management of coats disease: A case study
    • Abstract: Drowley, Christopher R; O'Day, Justin
      Coats disease, is a rare unilateral retinal vascular disease of unknown aetiology though there may be a genetic predisposition to the disorder. If left untreated, severe and permanent vision loss can occur due to total exudative retinal detachment. Early intervention and close monitoring remains the most effective way to prevent potential vision loss and the progression to a blind and painful eye. This report describes the case of a 15 year-old healthy male who presented with a one-month history of unilateral blurred central vision. Fundus examination revealed a peripheral retinal vascular lesion which resulted in lipid deposits in the macular region. The patient was treated with argon laser panretinal photocoagulation and monitored over an 18-month period. He demonstrated a slow though significant resolution of the maculopathy which correlated with an improvement in visual acuity. This case highlights that early presentation followed with an appropriate management regime can result in a successful visual outcome.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 10:04:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Zoran Georgievski
    • Abstract: Koklanis, Connie
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 10:04:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 2 - Selected Abstracts from the Orthoptics Australia 67th
           Annual Scientific Conference Held in Adelaide 21-24 November 2010
    • PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 2 - Monocular Nystagmus in a Case of Septo-optic Dysplasia
    • Abstract: Moorhead, Rebecca; Moon, Maria
      A case of septo-optic dysplasia in a 2-year old boy is presented. The variable symptoms and characteristics of the disorder are described in relation to its aetiology, with particular emphasis on the unusual occurrence of monocular nystagmus.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 2 - Spontaneous Resolution of Early Onset Esotropia: Two
           Case Studies
    • Abstract: Parsons, Lora
      The case studies of two infants who both presented with a large angle early onset esotropia that resolved completely within the first 12 months of life are presented. Spontaneous resolution of early onset esotropia is uncommon and these two cases highlight the importance of examining infants carefully and repeatedly prior to early surgical intervention.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 2 - Parental Predictors of Poor Visual Outcome with
           Occlusion Treatment for Unilateral Amblyopia
    • Abstract: Costa Lanca, Carla; Carolino, Elisabete
      Aim: Visual acuity outcome of amblyopia treatment depends on the compliance. This study aimed to determine parental predictors of poor visual outcome with occlusion treatment in unilateral amblyopia and identify the relationship between occlusion recommendations and the patient's actual dose of occlusion reported by the parents. Methods: This study comprised three phases: refractive adaptation for a period of 18 weeks after spectacle correction; occlusion of 3 to 6 hours per day during a period of 6 months; questionnaire administration and completion by parents. Visual acuity as assessed using the Sheridan-Gardiner singles or Snellen acuity chart was used as a measure of visual outcome. Correlation analysis was used to describe the strength and direction of two variables: prescribed occlusion reported by the doctor and actual dose reported by parents. A logistic binary model was adjusted using the following variables: severity, vulnerability, self-efficacy, behaviour intentions, perceived efficacy and treatment barriers, parents' and childrens' age, and parents' level of education. Results: The study included 100 parents (mean age 38.9 years, SD approx 9.2) of 100 children (mean age 6.3 years, SD approx 2.4) with amblyopia. Twenty-eight percent of children had no improvement in visual acuity. The results showed a positive mild correlation (kappa = 0.54) between the prescribed occlusion and actual dose reported by parents. Three predictors for poor visual outcome with occlusion were identified: parents' level of education (OR = 9.28; 95%CI 1.32-65.41); treatment barriers (OR = 2.75; 95%CI 1.22-6.20); interaction between severity and vulnerability (OR = 3.64; 95%CI 1.21-10.93). Severity (OR = 0.07; 95%CI 0.00-0.72) and vulnerability (OR = 0.06; 95%CI 0.05-0.74) when considered in isolation were identified as protective factors. Conclusions: Parents frequently do not use the correct dosage of occlusion as recommended. Parents' educational level and awareness of treatment barriers were predictors of poor visual outcome. Lower levels of education represented a 9-times higher risk of having a poor visual outcome with occlusion treatment.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - A Case Study: Bilateral Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia
    • Abstract: Portingale, Jade; Santamaria, Linda; Etheridge, Mark
      A 30-year old female presented with a five-day history of vertical diplopia. Clinical examination revealed bilateral restriction of adduction and nystagmus of the abducting eye, diagnosed as a bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia. A three-day course of intravenous methylprednisolone was prescribed and her signs and symptoms soon resolved. Later, magnetic resonance imaging revealed no signs of demyelination.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - A Case of Orbital Cellulitis with Accompanying
           Bilateral Ptosis
    • Abstract: Norman, Stephanie; Santamaria, Linda; Biondi, Sonia
      A case study of a young male with right orbital cellulitis secondary to sinusitis is presented. Ocular signs are described, including decreased visual acuity, ptosis, proptosis, pain, and restriction of ocular movements. The patient had a number of clinical signs, including a decompensating intermittent exotropia and the continued presence of bilateral ptosis following resolution of the orbital cellulitis. It was concluded that the patient likely had previously unknown pre-existing conditions, which meant that he will continue to require ophthalmic and orthoptic management beyond the resolution of the orbital cellulitis.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Electroretinography in a Paediatric Setting: A Useful
           Diagnostic Tool
    • Abstract: Crofts, Stephanie; Brennan, Louise; Scanlon, Katie
      Assessing visual behaviour in young children is a challenging task. When children present with poor vision, nystagmus, photophobia or nyctalopia, it can be difficult to determine the cause. The electroretinogram (ERG) plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of paediatric retinal eye conditions and can be a useful diagnostic tool for the paediatric ophthalmologist. The ERG records electrical activity of the retina in response to ocular stimulation with either a light or pattern source. Patients are referred to the visual electrophysiology clinic when a diagnosis is uncertain or when the ERG result will help confirm a diagnosis. When a diagnosis is confirmed the ERG can be used to monitor progression of the disease. These results, along with genetic counselling, allow patients and their families to be informed on prognosis and progression of retinal disease and its impact on vision. A retrospective review of patients attending The Children's Hospital at Westmead for ERG assessment over a two-year period from 2007 to 2009 was carried out. This paper discusses methods of paediatric ERG assessment, indications for testing and common paediatric retinal dystrophies.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Orthoptic Practice Variations and Effective Care: The
           Need for Clinical Practice Guidelines to Improve Care
    • Abstract: McMain, Karen
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 2 - Selected Abstracts from the OAA 66th Annual Scientific
           Conference, Held in Brisbane, 15-18 November 2009
    • PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 2 - Concordant Esotropia and Bilateral Hypermetropia in
           Young Monozygotic Twins
    • Abstract: Jurgens, Melissa
      Monozygotic twins with concordant essential infantile esotropia and bilateral hypermetropia are reported. They are discussed in relation to the importance of early surgical alignment before the age of two years and the influence of high hypermetropia on visual development post operatively.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 2 - Why are Males with Compressive Optic Neuropathy
           Predisposed to Developing Cranial Nerve Palsy and Binocular Vision
           Problems'
    • Abstract: Elderman, Inez Eveline; Vukicevic, Meri
      Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of diplopia and cranial nerve palsies in a group of consecutive patients presenting with suspected compressive optic neuropathy. Methods: Fifty patients aged 17 to 93 years diagnosed with a brain tumour and possible compressive optic neuropathy were referred to an outpatient orthoptic clinic. The orthoptic investigation included an ocular motility assessment to determine the characteristics of the problems reported. All patients presented with a diagnosed brain tumour and possible compressive optic neuropathy. Results: Thirteen patients (26%) presented with complaints of diplopia pre-operatively and a cranial nerve palsy was found in 8 of these patients (61.5%) and all were male. This result was statistically significant ([X squared]=
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 2 - The Verbal Skills Used by Orthoptists During Private
           Patient Consultations
    • Abstract: Sim, Irina; Jolly, Neryla; Pepper, Karen
      Purpose: Verbal communication is an essential part of the medical consultation. It can affect the patient's level of satisfaction, compliance to treatment regimes and recommendations, and may impact on the quality of the patient-practitioner relationship. This study aims to explore the form and patterns of verbal communication that are used by orthoptists in private ophthalmic settings when consulting with patients and the impact of external factors such as experience, patient characteristics and initial or return consultations. Methods: Twelve orthoptists and 49 patients were recruited from 3 private ophthalmic practices in metropolitan New South Wales. A real-time assessment of duration of clinical tasks and coding of verbal communications into categories was performed and analysed with the SPSS program using correlation and t-tests. Results: Orthoptists were found to use extensive explanations, delivery of information and use of rapport, which increased with the orthoptists' clinical experience. Patient characteristics such as age, gender, and cultural background did not affect the duration of tests performed or the verbal communication used. Conclusion: Orthoptists use a wide range and types of verbal communications in their clinical practice. The level of the orthoptists' clinical experience influences the verbal communications used by the orthoptist. Patient characteristics had little influence on the verbal communications used.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 2 - The Importance of Evidence Based Practice
    • Abstract: Koklanis, Connie; Georgievski, Zoran
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - Double Elevator Palsy with Congenital Esotropia: A
           Case Study
    • Abstract: Hensman, Marika
      This case study follows Master JT, a young boy who has congenital esotropia in addition to a right double elevator palsy. Ocular assessment of the patient is outlined as well as management and surgical treatment. The characteristics of congenital esotropia and double elevator palsy are discussed in context with the child's presentation. The importance of performing a forced duction test to determine the classification of double elevator palsy and options or surgery is stressed. Rationale over surgical choices and likely prognosis are included.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - A Case of Brown's Syndrome in Association with
           Goldenhar Syndrome
    • Abstract: Muecke, Kara; Santamaria, Linda
      A case study of a young girl diagnosed at birth with Goldenhar syndrome is presented. Ocular features are described, including the unusual finding of Brown's syndrome, suggesting a possible teratogenic link between the two conditions.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - A Case of Triplopia: A Case of Conversion
           Disorder'
    • Abstract: Fitzpatrick, Julie
      The low vision rehabilitation orthoptist is involved in assisting clients to maximize independence despite functional vision loss, which may come in the form of reduced vision, field loss, reduced contrast sensitivity, or loss of binocular functions. In this paper, a case study of an elderly female who presented with monocular triplopia is discussed. The relationship between conversion disorder and the patient's symptoms, the importance of tailoring management to the patient's functional requirements and the role of the orthoptist within a multidisciplinary team is discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - The Use of Peer-supported 'Case Conferencing' to
           Enhance Orthoptic Students' Learning in a Clinical School Environment
    • Abstract: Robinson, Kylie; Georgievski, Zoran; Koklanis, Konstandina
      An orthoptic student 'case conferencing' program was developed and introduced at the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital with the aim of enhancing students' clinical experience. The aim of this study was to report on this initiative and on students' perceptions of the program. Students presently undertake their clinical placements in differing modes, according to the semester in which they are enrolled. It was found that students undertaking the 'block' placement mode find case conferencing particularly beneficial, the key difference being the increased amount of contact time and engagement compared with students undertaking sessional placement.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - Myopia, Near Work, Atropine and Bifocals: Critical
           Reflections of the Key Literature Examining the Influence of Several
           Factors on the Progression of Myopia
    • Abstract: Elderman, Inez Eveline; Vukicevic, Meri
      In the last century there have been many studies into the factors that influence the progression of myopia. Genetics, exposure to light, intra ocular pressure, near work, stress, presence of esophoria, level of education and living environment are described as possible factors influencing myopia. Some studies 1-3 indicate that there is a possible connection between near work and myopia progression and other studies suggest that methods to delay myopia progression are negligible. The literature shows that it is impossible to measure the amount of influence each factor has on the progression of myopia as it is not possible to separate one individual factor from another. The exact mechanism that causes myopia progression is not known and there are no evidence based studies that document what the causes may be. Whilst it is known that genetics have an influence, it is also possible that reading and near work have influence on myopia. Thus, could the progression of myopia be delayed with treatment such as atropine and bifocals' The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that may contribute to myopia progression as outlined in the literature and to consider, by comparing two key papers, whether the use of atropine and bifocals is effective treatment. In addition, important considerations from an orthoptic perspective are also described.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - Searching AOJ Scientific Papers and Authors
    • Abstract: Georgievski, Zoran; Koklanis, Connie
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Selected Abstracts from the 65th Annual Scientific
           Conference, Held in Melbourne, 23-26 November 2008
    • PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Functional Vision Assessment: Looking beyond Clinical
           Measures of Ocular Function
    • Abstract: Vukicevic, Meri
      Clinical measures of ocular function are commonly used by orthoptists in a variety of settings. However, investigation of functional vision is not often assessed nor quantified. This paper utilises three case reports to highlight the importance of investigating functional vision and describes the use of one such tool useful for this purpose.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - The Specialised Orthoptic Role in Management of
           Contact Lens Use in Infants
    • Abstract: Sendelbeck, Stephanie; Brennan, Louise
      Contact lenses are a standard method of correcting aphakia during infancy. Aphakia in infancy occurs secondary to congenital cataracts, PHPV, ectopia lentis and some penetrating eye injuries. Contact lenses may also be used to correct high anisometropic refractive errors in infants. A retrospective review was carried out on patients attending the Eye Clinic at The Children's Hospital at Westmead who required contact lens correction over a seven year period from 2000 to 2007. This paper discusses specialised techniques related to the use of contact lenses in these infants and the orthoptists role in the management of patients with contact lenses.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - The Evolution of Colour Vision Testing
    • Abstract: French, Amanda; Rose, Kathryn; Cornell, Elaine; Thompson, Kathryn
      Colour vision testing forms an important part of the assessment of retinal pathology and congenital colour vision anomalies. Although the traditional Ishihara test and other pseudoisochromatic plates are relatively simple to use, some are not designed for the assessment of more complex acquired defects, and hue discrimination tests can be very time consuming to administer and analyse. This review outlines the theoretical development and historical evolution of colour vision tests, from the 19th until this early part of the 21st century. Based on these developments, speculation is made on how the tests will evolve in the future, with increasingly refined computer technology, and predicts that they will provide consistent and robust assessments of colour vision that will become routinely used in the clinical environment

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Looking for You, Looking for Us'
    • Abstract: Georgievski, Zoran; Koklanis, Connie
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Suitability of Monovision Laser Correction in Patients
           with Ocular Motility Disorders
    • Abstract: Ta, Shih Shih
      This paper presents two cases which illustrate the importance of a pre-operative orthoptic examination in patients with ocular motility disorders considering monovision laser correction. The relative influence of the pre-operative orthoptic examination on the advice given to patients seeking monovision is discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Surgical Management of Essential Infantile Esotropia
    • Abstract: Mocnay, Nicole; Koklanis, Konstandina; Georgievski, Zoran
      There is universal agreement that surgical intervention is necessary to treat infantile ET, however debate regarding the timing of surgery and the type of procedure necessary to produce the best postoperative outcome continues. This paper highlights the issues regarding the management of infantile esotropia and briefly reviews a cross section of the literature.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Vision Rehabilitation and the Development of Eccentric
           Viewing Training: A Historical Overview
    • Abstract: Vukicevic, Meri; Fitzmaurice, Kerry
      The concept of vision rehabilitation is a comparatively new concept given the long-standing history of medical practice and medical research. This paper provides a historical overview of vision rehabilitation, with an emphasis on the development of eccentric viewing training, from antiquity to the present day.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Eye Movements in Vestibular Function and Dysfunction:
           A Brief Review
    • Abstract: Cornell, Elaine; Curthoys, Ian
      It is well known that there is a very close relationship between the vestibular system of the inner ear and eye movements, however symptomatic outcomes of this relationship are not common in general eye clinics. Stimulation of the semicircular canals by rotation or caloric testing results in vestibular nystagmus and this can be used clinically to assist in the diagnosis of peripheral and organ vestibular disorders. Testing of otolith dysfunction, however, has been less straightforward. It has recently been shown that eye movements can be elicited by otolithic stimuli, delivered either as air or bone conducted sound. These eye movements are small, but reliable, and can assist in the diagnosis of vestibular disease or dysfunction.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Life Begins in the 40's - a Ruby Tribute to This
           Australian Orthoptic Icon
    • Abstract: Koklanis, Connie; Georgievski, Zoran
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Selected Abstracts from the OAA 63rd Annual Scientific
           Conference, Held in Sydney, 5- 8 November 2006
    • PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Ocular Tilt Reaction Caused by a Polycystic
           Astrocytoma: A Case Report
    • Abstract: Le, Thong
      An ocular tilt reaction consists of a vertical misalignment of the eyes (skew deviation), a head tilt and conjugate ocular torsion in the direction of the hypotropic eye. Ocular tilt reaction, however, may be mistaken for a superior oblique palsy due to the similarities in clinical findings of the two conditions. They both display similar vertical deviations and head tilts on presentation. In order to differentiate between the two conditions torsion needs to be assessed and measured. An ocular tilt reaction will display paradoxical conjugate torsion unlike a superior oblique palsy. This paper describes a case of a patient with an ocular tilt reaction that was initially thought to be a superior oblique palsy. An MRI scan revealed a polycystic astrocytoma in the midbrain region consistent with reports in the literature associating midbrain lesions and an ocular tilt reaction. Although rare, an ocular tilt reaction should never be ruled out until torsion is measured in patients presenting with a vertical deviation and head tilt.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Vision Disturbances in Pituitary Prolactinomas: A
           Clinical Case Study
    • Abstract: Freijah, Lara
      A pituitary prolactinoma is a benign tumour of the pituitary gland that causes excess production of prolactin, the hormone normally responsible for the formation of milk during pregnancy. It is the commonest type of pituitary tumour and is most prevalent in females under the age of 40. Considering the close proximity of the optic nerves to the pituitary gland, it is imperative that patients diagnosed with this condition undergo regular ophthalmologic examinations, including perimetry, to monitor any potential changes. The visual field defect commonly seen in patients with pituitary tumours is a superotemporal quadrantanopia as the inferonasal fibres are affected. Bitemporal hemianopias are also commonly seen. Aside from the visual disturbances associated with pituitary prolactinomas, affected individuals can also experience infertility, low bone density and hypopituitarism. A case study of an 18 year old woman diagnosed with a pituitary prolactinoma who interestingly also became pregnant will be presented. It is well documented that women with prolactin-secreting tumours can experience further pituitary enlargement than what is expected in a healthy pregnant woman. The progress of this case was closely examined with MRI scans and perimetry, all of which will be presented.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Glaucoma and Sleep Apnoea: Is there a Link': A
           Review
    • Abstract: Moore, Shandell; Malesic, Linda
      Glaucoma is one of leading causes of vision loss in Australia. There are well documented and accepted risk factors associated with glaucoma such as family history, high myopia, diabetes and if an individual is of black decent. It is only since the turn of the 21st century that researchers have attempted to establish if there is a link between glaucoma and sleep apnoea and whether this too could be a risk factor in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The cause of glaucoma and damage to the optic nerve head due to sleep apnoea remains unclear, however, it has been postulated that a decrease in optic nerve head blood flow occurs during the prolonged apneic episodes leading to ischemia, just as occurs in low tension glaucoma. This review will discuss key studies that have researched the prevalence of sleep apnoea in individuals who have glaucoma and discuss whether sleep apnoea should be considered a risk factor in the pathogenesis of glaucoma.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Surgical Considerations in the Treatment of
           Intermittent Exotropia: A Review
    • Abstract: Le, Thong; Georgievski, Zoran; Koklanis, Konstandina
      The surgical management of intermittent exotropia has been subject to wide discussion and debate in the literature. In general, recommendations for best practice guidelines for the surgical management of this condition are not possible due to the conflicting finding of various studies and a lack of high quality evidence. The main issues concerning surgical intervention relate to the timing, type and amount of surgery. This paper presents a review of the current literature with a particular focus on these three issues.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Comparison of the Effect of Enlarged Print vs a Hand
           Held Visolett Magnifier on Reading Performance in Fully Sighted Children
    • Abstract: Roediger, Naomi; Silveira, Sue
      Introduction: The aim of this project was to determine if reading performance in terms of reading speed, accuracy and comprehension was affected by use of two low vision aids (LVA) a Hand-Held Visolett Magnifier (HHVM) and enlarged print. Method: Data was collected from 21 students in year 4, all fully sighted. Their reading performance was assessed whilst reading with a HHVM, with enlarged print and without a LVA. Reading performance was assessed using the Ekwall and Shanker Reading Inventory, which included a measurement of reading speed, accuracy and comprehension. Results: Students gained maximum reading speed and accuracy with the enlarged print and without a LVA. Reading with the HHVM caused a reduction in reading speed and accuracy, however there was no difference in the comprehension scores between the three conditions. Discussion: The enlarged print allowed the students to demonstrate a higher level of reading speed and accuracy when compared to reading with the HHVM, primarily due to the influence of the device and the student's inexperience as opposed to a reduction in the reading performance. This influence may be minimised with a period of training and adaptation to the HHVM. Reading comprehension was not affected when either the HHVM or enlarged print was used.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Editorial: The Value of Reviews
    • Abstract: Rowe, Fiona
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 12:22:56 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.80.180.248
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016