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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover
Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2200-3886
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 29 Issue 4 - A case of migraine headache successfully treated with
           low-dose magnesium phosphate in a pregnant woman
    • Abstract: Papadopoulos, George
      Magnesium supplementation is considered to be a safer and effective alternative to conventional drugs in the treatment and prevention of migraine headache. Trials to date demonstrate beneficial outcomes at low and higher doses. Higher doses, however, are associated with more adverse events. It is not clear how low-dose magnesium phosphate works, particularly in light of the fact that it isn't clear if the supplement is bioavailable. A case is presented where a pregnant woman with recurring migraines was successfully treated with magnesium phosphate. The precautionary approach influenced the choice of this low-dose magnesium supplement as there are reasons to believe that excessive doses of magnesium may be deleterious in pregnancy, particularly towards the developing foetus. Energetic or placebo effects need to be considered in the interpretation of this outcome.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 19:31:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 4 - Report from Tradmed International Conference, Sri
           Lanka 2017: Multidisciplinary research bringing together academia,
           clinical practice and industry from the region and beyond
    • Abstract: Thomas, Christine
      An international symposium on traditional medicine (TM) and complementary medicine (CM), Tradmed International, took place in Sri Lanka on 23-25 November 2017. Organised by the Ministry of Health, Nutrition and Indigenous Medicine of the Government of Sri Lanka, the World Health Organization and the University of Sri Jayewardenepura, the symposium was a multinational platform where the latest research and production of TM and CM was presented and discussed. It ushered in the establishment of an integrative, evidence-based TM system in Sri Lanka. A wide scope of TM- and CM-related issues were covered under the two broad themes of 'TM and CM service delivery for health promotion, disease prevention and management' and 'Safety, quality, efficacy and regulation of TM and CM products'. Experts shared their research findings through oral and poster presentations. It was proposed that this initiative would pave the way towards multidisciplinary research, bringing together academia and industry from the region and beyond in an innovative platform.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 19:31:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 4 - People, computers, the internet and a changing world
    • Abstract: Arentz, Susan
      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 19:31:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 4 - Severe allergic rhinitis, perennial sinusitis and
           antihistamine dependence resolved with naturopathic treatment: A case
           study and short literature review
    • Abstract: Arbuckle, Jackie
      Allergic rhinitis is very common in Australia, and 20% of those who suffer from this also have perennial sinusitis. Histamine release is what causes inflammation and the commonly experienced symptoms of nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itchy nose, throat and palate, as well as watery, itchy and red eyes. There is a small amount of clinical evidence for the use of honey in these cases; however, a low histamine diet may also improve patients' symptoms and little research has been done to confirm the effectiveness of naturopathic interventions. This paper presents a case of severe allergic rhinitis, perennial sinusitis and antihistamine dependence where naturopathically prescribed nutritional supplements, herbal medicines, honey and a low histamine diet had an improvement on the patient's symptoms and pharmaceutical antihistamine reliance sustained for at least two years.

      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 19:31:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 4 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 19:31:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 4 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 19:31:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 4 - Around the colleges, institutes and universities
    • PubDate: Tue, 6 Feb 2018 19:31:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - A naturalistic, observational study of Western herbal
           medicine practice in self-reported anxiety and depression
    • Abstract: Casteleijn, David
      The NHMRC Natural Therapies for Private Health Insurance review has been criticised for requiring medical standards of evidence and as a result finding Natural Therapies to be ineffective. While the report could be criticised on a number of points, David Casteleijn responds to some of the questions and concerns, explaining the purpose of the report, how the evidence was assessed and how it could inspire new research directions.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Arentz, Susan
      PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Naturopathic treatment of recurrent urinary tract
           infection symptoms: A case study
    • Abstract: Hatfield, Desley
      Approximately 20% of women aged between 20 and 56 experience bacterial urinary tract infections (UTIs) each year with one in four developing chronic, recurrent infections. Increasing microbial resistance to antibiotics and tissue inflammation can increase the risk of chronic, recurrent disease. Chronic UTIs can lead to serious disease including renal failure and kidney disease. Conventional treatment consists of pharmaceutical antibiotics. However, some urinary tract pathogens have developed resistance to antibiotics and rates of side effects associated with long-term antibiotic use are high. Multidimensional approaches to control infections and increase an individual's resistance are needed. This case study describes a multidimensional approach aimed to increase the individual's resistance and prevent recurrent infections. The impact of chronic disease on women's bodies can have negative consequences, including an impact on psychological and social health and well-being. Complications can include impaired sleep and digestion, lowered energy and vitality, and strained relationships, which further reduce immunity and perpetuate the vulnerability and risk of an ongoing negative cycle. Intervention to break the cycle may include the administration of targeted dietary supplements and herbal medicines along with self-care strategies. This is the case of a 22-year-old female with recurrent UTI treated for six weeks. Individualised strategies aimed to increase immunity, improve mucosal health, reduce stress and support energy and vitality. The client's self-perceived stress was reduced from 8/10 at the beginning of treatment to 5/10 at six weeks. Her energy increased from 0/10 to 4/10. There was no recurrence of UTI.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Supporting those that care for others - invitation to
           participate in research
    • Abstract: Warren, Rebecca
      Every year, cancer carers in Australia save our health care system around $2.45 billion ('imagine having to fundraise that'!) and provide around 79 200 000 hours of care. While many caregivers take on this role as an act of love for the patient, the constant juggling act and energy required to provide care, can start to take its toll.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Around the colleges, institutes and universities
    • Abstract:
      There has never been so many naturopaths and herbalists extending their knowledge and developing their careers through higher degree research (enrolling in Honours, Masters and Doctorates). This page will outline three Naturopath and Herbalist researchers, their topics of interest and the colleges, institutions and university's that have provided infrastructure for research and career development opportunities and employed naturopathic and herbalist researchers. It also presents the researchers' words of wisdom. This page aims to outline a career path compatible with naturopathic and herbal clinical practice, inspire curiosity and further study, describe avenues that facilitate further research and to raise awareness of the wonderful work that is being done, and help us build a naturopathic and herbal research network to support each other. The aim of all research is to be relevant and to inform practices, policy and professions; naturopathic and herbal researchers are engaged in work that is directly and immediately relevant and this page will keep you up to date with what is going on around the colleges, institutes and Universities.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Evaluation of 'Salvia miltiorrhiza' radix (Danshen) in
           the treatment of chronic kidney disease: A literature review
    • Abstract: Care, Jenny
      Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant global public health issue with few treatments currently available that effectively reverse the disease or prevent its progression. Diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and acute kidney disease are the major contributors to CKD. These co-morbidities cause the destruction of glomeruli resulting in blood flow changes, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, systemic hypertension, proteinuria, inflammation and oxidative stress. Pharmaceutical interventions, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers and diuretics, are used as mono- or combination therapies to achieve blood pressure control and improve the condition. However, combinations of pharmaceuticals increase the risk of adverse events and in many patients does not prevent progression to renal failure. Salvia 'miltiorrhiza radix' (Danshen) is a traditional Chinese herb that shows considerable potential in ameliorating the effects of CKD. A computer-based search of Cinahl, The Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline and TRIP databases was performed to appraise the scientific literature on this herb. While there is little evidence for the use of Danshen in CKD and no human studies have been located, this review provides a summary of the research to date that may reveal a novel treatment for this disease.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - CPE points
    • PubDate: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 20:27:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - The business of healing, 3rd edition [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Campbell, Gabriella
      Review(s) of: The business of healing, 3rd edition by Robert Medhurst.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - 10th international conference on Herbal Medicine
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      Calcium is an essential nutrient, required for maintaining bone health, vascular contraction and vasodilation, muscle function, nerve transmission, intracellular signalling, and hormonal secretion. Conflicting evidence exists regarding potential cardiovascular risks associated with high levels of calcium intake. The aim of the present study was to update and reanalyse two systematic reviews to examine the effects of calcium intake on cardiovascular disease (CVD) among generally healthy adults.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Arentz, Susan
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Innovation, integration, inspiration. The 2017 NHAA
           international conference
    • Abstract: Cook, Natalie
      The NHAA 10th International Conference on Herbal Medicine took place from 17 to 19 March 2017 and welcomed over 410 participants representing practitioners, students, researchers and industry from around Australia and around the world. The theme was innovation, inspiration, integration and NHAA President Natalie Cook reflects on the privilage of hosting such an inspiring event.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Our future: What story will we share'
    • Abstract: Flatt, Jeff
      Futures, by their very nature, are inevitable. Managing how our own future may unfold takes some thought, and how naturopathic and Western herbal medicine projects its existence into a changing global healthcare context is relatively unexplored. As we are a philosophically rich healthcare service, it is inevitable that this will require a presence within this future. So how may this manifest, and where might we ground our knowledge when technoscientific advances and artificial intelligence increasingly challenge what it is to be human' Where may our holism and engagement with a purposeful nature lie' This commentary explores such questions through a discussion on philosophical rigour and some suggestions on how we may strengthen, assess, test and articulate this through reasoned action in the future world.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Bursting the bubble of 'no evidence' by reframing the
           foundations of Naturopathy
    • Abstract: Arentz, Susan
      Reflecting on how we make clinical decisions may highlight our strengths and limitations, and reveal a path forward. Evidence-based practice may define naturopathic expertise in terms of transparency and validity, develop a common language between naturopaths and conventional providers and enhance our patient-centred practices. Who would have thought!

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Due diligence in practice: Or, do you know what your
           patients are taking'
    • Abstract: Kendon, Ruth
      This commentary discusses the importance of checking not only a patient's diet, lifestyle and prescription medications, but also the necessity to examine all natural medicines and food supplements used. The risks of unlisted herbal medicnes and food supplements are laid out. Finally, colloidal silver is used as an example, with a detailed discussion of the risks, benefits and safe use of this product. Ruth Kendon has been a a Sydney herbalist and naturopath for more than 30 years. She is a Fellow of the Naturopaths and Herbalists Association of Australia; taught clinical nutrition for over 20 years; and has worked as a consultant to the natural products industry in Australia and internationally for 25 years.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - The World Naturopathic Federation: Global
           opportunities for the Australian profession
    • Abstract: Wardle, Jon; Cook, Natalie; Steel, Amie; Barker, Carolyn
      The World Naturopathic Federation was formally launched in Calgary, Canada in June 2015. Less than one year on, the WNF is in the process of developing formal relations with the World Health Organization and has members drawn from five continents. At the end of its founding year, Australia and Canada are the only countries with representation across all membership categories of the WNF, demonstrating a commitment across the entire spectrum of the naturopathic professions in these countries to connect with the international naturopathic community to advance the profession on a global and a local level. This paper highlights the history and efforts which have led to this momentous achievement, as well as the perspectives and experiences of organisations from each membership category within Australia. The potential contribution of the Australian naturopathic community and the opportunities to strengthen the profession within Australia through the WNF are also described from the viewpoint of organisations who have chosen to be involved.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Continuing professional education of Australian
           naturopaths; the need for independent education
    • Abstract: Arthur, Rachel
      The medical profession's dependence upon industry-sponsored education is a major point of contention in ethical modern practice. Interactions between doctors and industry consistently result in altered clinical practice behaviours, producing at times clinical decisions that may be at odds with evidence-based guidelines. Despite this, many doctors' report being unaware of the degree to which industry influences their behaviour. Research documenting Australian naturopaths' heavy reliance on commercial sources of information and their reluctance to acknowledge commercialism as a source of influence upon their clinical decision making, suggests that the same phenomenon may be at play in our professional community. There is an urgent need for more independent education in the Australian naturopathic profession.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - A conceptual model - Exploring the influence of
           complementary medicine use on attitudes towards ageing
    • Abstract: Harnett, Joanna; Rickwood, Catherine
      Objective: To develop a conceptual model for exploring the relationship between complementary medicine (CM) use and attitudes and beliefs towards ageing.

      Methods: We examined literature from psychology, consumer behaviour, western medicine and CM on the broad topic of agerelated stereotypes, ageing, health care practice and CM.

      Results: Age-related stereotypes are associated with negative attitudes towards ageing. Self-management is thought to contribute to a positive attitude towards the prevention and treatment of age-related health and disease. However, an association specifically between CM practices that promote self-management and beliefs towards ageing has not been established.

      Conclusion: A conceptual model that guides research exploring attitudes towards ageing, and the influence of complementary medicine on behaviours is essential for informing strategies that shape the future of our ageing population.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Medicinal plants used for gastrointestinal diseases in
           Garhwal region of Uttarakhand state in India
    • Abstract: Kala, Chandra Prakash
      Diarrhoea, dysentery, cholera, and constipation are common gastrointestinal diseases prevalent across the world. Gastrointestinal disease is often fatal in the developing world due to malnutrition, consumption of contaminated food and water, and poor hygienic conditions. In many rural areas, the traditional healing system, based on the use of plants, is still practised for treating gastrointestinal disease. In this context, the specific objective of this study is to identify and document the uses of plant species for treating gastrointestinal disease. Herbal healers living in the Garhwal region of Uttarakhand state in India were interviewed using a structured questionnaire survey. A total of 90 plant species were documented in the treatment of 10 types of gastrointestinal disease, including dysentery, diarrhoea, ulcer, gastric troubles, flatulence, piles, indigestion and cholera. Most of the species were used for treating a limited number of gastrointestinal diseases, whereas Aconitum heterophyllum, Aegle marmelos, Azadiracta indica, Bauhinia variegata and Ziziphus mauritiana were used for treating over 5 types of gastrointestinal diseases. Among different ailments, the highest number of species (n=47) was documented for treating dysentery, followed by diarrhoea (n=37), ulcer (n=23), piles (n=22), cholera (n=16), and indigestion (n=14). Thorough clinical testing of these plant species may help to generate herbal drugs that may be affordable to a large population in developing countries for the treatment of gastrointestinal disease.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Consultations with complementary and alternative
           medicine (CAM) practitioners in pregnancy influenced by women's life
           circumstances
    • Abstract: Steel, Amie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Important considerations of the use of complementary
           and alternative medicine through pregnancy, labour and birth: An update
           based on recent Australian research
    • Abstract: Steel, Amie
      The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in pregnancy has recently attracted substantial interest from researchers in Australia. As a result, there has been advancement in our understanding of the nature and drivers of CAM use by Australian pregnant women, as well as a number of novel findings identified which provide a platform for future enquiry. This paper overviews a number of these recent Australian studies and highlights some important considerations and implications of the findings for practitioners, women and policymakers alike. The areas discussed include the impact of CAM use during pregnancy on adverse birth events at a population level, the impact of the model of maternity care upon CAM use during labour and birth, and the need for additional information regarding the safety and effectiveness of CAM use during pregnancy to better inform women's decision-making.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Partners in practice: Practitioners' perceptions of
           herbal medicine manufacturers revealed through dispensary decisions
    • Abstract: Evans, Sue; Avila, Catherine
      The dispensary of professional herbalists and naturopaths, with its stock of herbal products, provides a window into their relationships with both herbal manufacturers and patients. This research aims to examine their decision-making process in relation to dispensary stock.

      Method: A survey was developed in the Qualtrix platform to gather the perceptions of practitioners of Western herbal medicine in Australia who are responsible for herbal dispensary decisions. Links to the survey were disseminated through major professional bodies and a hard copy was distributed at the NHAA International Conference in 2015.

      Results: One hundred and sixty-seven surveys were completed by decision-making initial respondents who tended to be in their forties and in practice for over 10 years. Herbal tinctures were ranked by 71% as their most frequently prescribed herbal product, followed by herbal tablets (23%). Eighty-five percent purchased stock from two or more suppliers and/or manufacturers. The range of herbal products (both plant species and preparations) and perceptions of manufacturers 'standards and practices' drove decisions about purchases. Clinicians' textual responses reveal high expectations of manufacturers beyond manufacturing standards, including ethical practices, honesty, sourcing of herbal raw materials, investment in research and customer support.

      Conclusion: Practitioners rely on manufacturers to provide clinically effective herbal products, to disseminate research summaries and to provide continuing professional education. This gives manufacturers great responsibility and influence. Australian herbalists need to be aware of the importance of access to independent, non-commercial advice regarding all aspects of the clinical encounter.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Stumbling Stones; a path through grief, love and loss
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hunter, Assunta
      Review(s) of: Stumbling Stones; a path through grief, love and loss, by Airdre Grant, Published by Hardie Grant Books Melbourne, 2016 ISBN 978 1 74379 057 10, 114 pages.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - The efficacy of Hibiscus sabdariffa (rosella) in
           essential hypertension: A systematic review of clinical trials
    • Abstract: Walton, Rebecca J; Whitten, Dawn L; Hawrelak, Jason A
      Hypertension is a common condition in Western nations and is associated with significant morbidity. Hibiscus sabdariffa (rosella) has a long history of traditional use across multiple continents and cultures for a number of chronic illnesses, including hypertension.

      Method: The effectiveness of Hibiscus sabdariffa for the treatment of hypertension was assessed via a systematic review of human clinical trials. A computer-based search and data abstraction was done on 29 October 2015 using the following databases: AMED, Academic Search Prem, CINAHL, Greenfile, Healthsource, Medline, PsychArticles, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE and COCHRANE.

      Results: Ten papers were found that met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity in trial design precluded combination of the results. All papers found a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the rosella groups. The decrease in SBP ranged from 6.3-31.9 mmHg in individual trials. The decrease in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was significant in nine of the ten trials and ranged from 1.1-19.7 mmHg. In comparative trials, a standardised extract of rosella (9.62 mg of total anthocyanins/dose/day) appeared to be as effective as captopril and hydrochlorothiazide, but not as effective as lisinopril.

      Conclusion: Rosella appears to be a safe and well-tolerated treatment option, which may have a place in the treatment of mildto- moderate essential hypertension. Data suggests that it may provide comparable effectiveness to some pharmaceutical antihypertensive medications. Further research should focus on dose and duration of treatment, interactions with medications and quality of starting material.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - AJHM based CPE Questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Management of mental health in Australia: A critical
           role for herbalists and naturopaths
    • Abstract: McIntyre, Erica
      Mental health problems are highly prevalent in Australia, with one in five Australian adults experiencing a common mental disorder in the previous 12 months. Many people with mental health problems use complementary medicines, including herbal medicines; however, relatively few of these people consult with herbal medicine practitioners. While naturopaths and herbalists are not integrated within the mental health care system, they have the potential to play an important role in the treatment and prevention of mental illness; however, there are a number of barriers to achieving this. This article outlines the prevalence of common mental illness in Australia, herbal medicine use for mental health, the current mental health care system in Australia, the role of herbal medicine practitioners in managing mental health, the barriers for herbal medicine practitioners to effectively manage mental health, and proposes a way forward to ensure people with mental illness can have access to quality mental health care provided by Western herbalists and naturopaths.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Being internationalist: The only way forward for
           developing the Australian naturopathic profession
    • Abstract: Wardle, Jon
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Report from Sri Lanka's 4th National Symposium on
           Traditional Medicine 2016 "Healthy Women for a Wealthy Nation"
    • Abstract: Thomas, Christine
      The 4th National Symposium on Traditional Medicine 2016 "Healthy Women for a Wealthy Nation" was held at the Institute of Indigenous Medicine, part of the University of Colombo, in Sri Lanka on Friday, June 3, 2016. The aim of the symposium was to encourage academics, medical officers, young researchers and students to collaborate with traditional practitioners who focus on maternal and child health. Participants discussed the role of Ayurveda and Unani traditional medicine in women and children's health in the 21st century and how the health of an entire civilisation depends heavily on the health of its women.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - The clinical management of menstrual migraine and
           headache by the herbal medicine practitioner
    • Abstract: Villella, Sandra
      Menstrual migraine affects approximately 20% of all female migraineurs and they are reported to be more severe, longer lasting, more prone to recurrence and more resistant to treatment than nonmenstrual migraine attacks. Oestrogen is believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of migraine. The goal of hormonal (pharmaceutical) treatment of menstrual migraine is to minimise oestrogen fluctuations. This may be achieved by supplemental oestradiol during the perimenstrual period, continuing the administration of the hormonally active oral contraceptive pill, or the use of transdermal oestrogen during the pill-free week of the oral contraceptive pill. Administration of combined oral contraceptives to migraineurs with aura is cautioned due to the further increased risk for ischemic stroke. This paper explores the hypothesis and available evidence as to whether supplemental dietary phytoestrogens, particularly soy isoflavones, with their weak oestrogenic action, may mitigate the premenstrual decline in oestradiol that predictably precipitates migraine attacks, and reduce or prevent menstrual migraine in a similar way to supplemental pharmaceutical oestrogens.

      Discussion also includes an exploration as to whether herbal medicines, either with a phytoestrogen component or with an oestrogen-modulating effect, work to counterbalance this oestrogen decline. Herbal medicines that have traditionally been used for the treatment of migraine and headache are also considered as part of the holistic treatment of menstrual migraine.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Concurrent use of self-prescribed complementary and
           alternative medicine, and hormone replacement therapy in menopause:
           Possible side effects
    • Abstract: Peng, Wenbo
      Whilst women frequently visit general practitioners for help with menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, research shows many women also self-prescribe complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to control these symptoms. Further research is required to understand women's motivations for self-prescribing CAM during menopause and to inform safe usage if these CAM and hormone products are utilised concurrently.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 4 - Bush medicine: A journey to the centre of Australia
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 4 - Complementary and alternative medicine in Australia:
           An overview of contemporary workforce features
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is popular in Australia, with CAM practitioners making up the third largest group of health professionals nationwide. Practice characteristics, education, and regulatory requirements differ widely, and this article provides a snapshot of the contemporary Australian CAM workforce.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 4 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 4 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 4 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 4 - An introduction to cannabis and the endocannabinoid
           system
    • Abstract: Sinclair, Justin
      As Australia moves to regulate and enact the cultivation and manufacture of high quality medicinal Cannabis strains for assorted therapeutic applications, this raises important issues of safety, quality, efficacy and the clinical challenges that will be presented to authorised prescribers in understanding the complexity of the Cannabis genus and how it interacts pharmacologically with human physiology. Key areas of focus in this overview include the endocannabinoid system, Cannabis phytochemistry, the entourage effect (constituent synergy), potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions and the impact of route of administration on clinical efficacy. All of these factors pose significant clinical challenges in not only prescribing medicinal Cannabis safely, but also in achieving effective amelioration of symptoms and positive patient outcomes. Furthermore, these factors highlight that the classic pharmacological "one-size-fits all model" may not be entirely appropriate for this unique herbal medicine, but rather supports the application of a holistic, patient-centred, individualised approach to this plant's therapeutic implementation in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 4 - Immune modulation via herbal medicine: new treatment
           proposals to improve outcomes for type 1 diabetics'
    • Abstract: Beaumont, Gabrielle
      Current research surrounding both epigenetics and the human microbiome are changing our understanding of possible treatments for autoimmune diseases. Herbal medicines with the ability to modulate immune responses have the potential to reorganise both innate and adaptive immune system responses. Recent discoveries have furthered the understanding of the possible mechanisms behind the development of type 1 diabetes and the complex cellular interplay that results in T-cell mediated autoimmune destruction of pancreatic B-cells, leading to an insulin deficit. While there is promising research into herbal medicines that can regenerate B-cells, this article focuses on two herbal medicines that show promise in the field of immune modulation: Cordyceps militaris and Urtica dentata.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - The treatment of infertility using ethnomedical
           practices in northern Jordan: A medical anthropological study
    • Abstract: Abu Dalou, Ahmad Y; Alshboul, Ayman; Na'amneh, Mahmoud; Sekhaneh, Wassef A; Alrousan, Mohammad
      This medical anthropological study aims to analyse and document some of the ethnomedical practices related to both the diagnosis and treatment of infertility in northern Jordan. Several folk healers were interviewed to collect ethnographic data regarding the use of medicinal plants and rituals in the cure of partial or complete infertility. We have selected three case studies based on our belief that they represent a variety of practitioners, techniques, and clients. When asked about the socioeconomic status of their clients, most of the interviewed healers pointed out that a large segment of the people who sought their health services were from rural areas.

      The study deploys an anthropological approach in gathering and analysing data. In-depth interviews with healers of both sexes were conducted in various villages in northern Jordan. Furthermore, videotaping and camera photographing were used to document the different steps of various treatment procedures, including the preparation of the medicinal plants.

      As shown by our study, some folk healers refer to both ethnomedicine and biomedicine simultaneously. This demonstrates that both medical systems co-exist in the same socio- cultural context.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - The 9th international conference on herbal medicine
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Presentations from the 9th international conference on
           herbal medicine
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie; Finney-Brown, Tessa
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie; Finney-Brown, Tessa
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Conference report: The 9th International Conference of
           Herbal Medicine
    • Abstract: Campbell, Gabriella
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Naturopathic treatment for bowel incontinence in a
           patient with multiple sclerosis: A case study
    • Abstract: Lorback, Sophie
      Multiple sclerosis (MS) and faecal incontinence are debilitating conditions, both physically and emotionally. This case study explores the use of herbal medicine within a naturopathic framework in the assessment and treatment of two complex health conditions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Traditional naturopathic management of acute
           pancreatitis: A case study
    • Abstract: Sinclair, Justin
      Acute pancreatitis is a painful inflammatory disorder of variable aetiology causing abdominal pain, nausea, emesis, fever and elevated white blood cell count. It is characterised pathologically by pancreatic lytic enzymes activating the inflammatory cascade, causing acute inflammation and destruction of surrounding tissue. Medical intervention and investigation is paramount as the condition can be life threatening. A patient presented with acute and persistent abdominal pain, nausea and eructation with biomedical investigations diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Naturopathic management included the use of simple crude herbal medicines, phytochemically rich foods and traditional principles to manage gastrointestinal sequelae and inflammation. The patient responded quickly and had significantly reduced gastrointestinal pain within hours of initial treatment, and was largely asymptomatic after 72 hours of continuing naturopathic care. Traditional supportive herbal and naturopathic therapies may be an effective management strategy for acute pancreatitis in conjunction with close medical supervision.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Respecting science, respecting tradition:
           Evidence-based care in the integrative medicine professions
    • Abstract: Wardle, Jon
      Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is seen as integral to modern medical science and practice, yet perceptions persist that there is a direct conflict between evidence-based and complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) models of patient care. Many practitioners fear that application of evidence-based philosophies to clinical practice may encourage therapeutic approaches that are reductionist (rather than holistic) and allopathic (rather than e.g. naturopathic), as well as eroding clinical autonomy by promoting 'cookbook' medicine over individualised care. These fears may be unfounded, as scientific inquiry has always been a core part of CIM practice. Founders of CIM professions highly valued the development and dissemination of research, as well as the development of higher clinical and education standards that evolved the professions. Although this has led to increasing research into CIM, the development of an evidence base for CIM needs to be appropriate, and respectful of the philosophy in which CIM is practiced. Such research suggests it is the traditional elements of practice that demonstrate the most benefit to patients when critically evaluated. Whilst new therapies are not without value, and the incorporation of these remain critical to the development of CIM professions, CIM may work best in an EBM model of healthcare when practice is focused upon tradition and philosophy. This discussion paper draws from a large body of work to highlight that only by truly respecting, valuing and incorporating tradition and philosophy can CIM be EBM, and the full promise of CIM realised.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - We need to talk about vaccination
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Use of omega-3 for improving behavioural outcomes in
           autism spectrum disorder in children: A review of the literature
    • Abstract: le Roux, Cheryl
      Purpose: The global rate of diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is increasing and many parents are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to help with the wide range of symptoms, including behavioural abnormalities. The aim of this review is to examine the efficacy of omega-3 supplementation, a popular CAM therapy for behavioural problems in children with ASD.

      Methods: The peer-reviewed literature published in the English language between 2007 and April 2015 was systematically searched using (US National Institute of Health database), CINAHL, Google scholar, PubMed (US National Library of Medicine) and Cochrane library databases, using a combination of the search terms Autism, ASD, Omega-3, fish oil, PUFA, EFA, EPA, DHA. Clinical studies examining the effects of omega-3 in ASD were considered.

      Results: Six studies were found to be relevant to this review (N = 168, ages 2 - 17). Two of these were open-label studies and four were randomised control trials.

      Conclusion: There is limited evidence supporting the use of omega-3 supplementation in clinical practice for the treatment of behavioural symptoms in children with ASD. However, some studies do show potential for this treatment option in a limited range of behavioural outcomes. Further studies are required.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - The importance of the PRACI project for grass roots
           complementary medicine practice: A call for practitioner involvement
    • Abstract: Reid, Rebecca; Steel, Amie
      The Australian complementary medicine (CM) community needs advancement in clinical knowledge that can be implemented into grass roots practice, yet there is still an ongoing gap between academic researchers and clinical practitioners. A practice-based research network (PBRN) is a feasible research model that can be of great value to clinical practitioners by developing new knowledge and by providing a bridge between researchers and practitioners. With the emergence of PBRNs in a variety of health care professions, the Australian CM community has recently become involved with the establishment of the Practitioner Research and Collaboration Initiative (PRACI). PRACI will provide 14 CM professions with the essential research infrastructure to establish new ground breaking research drawn directly from grass roots practice. However, in order for PRACI to fulfil its highest potential, CM practitioners need to be involved. PRACI will facilitate research projects that are clinically relevant to the professions involved and will have the potential to be utilised as a platform for future CM research that is meaningful and relevant to contemporary clinical CM practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Could herbal medicine alternatives reduce overuse of
           benzodiazepines in older adults' Thoughts on the EMPOWER trial
    • Abstract: Evangelidis, Nicole
      Inappropriate prescribing of benzodiazepines is very common, despite known risks. This is a significant problem in older adults with further pressure being placed on health care services as this population increases. This presents an opportunity for herbal medicine to offer safe and effective alternatives. Anxiety and insomnia are the main conditions treated with benzodiazepines. Traditional and modern evidence supports the use of herbal medicine for the treatment of these conditions. In particular, Passiflora incarnata has shown strong potential as a substitute for benzodiazepines with minimal or no side effects. The challenge is in how to create awareness about these alternatives to provide patients with a choice. A patient-centred approach using a shared decision making model (EMPOWER trial) has been effective in benzodiazepine withdrawal for older adults. Including herbal medicine in the discussion would provide patients with further options for safe and simple alternatives.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Is this working': The importance of outcome
           measures in herbal and naturopathic practice
    • Abstract: Breakspear, Ian
      An acknowledged strength of herbal and naturopathic medicine is its patient-centred focus, yet critics often state that these disciplines lack evidence of efficacy. Assessing efficacy of the individualised care practices of herbalists and naturopaths is not always an easy process, for clinicians or for researchers. The incorporation of outcome measures, especially patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in clinical practice has the potential to improve the assessment of efficacy at the individual patient level. Additionally, increased use of outcome measures in published case studies may assist in evidence generation which is consistent with the individualised care philosophies inherent to naturopathic and herbal medicine. This commentary piece will introduce the reader to the concept of outcome measures, discuss their nature, and point out some of the benefits as well as barriers to their widespread use.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Letters to the editor
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - The pluralistic nature of contemporary maternity care
           in Australia
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie; Finney-Brown, Tessa
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie; Finney-Brown, Tessa
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Being herbal practitioners: The experience of five
           prominent Australian herbalists
    • Abstract: Hunter, Assunta; Adams, Jenny; Evans, Sue; Singer, Judy; Stannard, Gill
      In this article a group of five naturopaths and herbalists discuss their professional trajectories and outline the pathways they have taken as practitioners over the last 35 years. It emphasises the variety of ways that naturopathic and herbal training can be used, and how it can provide the basis for post-graduate education. There are many career pathways open to practitioners with undergraduate clinical skills. The sustainability of practice may be dependent on specialising in a particular area of practice or diversifying into other forms of practice or other disciplines.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Use of complementary and alternative medicine in
           children: Research opportunities and challenges in an ever growing field
    • Abstract: Lucas, Sandra; Kumar, Saravana; Leach, Matthew
      The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) continues to rise across the globe and yet there remains a paucity of research underpinning the field; this is particularly evident in the area of paediatric CAM use. The limited evidence base and many unanswered research questions in the field provide a number of opportunities for conducting research into the use of CAM in children; this includes understanding the characteristics of paediatric CAM users, as well as the determinants of CAM use in children and adolescents. These opportunities need to be considered alongside several unique and important challenges if there is to be progressive understanding in the field. Such challenges include access to children and parents, research funding, research capacity, and ascertaining the determinants of parental decision making. Given the numerous research opportunities and challenges that this ever growing field faces, establishing a clear research agenda for key stakeholders in the field is warranted. This paper proposes such an agenda with a view to improving future health practice, education and policy regarding CAM use in children.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Person-centred care and naturopathy: Patient beliefs
           and values
    • Abstract: Lord, Despina
      This paper explores patient beliefs and values for those consulting with a naturopath in Australia with relevance to person-centred care. Understanding, respecting and honouring the patient as a person with individual beliefs and values are important aspects in ensuring person-centred care, and are an important component of naturopathic practice development. Collaboration, inclusiveness and participation (CIP) principles are important teachings incorporated into practice development to advocate for better person-centred care. This is important in developing a health management plan. Practitioners need to also be mindful of their own values and beliefs in supporting their patients. Further research is needed to understand more on the patient-practitioner values and beliefs, and the effects on person-centred care and patient outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Screening for cervical cancer in Australia: Future
           changes to the program and the evidence for screening
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      The environment has changed considerably since the introduction of Australia's National Cervical Screening Program (NSCP) in 1991 with an increased understanding of the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer, the introduction of HPV vaccination, and new technologies in screening and diagnostics. Accordingly, the Medical Services Advisory Committee have reviewed the NSCP and made a number of recommendations for changes to the program, which have recently been accepted by the Australian Government. Key changes include replacing cytological testing with HPV testing; increasing the age of commencement to 25 years; screening every 5 years until the age of 70-74; and availability of self-collection tests. The changes to the NSCP will take effect in 2017. This commentary will provide an overview of cervical cancer in Australia and the current screening program, and also discuss the recommendations and supporting evidence for the changes. The role of complementary and allied health providers in understanding these changes is also considered.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - The need to characterise paediatric visits to
           complementary medicine practitioners
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - AJHM based CPE questionnaire
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Reviews of medical journal articles
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 4 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - The decline of herbal medicine/naturopathy
           consultations: How research can help further the profession
    • Abstract: Sibbritt, David
      At present there is much debate within the herbal medicine/naturopathy professions as to the merits of registration. Further, there is a history of division within the professions of herbal medicine and naturopathy in relation to different models of regulation. So, with much energy devoted to these emotive issues, it is not surprising that a relatively small amount of research is being conducted by herbalists/naturopaths - resulting in the general public and other healthcare providers knowing little of the daily practice activities of herbalists/ naturopaths, as well as the health benefits that can be gained by consulting these practitioners.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Antioxidants to abrogate free radicals: New insights
           to challenge currently held beliefs
    • Abstract: Schloss, Janet M; Vitetta, Luis
      Compounds found in foods, nutrients and herbs commonly defined as antioxidants have been posited to neutralise free radicals produced by cellular oxidation reactions in the hope of ameliorating symptoms of chronic diseases. It has been reported that the body can function effectively with low levels of free radicals but if there is an overload of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/ or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that there is an increased risk for heart disease, cancer, and other chronic diseases. However, physiologically, the idea of neutralising a free radical with an antioxidant is very much a chimera. Five decades of in vitro and in vivo investigations on antioxidants and free radicals with no proven mechanistic understanding has confused researchers, antioxidant compound manufacturers and the public. This commentary advances a biochemical understanding as to the antioxidant / free radical connection that runs counter to decades of research dogma. The notion that an over production of free radicals such as superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide are deleterious to health by causing cellular damage is not proven. The increased risk for chronic diseases and the aging process due to an overload of intracellular free radicals is untenable and challenged. These compounds are required for normal cellular function. Furthermore, as an example, we cite vitamin C, the bastion of the antioxidant library of molecules, as anything but an antioxidant in vivo. Vitamin C is an essential co-enzyme and plays an oxido-reductase role in the hydroxylations of, for example, pro-collagen.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Editorial: Herbal medicine use in pregnancy by
           Australian women: High rates of self-prescription and low rates of
           disclosure'
    • Abstract: Frawley, Jane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Reviews of articles on medicinal herbs
    • Abstract: Finney-Brown, Tessa; Tester, Jodie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - The integrated treatment of 'Blastocystis hominis' in
           a patient with ulcerative colitis: A case study
    • Abstract: Hunter, Susan
      Blastocystis hominis is a common protozoan in the human intestinal tract that can cause anorexia, diarrhoea and abdominal pain. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that, when active, may present with similar signs and symptoms to a Blastocystis infection. A patient with ulcerative colitis presented with anorexia, increased urgency and frequency of defecation. He had watery, bloody stools with mucus and left-sided lower abdominal pain. Further testing was required to identify the cause of symptoms. A stool test detected Blastocystis hominis and blood tests indicated inflammatory markers were within range, ruling out an ulcerative colitis flare. Treatment included the use of metronidazole, Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (HN001), Bifidobacterium animalis spp. lactis BB-12, Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and anti-parasitic herbs and was successful in resolving all digestive symptoms. Taking an integrated approach with antibiotic therapy, probiotics and anti-parasitic herbs may be an effective treatment for eradication of Blastocystis hominis in the symptomatic patient.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Evaluation of the antioxidant activity and additive
           effects of traditional medicinal herbs from Sri Lanka
    • Abstract: Waisundara, Viduranga Y; Watawana, Mindani I
      Background: Located in the tropics, Sri Lanka has an assortment of medicinal plants which have been utilised for generations. Despite the history, the therapeutic properties of many herbs have not been scientifically evaluated. Claims even exist that certain herbs have the potency to cure diseases such as diabetes. Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of five selected Sri Lankan medicinal herbs which are commonly used as anti-diabetic remedies. The additive effects of the two most potent antioxidant herbs in combination with the remaining three were also explored. Method: The leaves of the following herbs were authenticated for the study: Coccinia grandis, Costus specious, Desmodium gangeticum, Mimosa pudica and Psidium guava. The leaves were sun-dried and ground into powders. One gram of each herb was added to 20 mL of water at 1000C, cooled to room temperature, centrifuged, and the supernatant collected for analysis. DPPH scavenging activity and the total phenolic content were evaluated. For evaluation of the herbal combinations, the powders were added at a 1:1 weight ratio and the extracts were similarly prepared. Results: Coccinia grandis and Costus specious had the highest DPPH scavenging activities and thus were combined with the remaining three herbs. Coccinia grandis had additive effects only on Desmodium gangeticum and Mimosa pudica, while Costus specious had additive effects on Desmodium gangeticum, Mimosa pudica as well as Psidium guava. Conclusions: Coccinia grandis and Costus specious were identified as potent antioxidants capable of having additive effects on herbs which are less effective in this aspect.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Crocus 'sativus' (saffron): A monograph
    • Abstract: Wright, Kaye
      Crocus sativus (saffron) is best known for its use as a culinary spice but it also has traditional usage as a medicine, sparking an interest in the medicinal properties and potential clinical uses of saffron. Research has identified the main chemical components as crocin, crocetin, safranal and picrocrocin, and the main actions as thymoleptic, aphrodisiac and antioxidant. To date, the strongest evidence for the use of saffron has been in the treatment of depression with randomised controlled trials showing it to be as effective as fluoxetine and imipramine. It also shows some potential for the treatment of sexual dysfunction, Alzheimer's disease, pre-menstrual syndrome, retinal disease and weight loss. There is no long-term safety data at this time.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Carrot seed for contraception: A review
    • Abstract: Jansen, Gabrielle Claire; Wohlmuth, Hans
      The seeds of wild carrot (Queen Anne's Lace, Daucus carota L., Family Apiaceae) have a long history of use relating to fertility, especially as an anti-fertility agent. Objectives: A literature review was conducted in an attempt to evaluate the potential efficacy of carrot seed as a contraceptive and to more clearly identify the mechanisms of its reported actions. Methods: Databases, including PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct were searched, as were authoritative herbal and historical texts including Culpeper, Eclectic texts and Indian pharmacopoeias. Results: The use of carrot seed for contraception and abortion is recorded throughout European history, with contemporary reports from India and the United States. Scientific in vivo and ex vivo studies suggest that several modes of action may contribute to the anti-fertility effect, including an effect on the oestrous cycle and anti-progestogenic activity. Conclusions: Historical and ethnobotanical evidence make essential contributions to multidisciplinary research on herbal medicines. Further research is required to confirm the anti-fertility action of carrot seed and to provide a better understanding of the mechanism(s) of action and the compound(s) responsible.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
 
 
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