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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australian Journal of Cancer Nursing
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   ISSN (Print) 1441-2551
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - A systematic approach to breast care nursing in the
           rural setting: Development of a database and support tool to ensure
           continuity of care
    • Abstract: Pitt, Rachael; Davis, Annette
      Breast care nurses (BCNs) are known to improve the cancer experience for those diagnosed with breast cancer. This paper examines the specialist breast nurse competencies and the development of a database and support tool to assist BCNs in the provision of continuity of care in a rural hospital in New South Wales (NSW). The database and tool, guided by the competencies, supports the provision of optimal care through a more structured approach to management.

      PubDate: Tue, 30 May 2017 21:20:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Author guidelines
    • PubDate: Tue, 30 May 2017 21:20:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Using distress screening assessments to improve
           quality care
    • Abstract: Holz, Lynette; Ruhl, Jacquie
      Introduction: Alleviating distress experienced by patients with a diagnosis of cancer is important. Distress screening and targeting interventions aimed at the cause of distress improves quality of life for cancer patients. Distress screening was introduced to the ambulatory treatment centre in 2015 at initial education and when a change of treatment was implemented.

      Objectives: To improve understanding of nurse-led interventions that may assist patients following distress screening as a quality project. Methodology: A literature review was conducted examining resources published between 2010 and 2015.

      Results: The review revealed a range of successful, nurse-led interventions and revealed some potential barriers to effective screening.

      Conclusion: Developing and implementing a clinical management pathway to assist nurses in responding effectively to distress screening is needed. Continuing education to inform nurse-led interventions can also support effective integration of distress screening into clinical practice. Additionally, improving the consistency of use of the distress screening tool allows evaluation of the effectiveness of nurseled interventions.

      PubDate: Tue, 30 May 2017 21:20:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Optimal cancer care pathways: Developing best practice
           guides to improve patient outcomes and identify variations in care
    • Abstract: Viner, Alexandra H; Williams-Spence, Jenni M; Whitfield, Kathryn; Thomas, Robert JS
      Introduction: The pathway for people undergoing diagnosis and treatment for cancer is complex and often poorly understood by patients, clinicians and administrators. In Australia, national Optimal Cancer Care Pathways (OCPs) have been developed to map this journey for specific tumour types.

      Aim: The primary objectives of establishing the OCPs are to describe the standard of care and targets for evaluating cancer care programs, and improve understanding of the components of the pathway for both clinicians and consumers.

      Method: Multidisciplinary expert groups for each tumour stream reviewed and agreed upon the content for each pathway. This was followed by public consultation with peak national bodies and key stakeholders.

      Results: OCPs for 15 tumour streams, with consumer versions and quick reference guides for general practitioners, have been published online. The full suite of OCPs provides nurses and other health care professionals with improved resources for addressing their patients' needs and questions.

      Practice implications: State-based health departments in Australia are responsible for implementing the OCPs in their jurisdiction. Structural support for implementation is provided by the federal government. Performance expectations, clinician engagement and system accountability will be integrated in the implementation process.

      PubDate: Tue, 30 May 2017 21:20:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Professional leadership in the context of cancer
           nursing organisations
    • Abstract: Chan, Raymond Javan; Truant, Tracy
      PubDate: Tue, 30 May 2017 21:20:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Understanding and managing symptom effects of cerebral
           oedema in high-grade glioma patients: A review of the literature
    • Abstract: Hammersley, Jessica Ann
      High-grade glioma (HGG) is a primary brain tumour which is associated with a high mortality rate. An HGG diagnosis is an overwhelming experience for patients and their families, with patients suffering from a range of symptoms associated with disease progression and treatment resulting in poor outcomes and quality of life. For the neuro-oncology nurse, it is difficult to deliver comprehensive health care to this patient group. A search of the literature was conducted for the years 2004 through September 2015. Based on predefined criteria, 16 records were retrieved for review with a major focus on symptoms and treatment of cerebral oedema. The findings were grouped based on emerging categories relating to treatment and management of cerebral oedema, quality of life, functionality and psychological health and nursing assessment and interventions. This article aims to provide health care professionals with a better understanding of the symptom management and effects of cerebral oedema in HGG patients.

      PubDate: Tue, 30 May 2017 21:20:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - A scoping exercise by the CNSA Education Standing
           Committee regarding enrolled nurse (EN) administration of antineoplastic
           agents
    • Abstract: Ash, Kylie; Baychek, Kate; Black, Elisabeth; Brown, Leisa; Coyne, Elisabeth; Pascoe, Liz; Patton, Lucy; Pearse, Heather; Peterman, Danielle; Pigott, Catherine; Reid, Alayne
      A change to the scope of practice for Australian nurses providing cancer care services is an important national professional issue. This article will outline the contemporary issues that have created opportunities for expanded scope of practice of the enrolled nurse (EN) to include administration of antineoplastic agents. A range of professional issues related to registered nurse (RN) delegation and supervision of EN practice need to be considered. The potential impact on patient outcomes is fundamental to this discussion. The literature review identified limited information; however, a discussion of potential facilitators and challenges associated with expanding the scope of practice of an EN to include antineoplastic agents is presented. There is a need for further clarification of the RN role in delegation, education requirements and competency assessment.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2016 18:10:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Systematic review of the tools used to assess the
           informational and practical needs of acute leukaemia and lymphoma
           survivors
    • Abstract: Taylor, Karen; Monterosso, Leanne
      Purpose: To identify validated measurement tools to assess the informational and practical concerns of leukaemia and lymphoma survivors. Cancer nurses have the potential to lead the way in providing quality post-treatment survivorship care.

      Method: This systematic review utilised a search of electronic databases for eligible articles published to March 2014. Included articles described a tool to assess informational and/or practical concerns of leukaemia and/or lymphoma survivors.

      Results: Seven full text articles were identified that described cancer-specific tools used to assess informational and/or practical needs of this survivor cohort. There was variation in the use of cancer survivor-specific tools and generic cancer tools.

      Conclusions: No haematology-specific needs assessment tools were identified. Therefore only tentative conclusions on the best tool for this cohort can be made. Further research is required to develop reliable and validated tools that will support the selection of the most appropriate tool for leukaemia and lymphoma survivors.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2016 18:10:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Celebrating the science and art of cancer nursing
           through inspirational leadership
    • Abstract: Johnson, Catherine
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2016 18:10:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Knowledge, attitudes and practices of oncology nurses
           regarding fever and fever management in febrile adult cancer patients
    • Abstract: Dam, Ngoc Minh; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Ramsbotham, Joanne
      The literature indicates that nursing fever practice is often not evidence-based. This study aimed to investigate the fever knowledge, attitudes and practices of oncology nurses and to determine the participants' intentions to administer paracetamol to febrile cancer patients. The cross-sectional study (n=65), using an adapted survey underpinned by the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), was conducted in one Australian cancer setting. Participants' scores revealed that their fever knowledge was generally consistent with the evidence; however, nursing cultural norms likely precluded the translation of this knowledge to practice. The TPB-based model explained 26% of the variance in respondents' intentions to administer paracetamol (p=0.001), to which "subjective norms" (p=0.037) and "indirect perceived control" (p=0.016) were significant contributors. The practices of oncology nurses did not reflect their theoretical knowledge, highlighting the need for further education and to target the cultural norms that appeared to preclude evidence-based fever practice in this setting.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2016 18:10:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Development, face validity and reliability testing of
           a survey instrument to explore the role of the Australian breast care
           nurse
    • Abstract: Ahern, Tracey; Gardner, Anne; Courtney, Mary
      This paper reports the development of a survey instrument to explore the role of the breast care nurse (BCN) in the provision of information and support to Australian women with breast cancer, as well as the differences experienced by BCNs working in urban, rural and remote areas.

      A comprehensive literature review and a panel of experts were used to inform the survey questions. The instrument was developed in an online format and pilot tested by a group of BCNs before being issued to participants.

      The final version of the Breast Care Nurse Survey consists of 59 items organised into three sections. The survey was completed by 50 BCNs. Cronbach's alpha for Section Three of the survey was 0.935, indicating strong internal reliability; however, further validation of this instrument is recommended.

      This is the first national survey to collect data about the role of the BCN in Australia, specifically related to the provision of education, information and support and the perceived barriers to undertaking the role.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2016 18:10:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - The role of the oncology nurse practitioner in the
           clinical management of febrile neutropenia
    • Abstract: Campbell, Julie; Cusack, Lynette; Green, Cheryl
      Background: The nurse practitioner is a protected title in Australia and is available to an experienced registered nurse educated at Master's level and authorised to function in an advanced and extended clinical role. The role of oncology nurse practitioner (ONP) is to meet the diverse and specialised needs of cancer patients. One important aspect of care for the ONP is the clinical management of febrile neutropenia.

      Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to present some of the findings from a qualitative study that explored the ONP role and experience in the clinical management of febrile neutropenia across the inpatient, outpatient and the home settings across Australia.

      Method: A descriptive, exploratory research approach was used to describe, explore and generate meaning on the clinical management of febrile neutropenia.

      Findings: The research findings indicated that ONPs do significantly impact upon the oncology patient experience in relation to risks and management of febrile neutropenia.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2016 18:10:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - What's happening to the role of the registered
           nurse'
    • Abstract: Ryan, Mary
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Dec 2015 23:30:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Cardiotoxicity related to anti-cancer drug treatment:
           A literature review
    • Abstract: Thomy, Lebogang B; Theobald, Karen
      Introduction: New anti-cancer drug treatments have resulted in longer life expectancy for many patients; however, anti-cancer drug treatment-related cardiotoxicity can become an issue for those who have completed treatment. Anti-cancer drug treatment-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. However, there is limited research to indicate when cardiotoxicity develops and what preventative measures might be available for people with cancer who have received cardiotoxic anti-cancer drug treatment.

      Objectives: The review explores the potential risk factors for cardiotoxicity and examines their precise aetiology and pathophysiology.

      Methodology: A literature review was undertaken by searching online databases CINAHL, PubMed and Medline. The comprehensive review resulted in 17 articles meeting the inclusion criteria: English language articles from peer-reviewed journals dating from 2004 to 2014.

      Results: The published literature indicates an increased incidence of cardiotoxicity in people who have received anti-cancer drug treatment. In addition there is a dearth of understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity.

      Conclusion: This literature review serves as a first step towards understanding the pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity. Further, before the health care needs of people who have received cancer treatment can be understood and addressed, it is crucial to have a clear understanding of the mechanism and risk factors associated with cardiotoxicity.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Dec 2015 23:30:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - The role of the cancer nurse coordinator: An
           observational reflective study
    • Abstract: Bishaw, Suzanne; Coyne, Elisabeth
      Introduction: Cancer is a complex, multifaceted condition requiring multimodal treatments over prolonged periods of time, in a variety of settings, delivered by multiple health professionals. Patients have reported confusion and fragmentation with their care and in many centres, cancer care coordinators (CCCs) have been employed to solve this problem.

      Method: A convenience sample of CCCs were observed over a period of one week to understand and interpret how they apply their role in the clinical setting to meet the needs of their patients and clients.

      Results: Three key prominent themes were observed in the role of the CCC: general assessment; psychological support; and educational support. Coordination of care and of the multidisciplinary team was not observed as a prominent role in the sample observed.

      Conclusion: CCCs assess, educate and support the patient and their family during treatment with an aim of holistic care.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Dec 2015 23:30:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - The usefulness of the distress thermometer in the
           management of cancer patients: A mixed methods approach
    • Abstract: Williams, Melinda; Walker, Arlene; Henry, Margaret J
      Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Distress Thermometer and Problem List in identifying distress levels and psychosocial concerns over the cancer trajectory using a mixed-methods approach.

      Method: Eighty-five cancer patients from the Barwon South West region of Victoria participated in this study by completing the NCCN Distress Thermometer and Problem List over three time periods. Three case studies were also conducted to add a qualitative dimension.

      Results: Emotional concerns decreased as psychological distress levels decreased and a high level of physical concerns were consistent with a high level of psychological distress. Cancer patients' narrative accounts also supported the usefulness of the NCCN Distress Thermometer and Problem List as a screening tool.

      Conclusions: Findings are discussed with reference to implications for psychological/emotional support of cancer patients, the provision of supportive care services and directions for future research.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Dec 2015 23:30:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - A nurse-led survivorship intervention for survivors of
           Hodgkin lymphoma: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Gates, Priscilla; Seymour, John F; Krishnasamy, Mei
      Long-term survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) experience a range of physical and psychosocial late effects of treatment. This study set out to pilot-test the capacity of a nurse-led, survivorship intervention to enhance awareness of health risks and adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviours. Thirty HL survivor participants who were at least five years post potentially curative treatment were recruited. The General Health Index and the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II measures were completed at four time points and demographics recorded. The intervention included: exploration of knowledge of health risks; screening for unmet supportive care needs and, delivery of a tailored survivorship care plan. Participants reported a range of issues, including fatigue (57%); "a lot of worry" (47%) and, feeling depressed (23%). Significant post-intervention improvements were reported for: physical activity (p=.014); nutrition (p=.0005); stress management (p=.002) and health promoting lifestyle (p=.005). This study suggests that the nurse-led intervention is feasible and has potential to improve awareness of health status and healthy lifestyle behaviours among survivors of HL.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Dec 2015 23:30:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Nursing fever management in adult oncology patients: A
           literature review
    • Abstract: Dam, Ngoc Minh; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Ramsbotham, Joanne
      Fever associated with neutropenia, blood transfusion and disease processes is common in adult cancer patients. The literature indicates, however, that the aetiology, rationale and symptoms of fever are often misunderstood, resulting in fever management that is not evidence-based in this cohort. Thus in this review, an overview of fever, with a focus on fever in cancer contexts, is provided. Content includes an explanation of the therapeutic function of fever, an analysis of the physiological consequences of fever and an exploration of the aetiology of fever in cancer patients. Current guidelines for fever management in cancer patients and existing nursing practice are also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Dec 2015 23:30:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Exploring the preferences, perceptions and
           satisfaction of people seeking cancer information and support:
           Implications for the cancer council helpline
    • Abstract: Boltong, Anna; Byrnes, Monica; McKiernan, Sandy; Quin, Nicola; Chapman, Kathy
      Background: Helpline services have existed in Cancer Councils for more than 20 years as an information and support service and gateway to a myriad of practical, informational and emotional support programs for people affected by cancer.

      Aims: To explore public awareness and perceptions of the Cancer Council Helpline, including barriers and facilitators to calling this telephone service and user satisfaction.

      Methods: An exploratory, mixed-methods study design was employed. In the qualitative phase, six focus groups were conducted with Helpline callers (n=14) and non-callers (n=28). In the quantitative phase, a community attitudes online or telephone survey was completed by people with a cancer diagnosis (n=128) and people who had friends and family with a cancer diagnosis (n=300).

      Results: Low awareness of the service, as well as a widely held perception of not wanting or needing help, were found to be barriers to calling the Helpline.

      Discussion: This research informed key elements of an identity refresh strategy for the Helpline, including public awareness and promotion with consumers and health professionals; and a name change for the service, including removal of the word 'help'.

      PubDate: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 22:36:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Improving the patient journey through better mental
           health care: Core business for all nurses
    • Abstract: Ryan, Kim; Marks, Peta; Butterfield, Clare
      The evidence is clear that the mental and physical health of people is closely linked and has a reciprocal relationship. People with cancer are likely to experience psychological distress at various times throughout their illness, and a significant proportion will develop a mental health problem. There are many contributors to psychiatric morbidity in people who have cancer, including physical and biological issues, as well as psychological and social issues.

      PubDate: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 22:36:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Indigenous cancer care in Queensland, Australia:
           Health professionals' framing of "difference"
    • Abstract: Meiklejohn, Judith A; Adams, Jon; Valery, Patricia C; Walpole, Euan T; Martin, Jenny H; Williams, Hayley M; Garvey, Gail
      This paper reports on interviews with tertiary health professionals to elicit their perspectives of Indigenous cancer patients and report on factors influencing clinical decisions, particularly concerning co-morbidities, Indigeneity, and access and use of cancer services. The overarching concept of "difference" framed three main categories: "Acknowledging difference", "Not knowing how to accommodate difference" and "Not seeing difference". Findings indicate some health professionals acknowledge and aim to address needs and expectations of Indigenous cancer patients; however, challenges in identifying Indigenous status, limitations in providing relevant care within a biomedical system, and outdated assumptions and constraints of the health system limit this endeavour. Consistent and accurate recording of Indigenous status in medical records is important for health professionals to identify Indigenous status in a sensitive and timely manner. Cultural competence training should be embedded within all health training and be part of ongoing systematic organisational processes to improve the provision of culturally appropriate cancer care.

      PubDate: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 22:36:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Much to celebrate, but we need to do more
    • Abstract: Lancaster, Letitia
      PubDate: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 22:36:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Management of toxicities related to intravenous
           administration of epidermal growth factor inhibitors
    • Abstract: Condon, Marie; Ross-Adjie, Gail; Monterosso, Leanne
      The use of newer targeted cancer therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRI) in the solid tumour groups can often result in a complex suite of cutaneous side effects. Whilst not systemically as toxic as some traditional chemotherapy agents, their cutaneous side effect profiles may have a considerable impact on the patient and their health-related quality of life.

      Currently in Australia, cetuximab and panitumumab are the only intravenous EGFRI agents subsidised on the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. This discussion paper focuses on the nursing management and patient education related to the administration, side effects and adverse events associated with these two EGFRIs. While the side effects of panitumumab closely resemble those experienced by patients receiving cetuximab, the literature is often not specific about which agent when discussing adverse effects and management. However, where there is variance between the incidence or management of the adverse effect it will be highlighted.

      PubDate: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 22:36:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Cancer - using epidemiological data to understand
           cancer patterns
    • Abstract: Cameron, Kate; Roder, David
      Epidemiology is used to describe cancer trends in the population, investigate means by which cancer can be tackled, and evaluate interventions. It is an important tool used by policy makers and planners to identify and address public health issues. Developing an understanding of cancer data, how it is sourced, reported and used is useful for nurses working in all areas of cancer control to better understand the current cancer care context and how it is informed. Epidemiological data are used by consumer groups, non-government organisations, governments and the media when discussing health service needs and outcomes. In this report, the current state of cancer epidemiology in Australia is reviewed, and in particular, how epidemiological data are gathered, reported and used to advance cancer control is described.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:13:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Role diversity: Opportunities for all cancer nurses
    • Abstract: Milne, Donna
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:13:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Prostate cancer specialist nurses in Australia -
           changing the face of supportive care through a national approach
    • Abstract: Sykes, Julie; Ferri, Lisa; Kiernan, Deirdre; Koschade, Kelly; Wood, Lauren
      The Prostate Cancer Specialist Nursing Service is a three-year pilot program launched by the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (PCFA) in May 2012. This national program is the first of its kind in Australia, and has placed 12 prostate cancer specialist nurses (PCSNs) in selected hospitals across Australia as part of a structured program. The nurses are supported through a professional development framework which is delivered through PCFA. The program has been formally evaluated and the findings will be published later this year. The research examines the effectiveness of the service as a best practice model for providing specialist nursing care through a structured program. This paper reports on the structure of the service and its implementation at a local level, in both the clinical and strategic contexts since its launch. It also explores some of the challenges identified in the implementation process during the first 12 months.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:13:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Untangling the lines - reducing cytotoxic exposure
           risk via the implementation of a closed intravenous cytotoxic
           administration system: An action research project
    • Abstract: Campbell, Patricia
      Background: Administration of cytotoxic medication can present an occupational health risk to nurses, especially when it involves inserting an intravenous (IV) spike at the bedside. Despite best efforts, cytotoxic exposure can still occur. Method: An action research project was undertaken with the aim to successfully implement a closed system for IV cytotoxic medication administration that is prepared off-site and transported by a third-party pharmaceutical company. Results: Evaluation was based on safety, ease of use, including any potential barriers to user acceptance; and product cost. Project outcomes indicated a significant reduction in cytotoxic exposure risk to nurses with no associated micro-bacterial risk for patients. Users reported the system as being easy to manage, resulting in the facilitation of consistent practice when administering IV cytotoxic drugs within the hospital. A rise in direct costs was noted; however, when compared to the expense of managing staff exposure, an overall net cost benefit was found. Conclusion: This project has had positive results for oncology nurses and health care workers who are seeking to reduce cytotoxic exposure risk and establish the safest possible practice at the bedside.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:13:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Caring for young people with cancer: Practical
           implications of qualitative engagement with cancer survivors and members
           of the multidisciplinary team
    • Abstract: Lewis, Peter; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Patterson, Pandora; Jordens, Christopher FC; Bennett, David; McDonald, Fiona EJ; Smith, Kris; Kerridge, Ian
      Many adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors live with ongoing adverse consequences of their cancer experience. While an increasing number of these young Australians have direct access to care in the specialised Youth Cancer Service, many continue to receive care in diverse, non-specialised settings. It is important that health professionals in specialised and non-specialised settings are aware of the continuing diverse consequences of cancer, including the challenges created for negotiating family, peer and intimate relationships. This paper draws together insights derived from qualitative studies into the experiences of AYAs who have survived cancer, with a focus on our recent Australian study of young people diagnosed during adolescence and young adulthood. We describe how members of multidisciplinary teams (MDT) can help young cancer survivors maintain their social relationships.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:13:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Evaluation of an education program to facilitate
           patient adherence, toxicity monitoring and promote safety and wellbeing in
           the self-administration of oral chemotherapy in the home setting: An
           Australian study
    • Abstract: Griffiths, Tina; Pascoe, Elizabeth
      Introduction: The use of oral chemotherapy as a cancer treatment is increasing, posing significant challenges for health care professionals with respect to patient adherence, toxicity monitoring and safety in the home. Aim: To evaluate an education program promoting patient knowledge to facilitate patient adherence, toxicity monitoring and promote safety and wellbeing in the self-administration of oral chemotherapy in the home setting. Methodology: Cancer patients (n=15) prescribed oral chemotherapy received education using a teaching tool developed by The Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC). Supportive care needs were screened using the Distress Thermometer. Patients' knowledge, understanding and supportive care needs were assessed pre- and post-education. A follow-up phone call addressed issues relating to the education program and patient wellbeing. Results: Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Individualised education facilitated knowledge and understanding around key issues pertaining to oral chemotherapy. Participants reported feeling less fearful, nervous and worried. Conclusion: Nurse-led education may facilitate medication adherence, toxicity management, and enhance patients' wellbeing.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:13:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Screening, testing and treatment of prostate cancer: A
           call for further research
    • Abstract: Ireland, Colin; O’Shaughnessy, Peter Kevin
      Controversy exists over the benefits of screening for prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and recently the US Preventative Task Force and The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners both recommended against PSA-based screening. The National Health and Medical Research Council currently has an expert panel reviewing the evidence regarding PSA screening. Despite the recommendations of the panel, men will potentially continue to request screening because of the increased profile within the media and men's health initiatives. If diagnosed with prostate cancer, men face a complex decision as to the best treatment option. These decisions cannot be taken lightly. Men require appropriate delivery of information regarding screening to make an informed decision to screen or not. For men diagnosed with prostate cancer, information about treatment choices needs to be easily understood and appropriate. There are many uncertainties about prostate cancer and education that men find acceptable is a key tool in assisting them to make informed decisions. Further research needs to be undertaken with men to ensure that the available educational material is unbiased and meets their needs in relation to language, literacy, cultural sensitivity and mode of delivery. This information will then equip nurses to facilitate fruitful discussions with men to assist them during these stressful times.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:41:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Coordinating neuro-oncology care from a primary health
           care perspective: A critical literature review and implications for
           practice
    • Abstract: Nichols, Linda Jayne
      Primary brain tumours pose a unique concern for health professionals, generally presenting with a rapid and poor prognosis associated with the development of functional and cognitive deficiencies which creates a profound psychosocial impact. Whilst the diagnosis of a primary brain tumour can be associated with medium- to long-term survival, the majority of patients diagnosed with a high-grade brain tumour will die within 14 months of diagnosis. Given this, patient care needs to be comprehensive, seamless and individually focused. The management of patients by specialist neuro-oncological nurses and cancer care coordinators has resulted in an increased focus on cancer care reform. However, despite the aim of these changes there needs to be an increased emphasis on primary health care as a strategy for achieving coordination of care. Cost-effective primary health care initiatives are urgently needed to achieve not only coordination of care but to also balance the biomedical model. Whilst the biomedical model of care focuses on physical wellbeing in the absence of disease, primary health care encompasses a more comprehensive and holistic notion of wellness. This critical literature review examines primary health care, how it can be applied to the neuro-oncology setting and the implications for practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:41:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Oral chemotherapy nurse: A trial position at Sir
           Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH), Perth, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Fyfe, Katrina; Nowak, Anna K
      This article describes the development of an oral chemotherapy nurse role and patient support materials in the Department of Medical Oncology at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH), Perth, Western Australia, and includes a short literature review. The objectives of the oral chemotherapy nurse role were to: identify areas of patient need, develop processes to support patient safety and quality of care during treatment with oral chemotherapy medications for cancer (oral chemotherapy), and collect resources to support patient safety and quality of care during treatment with oral chemotherapy. The oral chemotherapy nurse undertook two quality improvement projects, developed a system to educate, support and follow up patients with glioblastoma (GBM) treated with combined chemo-radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, undertook nurse education and was involved as the author of the draft oral chemotherapy policy at SCGH. Although this position was not made permanent, the process highlighted the needs of patients on oral chemotherapy and opened a dialogue with health professionals committed to improving the safety and quality of care for these patients.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:41:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - The role of the nurse in patient education and
           followup of people receiving oral anti-cancer treatment: An Australian
           survey
    • Abstract: Johnson, Catherine; Adler, Kim
      Introduction: The use of oral anti-cancer treatment (OCT) is increasingly common and it is accepted that for patients OCT provides a sense of control, fewer disruptions to lifestyle, reduced costs for travel and care and eliminates the discomfort of intravenous treatment. OCT use also poses safety challenges with implications for both patients and health care workers. These challenges include new toxicity profiles and adherence issues. Whilst not new, these challenges are especially relevant to nurses who are the primary providers of patient education, side effect management and follow-up. Objectives: A national cross-sectional survey of Australian nurses working in cancer care was undertaken to assess the nursing role in the education and follow-up of patients receiving OCT. Methodology: A survey was distributed to members of the Cancer Nurses Society of Australia (CNSA) using snowball sampling; survey data was analysed using descriptive statistics in SPSS. One hundred and eighty-two survey responses were received. The study has received Human Research Ethics Committee approval. Results: Variation in processes for providing information about OCT to patients was highlighted. The shifting treatment paradigm from intravenous chemotherapy to OCT has reduced the opportunity for contact with patients to monitor toxicities and provide education via traditional avenues. Nurses are also confronted with new side effect and symptom management profiles associated with novel OCT. Conclusion: Workflow, organisational processes and resources have not kept pace with increasing use of OCT in cancer treatment. This exposes patients to increased risk of harm and poses new challenges for providing optimal nursing care.

      PubDate: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:41:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Cancer nurses: Informed and responsive to change
    • Abstract: Stephens, Moira
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:41:50 GMT
       
 
 
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