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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 400 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 400 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, h-index: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, h-index: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, h-index: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, h-index: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.535, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, h-index: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, h-index: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, h-index: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.41, h-index: 1)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, h-index: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, h-index: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.282, h-index: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.119, h-index: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.549, h-index: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, h-index: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, h-index: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, h-index: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, h-index: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, h-index: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.032, h-index: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, h-index: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Journal Cover
Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.299
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0813-0531 - ISSN (Online) 1447-4328
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [400 journals]
  • Volume 35 Issue 3 - Outbreak management in residential aged care
           facilities - prevention and response strategies in regional Australia
    • Abstract: Latta, Rachel; Massey, Peter D; Merritt, Tony; Eastwood, Keith; Islam, Fakhrul; Durrheim, David N
      Objective:To identify the outbreak prevention and response preparedness of residential aged care facilities (RACFs) in the Hunter New England area of New South Wales (NSW).

      Design: A cross-sectional telephone survey.

      Setting: RACFs who provide full time nursing care in regional NSW.

      Subjects: Twenty randomly selected RACFs including nine metropolitan and 11 rural facilities within the regional Hunter New England (HNE) district of NSW. Main outcome measures Percentage of staff and residents vaccinated against influenza in 2013; availability and use of a surveillance system to detect outbreaks; knowledge of national outbreak resources; and presence of a facility outbreak management plan.

      Results: Across the 20 facilities more than 85% of residents were vaccinated against influenza in 2013. Staff influenza vaccination rates varied from less than 50% in six facilities to greater than 80% in nine facilities. Overall, 18/20 (90%) facilities reported having outbreak management plans available; however only 5/20 (25%) facilities reported having an outbreak surveillance system in place.

      Conclusion: RACFs in this sample reported varying levels of outbreak prevention and preparedness strategies. Nursing staff working in RACFs need to ensure strategies are in place to prevent and respond to communicable disease outbreaks. In particular all facilities are encouraged to have an outbreak surveillance system in operation, especially during the peak seasons. RACF accreditation should consider including outbreak prevention, preparedness and management outcomes in the review measures to ensure all RACFs have strategies in place to protect vulnerable residents from common communicable disease outbreaks.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 May 2018 22:52:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 3 - Glycaemic response to three main meals or five smaller
           meals for patients on rapid-acting insulin
    • Abstract: Meng, Zhaolin; Overland, Jane; Shen, Xingping; Wu, Xiaobin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yunyun
      Objective: To compare seven-point blood glucose profiles of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using rapid-acting insulin, when daily calories were provided as three main meals versus five smaller meals (three main meals + two snacks), while maintaining the same total daily calorie intake and composition of carbohydrates, fats and protein.

      Design: A cross-over study.

      Setting: Xiamen University Zhongshan Hospital, China.

      Subjects: Over a four week period, 22 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using fixed doses of rapid-acting insulin were recruited into the study. Two patients failed to complete the study and data from the remaining 20 subjects were analysed.

      Intervention: The subjects using fixed doses of rapid-acting insulin were randomised to five smaller meals versus three main meals treatment periods. Glycaemic response to each meal pattern was measured by seven-point blood glucose profiles.

      Main Outcome Measures: The mean seven-point blood glucose levels and the risk of hypoglycemia.

      Results: The mean seven-point blood glucose levels with the pattern of eating five smaller meals was lower than that with three main meals (9.1mmol/L vs. 9.5mmol/L), however the difference was not statistically significant (F=0.524, P=0.474). There were no differences in mean blood glucose levels across the seven-point profile. The risk of hypoglycaemia was also not statistically significant.

      Conclusions: This suggests that it may be unnecessary for patients using rapid-acting insulin to have five smaller meals.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 May 2018 22:52:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 3 - No one said he was dying: Families' experiences of
           end-of-life care in an acute setting
    • Abstract: Odgers, Jade; Fitzpatrick, Denise; Penney, Wendy; Shee, Anna Wong
      Objective: To explore the family's experience of end-of-life care for their dying family member during the last few days of life in an acute rural hospital.

      Design: Interpretive design using qualitative methods, including 1:1 semi- structured interviews.

      Setting: The study was undertaken in a large regional health service in Victoria.

      Subjects: Twelve relatives who were next of kin of people who died between 1 January 2012 and 30 June 2013 in an acute ward at the health service agreed to participate in the study.

      Main outcome measure: Families' perceptions of end-of-life care for their dying family member.

      Results: Data analysis identified five themes that were grouped into two general dimensions - communication (guidance for family member's role in end of life care, the family's preparation for death, the dying experience) and care and support (the hospital care experience, follow-up after death).

      Conclusion: A lack of open and candid communication hindered family members' engagement in decision-making and involvement in their loved ones' last days of life. The absence of formal processes for end of life (EOL) care planning resulted in families being unprepared for what they perceived as their family member's 'sudden death'.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 May 2018 22:52:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 3 - Pilot study: How Sydney community nurses identified
           food security, and student nurse focus group perceptions
    • Abstract: Saville, Lynette
      Objectives: This paper aims to discuss and explore food security in the context of community health nursing, to provide insight about how frontline workers may identify whether their client is food secure.

      Design: A qualitative descriptive design pilot study, using questionnaire and unstructured interviews.

      Setting: Community health services across Sydney.

      Subject: How community health nurses identify whether their client is food secure.

      Method: Three community health nurses were interviewed and their responses recorded. Two student nurses participated in a focus group during professional work experience in community health.

      Findings/Results: Although community health nurses claim they can identify whether their clients are food (in)secure, it remains unclear how they operationalise this claim, and indeed if they do, what the outcome may be for their clients' health determinants.

      Primary argument: To raise awareness and stimulate discussion about food security as a social determinant of health, and whether community nurses have a role identifying client food security.

      Conclusion: Food (in)security is increasingly recognised as a social determinant of health, with evidence that the prevalence of food insecurity is increasing in Australia. It is acknowledged that community health nurses have established professional relationships with their clients, and that food insecurity may be identified though formal and informal means. A more open discussion is required about food (in)security and potential ways in which it may be discussed in non-judgemental, sensitive ways. Further investigation is required to interview community health nurses, in the context of their relationships with clients, how they establish whether food security is occurring and being maintained.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 May 2018 22:52:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 3 - Osteoporosis treatment preferences and satisfaction in
           postmenopausal women: Denosumab compared with oral bisphosphonates
    • Abstract: Bajger, Boguslawa
      Aim: This paper aims to investigate whether Denosumab is more effective in promoting adherence and satisfaction than oral bisphosphonates in the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

      Methods: Electronic database - MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, Wiley online Library, ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health), free text engines Google Scholar and reference lists of retrieved papers were searched according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twelve studies were ultimately selected.

      Primary argument:The author analyses and critically appraises literature comparing two common osteoporotic medications: oral bisphosphonates and subcutaneous Denosumab in view of patients' preferences and satisfaction. Findings from this review could provide suggestions for developing frameworks in clinical practice, identify strategies to improve patient adherence to treatment and develop policies promoting active patient involvement in treatment decisionmaking.

      Results: Following thematic organisation of the studies, four major themes emerged: patient's view on attributes on osteoporotic medications; patient satisfaction and preferences in oral bisphosphonates compared to Denosumab; adherence to treatment with oral bisphosphonates compared to Denosumab; and practice implications.

      Conclusion: Findings from reviewed studies favor Denosumab over oral bisphosphonates as the preferred long-term treatment in postmenopausal women. Patients have a greater satisfaction with less frequent dosing, mode of administration and side effects of Denosumab.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 May 2018 22:52:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 3 - Sporting injuries amongst children in Australia: A
           review of the literature
    • Abstract: Yu, Amanda; Green, Janet; Walker, Karen
      Objective: Sports and recreation promotes health benefits to the child's wellbeing but can also expose him or her to injury risks. Literature that explores sporting injuries amongst children in Australia with discussions about the paediatric nursing role is reviewed.

      Setting: Prevalence of sporting injuries within the Australian paediatric population.

      Sample: The search utilized medical search terms of 'Sporting injuries' 'Children' 'Pediatric/paediatric Nurses' in health related databases to locate literature published from 2007 until present. Australian based studies were preferable but not exclusive. Relevant sources through hand selection helped to develop a potential relationship between the frequency of sports injuries occurrences and the types of injuries being treated in hospital.

      Primary argument: Of the twenty-five papers chosen, nineteen were related to sports injuries while a further thirteen focussed specifically on children involved in sports and recreation. Data concerning children sustaining sports related injuries, particularly in Australia, is scarce and inconsistent with no literature found relating to the role of paediatric nurses. With a particular focus on spinal injuries sustained through sports and recreation, how the paediatric nurse is involved is identified.

      Conclusion: Further analysis on sporting injuries in children in Australia will help to gauge its health burden to the country to better understand this contemporary child safety concern.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 May 2018 22:52:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Assessment and management of acute pain in older
           people: Barriers and facilitators to nursing practice
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Sally; Tripp, Henrietta; Halksworth-Smith, Gillian
      Objective: The aim of this review was to examine the pain management practices of nurses, and identify barriers and facilitators to the assessment and management of pain for older people, within the acute hospital setting.

      Design: Integrative literature review.

      Setting: Acute care for inpatients in a tertiary hospital.

      Subjects: Older people defined as 65 years of age or over.

      Primary argument: A nurse's individual practice was found to significantly influence how pain is managed in the older patient; this encompassed nurses attitudes, communication, documentation, and the use of pharmacological and non pharmacological strategies. Nurses' ability to provide optimal care was found to be influenced by organisational factors such as workforce planning and the workplace environment. Provision of knowledge and skills to both nurses and older patients through education was found to facilitate better pain management; whilst a model of care whereby the nurse has authority and the patient is perceived as a passive recipient, was found to be a hindrance to optimal pain management outcomes.

      Conclusion: Findings indicate that nurses need to improve communication with older patients, increase their knowledge of pain assessment and management principles in regards to this population, and have a greater awareness of human and social influences. Whilst organisational factors can impact upon nursing care, pain management needs to be highly prioritised and promoted as essential. Targeted education is required to overcome many of the identified barriers, and is a key recommendation from this review.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:14:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - A nurses' guide to ethical considerations and the
           process for ethical approval of nursing research
    • Abstract: Ingham-Broomfield, Rebecca
      Objective: A sound knowledge of the ethical principles that guide nursing practice and research are essential for any researcher. This article provides discussion regarding the principles as well as the history behind ethical practice in the construction of nursing research. The article also breaks down the process for achieving ethical consent and includes a simplified framework to guide the process of seeking ethical approval.

      Primary Argument: Nurses new to the field of conducting research may benefit from an organised structure that helps them understand the sequence of events required to gain appropriate ethical approval and ensure an ethical approach is adopted. It is crucial for all researching nurses to understand, and adhere to, already well developed nationally and globally prescribed ethical and validated research study structures to be able to achieve ethical, valid and reliable research outcomes.

      Conclusion: A framework is provided within this article to outline the process of gaining ethical consent for research. The information presented in the framework is based upon the discussion within the article and may assist the nurse researcher, who is unfamiliar with the process of obtaining ethics committee consent, to plan and prepare for their research approval, in a systematic logical manner. The framework reflects the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) criteria which guides Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs). Nursing research needs to be able to ethically contribute to the body of Evidence Based Practice.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:14:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - The art of clinical supervision: The traffic light
           system for the delegation of care
    • Abstract: Russell, Kylie; Williamson, Sarah; Hobson, Ann
      Objective: The Traffic Light System for the Delegation of Care was developed as a tool to assist student nurses and their allocated clinical supervisor on clinical shift, to determine their scope of practice for the delivery of patient care.

      Setting: Western Australian health services.

      Primary Argument: With each clinical placement student nurses are required to determine their scope of practice according to the health service polices and guidelines in conjunction with their own School of Nursing practice policies and legislation. Health service nurses support students in this scope of practice determination, but often themselves are perplexed by the different placement structure in each university course, and the lack of consistency across these.

      Conclusion: Participant feedback and implementation of the tool supports its usefulness as a practical strategy to assist decision-making in the delegation of care to student nurses.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:13:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Antipsychotic use for behaviours by persons with
           dementia in residential aged care: The relatives' perspectives
    • Abstract: De Bellis, Anita; Bradley, Sandra; Xiao, Lily; Belan, Ingrid; Wallace, Tim
      Objective: To explore relatives' experience, knowledge and perceptions of challenging behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and association with antipsychotic use for persons with dementia in residential aged care.

      Design: A qualitative Interpretive Description design using semi-structured interviews was used for understanding the construct and context of perceptions and experiences using a six-step process to analyse themes.

      Settings: South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia.

      Subjects: Six relatives of a person with dementia in residential aged care.

      Main Outcome Measure: Themes describing relatives' experiences, knowledge and perceptions of antipsychotic medication use for the person with dementia in residential aged care.

      Results: Three themes were identified: 1) lack of education and information - relatives found it difficult to differentiate between behaviours influenced by disease or antipsychotic medication; 2) need to be included in decision-making - relatives believed challenging behaviours resulting from BPSD could be prevented with a more person-centred approach; and, 3) influence of aged care culture on attitudes towards use of antipsychotic medication - relatives identified this could be problematic depending on use of agency staff and time pressures.

      Conclusion: Relatives of persons with dementia require support and education about the progression of dementia, BPSD and the risks and benefits that antipsychotic medication may have on BPSD. Most importantly, relatives need to be involved in decision-making regarding the use of antipsychotic medication. Nurses have a role to educate care staff on the use of person centred care in preference to medication for better care of the person with dementia.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:11:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Graduate nurses' experience of feedback, support and
           anxiety: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Gardiner, Isabelle; Sheen, Jade
      Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between feedback and anxiety, while also exploring the feedback and support experiences of graduate nurses.

      Design: This study used a mixed methods approach.

      Setting: Participants completed an online survey.

      Subjects: The study included 107 Australian graduate nurses.

      Main outcome measures: Anxiety and feedback.

      Results: Using bivariate regression a negative relationship was identified between feedback and anxiety. Further analysis using one-way analysis of variance revealed that participants who received regular and quality feedback and support, reported the lowest anxiety. The second aim was assessed by reviewing participants' subjective comments regarding their experiences as graduate nurses. Results revealed high variability in feedback and support experiences. The data gathered suggests graduate nurses experience anxiety during their transition from university to professional nursing.

      Conclusion: The provision of regular feedback and support was associated with reduced anxiety in graduate nurses. These preliminary findings highlight the importance of regular and appropriate feedback and support to facilitate learning, successful role transition and improved patient outcomes.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:10:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - The non-medical surgical assistant in Australia: Who
           should contribute to governance'
    • Abstract: Hains, Toni; Turner, Catherine; Strand, Haakan
      Objective: This paper focuses on the role of the Non-Medical Surgical Assistant (NMSA) in Australia. Registered Nurses predominately perform this role. This paper will articulate a position to:
      - validate this role as an Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) role in Australia through regulation and governance by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (NMBA) who sit under the umbrella of the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA);
      - lobby AHPRA to recognise, regulate and protect the title of Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) roles other than the Nurse Practitioner (NP) in Australia; and
      - as a result of sanctioned regulation, facilitate APN (including NP) to seek appropriate remuneration for undertaking this role in the private sector in Australia.

      Setting: The Australian Healthcare system.

      Subjects: Clinicians performing the role of the NMSA in Australia.

      Primary Argument: The NMSA is well established with clear mechanisms for governance internationally. This role has been practiced in Australia for more than 20 years, and while clinicians function under the guise of advanced practice, the role is not clearly defined, standardised or regulated. This is partially attributed to lack of sanctioned governance from AHPRA.

      Conclusion: While the AHPRA via the NMBA are reluctant to formally recognise and regulate this role, the overwhelming majority of clinicians in Australia are nurses. Without regulation it is difficult to quantify the role as APN. Lack of governance excludes NMSA (including the NP) from access to the Medicare Benefits Schedule and private health funds for intraoperative reimbursement thereby rendering a potentially cost effective role unsustainable to many clinicians.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:08:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Nurses plastering and splinting in the emergency
           department: An integrative review
    • Abstract: Stevens, Leahanna; Thompson, Susie; Stoddart, Emma; Bost, Nerolie; Johnston, Amy NB
      Objective: Increasing numbers of presentations, high acuity of patients and a decreased access to hospital beds contribute to lengthy waiting times in Emergency Departments (EDs). Implementing models of care to improve patient flow through EDs is imperative. This integrative review was undertaken to evaluate existing evidence regarding the impact of nurses' plastering and splinting in EDs.

      Setting: Data included in the review was drawn from five International databases that include publications exploring acute care interventions using PRISMA guidelines. An unbiased search and then application of exclusion criteria by three independent researchers delineated 11 papers for inclusion. Full text analysis using a predefined framework enabled development of the primary outcomes.

      Primary argument: The research question guiding this integrative review is: What is the impact on patient and staff satisfaction, cost, ED length of stay, ED re-presentation rates when ED nurses apply plasters and splints to patients who present to ED with a fractured or sprained limb'

      While no literature focused specifically on outcomes from nurses applying plasters or splints, studies indicated that plastering, as part of a suite of nursing skills, had positive effects on patient outcomes such as reduced waiting times to treatment.

      Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to inform protocols for nurses to perform plastering and splinting. Further research evaluating the impact of nurses using this skill in their practice is required to support evidence based practice.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:06:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Is it time to re-examine the doctor-nurse relationship
           since the introduction of the independent nurse prescriber'
    • Abstract: Pritchard, Michael John
      Objective: The aim of this paper is to stimulate a debate and discussion into how the nurse-doctor relationship needs to change.

      Setting: The National Health Service, United Kingdom.

      Primary argument: The nurse-doctor relationship needs to be re evaluated in light of the expanding role of nurse's into areas that traditionally had been considered a doctor's role. While the medical profession has been willing to relinquish some control to nurses in areas such as wound or incontinence care because these aspects do not threaten their authority, position or power. The issue of non-medical prescribing remains for some in the medical profession a topic of concern. Despite non-medical prescribing being discussed widely in the literature very little has been mentioned about how the introduction of the nurse prescriber has impacted the professional relationship between the nurse and the doctor.

      Conclusion: The blurring of the roles between nurses and doctors requires a re evaluation of this relationship. As nurses take on more responsibility such as prescribing medication the old traditional view of this relationship is no longer viable, if we are to maximise patient health care in the 21st century.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:03:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Improving diabetes control in the community: A
           nurse-managed intervention model in a multidisciplinary clinic
    • Abstract: Ginzburg, Tatyana; Hoffman, Robert; Azuri, Joseph
      Objective: To assess diabetes management and control measures in a central multidisciplinary primary care clinic, conducted by a nurse.

      Design: A cross sectional study.

      Setting: Central, multidisciplinary, primary care clinic.

      Subjects: Randomly selected 100 people with diabetes.

      Interventions: People with diabetes with suspected non optimal glucose control (HbA1c > 7%), were invited to the clinic nurse to discuss optimal personal diabetes control, treatment and follow up. All were provided the necessary referrals to consultants and were called in for follow up visits, and received telephone reminders. All interventions were made according to the current American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Practice recommendations.

      Main outcome measures: Retrospective data were collected. Data included demographics and diabetes control measures (e.g. HbA1c, LDL, blood pressure, ophthalmologic examination etc.). Data was collected for three x 6 months periods: 1) six months before the nurse visit; 2) six months following the first nurse visit (the intervention); and 3) for patients who were followed up for at least one year after the intervention, the last six months of follow up.

      Results: With a median follow up of 25 months, HbA1c, LDL and systolic blood pressure levels dropped significantly from before starting the clinic through the intervention and remained low in the last half year of follow up. GP, Ophthalmologist and Dietician visits increased significantly during the study. Non-significant trends were observed with total and diabetes related hospitalisations decreased, foot examination rates increased and mild weight loss.

      Conclusion: Multidisciplinary intervention managed by a nurse, improve diabetes management and control measures. Observed changes persisted after the intervention period.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 16:01:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Profiling Australian school students' interest in a
           nursing career: insights for ensuring the future workforce
    • Abstract: Gore, Jennifer; Rickards, Bernadette; Fray, Leanne; Holmes, Kathryn; Smith, Maxwell
      Objective: Given that the current shortage of nurses threatens the quality of health care globally, we urgently need to find new ways to bolster recruitment. This paper aims to understand patterns and predictors of interest in a nursing career among school students in order to inform ways of ensuring a viable future workforce.

      Design: A four year longitudinal mixed methods study undertaken in New South Wales, Australia.

      Setting and subjects: Survey data collected annually (2012-2015), involving 6,492 students in Years 3-12 in government schools, were analysed using logistic regression. Focus group data (2013-2015) involving 553 students and open ended survey responses were analysed to investigate reasons for interest in nursing.

      Results: Significant predictors of interest in nursing included being female and having a parent in a nursing occupation. A 'helping orientation' and prior experiences with nurses or nursing were key factors underpinning students' interest in this career. Some students perceived nursing as a 'safe' career choice, balancing practical concerns, such as job security, with their desire to care. Other students expressed ambivalence, with nursing but one of many 'caring' careers to which they were drawn.

      Conclusion: Given that early experiences with nursing or nursing-related activities influenced the desire to pursue this career, developing new experiential strategies that engage school student interest are important for ensuring the growth and stability of the Australian nursing workforce.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 15:58:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Designing simulation learning experiences to reduce
           technological burden on nursing academics: A discussion paper
    • Abstract: Ryan, Colleen; Roy, Sherre; O'Neill, Barbara; Simes, Tracey; Lapkin, Samuel; Riva, Elizabeth
      Objective: The literature reports nursing academics avoid manikin-based simulation because they feel intimidated by the technology. With that in mind we sought to design a manikin-based simulation learning experience for nursing students, with low technological burden for those nursing academics expected to work with the technology.

      Setting: A multi-campus Australian regional university school of nursing.

      Subjects: Nursing academics with little or no experience in manikin-based simulation.

      Primary argument: Nursing academics are encouraged to use manikins in their clinical teaching but little has been done to address their fears and concerns around the technology. We argue that taking simple steps to decrease the technological burden will help to encourage nursing academics uptake of manikin-based simulations, as a favoured pedagogy in clinical teaching.

      Conclusion: The technological burden around manikin-based simulation was reduced by: (1) choosing medium level fidelity simulations, (2) designing simulations where students operate the equipment, (3) preparing participants for the SLE with a pre-brief video and instruction handouts, (4) offering academics roles as observers, and (5) providing on-site technological support. Nursing academics were encouraged by the process and more inclined to engage with manikin simulations. Designing simulations that address nursing academics' fears and concerns around simulation technology encourages simulation uptake.

      PubDate: Wed, 9 May 2018 15:57:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Potential drug-drug interactions in children with
           acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: A cohort study
    • Abstract: Soccal, Daiana Carbalho; dos Santos, Wendel Mombaque; de Campos, Marli Matiko Anraku
      Objective: To evaluate the potential drug interactions in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the remission induction period of treatment. Design: A prospective cohort study.

      Setting: A tertiary referral centre.

      Subjects: Twenty-two children undergoing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The median age was 4.5 years (minimum of 1 and maximum of 18 years) with male predominance (54.4%).

      Main outcome measure: Presence of potential drug interactions in patients undergoing treatment for precursor cell lymphoblastic leukaemia-lymphoma. The potential drug interactions term refers to the ability of a drug to affect the pharmacologic intensity as well as the therapeutic effect of another and cause adverse reactions, as well as the possibility of clinical manifestations.

      Results: All participants were exposed to at least one potential drug interaction. About 60% of interactions classified as more severe. Every new drug included in the treatment increased the chance of potential drug-drug interactions by 0.4 times.

      Conclusion: These results demonstrated the patients under chemotherapeutic care for lymphoblastic leukaemia-lymphoma have high potential for drug interactions of greater severity.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 11:52:14 GMT
       
 
 
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