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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing
  [SJR: 0.225]   [H-I: 26]   [11 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0813-0531 - ISSN (Online) 1447-4328
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 34 Issue 4 - Managing medical service delivery gaps in a socially
           disadvantaged rural community: A Nurse Practitioner led clinic
    • Abstract: Kelly, Jo; Garvey, Deb; Biro, Mary Anne; Lee, Susan
      Objective: The aim of this pilot project was to investigate how Nurse Practitioners (NP) manage medical service delivery gaps in a socio-disadvantaged rural Victorian region.

      Design: A cross-sectional study utilising data from patient consultations that took place at the Nurse Practitioner Community Clinic (NPCC) over six months in 2013 and patient satisfaction survey.

      Setting: The NPCC is a rural clinic servicing a rural population in Victoria.

      Subjects: 629 patients.

      Main outcome measures: Numbers of patients; presentations; age; gender; postcode; reason for encounter; consultation length; availability of General Practitioner (GP); consultation activities and follow up; NP Medicare Benefits Scheme (MBS) item number rebate; and equivalent GP MBS item number rebates.

      Results: Over 50% of patients were female; 60% aged over 45 years. Patients had 2.6 encounters with the NPCC; over 50% lasting between 10 and 20 minutes. Approximately half the revenue of that claimed in equivalent GP encounters. Common reasons for attendance were symptoms and complaints (37.2%) and attendance was viewed as convenient and accessible, despite having a regular GP (47.8%). Fifty six Patients responded to a satisfaction survey and indicated they were satisfied with the service would use the service again and would recommend it.

      Conclusions: The NPCC provided an accessible service that met patients' needs in a rural community. The study provides evidence that NPs can provide medical management in areas where medical service delivery gaps exist. However, there was a significant discrepancy between funding reimbursements for services provided at the NPCC and those provided by GPs.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:23:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 4 - Accessibility and outcomes from a rural diabetes
           nurse-educator led self-management program
    • Abstract: Roberts, Diane Patricia; Ward, Bernadette Maree; Russell, Deborah Jane; O'Sullivan, Belinda Gabrielle
      Objective: To investigate factors associated with access to, and health outcomes of, a diabetes nurse-educator led self-management program for rural Australians with diabetes.

      Design: Retrospective cohort study

      Setting: A rural community-health service with a dispersed catchment of 10,000 population.

      Subjects: Clients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and referred to the program between April 2008 and December 2012.

      Intervention: A diabetes self-management program comprising an initial assessment, a group education session, and 3, 6, and 12 month clinical reviews.

      Main outcome measures: Program attendance after referral; and achievement of management goals for HbA1c, BMI, total cholesterol, quality of life and psychological distress.

      Results: Ninety-four percent (n=219/232) of referred clients attended at least once. Multivariate logistic regression showed that attending at least once was significantly associated with living within 25km of the service. Non-smokers/former smokers, general practitioner-referred clients and those with diabetes management plans were significantly more likely to attend three or more sessions. At 12 months clients showed significant improvements in cholesterol, BMI, quality of life and psychological distress.

      Conclusion: This study demonstrates that diabetes nurse-educator led self-management programs which adapt to their rural contexts - including geographically dispersed catchment populations and resource constraints - provide highly accessible services meeting the needs of most. Nevertheless, some groups (cigarette smokers, those living furthest from the service) may remain marginalised and less able to access services. Improvements in health outcomes for these clients may require further adaptation of models of care to better target their health care needs.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:23:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 4 - A paediatric nurses' journal club: Developing the
           critical appraisal skills to turn research into practice
    • Abstract: Purnell, Margaret; Majid, Gina; Skinner, Virginia
      Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine if implementation of a regular journal club improves critical appraisal confidence and facilitates integrating research literature into nursing practice.

      Design: A survey was distributed to all paediatric nurses across two wards who had potentially attended the journal club in the previous two years.

      Setting: This small scale study was undertaken at a northern Australian hospital.

      Sample: The surveys were distributed to 58 nurses from the two paediatric wards and 33 of them responded but only 29 of these had attended the journal club leaving 29 surveys to be analysed for this study.

      Results: The majority of responses to the survey questions were positive. When statistically analysed by Pearson's correlation, four variables showed a strong association: increased confidence with interpreting research literature, developing critical appraisal skills, the sharing of knowledge and integrating evidence-based practice into nurses' workplace.

      A number of changes in practice have occurred as a direct result of the journal club.

      Conclusion: The results from this study support the benefits of utilising nursing journal clubs to promote clinical practice that is informed by research evidence.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:23:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 4 - Elements to promote a successful relationship between
           stakeholders interested in mental health promotion in schools
    • Abstract: Handley, Christine; McAllister, Margaret
      Objective: An evaluation of a mental health promotion program called iCARE which depended on collaboration between multiple partners.

      Design: A qualitative exploratory evaluation that involved purposeful sampling of a range of stakeholders in the School settings.

      Setting: Two Secondary Schools in Tasmania.

      Intervention: iCARE stands for Creating Awareness, Resilience and Enhanced Mental Health and is a structured six-week program in which trained facilitators engage Year 8 students in learning about mental health and developing resilience. The collaboration involved university researchers, child and youth mental health clinicians, and education staff. It required investment in time and resources as well as intellectual effort and good will from each of the key players.

      Results: Successful elements of collaboration were distilled from the interview data, indicating that for a mental health promotion program to succeed in schools, highly tuned negotiation and communication skills are required.

      Conclusion: Nurses are increasingly working within the community to promote the health and wellbeing of many groups. To work effectively with young people in schools, and to share the impact of that work with the professional community, requires collaboration between health, education and university stakeholders. This evaluation found that success in this interdisciplinary connection requires respect, communication, negotiation and appreciation for disciplinary differences.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:23:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 4 - Rotating shift work and colorectal cancer among nurses
           and midwives: A cross-sectional study
    • Abstract: Wickremaratne, Kalana; Strand, Haakan; Zhao, Isabella
      Objective: The main aim of this study was to explore any association between colorectal cancer (CRC) and rotating shift work in nurses and midwives. The secondary aim of this study was to identify risk factors for CRC in nurses and midwives who are rotating shift workers.

      Design: Cross-sectional study.

      Setting: Electronic survey of participants from Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

      Subjects: A sample of 8,199 male and female nurses and midwives from Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom invited through their registration papers or newsletter advertisement.

      Main outcome measure: Prevalence of CRC in participants who have worked rotating shifts for 1-14 years or >=15 years compared to participants who have never worked rotating shifts. In addition, risk factors for CRC in the rotating shift work population were analysed in a multivariate logistic regression model in order to obtain odds ratio of CRC.

      Results: No statistically significant difference was found in the prevalence of CRC between those who have never worked rotating shift work, worked 1-14 years and worked 15 or more years.

      Among rotating shift workers, diabetes was associated with a 123-fold (95% CI 39-392; p < 0.001) increased odds of CRC, while Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) was associated with a 190-fold (95%CI 68-526; p < 0.001) increased odds of CRC. Screening colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy for CRC was associated with a 10-fold (95% CI 3-35; p < 0.001) increased odds of being diagnosed with CRC.

      Conclusion: No significant association was found between rotating shift work and colorectal cancer in nurses and midwives. In nurses and midwives who are rotating shift workers, diabetes, IBD and CRC screening significantly increased the odds of CRC.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:23:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 4 - Literature review: Why do we continue to lose our
           nurses'
    • Abstract: Goodare, Pete
      Objective: To decrypt what determining factors contribute to nurses leaving the clinical facet of the profession.

      Primary argument: Nurses encompass the largest professional constituent of the health care workforce in most countries, resulting in the impact of a shortage of these professionals, as immense. A projection in the shortage of nurses is upon us, and the margin in the reduction of these health professionals is thought to be worse than any of the preceding cyclical reductions. More than half of the nursing profession feel they are underpaid and overworked, resulting in the likelihood of patient's needs not being met, significantly increasing. Lengthy hours, quality of working environments, lack of leadership and the ageing population and workforce, can all be seen as influential factors, in which have the potential to leave this profession in a situation of calamity.

      Conclusion: In light of the predicted global demand for nurses over the next decade, the departure and retirement of the existing nursing workforce will potentially result in the loss of significant and treasured experience and organisational knowledge, weakening the capacity and capability of the nursing profession.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:23:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 3 - Australian undergraduate nursing students' opinions on
           mental illness
    • Abstract: Millar, Rebecca
      Objective: To determine second year Bachelor of Nursing students' opinions on mental illness and relationship with demographic data for the purpose of curriculum development.

      Design: The present study is a pilot study for a larger project which will investigate undergraduate nursing student opinions across the duration of their undergraduate degree at an Australian university. The 'Student Opinions of Mental Illness Scale', a 53 point Likert type questionnaire was used in a sample of second year nursing students to investigate their opinions of mental illness.

      Setting: Metropolitan nursing school in Victoria, Australia.

      Subjects: 133 second year undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing students'.

      Main outcome measures: Student opinions based on Likert responses.

      Results: The study revealed that student experiences, education, employment history of country of birth may impact upon student opinions of mental illness.

      Conclusion: Overall, students were found to have a generally neutral opinion about mental illness except in the sub-scale factors of benevolence, mental hygiene ideology and interpersonal aetiology where students held less positive opinions. Knowing the student populations opinions about a subject matter can assist academics to direct and focus their efforts to improve those opinions in those areas.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:38:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 3 - A review for Australian nurses: Cannabis use for
           anti-emesis among terminally ill patients in Australia
    • Abstract: Chan, Alex; Molloy, Luke; Pertile, Joy; Iglesias, Miguel
      Objective: The objective of this article is to describe the potential benefits of medicinal cannabis in emesis control and the position of nurses looking after palliative patients who are on medicinal cannabis treatment in Australia.

      Setting: Palliative care

      Primary argument: Cannabis is the most commonly abused drug and its use for medical purposes was restricted throughout the world since the early 20th century. However many clinical studies show that the natural cannabinoid compounds can stimulate the cannabinoid receptors in the brain leading to attenuation of signal transmission, resulting in alleviation of the vomiting stimuli. The debate about the use of cannabis as an anti-emetic agent in patients with life-limiting conditions has renewed interest in recent years. The principle of palliative care is to improve the quality of life of patients living with life-limiting conditions based on the best evidence available. Although some evidence suggests cannabis may have therapeutic effects on some palliative patients and the Australian Commonwealth Government has recently changed the legislation, the concept of using medicinal cannabis in emesis control is very new to many Australians including the health care providers.

      Conclusion: In comparison to conventional medications, medicinal use of cannabis in palliative care is a new phenomenon and nurses as well as general public may be less prepared for the use of cannabis as a medical modality in all clinical settings. This review is intended to raise awareness of the physiological mechanism of cannabis and its medicinal use to the nurses in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:38:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 3 - Can patients and their caregivers boost identification
           of HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND)'
    • Abstract: Cummins, Denise; Murray, Kenneth; Trotter, Gary; Batterham, Marijka; Healey, Loretta; O'Connor, Catherine C
      Objective: To ascertain whether people living with HIV and their caregivers using a self reflective tool could identify S&S of HAND.

      Design: This study was a nurse led prospective observational multi-site study using a quantitative design.

      Setting: Participants were recruited from three sites in Sydney, New South Wales (NSW), Australia: an inner metropolitan HIV clinic, an inner metropolitan sexual health clinic and a suburban hospital HIV clinic.

      Subjects: 121 patients and 44 caregivers who attended ambulatory clinics providing HIV care.

      Main Outcome Measures: Observing usual standard of care to follow patients who had formal neuropsychological testing and diagnosis of HAND.

      Results: Sixty one percent of participants and 57% of caregivers identified more than four symptoms. Sixteen had neuropsychological exams; five were diagnosed with HAND. After changes to their medication regime all of those five showed an improvement in cognition. Of the remaining 11, four results were inconclusive, with some deficits noted.

      Conclusion: Patients and caregivers stated the booklet helped them to reflect on behavior changes which they could subsequently discuss with their doctor. The booklet was considered useful to identify S and S which could indicate HAND.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:38:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 3 - The impact of clinical placement model on learning in
           nursing: A descriptive exploratory study
    • Abstract: Birks, Melanie; Bagley, Tracy; Park, Tanya; Burkot, Camilla; Mills, Jane
      Background: Learning in the clinical setting is an essential component of nursing education. Two common models of clinical learning place students in facilities using either block or distributed approaches.

      Aim: The aim of this study was to examine nursing students' perceptions of the impact of block versus distributed model of clinical placement on their learning experience.

      Design: The study employed a descriptive, exploratory approach. Focus groups and an individual interview were conducted with third-year undergraduate nursing students.

      Setting: Students from four Australian universities took part in the study.

      Subjects: The average age of the 22 student participants was 37.5 years and 91% were female. More than half (55%) studied full time.

      Results: Thematic analysis of the data identified five overarching themes: We're there to learn; Taking all that knowledge out and practising it; You actually feel a part of the team; Just prepare them for us coming; and It's really individual.

      Conclusions: It is clear that both block and distributed modes of placement have inherent advantages and disadvantages that might be magnified depending on the individual student's circumstances. Sequencing, consistency and preparation must be considered when planning either mode of clinical placement to ensure the best possible experience for students. Most significantly, students need to feel as though they are part of the team while on placement to get the most out of the experience. These findings have implications for education providers planning the integration of clinical placement into the nursing curriculum.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:38:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 3 - Promoting student belongingness: 'WANTED' - the
           development, implementation and evaluation of a toolkit for nurses
    • Abstract: King, Chris; Russell, Kylie; Bulsara, Caroline
      Objective: Literature suggests that the need to belong influences health and well-being, behavioural, emotional and cognitive responses. This paper describes the impending development and validation of a toolkit for nurses to create the experience of belongingness with a team approach, for student nurses undertaking a clinical placement.

      Setting and Subjects: The design of the toolkit will be developed from a selected Delphi panel process involving nursing experts' experience and opinions. The toolkit will then be distributed to nurses in selected clinical areas for use during periods of clinical placements.

      Primary Argument: Clinical placements are essential for professional socialisation in which nurses provide compelling role models for how to think, feel and act. However, students have often identified a sense of alienation through poor clinical experiences. The need to belong and be part of a team exerts a powerful influence on cognitive processes and behavioural responses. The absence of meaningful interpersonal relationships can result in failure to develop optimal clinical reasoning and critical thinking skills to manage patient care safely.

      Conclusion: More needs to be achieved than to simply justify the core attributes of a good clinical learning environment. Understanding of the key role that clinical leaders and supervisors exert to create a belongingness environment can influence positively the attitude of other staff towards students. For a valued positive clinical learning experience to become the benchmark of best practice, it requires a structured process, a toolkit to enable nurses to comprehend the concept of belongingness and to support them in embedding this model into their role of supervision.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:38:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 3 - Assessing the effectiveness of clinical education to
           reduce the frequency and recurrence of workplace violence
    • Abstract: Adams, Jillian; Knowles, Alex; Irons, Garry; Roddy, Alison; Ashworth, John
      Objectives: This study assessed the effectiveness of clinical education to identify patients with a high risk for violence and to reduce the frequency of violent incidents.

      Design: A before and after design with an education intervention.

      Setting: Data were gathered from the direct care staff and from records of violent/aggressive incidents which occurred on two adult medical wards at a teaching hospital in Western Australia.

      Subjects: Nurses, Assistants in Nursing and Patient Care Assistants working on the study wards participated in the education intervention (n=65) and completed a questionnaire before and after the education. Details of 48 violent/aggressive incidents perpetrated by 21 patients were examined.

      Intervention: An education program addressed four key areas (assessment, planning, implementation [crisis], post incident). Case studies and in-patient scenarios provided context, immediacy and relevance, and 77% of the staff completed the program.

      Main outcome measure: Knowledge, confidence and capability of direct care staff to prevent/manage violent/aggressive incidents were measured. Incident data measured the frequency and recurrence of violence/aggression, and if perpetrators met the high risk criteria.

      Results: Post education, knowledge increased significantly (p=0.001, CI 0.256-0.542), the use of verbal de-escalation increased significantly (p=0.011, 1df) and the frequency and recurrence of incidents decreased. All perpetrators met criteria indicating a high risk for violence.

      Conclusions: Education and coaching provided by clinical experts resulted in increased knowledge, greater use of verbal de-escalation and less incidents. However, more time/coaching is required to improve the perceived capability of clinical staff to manage these incidents.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:38:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - Exploring infant deformational or positional
           plagiocephaly prevention and management by Maternal Child Health Nurses
           and Paediatric Physiotherapists
    • Abstract: Williams, Elizabeth N; Galea, Mary P
      Objectives: To explore Maternal Child Health (MCH) nurses' and Paediatric Physiotherapists' (Physiotherapists) experience with infant deformational or positional plagiocephaly (plagiocephaly).

      Design: Cross-sectional online survey.

      Setting: Community health setting in Victoria, Australia.

      Subjects: MCH nurses and Paediatric Physiotherapists in Victoria were invited to participate.

      Main outcome measures: Survey results were collated and analysed descriptively.

      Results: Surveys were completed by 183/961(19%) MCH nurses and a sample of 16 Physiotherapists, from a cross section of metropolitan (62%), regional (18%) and rural/remote (24%) Victoria. All MCH nurses and Physiotherapists reported seeing infants with plagiocephaly in the previous 12 months. Responses indicated MCH nurses saw between 11-50 infants with plagiocephaly (n=110). These were first diagnosed by MCH nurses at one to three months. Infants first presented to Physiotherapists on average at four to six months. All MCH nurses and Physiotherapists implemented prevention strategies and both groups thought it was effective subject to parents' implementing the advice. Strategies for prevention and management of plagiocephaly included early prone play (tummy-time) and counter positioning. Physiotherapists also included gross motor exercises, stretches if torticollis was present and, if appropriate, referral for helmet therapy. Referrals of infants with plagiocephaly by MCH nurses were made to Physiotherapists, General Practitioners, Chiropractors and Osteopaths.

      Conclusions: All MCH nurses and Physiotherapist respondents see infants with plagiocephaly, MCH nurses earlier than Physiotherapists. The effectiveness of plagiocephaly prevention advice can be called into question because of the high numbers of infants presenting and subsequent referrals to different health professionals. Recommendations from respondents included a review of past initiatives including extensive education for Maternal Child Health Nurses, Pamphlets in their Home visiting pack and video for demonstration at first time mothers group and the provision of clearer early prevention advice in the Government Key Ages and Stages (KAS) Framework for MCH nurses.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 22:52:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - What prompts nurses to seek help from wound care
           consultants in spinal cord injury management'
    • Abstract: Bundz, Julie; Schuurs, Sarita; Kendall, Melissa; Amsters, Delena
      Objective: This study aimed to identify clinical scenarios that might prompt nurses to seek advice from a spinal cord injury wound care nurse consultant for pressure injury management. In addition, some attributes of nurses were examined for associations with intention to seek the help of a consultant.

      Design: Exploratory quantitative survey.

      Setting: Queensland, Australia.

      Subjects: Fifty currently practising hospital and community based nurses

      Main outcome measure(s): Two part online survey - part one presented hypothetical clinical case scenarios, in which respondents indicated their likelihood of seeking help; and, part two examined participant attributes and work experience.

      Results: Each scenario presented was rated as either of little importance or utmost importance by at least one respondent. Participants identified consultant personality and proximity as more influential on help seeking than timeliness, common sense or knowledge.

      Conclusion: The study did not identify a pattern of association between the presence of certain clinical factors and intention to seek help from a spinal cord injury consultant nurse for pressure injury management. What is important and influential for one person may be of less importance for others. Consultants must market their value to nurses in order that they are front of mind during the help seeking process. Further studies are required to examine the decision making process associated with help seeking.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 22:52:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - The Cancer Nurse Coordinator Service in Western
           Australia: Perspectives of specialist cancer nurse coordinators
    • Abstract: Monterosso, Leanne; Platt, Violet; Krishnasamy, Meinir; Yates, Patsy; Bulsara, Caroline
      Objective: In Western Australia the cancer nurse coordinator (CNC) role is unique, state wide and situated in nursing. It requires the domains of clinical expert, resource consultant, educator, change agent, researcher and advocate to facilitate seamless coordination of care for patients across metropolitan, rural and remote geographical areas of Western Australia. This study examined the role, function and impact of CNCs from the perspective of coordinators themselves.

      Design: Prospective two-phase mixed method study. This paper reports data from the Self Report Activity Questionnaire in Phase one.

      Setting: The state-wide Western Australian Cancer Nurse Coordinator Service.

      Subjects: Metropolitan and rural CNCs (n=18) who had worked in the role for at least six months.

      Results: Overall, CNCs spent 70% of time in clinical consultation and 41% of CNCs reported having an educational role. Most CNCs (71%) noted that at least half of their patients had complex psychosocial needs at referral. Key role-related activities related to direct nursing care and patient education were performed most frequently on a daily basis. Tasks related to care management planning, patient advocacy and multidisciplinary clinical care were performed weekly. Strategic, team communication and professional development activities were performed less frequently.

      Conclusion: Diversity of the CNC role was demonstrated with findings showing that CNCs fulfilled the core components of the specialist cancer nurse. Given the clear need to provide consistent support to cancer patients in an increasingly individualised and integrated manner, we consider the CNC role a fundamental element of quality cancer care.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 22:52:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - Being a fellow patient to a critically ill patient
           leads to feelings of anxiety - an interview study
    • Abstract: Laursen, Jannie; Lundby, Trine Bonnevie; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob
      Objectives: To explore in-patients' experiences being a fellow patient to patients who become critically ill.

      Design: The study was designed as a qualitative phenomenological study.

      Setting: The study was conducted in a surgical ward of a hospital in Denmark.

      Subjects: Fifteen fellow patients to patients, who became critically ill.

      Results: Three key themes emerged from the analysis of the data: patients' interaction, anxiety, and professional support. These findings demonstrated the importance of understanding how patients experienced being a fellow patient to patients, who become critically ill, their views on interacting with such a patient, how the patients who become critically ill influenced them, and what kind of support they needed from the health professionals.

      Conclusion: The findings highlighted the different emotions and feelings experienced by fellow patients. It showed how the impact of the situation can lead to anxiety, a feeling of being forced into patient inter-action and the lack of professional support. Health professionals should have a central role in supporting the fellow patients and communicating with them about their experiences and this does not seem to be fulfilled sufficiently in daily clinical practice.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 22:52:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - The transition of overseas qualified nurses and
           midwives into the Australian healthcare workforce
    • Abstract: Ohr, Se Ok; Holm, Doreen; Brazil, Sue
      Objective: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the key elements to consider when developing and implementing strategies to enhance the transition of overseas qualified nurses and midwives (OQNMs) into the Australian healthcare clinical practice environment.

      Setting: A local health district with a major metropolitan centre and a mix of large regional centres which provide a range of public health services, to a population of approximately 850,000 people located in New South Wales, Australia.

      Subjects: Newly recruited overseas qualified nurses and midwives. Many of these nurses and midwives are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and different countries.

      Primary argument: Within the Australian nursing and midwifery practice environment the recruitment of overseas qualified nurses has gradually increased. While transitioning into the practice environment requires a range of support strategies, there is limited information on how to support them.

      Conclusion: The culturally constructed support program and its strategies assisted in minimising the impact of the challenges and difficulties faced by OQNMs in their transition into the Australian nursing workforce. The program was instrumental in improving their well-being and it provided a strategic framework to facilitate a smoother transition. Risks to patient safety were mitigated by providing opportunities for education so the provision of safe quality care was enhanced. This was also seen as a factor that enhanced the recruitment and retention of nurses in the workforce.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 22:52:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - Male or nurse what comes first': Challenges men
           face on their journey to nurse registration
    • Abstract: Juliff, Dianne; Russell, Kylie; Bulsara, Caroline
      Objective: This paper aims to provide an account of the first phase of a qualitative longitudinal study that explored the initial challenges men in nursing face to become registered. What is known is that men, a minority group within nursing, face the usual challenges of all new nurses in their quest to register as nurses. In addition, they have added pressures that hinder their quest due to being male.

      Primary Argument: An Australian nursing shortage is looming due to nurses retiring from this female-dominate profession. Hence, the retention of men in nursing is an area requiring attention in order to support a sustainable workforce.

      Subjects and Setting: Nine newly graduated male registered nurses participated. These nurses had recently commenced employment in the Western Australian metropolitan health region.

      Findings: Individual face-to-face interviews produced the theme of role misconception with a major focus on male or nurse what comes first. This theme was derived from the categories of gender stereotyping and marginalisation.

      Conclusion: This study suggests the need for a gender-neutral image when promoting nursing within and outside the professional environment. Furthermore, consideration for a professional title mutually accepted by both women and men in nursing, with the gender-neutral 'nurse' title preferred by the men in this study. Moreover to acknowledge that men in nursing will augment a technical savvy workforce that will complement emergent complex nursing practices, and enhance a more comprehensive Australian nursing workforce that will assist with meeting the health care needs of a diverse population.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 22:52:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Stoma and shame: Engaging affect in the adaptation to
           a medical device
    • Abstract: Diebold, Lionel
      Objective: The objective is to understand difficulties some patients have with their adaptation to a medical device, specifically a stoma and an ostomy appliance, following gastro-enterologic surgery. A partial or total colectomy is typically performed in cases of digestive cancers, Crohn's disease, or anal incontinence. A psychotherapeutic application deduced from this understanding is described. The therapeutic approach is informed by Lacanian psychoanalysis.

      Setting: The setting is the digestive surgery services section of a large public teaching hospital in France. The clinical team conducting the interventions described perform their work with patients post-operatively.

      Subjects: Selected cases are chosen to provide brief illustrations of the analysis and the psychotherapeutic approach developed.

      Primary argument: This study focuses on the impact of the stoma and the ostomy appliance on the subjectivity of the patient and shows how the affect of shame can appear. It is noted that the affect of shame in the adaptation to an ostomy appliance has not been investigated to date. This affect can in turn have psychological effects on the gastroenterologic treatment itself, even to the point of the patient's abandonment of ongoing care. The analysis reported here explores the recognition of shame when it might be present, and the process of accompanying the patient therapeutically, engaging the logic of the transference.

      Conclusion: Shame cannot be treated by ignorance or by indifference. A psychotherapeutic application engaging the transference between the patient and members of the nursing and psychotherapeutic team, helps patients support shame and adapt well to the ostomy bag.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:56:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Flooded with evidence: Using a 'spillway' model to
           improve research implementation in nursing practice
    • Abstract: Moloney, Clint; Taylor, Melissa; Ralph, Nicholas
      Objective: To identify barriers to implementing evidence-based practice initiatives in small to medium sub-acute facilities in Queensland.

      Design: The study uses a qualitative methodology in which field observations and convergent interviews were employed to generate data.

      Setting: Four south-east Queensland sub-acute care facilities participated in the study. Observational and interview data were collected.

      Subjects: Field observations were recorded across the sites. Five research fellows collected observational data on evidencebased practice implementation across a period of six months. Nine clinicians participated in in-depth, convergent interviews at the end of the period of observation.

      Main outcome measures: The authors analysed observational and interview data using qualitative thematic analysis.

      Results: Three themes emerged which described the needs of clinicians when evidence-based practice initiatives were being implemented: (1) valuing evidence; (2) risk prioritisation; and (3) controlling the flow of evidence. A 'Spillway Model' is proposed as a mechanism for targeting clinical priorities using integrated risk management.

      Conclusion: This study supports the use of integrated risk management as part of a Spillway Model to guide the introduction of evidence-based practice initiatives in the clinical setting.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:56:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - A mental health nursing transition program for
           enrolled nurses at a forensic mental health hospital
    • Abstract: Quinn, Chris; Ryan, Jo
      Objective: There are difficulties in recruiting enrolled nurses to mental health positions. A six month program was developed with the aim to bridge possible knowledge gaps for enrolled nurses, and to provide them practical support to consolidate skills and knowledge for nursing in a forensic mental health hospital.

      Setting: The setting was a 116 bed secure forensic mental health hospital in the state of Victoria, Australia.

      Subjects: Nine enrolled nurses who had completed a Diploma of Nursing, were recruited into the program.

      Primary argument: There is a national decrease in enrolled nursing supply, and a paucity of data exploring the training needs of enrolled nurses transitioning from the Diploma to a mental health nursing role. Nursing programs are required to assist enrolled nurses with the knowledge and skills, and support required to effectively make their transition into mental health nursing.

      Conclusion: The results demonstrate the importance in providing a program to assist enrolled nurses transition to mental health and that the mental health course requirements within the Diploma of Nursing and placement length may not be adequate in preparing enrolled nurses for direct entry to mental health nursing. Providing a structured transition program for a group of enrolled nurses is a useful strategy to improve knowledge, skills, and retention.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:56:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to
           fertility among nurses working in primary health care
    • Abstract: Hammarberg, Karin; Collison, Lisa; Nguyen, Hau; Fisher, Jane
      Objective: To explore knowledge, attitudes and practice relating to factors that affect fertility among nurses working in general practice and other primary health care settings.

      Design: Anonymous online survey.

      Setting: Primary care.

      Subjects: Members of the Australian Primary Health Care Nurses Association (APNA). Main outcome measures: Fertilityrelated knowledge, attitudes and practice.

      Results: 102 individuals completed the survey. More than half overestimated the age when male and female fertility declines and the chance of women conceiving with IVF. Most knew that smoking affects a man's sperm but only one quarter that smoking halves a woman's fertility. The majority recognised obesity and STI's as detrimental for fertility and agreed that educating patients about fertility is part of primary health care nurses' role to ask people of reproductive age about their reproductive life plan and alert them to the factors that influence fertility. The most commonly cited barrier for discussing fertility with patients was perceived lack of knowledge about the subject.

      Conclusion: This study identified opportunities and barriers for nurses working in primary health care to proactively discuss fertility and the factors that influence the chance of conceiving with their patients. Appropriate educational resources to improve knowledge and support from general practitioners (GPs) can enable nurses working in general practice and other primary health care settings to provide effective fertility related education as part of their role as health promoters.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:56:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Doctoral education for nurses today: The PhD or
           professional doctorate'
    • Abstract: Walker, Kim; Campbell, Steven; Duff, Jed; Cummings, Elizabeth
      Objective: This paper seeks to stimulate discussion and debate about the future of doctoral education for nurses in Australia.

      Setting: A large Magnet recognised acute care private hospital in New South Wales and a large regional university in Australia.

      Primary argument: Healthcare today and into the future is increasingly more complex and requires ever more highly skilled healthcare professionals to meet the challenges of providing safe, quality care. Doctoral research and education based in the workplace and designed to improve healthcare while skilling up nurses and other professionals in research methods has never been more relevant and appropriate.

      Conclusion: Nurses have generally not seen the PhD as the best fit for their higher professional development. The professional doctorate offers a compelling and dynamic alternative to the more academic focus of the PhD and prepares 'inquirydriven leaders' for tomorrow's challenges.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:56:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Nurse empathy and the care of people with dementia
    • Abstract: Digby, Robin; Williams, Allison; Lee, Susan
      Objective: Empathy is widely accepted as an essential nursing attribute yet the relationship between nurse empathy and the care of people with dementia in the hospital setting has rarely been explored. A number of themes have emerged from the relevant literature regarding the influences which shape a nurse's ability to deliver empathetic care to this patient cohort. These issues include a lack of hospital resources, an organisational focus on operational issues such as patient flow and risk management, and widespread stigmatisation of dementia in society.

      Setting: Acute and sub-acute facilities.

      Subjects: In-patients with dementia and nurses

      Primary argument: Although there is widespread acknowledgment that nurses require empathy to deliver quality care, the complexity of caring for people with dementia in hospital creates further challenges for both nurses and patients. This issue has been discussed previously but there is little evidence that the situation has improved.

      Conclusion: This paper details the relevant influences on the ability of nurses to care empathetically for people with dementia in hospital. The recognition that there are distinct factors related to this patient cohort is an important one and may assist nurses and health organisations to identify systemic and individual problems associated with hospitalisation and lead to the implementation of supportive strategies. Appropriate nurse-patient ratios which consider the additional workload attached to caring for people with dementia, clinical supervision and targeted nurse education must be considered to ensure health systems deliver appropriate person-centred care to people with dementia.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:56:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Access to healthcare services for people living with
           HIV experiencing homelessness - a literature review
    • Abstract: Crock, Elizabeth
      Objective: People living with HIV (PLHIV) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness experience significantly worse health outcomes than those in stable housing. They are more likely to be diagnosed late, use substances, engage in high-risk sexual activities and have difficulty adhering to treatments. This review identifies strategies described and evaluated in the international social science literature which can improve access to HIV-treatment and care for PLHIV who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, to inform policy and service development in Australia.

      Setting: The principle research question addressed in this review is:

      - What strategies enhance the ability of PLHIV who are homeless to access health care services, in particular community nursing services' A literature review of social science research relating to the research question in the international and Australian contexts was conducted.

      Primary argument: No literature was identified that addressed access to community nursing services for PLHIV experiencing homelessness in Australia, and very little internationally. Community-based nursing organisations are well-placed and experienced in engaging marginalised groups in health care. Specific interventions need not always be developed: rather, better use could be made of existing services that utilise assertive outreach models of care and co-location with other services.

      Conclusion: HIV-specialist community nursing services could be better integrated with homelessness services to enhance access to care, link PLHIV into the health system and keep them engaged in care. The absence of research on engagement with HIV specialist community nursing services demands exploration.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:56:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 4 - The effect of overactive bladder syndrome on the
           sexual life in asymptomatic continent women
    • Abstract: Alatas, Erkan; Ozkan, Sevgi; Ogce, Filiz
      Objective: Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a very common problem, particularly in women, and has an effect on their daily lifestyle and sexual activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of overactive bladder syndrome on sexual life in asymptomatic continent women who are considered to be sexually active. Design: Descriptive and cross-sectional study. Setting: Gynaecology and obstetrics outpatient clinic, Pamukkale University Medical Faculty, Turkey. Subject: A total of 1,504 patients as research population were examined and 117 patients without gynaecological symptoms presenting to the Obstetric and Gynaecology Clinic were included in the study. Main outcome measures: For data collection a questionnaire to gather socio-demographic and medical information, an assessment tool (OAB-at) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) for evaluating sexual dysfunction were utilised. Results: Patients were determined as 28 continent women with OAB, 89 women without OAB. In line with this information we found the mean score of OAB positive continent women was 13.00+/-5.06 and the mean score of OAB negative women was 3.57+/-2.15. Patients with OAB had negatively impacted sexual function in the areas of arousal, lubrication, orgasm and pain. Conclusion: OAB syndrome adversely affects sexual life even in continent women.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 08:46:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 4 - Clinical placement in Jordan: Qualitative views of
           final year nursing students
    • Abstract: Shoqirat, Noordeen; Abu-Qamar, Ma'en Zaid
      Objective: This study explored the nurse student's experience of the final year placement, and uncovered contributing factors to a positive clinical experience in Jordan. Design: A qualitative explorative approach was used. Two focus group discussions were conducted in Arabic language with a total of 12 participants selected randomly from the list of students who completed the period of pre-‑graduation intensive clinical placement. The focus discussions were digitally recorded. Setting: The setting for this study was a public faculty of nursing located in the southern province, Jordan. Subjects: Twelve final year nursing students including seven males and five females took part in the study. Main outcomes measures: The recorded discussions were translated independently into English text and were uploaded into Nvivo 9 for thematic analysis. Results: Three themes emerged from the data. The first theme related to the environment of clinical placement and included two sub-‑themes: 'from orientation-to-team work' and 'from tiredness-to-ignorance'. The second theme is about the faculty and preceptors as reflected by the lack of coordination between the clinical settings and the faculty, plus inconsistency in students' evaluation. The third theme concerned patient preferences that included a lack of interest in receiving care from students. Conclusion: Creating a supportive learning environment guided by issues identified and implications put forward by this research is a prerequisite for successfully executed nursing programs. Failure to do so could lead to a stressful transitional journey and detachment from the classroom and the real world of clinical work.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 08:46:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 4 - Diabetes- a significant contributor to complications
           in cardiac surgery: How and when to optimise glycaemic control
    • Abstract: Penrose, Melissa; Lee, Geraldine A
      Objective: The aim is to present the literature on the association between pre-‑operative hyperglycaemia and post-‑operative complications and to review the current interventions (pre surgery, peri /intra-‑ and post-‑operatively) in those with diabetes undergoing cardiac surgery. Design: A literature review was undertaken to examine complications and interventions in those with diabetes undergoing cardiac surgery. Setting: Acute care. Subjects: Those with diabetes undergoing cardiac surgery. Main outcome measures: Mortality and morbidity and improved glycaemic control. Results: Pre-operative hyperglycaemia is associated with wound infections and prolonged length of hospital stay. Studies on intra- and post-operative medical interventions to control glycaemia in cardiac surgical patients demonstrate improved short-term medical outcomes, including decreased mortality and improved glycaemic control, reduction in infection rates and reduced length of stay. Some studies examined the roles of pre-operative glucose management (using glycosylated haemoglobin, HbA1c) prior to surgery and demonstrated that HbA1c can be decreased in short term post-educational interventions. Improvements in physical functioning and quality of life post-educational interventions have been reported. Although the primary outcome is often HbA1c, patient focused outcomes (such as empowerment and education) are equally as important in this chronic condition. Conclusion: Diabetes is a chronic condition and patients need to be educated about the association between coronary artery disease and diabetes and the importance of glycaemic control. Interventions can improve glycaemic control in the short-term as well increasing patients' empowerment and self-mastery. There is evidence supporting the benefits of educational interventions in those with diabetes undergoing cardiac surgery.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 08:46:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 4 - Career choices and destinations of rural nursing
           students undertaking single and double degrees in nursing
    • Abstract: Hickey, Noelene; Harrison, Linda
      Objectives: To identify and compare the location and career preferences of students enrolled in single and transdisciplinary double degrees in a Bachelor of Nursing program at a rural university. To understand what influences and motivates students to enrol in a double degree program that includes nursing. Design: A cross-sectional cohort study using a semi structured survey. Setting: Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia. Subjects: 209 undergraduate students in all years of the Bachelor of Nursing (BN), Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Clinical Practice (Paramedic) (BN/BCP), and Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Early Childhood Teaching (BN/BECT).programs. Main outcome measures: Demographics of participants; reasons double degree students enrolled in a nursing program; career location and career discipline preferences. Results: In 2008 the majority (70%) of students in all three groups were from rural areas, but double degree students came from a higher socio-economic background, were younger and were more likely to be male than single degree nursing students. They also had different motivating factors for enrolling and many did not prefer nursing as a career. 40% of BN, 45% of BN/BECT students and 28% of BN/BCP students preferred to work in a rural location for their graduate year. Conclusions: Students undertaking this rural based double degree nursing program are different to single degree nursing students in a number of important areas. The lack of interest in a nursing career and a rural location by over half of these students is concerning. Targeted strategies are needed to reverse this loss of potential nursing graduates.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 08:46:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 4 - Career progression - the views of Queensland's nurses
    • Abstract: Eley, Robert; Francis, Karen; Hegney, Desley
      Objectives: To inform policy through determination of the views of Queensland nurses on career progression. Design: A quantitative cross-‑sectional cohort design with mailed survey. Setting: Financial members of the Queensland Nurses' Union. Main outcome measures: Extent of the relationship between opportunity for career progression in nursing with turnover and retention. Results: A majority (54.4%) of the 1365 respondents were satisfied with their career progression. Only 11.6% were dissatisfied. Satisfaction was not related to length of time in nursing, but did increase among nurses enrolled in further education programs. Dissatisfaction was related to four themes: lack of support to advance knowledge; lack of opportunities for promotion; number of career options; and costs associated with advancement. A quarter of the nurses were contemplating a move within nursing in the next year and most of these nurses (62%) indicated that the move was for the purpose of career advancement. One in six nurses were contemplating leaving nursing altogether; however only 12.8% of those cited lack of career as the factor for intended departure. Results continued the trend seen in previous surveys over the last decade of a small but significant reduction in the perception that career prospects in nursing were limited. Conclusion: Although the perception that there are limitations to career advancement in nursing has reduced in the last decade, there is still room for improvement. Lack of career progression remains a concern of nurses; however this is not generally manifested in an intention to leave nursing. Rather, nurses are prepared to consider moves within nursing to further their careers.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 08:46:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 4 - Getting the message out - disseminating research
           findings to employees in large rural mining organisations
    • Abstract: Drury, Vicki; Hart, Kristy
      Objective: To identify that effective dissemination of research results in large organisations is possible through novel approaches. Setting: Two mine sites in Western Australia. Subjects: All employees working in two large mining organisations in rural Australia. Primary argument: To encourage employees to participate in research it is essential to disseminate findings. Currently utilised dissemination methods include conference presentations, journal articles and company reports. However these methods of dissemination do not reach all employees and often neglect to inform employees below middle management levels of the outcomes of projects. It is imperative that researchers develop strategies through a consultative process with industry to inform people of research findings. This paper argues that despite ongoing rhetoric concerning the need to disseminate research there is little evidence in the literature that describes effective methods of dissemination in large organisations. Conclusion: Discussion during each focus group highlighted the dissatisfaction staff had regarding involvement in research projects as they rarely received any feedback or perceived any improvement. By organising a research steering group including membership by all key stakeholder groups from senior management to junior staff and identifying dissemination of results as a priority the research team developed a climate of trust. Dissemination of results through posters was a decision made by the team in response to staff dissatisfaction. This 'bottom up' approach created a climate of ownership catalysing behaviour change.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 08:46:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 4 - A view from the outside: Nurses' clinical decision
           making in the twenty first century
    • Abstract: Deegan, Joan
      Objective: The purpose of this paper is to highlight some observations of clinical decision making processes made by culturally and linguistically diverse nurses (CALD), in relation to elderly patients in particular. It will explore some of the potentially serious professional and legal implications for nurses when there is an over reliance on experiential knowledge and routine tasks without mindful application of evidence and consideration of the ethico legal imperatives. Setting: The CALD nurses in the study were enrolled in competency based assessment programs (CBAP) in two universities in Melbourne, Victoria between 2005 and 2006 in preparation for their professional registration in Australia. Participants: Following ethical approval from the relevant universities and participating hospitals, a purposive sample was chosen followed by theoretical sampling. Fourteen CALD nurses and three teachers, who were directly involved in the clinical supervision of the nurses during their placement took part. Primary Argument: Using some in vivo quotes to highlight what appear to be less than optimal decision making process by nurses, it will be argued that sound decision making in clinical practice is ideally based on a combination of factors; amongst them professional judgement and a sound knowledge base, supported by principles of physical/psychological assessment and ethical principlism. Conclusion: The views of nurses who are new to the system can foster reflection on practices that have become routine, potentially lacking in application of scientific knowledge, and therefore a potential threat to patient safety with associated legal implications for the nurse.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 08:46:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 4 - Open access to nursing journals: An audit of the 2010
           ERA journal list
    • Abstract: Bail, Kasia; Ranse, Jamie; Clarke, Roger; Rattray, Ben
      Objective: To determine the proportion of nursing journals that are fully open access or have some elements of openness, and hence are readily accessible by nurses in clinical settings. Design: A descriptive study, with interpretive analysis of existing data sources. Setting: Access to online journals from the perspective of a nurse as a consumer. Subjects: Nursing specific journals from the 2010 Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) list of publications. Main outcome measure: The proportion of nursing journals with unrestricted online open access as of October 2011. Results: Of the 224 journals included in this research, 12% (27/224) had unrestricted open access to all published manuscripts, 39% (88/224) had partial or conditional access and 49% (109/224) had no elements of open access, and required the consumer to have access to a paid subscription. Conclusion: Approximately half (51%) of nursing journals surveyed have all or some articles that are open access. This is higher than other studies of open access research articles globally. However, barriers at an institutional level may need to be addressed to ensure nurses can be informed in their care of patients.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 08:46:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 3 - Practice-based simulation model: A curriculum
           innovation to enhance the critical thinking skills of nursing students
    • Abstract: Park, Mee Young; McMillan, Margaret Anna; Conway, Jane Frances; Cleary, Sonja R; Murphy, Leonie; Griffiths, Sharee Kathleen
      Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe the Practice Based Simulation Model (PBSM) as a pedagogical framework that enables the integration of simulation in a way that ensures critical thinking skills are explicitly taught as part of the processes and outcomes of students' learning. Setting: The PBSM is an innovative pedagogical strategy that offers greater flexibility; one that can be applied to various types of educational contexts and delivery modes, while simultaneously ensuring desired learning outcomes. Primary argument: The use of simulation has been gaining popularity because of its capacity to provide effective experiential learning as a method of enhancing learners' critical thinking skills. Despite ample literature that highlights the need for the integration of simulation into nursing curricula, there are few papers demonstrating simulated learning experiences that are underpinned by sound pedagogy. This paper asserts that simulated learning experiences need to be integrated into a curriculum underpinned by sound pedagogy, such as the PBSM, in order to ensure that learning facilitates the development of the critical thinking abilities deemed essential for nursing. Conclusion: The PBSM demonstrates an example of effective integration of simulation into a curriculum, and highlights the importance of the integral relationship of simulation as a key component of curriculum.

      PubDate: Tue, 2 Apr 2013 11:39:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 3 - To investigate the concerns and benefits of job
           sharing a community based Clinical Nurse Consultant role
    • Abstract: Woodhouse, Gay; Finn, Tracey; Johnson-De Wit, Karen
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify concerns and benefits of job sharing the Clinical Nurse Consultant (CNC) Youth Health team role and how these impact on job sharing a nursing leadership role. Design: A qualitative descriptive method was used in this study. Setting: Primary care. Subjects: The sample comprised of key stakeholders of the Youth Health care team including members of the multidisciplinary team and health care referrers to the Clinical Nurse Consultants as well as the Clinical Nurse Consultants whom share the role. Main outcome measures: Identification of needs required to assist in developing recommendations for nursing leadership job share models for a changing workforce in healthcare. Results: The study identified several themes needed to ensure successful job sharing of a leadership role: effective communication, compatibility, support, teamwork, mentoring and flexibility in care provision. Implementing systems that support and encourage these are necessary. Conclusion: Results suggest that concerns do exist for organisations when staff job share a leadership role. However, several key points can aid in successful job sharing for organisations and nurses as well as improved patient outcomes. These results should help nurses to develop and facilitate increased success for job sharing of leadership roles and contribute to the current need to be flexible in workforce models of nursing.

      PubDate: Tue, 2 Apr 2013 11:39:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 3 - The challenges for families managing an adolescent
           with an intellectual disability and type 1 diabetes
    • Abstract: Hillege, Sharon; Gallagher, Susan; Evans, Jennifer
      Objective: This paper describes the experiences of two families caring for their adolescent sons who have type 1 diabetes (T1D) and an intellectual disability. Design: This paper arises from a larger study and reports on the findings from four parents, (two couples), who have adolescent sons with both type 1 diabetes and intellectual disability. Case study analysis of these interviews gave a more in depth understanding of management of these dual conditions from the perspective of the parents. Setting: The interviews occurred in the parents homes. Subjects: Family one consisted of a mother, father, and three children aged 16 to 20 years. Family two comprised both parents and four children attending secondary school. At the time of the study all siblings were living at home. The two adolescent men with intellectual disability and T1D were 19 year old, still living at home and attending sheltered employment. Main Outcome Measures: This paper describes the experiences of two families caring for their adolescent sons who have T1D and an intellectual disability. Results: Independence was the major issue. Obtaining independence was hindered on several fronts: having an intellectual disability and having to manage T1D concurrently, and the short and long term effects this management has on the family now and in the future. Conclusion: The complex management of T1D coupled with intellectual disability makes independence more difficult to attain for these adolescents. The parents in this study accepted that full independence may not be possible for their sons and voiced concern for their future wellbeing.

      PubDate: Tue, 2 Apr 2013 11:39:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 3 - The influence of personal characteristics on
           perioperative nurses' perceived competence: Implications for workforce
           planning
    • Abstract: Gillespie, Brigid M; Polit, Denise F; Chaboyer, Wendy
      Objective: To examine the influence of personal characteristics on perioperative nurses' perceived competence. Design: A cross sectional survey design was used. Setting: A census of 3,209 operating room nurses who were members of the Australian College of Operating Room Nurses across all Australian states and territories was invited to participate. Primary Outcome Measure: The Perceived Perioperative Competence Scale Revised, a 40 item survey consisting of six subscales measuring the dimensions of perioperative competence was used. Results: A total of 1,044 usable surveys were analysed representing 32.5% of the accessible population. Across the six subscales, demographic predictors accounted for 5% to 33% of the variance in nurses' perceived perioperative competence. Conclusions: These results may inform workforce planning initiatives designed to address the needs of this diverse specialty group. Efforts to retain older nurses need to be centred on redesigning workplaces, increased remuneration and professional recognition, and integrating technology to promote efficiency and safety. Workforce planning should include strategies such as creating academic partnerships with universities, to provide perioperative nurses access to specialty education and advanced skills programs.

      PubDate: Tue, 2 Apr 2013 11:39:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 3 - The development and evaluation of a preceptorship
           program using a practice development approach
    • Abstract: Ford, Karen; Courtney-Pratt, Helen; Fitzgerald, Mary
      Objective: The aim of the research was to evaluate a Preceptorship Workshop for nurses and midwives structured using a Practice Development framework. The workshop was underpinned by an exploration of nurses and midwives attitudes, perceptions and concerns about being a preceptor. Design: Emancipatory Practice Development guided this study. Setting: The study was conducted in a 400 bed tertiary referral hospital in an Australian state. Subjects: Ninety three nurses and midwives participated in the study. Main outcome measures: Data collection was undertaken from July - December 2009. Participants' completed a self assessment of six identified learning outcomes on a five point Likert scale pre and post workshop. Findings were further informed by qualitative data collected during and following the workshops. Results: A paired samples t test was used to compare pre and post workshop participant self ratings of knowledge, understanding and ability to apply preceptor skills. Statement four: 'My knowledge of the requirements of my role as a preceptor in relation to the structure of a range of nursing programs' demonstrates the highest shift in self assessment. There was a significant difference in the scores pre test (M= 3.04, SD=.751) and post test (M=3.99, SD=.617). Statistically significant changes occurred across all six learning outcomes, confirmed by qualitative findings from participant input on the day. Conclusion: Findings support the use of a Practice Development approach in the provision of a preceptor workshop, with clinicians indicating high acceptability that resulted in achievement of key learning outcomes.

      PubDate: Tue, 2 Apr 2013 11:39:25 GMT
       
 
 
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