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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Journal Cover
Australasian Epidemiologist
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1327-8835
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Reshaping biostatistics 1-moving from the 20th to the
           21st century: A case study in teaching biostatistics in the Deakin master
           of public health
    • Abstract: Stevenson, Christopher
      Biostatistics 1 is a core unit in the Deakin University Master of Public Health. In 2012 this unit was taught and assessed in a traditional way with formal face-to-face lectures, written assignments and an exam. In 2013 the unit moved to a flipped classroom format and the assessment tasks were revised to have a more authentic focus. This paper is a reflection on the implementation of these changes and the challenges and barriers encountered and an assessment of their impact on students' experience of the unit.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Teaching epidemiology: The Auckland experience
    • Abstract: Scragg, Robert; Kool, Bridget
      This paper provides a reflection on some of the issues that have arisen while teaching two core epidemiology courses in the Masters of Public Health degree at the University of Auckland. One course focuses on public health and the other on clinical health. The courses have common components which could be considered as part of a core in a 'good' epidemiology course. These include measures of disease frequency, measures of effect, study design and bias, sample size, screening and diagnostic tests, meta-analysis and causation. Teaching issues include variable student experience and ability, online versus classroom teaching, and the process for choosing topics for student assignments. The passion and commitment of the teacher to the discipline of epidemiology is most important for a 'good' epidemiology course, and should convey the importance and centrality of epidemiology to the practice of public and clinical health.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - The pluses and minus of teaching biostatistics and
           quantitative epidemiology
    • Abstract: Bennett, Catherine
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - From the Editor
    • Abstract: Simpson, Steve
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Upskilling the epidemiological workforce with advanced
           biostatistics training: The ViCBiostat Summer School
    • Abstract: Simpson, Julie A; Forbes, Andrew; Wolfe, Rory; Gurrin, Lyle C; Lee, Katherine J; Schuster, Tibor; Vukcevic, Damjan; Kasza, Jessica; Moreno-Betancur, Margarita; Zaloumis, Sophie; DeLivera, Alysha; Nguyen, Cattram D; Karahalios, Amalia; McKenzie, Joanne; Milanzi, Elasma; Carlin, John B
      Epidemiologists and biostatisticians require training in modern statistical methods to ensure they are familiar with the novel methods available for the analysis of complex data. Most post-graduate training within Australia does not cover advanced biostatistics topics, whereas, in the United States it is a compulsory requirement of the PhD degree. To address this gap in training, the Victorian Centre for Biostatistics has developed a series of short courses (the ViCBiostat Summer School) that we have identified as important for progressing clinical and population health research and for building an internationally competitive epidemiological workforce.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Teaching epidemiology to undergraduate paramedics
    • Abstract: Lim, David; Hou, Xiang-Yu; Tippett, Vivienne
      The teaching of epidemiology and evidence-based practice to undergraduate paramedic students is a relatively recent addition to the curriculum in many paramedic programs. This paper describes our experience teaching epidemiology to undergraduate paramedic students a and explores the pedagogical challenges associated with these Units.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - An integrated approach to teaching introductory
           epidemiology and biostatistics to public health students
    • Abstract: Lawrence, Glenda
      Knowledge of epidemiological and biostatical concepts, and skills to apply the concepts, are essential competencies required of all public health practitioners. Traditionally, in public health degrees epidemiology and biostatistics are taught as separate subjects/courses. However, graduates need to integrate epidemiological and biostatistical knowledge and skills in their public health practice, whether critiquing published papers and other evidence to inform policy, programs and practice; collecting and analysing quantitative data; or designing a research study. Some examples of interrelated core introductory concepts and skills usually taught in either epidemiology or biostatistics core subjects in public health degrees include epidemiological study designs, measures of frequency, association and health impact; descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing and inferential statistics, correct use of statistical tests, sample size calculation, sampling, selection bias, measurement error, confounding, and regression, to name a few.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Blended learning: A way to engage undergraduate
           students in learning epidemiology and biostatistics'
    • Abstract: Graham, Melissa
      The boom in digital technology has enabled new and creative ways of both teaching and learning within universities, including blended learning and the flipped classroom. The adoption and use of digital technologies can be positive for student learning experiences; however, content material must be packaged in a meaningful way to promote and engage student learning. This article outlines the development of a framework for blended learning, how the framework was operationalised in two epidemiology and biostatistics units, and students' evaluation of the framework for blended learning.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - AEA membership
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Call for abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Konrad Jamrozik Award 2015
    • Abstract: Cameron, Adrian
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Alcohol and burden of disease studies: Challenges in
           conceptualising and measuring harm
    • Abstract: Ogeil, Rowan P; Matthews, Sharon; Lloyd, Belinda
      Background: Alcohol consumption has been linked to both acute outcomes (e.g. injuries) and longer-term consequences (e.g. chronic disease). Scientists, economists and policymakers use estimates of alcohol-attributable harm in burden of disease frameworks to estimate the impact of alcohol on disease, illness and injury. The present article highlights challenges associated with estimating alcohol harm in these models, and identifies limitations associated with measuring alcohol-related harms in the community.

      Methods: Challenges in measuring alcohol harms using alcohol attributable fractions are identified and discussed with respect to how they apply to burden of disease frameworks.

      Results: Methodological and theoretical considerations in using alcohol attributable fractions, the application of alcohol attributable fractions to hospital records and the definition of relative risk for injuries attributable to alcohol use are discussed.

      Conclusions: Alcohol-related burden significantly impacts on the health of the Australian population, and has consistently been ranked in the top ten risk factors in burden of disease frameworks. Despite this, these methods likely underestimate the overall harm. Improving estimates of alcohol related harm will enable a more accurate estimate of alcohol-related burden and inform both epidemiologists and policymakers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Comparison of two measures of past body size
    • Abstract: Sarink, Danja; Fritschi, Lin; Girschik, Jennifer; Heyworth, Jane; Winkels, Renate; Peters, Susan
      Introduction: We investigated an alternative for self-reported past adult body weight resulting in less missing data, but still providing a valid measure for ranking participants.

      Methods: We collected information from 2,647 women aged =45 years on their height and weight (to calculate body mass index (BMI)) when they were in their early thirties. Participants were also asked how their weight in their early thirties compared with that of other women of the same age and height (comparative weight), categorised as 'a lot less', 'a little less', 'about the same', 'a little more' and 'a lot more'. These two weight measures were compared using a Spearman rank correlation coefficient.

      Results: Data was missing less often for comparative weight (1.2%) than self-reported weight (12.5%). Of the 2,304 women with both BMI and comparative weight data, the two measures fell in the same category for 54.3%. Comparative weight underestimated self-reported BMI for 36.4%. The correlation coefficient was 0.64 (0.61-0.66), indicating that comparative weight is in overall good correlation with past BMI.

      Conclusion: We showed that measurement of past comparative weight (1) reduced missing data compared to recalled BMI, and (2) a good correlation between measures indicating that comparative weight may be a useful alternative for ranking on self-reported past BMI.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Data linkage of healthcare services: Alcohol and drug
           ambulance attendances, Emergency Department presentations and hospital
           admissions (2004-09)
    • Abstract: Ferris, Jason; McElwee, Paul; Matthews, Sharon; Smith, Karen; Lloyd, Belinda
      Background: To examine the feasibility of linking individual records from three siloed health data sources, drawn from Victoria, Australia: data relating to drug and alcohol ambulance attendances, and associated emergency department presentations and hospital admissions.

      Methods: The cohort for data linkage consisted of all patients attended by ambulance for alcohol- and other drug-related events in metropolitan Melbourne, Victoria, from 01 July 2004 to 30 June 2009. Three population-level administrative datasets were linked using the deterministic approach for matching: ambulance records, emergency department presentations, and hospital admissions. The linkage of these datasets involved a series of processes designed to maximise the number of cases linked and minimise the risk of incorrectly linked unrelated cases.

      Results: Of the 97,433 drug and alcohol ambulance attendances for the 2004-05 to 2008-09 period, 69,912 (over 70%) of these were reported as being transported to an emergency department. We linked approximately 90% of transported ambulance cases with emergency department data. We then identified 25% of these cases as being admitted to hospital.

      Conclusion: These results are a cornerstone for future studies examining the pathways of care associated with drug and alcohol ambulance attendances. Exploration of these linked data will provide an excellent opportunity to examine the nature and extent of drug- and alcohol-related harms across acute care settings, and enhance the capability of the available data to identify involvement of alcohol and drugs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Contraceptive use in women at risk of unintentional
           pregnancy
    • Abstract: Trinh, Lieu Thi Thuy; McGeechan, Kevin; Estoesta, Jane; Bateson, Deborah; Sullivan, Elizabeth
      Aims: More than 80,000 induced abortions - or one in four pregnancies - occur in Australia every year. Use of effective contraceptive methods is essential to prevent unintended pregnancy and abortion. The aim of this study was to examine contraceptive use among women who were at risk of unintended pregnancy.

      Methods: Data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey 2011 were analysed. Women who were fecund, in an intimate relationship and did not intend to have any more children in the next three years or ever were considered to be at risk of unintended pregnancy and were included in the analyses. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with any contraceptive use and by what contraceptive method.

      Results: Around one in three women aged 18-44 years were at risk of unintended pregnancy (n=1,250; 30%). Of these women, one in six (n=191; 17%; 95% CI: 15-19%) did not use contraception. Women from a non-English speaking background were more likely to not use contraception than those from an English speaking background (OR: 3.8; 95% CI: 2.3-6.2). Women who had no children (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.2-4.6) or had one child (OR 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2-5.3) were more likely to not use contraception than women who had three or more children. Among the 1,059 women who reported using some form of contraception, 138 women (12%) used a long-acting reversible contraceptive, 306 (30%) used a permanent method (e.g. tubal ligation) and 615 (58%) used other methods that were neither long acting nor permanent (e.g. condom).

      Conclusions: Efforts to promote contraceptive use should focus on women from a non-English speaking background, young women and women with less than three children.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Spanish influenza of 1918-19: The extent and spread in
           South Australia
    • Abstract: Kako, Mayumi; Steenkamp, Malinda; Rokkas, Philippa; Anikeevaa, Olga; Arbon, Paul
      The 1918-19 Spanish influenza was the first pandemic for which official records were compiled in South Australia. This followed the recognition of the disease as notifiable under the Public Health Act and the establishment of a surveillance system by the then South Australia Central Health Board (a precursor to the current South Australian Health Department). This is the first paper to describe the Spanish influenza epidemic for South Australia from an epidemiological and geographical perspective. Notification numbers were retrieved from the South Australian Central Health Board meeting records. Data were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and Epi info 7 software to enable a geographical analysis. There were 8,839 influenza notifications: of these, 4,854 (55.0%) originated from metropolitan areas (Attack Rate 9.9 per 1,000 population) and 3,985 notifications (45.0%) originated from regional areas (Attack Rate 8.0 per 1,000 population). There was a lack of comprehensive epidemiological data due to the still developing surveillance system. This restrained more in-depth analysis of risk factors and geological spread.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Suicides and unemployment: Is there a relationship in
           New Zealand'
    • Abstract: Campbell, Malcolm; Beere, Paul; Bowie, Christopher; Griffin, Edward; Kingham, Simon
      Objective: This study explored whether male and female suicide rates are associated with variations in unemployment at a national level in New Zealand for the period 1970-2009.

      Methods: Suicide rates by age-group and sex in the working population (15-64 years) were calculated for the period 1970-2009. Using records of national unemployment for the same period, regression analyses were used to examine the effect of both quarterly percentage unemployed, and the percentage change in unemployment between quarters, on national suicide counts.

      Results: Suicide rates were positively correlated with unemployment rate. Younger age groups, and males in particular, were identified as being most at risk of increased suicides during periods of higher unemployment. No effect of percentage change in unemployment between quarters was evident.

      Conclusions: Periods of high national unemployment may be drivers of increased suicides in New Zealand, and this relationship varied across sex and age groups.

      Limitations: The ecological nature of the study design does preclude ascription of causal directionality; however these findings are of interest and suggest more direct epidemiological studies in New Zealand.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Report for AEA mid-career international travel award
           2014
    • Abstract: Lynch, Brigid M
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Report for AEA mid-career international travel award
           2014
    • Abstract: Smith, Kylie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - AEA membership
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - The big gamble: The need for a comprehensive research
           approach to understanding the causes and consequences of gambling harm in
           Australia
    • Abstract: Thomas, Samantha L; Thomas, Stuart DM
      Problem gambling is now recognised as a major public health issue, with some gambling products posing significant burdens for individuals, families and communities. While gambling has attracted significant political and media attention, governments have been largely unwilling to implement a comprehensive approach to gambling reform. This article reviews the evidence base associated with gambling harm and advocates for a shift in focus away from initiatives that focus on responsible gambling, towards an approach that recognises the mutual obligation between industry, individuals, governments and the general community to engage in practices that prevent the development of gambling-related harm.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Teaching epidemiology in Australia and New Zealand:
           What are the core and advanced concepts for epidemiological practitioners
           and researchers'
    • Abstract: Sarfati, Diana; Lynch, John; Bain, Chris; Blakely, Tony; Edwards, Richard; Jackson, Rodney; Page, Andrew; Priest, Patricia; Stanley, James
      In June 2014, an invited group of experienced teachers of epidemiology from universities in New Zealand and Australia met for two days to talk about teaching epidemiology at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. This arose out of informal discussions that identified a series of emerging challenges we faced in teaching epidemiology. First, there are practical issues. We are increasingly teaching students who are highly heterogeneous in ability, backgrounds, and professional needs in relation to epidemiological knowledge; and in some cases it is not clear that our teaching of epidemiology meets the professional practice requirements of current students. Second, this heterogeneity combined with limited numbers of students make it difficult to provide classes to suit their diverse needs. For example, numbers of students are generally too small to sustain courses in advanced or specialist epidemiology methods. Third, there is a lack of research on the best pedagogical approaches to teaching epidemiology, and a lack of supporting resources for teachers of epidemiology. Fourth, given numerous recent methodological, technological and conceptual advances in epidemiology, epidemiology teachers are facing challenges about how and when to incorporate these advances, and how to keep up with these concepts and methods.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - A new way of categorising recurrent, repeat and
           multiple sports injuries for injury incidence studies - the subsequent
           injury categorisation (SIC) model
    • Abstract: Finch, Caroline F; Cook, Jill; Gabbe, Belinda J; Orchard, John
      Injuries are a major contributor to healthcare costs and individuals' health and disability status. In response to the overall public health burden, injuries were one of the first medical conditions identified as an Australian National Health Priority Area. Our previous epidemiological research has shown that sports injuries, especially those sustained through formal and highly competitive sport, are often associated with considerable pain and dysfunction. They have significant ongoing impact on quality of life and need for medical treatment, including in the hospital setting.They are also a major barrier towards both the uptake and continuance of health-generating physical activity guidance.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Biomechanical epidemiology: A novel approach for
           fitness activity injury prevention
    • Abstract: Gray, Shannon E; Finch, Caroline F
      There have been limited epidemiological studies that delve into injuries sustained during fitness activities, and fewer that have explored injury prevention strategies and evaluated their success. Popular individual and team sports such as athletics, swimming, basketball and various codes of football have enjoyed extensive epidemiological attention for years, and due to the sports' popularity and public profile, will continue to be highly researched areas. Other epidemiological research has focused on sports injuries more generally, or on specific injury types such as concussion, anterior cruciate ligament injury and hamstring injury. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Exercise Recreation and Sport Survey (ERASS), fitness/gym is the second most popular recreation or sport activity participated in by Australians aged 15+ years. Considering the number of people who participate in fitness activities, and the devastating impact that injuries can have on the individual, their family and friends, and society, it is necessary to devote some research to preventing these.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Analysis of interrupted time-series relating to
           statewide sports injury data
    • Abstract: Akram, Muhammad; Finch, Caroline F
      This study aims to present a new approach towards the analysis of intervention time-series studies in the context of sports-related injury data. We used Victoria-wide hospital admission injury data associated with the sport of Australian football during the period 2006 to 2013. To estimate the state-wide effect of an implemented exercise training intervention that aimed to reduce the number of football-related injuries, time-series analysis was performed using a generalised least square (GLS) method. We show how the GLS method can be used to evaluate the impact of the intervention. Trend and seasonal patterns time series were also assessed using the 'Seasonal and Trend decomposition using Loess' nonparametric seasonal decomposition procedure. The model identified a decreasing trend in the seasonally adjusted number of injuries after the implementation of the intervention in the hospital admission data. The seasonal decomposition plots also indicate strong seasonal patterns in the injury time series.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Spatial epidemiology: A new approach for understanding
           and preventing sport injuries
    • Abstract: Singh, Himalaya; Fortington, Lauren V; Eime, Rochelle; Thompson, Helen; Finch, Caroline F
      In order to develop effective strategies to prevent sports injuries, we need to have an understanding of the people and populations who are most at risk of injury as well as the risk factors associated with sustaining injury. Spatial epidemiology is a method used to address questions of when, where, to whom and how health outcomes such as sports injuries occur at a population level, taking into account geographic variation. The aim of this article is to outline the potential application of spatial epidemiology to achieve a better understanding of sports injuries to inform prevention strategies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Veterinary epidemiology and 'one health' in
           Australasia
    • Abstract: Stevenson, Mark A; Firestone, Simon M
      The website of the Australasian Epidemiological Association cites three main aims of the branch of medical science known as 'epidemiology': to describe patterns of disease in human populations; to identify the causes of diseases (also known as aetiology); and to provide data essential for the management, evaluation and planning of services for the prevention, control and treatment of disease. In veterinary epidemiology our aims are identical to those cited above: the only difference of course is that the word 'human' in item is replaced with 'animal'. Indeed, veterinary epidemiology considers the health states of populations of both human and non-human animals (including mammals, birds, fish and 'small livestock' bees and other farmed insects) which are linked through food and other environmental systems. Veterinary epidemiology is often taught and practiced alongside the discipline of 'veterinary public health' which encompasses the contributions that veterinary science makes to human health.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - How healthy is Australian sport'
    • Abstract: Eime, Rochelle; Harvey, Jack
      Behavioural epidemiology in health promotion has been defined as having five phases: establishing links between behaviours and health; developing measures of the behaviour; identifying influences on the behaviour; evaluating interventions to change the behaviour; and translating the research into practice. This article outlines some recent developments in the application of behavioural epidemiology to the issue of sport participation in Australia and its consequential health benefits.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Sarcopenia and physical activity in older Australians
    • Abstract: Rodríguez, Alexander J; Ebeling, Peter; Scott, David
      Originally, the term sarcopenia (derived from the Greek sarx and penia meaning 'lack of flesh') was proposed to describe the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass thought to contribute substantially to functional decline. However, research over the past 25 years has demonstrated that muscle mass is a relatively poor predictor of functional decline compared with muscle strength, and that muscle mass decline during aging may explain less than 10% of strength loss. Disparities in the pathophysiology of muscle mass and strength decline have led some to propose a separate term for muscle strength declines ('dynapenia'), but in general, sarcopenia is now considered as age-related loss of muscle function in addition to muscle mass. The most widely accepted recent definition was developed by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) which describes sarcopenia as low muscle mass combined with low handgrip strength and/or gait speed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Epidemiology of injuries in full-contact combat sports
    • Abstract: Lystad, Reidar P
      As in any sport, there is an inherent risk of injury to practitioners of combative martial arts. Notwithstanding the potential for injury, there has not been a concerted effort to clearly elucidate the injury problem in full-contact combat sports. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the injury incidence, injury pattern, and injury severity in six popular and commonly practiced full-contact combat sports. Data from a total of 47 observational studies suggest that there is a significant injury problem in full-contact combat sports generally. However, the injury incidence rates and injury patterns vary considerably across different styles, which most likely is a reflection of differences in competition rules. Very little is known about the actual severity of injuries in combat sports. Future studies are strongly encouraged to adopt stronger study methodologies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Bicycle travel, injury risk and conspicuity: Findings
           from a PhD project in New Zealand
    • Abstract: Tin, Sandar Tin; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi
      Regular cycling provides health, environmental and economic benefits but is rarely part of everyday travel for many people. The real and perceived risk of injury is commonly cited as a significant deterrent to engaging in such activity and motor vehicles are regarded as a particular threat. Bicycle-motor vehicle collisions often result from the driver's failure to detect the cyclist in time, suggesting that conspicuity may be a contributing factor. This paper provides an overview of bicycle travel, injury risk and conspicuity in New Zealand, based on the findings of a PhD research project conducted in 2008-14. The findings of the Taupo Bicycle Study, a prospective cohort study involving 2,590 adult cyclists, were used in conjunction with aggregate or de-identified data from routinely collected national databases.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - From the editor
    • Abstract: Simpson, Steve
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Behind every active and sporting population, there is
           an Epidemiologist
    • Abstract: Finch, Caroline F
      This Round Table on The Epidemiology of Fitness, Sport and Physical Recreation makes for compelling reading. Australia has long been regarded as a sports-mad nation and one that has achieved major international sporting achievements because of its long-term investment in sports medicine and sports science research. Sports spectatorship is also a major pastime in Australia, underpinning the value of using sport to promote a range of health promotion messages (e.g. in relation to tobacco, alcohol, social tolerance and most recently violence prevention). People of all ages now enjoy participating in a wide range of activities from general physical activity to fitness training to cycling to team ball sports such as Australian football to combat sports. All of these feature in papers in this issue.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Monitoring population trends through physical activity
           surveillance - a chequered history in Australia
    • Abstract: Bauman, Adrian; Chau, Josephine
      Health behaviour monitoring is an important dimension of population surveillance, to ensure that public health efforts are resulting in improved health. This is usually through self-report information using population surveys. For physical activity in Australia, there has been a 30 year history of these surveys, reporting on the proportions of the population who are regularly active, or who meet the national recommended levels of physical activity. The history of physical activity surveillance in Australia has been a patchwork of methods and measures at both State and national levels, providing limited trend information and demonstrating marked differences between measures used and across jurisdictions. The need for standardised assessment remains a mandatory component of useful surveillance systems.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Conference welcome
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Keynote and invited speakers
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - General information
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Registration information
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Meeting program at a glance
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Meeting sponsors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Plenary session
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Poster session abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Delegate list
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Annual general meeting agenda
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Biostatistics
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Oral health
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Non-communicable disease
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Addictive substances
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Quantitative methods 1
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Advances in record linkage 1
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Early career researcher workshops
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Maternal / infant health
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Cardiovascular disease
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Injury
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Indigenous health
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Social and digital media in epidemiology 2
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Cancer
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Epidemiology and cost-effect modelling
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Advances in record linkage 3
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Mental health
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Social and digital media in epidemiology 1
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Infectious disease
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Quantitative methods 2
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Advances in record linkage 2
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Plenary 2
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Ian Prior Oration: Robert Beaglehole
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 3 - Recruitment to epidemiological studies
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Challenges and opportunities for innovation in alcohol
           and drug epidemiological research
    • Abstract: Lloyd, Belinda; Heilbronn, Cherie
      Alcohol and other drug use is a significant public health issue with substantial impacts on individuals, health and social services, and the Australian community as a whole. Yet, there are discrepancies between the availability of population-level epidemiological research and the level of evidence necessary to plan appropriate responses. In this paper, we discuss the strengths and limitations of the traditional research methods used in alcohol and other drug epidemiology, as well as the potential gains from innovative research designs emerging within the alcohol and other drug field.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Making the numbers count
    • Abstract: Daube, Mike
      Two of the pioneers of modern epidemiology, Sir Austin Bradford Hill and Sir Richard Doll, held the view that scientists should not play any role in promoting publicity or policy outcomes arising from their work. Richard Doll eventually changed his position after decades of governmental failure to act on tobacco and decades of tobacco industry denials, delays and deceptions, but 'Hill in particular thought that drawing policy implications from science was a job not for scientists but for policy makers'.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - From the editors
    • Abstract: Simpson, Steve; Watt, Kerrianne
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Alcohol's harm to others: An overview of Australian
           work and results so far
    • Abstract: Laslett, Anne-Marie; Wilkinson, Claire; Room, Robin; Livingston, Michael; Ferris, Jason; Mugavin, Janette
      This paper provides an overview of the results of 'The Range and Magnitude of Alcohol's Harm to Others Study', conducted in 2008-10. The estimates of harm and costs associated with this harm are described, along with a short description of ongoing work in this field of research. This paper should be read in tandem with 'The Range and Magnitude of Alcohol's Harm to Others: study design, data collection procedures and measurement' article in this issue.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - The range and magnitude of alcohol's harm to others
           study: Study methodology and measurement challenges
    • Abstract: Wilkinson, Claire; Laslett, Anne-Marie; Ferris, Jason; Livingston, Michael; Mugavin, Janette; Room, Robin; Callinan, Sarah
      'The Range and Magnitude of Alcohol's Harm to Others', or 'Harm to Others Study' (HTO Study) for short, is an Australian study conducted collaboratively with researchers in New Zealand. The project studied the effects of alcohol on people other than the drinker using survey, registry and qualitative interview methodologies. The study commenced in 2008. This paper describes the methodologies as well as discusses some of the challenges in measuring alcohol's harm to others. The HTO Study is the first comprehensive study of alcohol's harm to others. The project has contributed a different perspective to the measurement of alcohol-related harms and contributed to policy discussions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Tobacco retailing: The new frontier of tobacco
           control'
    • Abstract: Burton, Suzan; Nesbit, Paul; Khan, Aila
      Successive waves of legislation have resulted in a very large decrease in the number of smokers in Australia. Yet smoking remains a massive health problem for Australia, and there is evidence that progress on quitting has stalled. With promotion of cigarettes through advertising, point of sale promotion and pack display banned, and smoking removed from enclosed public places throughout Australia, it's not obvious what additional steps can be taken to make it easier for attempting quitters to permanently quit smoking. This paper argues that restrictions on tobacco retailing may provide an effective way to reduce impulse purchases by smokers and attempting quitters, and thus improve the success of quit attempts in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Boozing and losing: The relationships between alcohol
           and gambling
    • Abstract: Young, Martin; Markham, Francis
      There are many parallels between alcohol and gambling. At the level of the individual, gambling and alcohol problems tend to co-occur. Explanations have generally argued that alcohol consumption increases impulsivity and hence gambling behaviour, although both laboratory and naturalistic studies have provided mixed conclusions in this regard. At the population level, gambling and alcohol consumption share a set of social and spatial determinants that influence the distribution of harms. One of the main challenges to implementing effective public health measures is the political power wielded by so-called 'Big Alcohol' and 'Big Gambling', both of which try to place responsibility on the individual rather than with the broader availability of these forms of dangerous consumption.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Alcohol outlet density: The challenge of linking
           research findings to policy
    • Abstract: Livingston, Michael
      This paper provides a brief summary of the research literature that links the local level density of alcohol outlets to alcohol-related problems before focussing on the challenges of translating this epidemiological evidence into effective policy. Alongside the ideological and political challenges of regulating the alcohol industry, there are two key issues that need to be tackled: critical weaknesses in the evidence base and the major challenges of policy implementation. These two areas are canvassed here, with implications for future research in this area and for the ongoing challenge of providing policy-relevant epidemiological evidence.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Social determinants of alcohol consumption that
           exceeds Australian national alcohol guidelines
    • Abstract: Matthews, Sharon; Lloyd, Belinda; Heilbronn, Cherie
      This paper examines the distribution of alcohol consumption across a series of social determinants of health including: educational qualifications, employment status, residential area, marital status, age and gender separately and in combination to determine their overall impact in Victoria, Australia. While the majority of the population do not drink at risky levels or exceed Australian Alcohol Guideline 1 of more than two standard drinks per day, there remains a substantial proportion of the population that do, with 40% consuming at risky levels and 11% exceeding this Guideline. Gender disparities prevail after adjusting for several social factors. Of concern are age distributions of consumption. While those 35 years and under have a higher proportion consuming alcohol at risky levels at least monthly (over 40% for all four surveys), over 30% of 36-50 year olds, and a fifth of 51-65 year olds also consume at these levels. This is concerning as much of the focus to date is on young people.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Sewage-based epidemiology: A novel, emerging approach
           to estimating population-level illicit drug consumption
    • Abstract: Lai, Foon Yin; Kirkbride, KPaul; Prichard, Jeremy; Bruno, Raimondo; Hall, Wayne; Gartner, Coral; Mueller, Jochen F
      Accurately measuring illicit drug use is difficult. In recent years, quantifying excreted drug metabolites in raw sewage samples, so-called 'sewage-based epidemiology', has become a complementary tool to other traditional epidemiological methods for more robust and better estimation of illicit drug consumption in general populations and/or specific sub-populations over different scales of temporal and spatial resolution.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Exercise addiction - the emergence of a new disorder
    • Abstract: Berczik, Krisztina; Griffiths, Mark D; Szabo, Attila; Kurimay, Tamas; Kokonyei, Gyongyi; Urban, Robert; Demetrovics, Zsolt
      An optimal level of regular physical activity plays an important role in the maintenance of physical and mental health. However, excessive exercise in a minority of individuals can have adverse effects on health and lead to exercise addiction. Exercise addiction can be conceptualised as a behavioural addiction. The aim of this paper is to outline the current knowledge on the concept, epidemiology, aetiology, comorbidity, and possible interventions of exercise addiction.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Exploring the barriers and enablers to smoking
           cessation in pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women with the
           behaviour change wheel
    • Abstract: Gould, Gillian Sandra
      Tobacco smoking is the most important reversible risk factor for maternal and infant health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This article uses the Behaviour Change Wheel to examine the factors affecting smoking cessation for pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and suggests avenues to strengthen support. It is necessary to find innovative ways to engage and educate pregnant smokers and those of child-bearing age, improve access to existing services, build on the positive changes occurring in smoke-free homes, and provide practical assistance for smoking cessation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - AEA membership
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Vale Tony McMichael
    • Abstract: LaMontagne, Anthony
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Cohort profile: The Australian and New Zealand
           Diabetes and Cancer Collaboration (ANZDCC)
    • Abstract: Harding, Jessica L; Shaw, Jonathan E; Koshkina, Vira; Magliano, Dianna J
      There is now a wealth of data supporting a link between diabetes, and obesity, with cancer. While the data strongly suggests an association, there is less clarity about site-specific cancers. This is often due to limitations in sample size. Additionally, many studies do not consider important confounding variables such as central adiposity, smoking, and physical activity. In 2010, we initiated the Australian New Zealand Diabetes and Cancer Collaboration (ANZDCC) in order to create a large pooled cohort to investigate factors of diabetes, pre-diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and hypertension, with cancer risk. We included all longitudinal cohorts in Australia and New Zealand from 1983 onwards with information on diabetes, hypertension, anthropometry, and with a sample size >=1000. These baseline data (n=153,025) were linked to the national cancer and mortality registries to obtain longitudinal follow-up of cancer and mortality outcomes for all participants in the pooled cohort. This study will provide insights into the potential mechanisms of cancer; allow a better and fuller assessment of the likely burden and consequences of diabetes and obesity; and in the Australia/New Zealand context, inform clinical practice about the appropriate care of patients with diabetes and obesity.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Methodological challenges and options for addressing
           them in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research
    • Abstract: Smith, Brian James; Carson, Kristin Veronica
      The disproportionate burdens of morbidity and premature mortality among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian's are well-documented. Research and clinical practice evaluations are essential in determining if existing programs to reduce this inequality gap will actually be effective. However, methodological rigour appears to be fundamentally lacking in the current evidence base with concerns that the absence of appropriate evaluations alongside these programs may result in implementation of ineffective practices and poor disease management. This article highlights some of the existing barriers for conducting research in collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and provides options to consider when addressing these issues.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Challenges and opportunities with communicating the
           results of studies related to fruit and vegetable consumption for general
           wellbeing and mental health
    • Abstract: Mihrshahi, Seema; Mishra, Gita D
      There has been recent interest in the role of dietary factors in improving mental health and preventing depression. In this article we outline some of the challenges associated with communicating the results of studies that measure dietary factors such as fruit and vegetable intake, on health outcomes, particularly those related to mental health. Some of these include conflicting results from observational studies and meta-analyses, differences in study design and variations in the measurements of dietary factors and health outcomes and how controversial claims and conflicting results are reported in the media. We also briefly discuss the potential of new technologies in communicating health messages and reporting results of epidemiological studies involving diet and disease to the public.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - The Blue Wiggle, the epidemiologist and dietary
           supplements
    • Abstract: Brew, Bronwyn K; Marks, Guy B
      Fish oil supplements are heavily promoted by vitamin companies as being useful for brain and mind improvement; however the epidemiological evidence does not back these claims. In this article we argue that epidemiologists and scientists are best placed to understand and communicate the research about food supplements but that they may not always have the skills to do this. We suggest some resources that may be helpful for the dissemination of knowledge to the general public.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Challenges, lessons and new ways of communicating
           epidemiology
    • Abstract: van der Mei, Ingrid
      It is my pleasure to introduce a beautiful set of articles on 'Communicating Epidemiology'. Communicating our research findings and being involved in the development of public health messages is a critical part of our work, but is not always given the attention it deserves. There are tips for you throughout the Round Table on what is important and how to improve your skills.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - From the editors
    • Abstract: Simpson, Steve; Watt, Kerrianne
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - AEA membership
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Report for AEA Early Career Researcher Travel Award
           2013
    • Abstract: Page, Matthew J; Sullivan, Sheena; Hocking, Jane; Yu, Xue Qin
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Long conversations: Gomeroi gaaynggal tackles renal
           disease in the Indigenous community
    • Abstract: Rae, Kym; Weatherall, Loretta; Blackwell, Caroline; Pringle, Kirsty; Smith, Roger; Lumbers, Eugenie
      The Gomeroi gaaynggal program in Tamworth and Walgett NSW, is working in partnership with Indigenous communities to understand the development of renal disease in women and their children. They are using innovative strategies of ArtsHealth to communicate the results of their NHMRC funded research programs and educate the community.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Disseminating health informatics research and
           'Informatics in Developing Countries' and the Health Informatics Forum
           MOOC
    • Abstract: Paton, Chris; Malik, Muzaffar; Househ, Mowafa
      Over the past five years, we have collaborated on a number of initiatives to disseminate health informatics knowledge to developing countries. The existing academic and publishing infrastructure is not well suited to distributing knowledge without incurring significant costs to students and researchers. This is a particular issue for researchers in developing countries where the costs of purchasing journal articles, books or courses can be prohibitive. This article describes two initiatives that aim to provide free, high quality research and educational resources to health informatics students, academics and professionals in developing countries. The first is an Open Access (OA) journal called the Journal of Health Informatics in Developing Countries (www.jhidc.org), and the second is a Massive Open Online Course that is hosted on the Health Informatics Forum website (www.healthinformaticsforum.com/MOOC).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - The use of social media advertising for study
           recruitment
    • Abstract: Frandsen, Mai; Ferguson, Stuart G
      Social media is a fast growing online phenomenon potentially providing researchers with a valuable recruitment tool. While some social researchers have explored the use of this medium as a recruitment strategy, taking advantage of its enormous potential reach, few have reported on its efficacy. The present paper hopes to offer prospective users and social researchers wishing to enhance their recruitment practices an overview of practical advantages, potential pit-falls and considerations for future use.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Communicating epidemiology: One experience from
           research on alcohol and pregnancy
    • Abstract: Cameron, Cate M; Shibl, Rania
      This paper provides a reflection on one researcher's experience of communicating findings from a recent study of trends in maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy in Australia from 2007-11. Through a planned journal media release, both traditional and social media methods were used to disseminate the study results and open a dialogue with the public worldwide. It is now more imperative than ever that the researcher gain media communication skills and harness social media opportunities to communicate epidemiological research findings and truly engage the public.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Socioeconomic differences in food choices:
           
    • Abstract: McKinnon, Loretta C; Langbecker, Danette H
      Nutrition knowledge is associated with dietary choices in the general population and has been proposed to contribute to socioeconomic differences in food choices and corresponding socioeconomic gradients in mortality and morbidity for a number of diet-related illnesses. This paper explores current evidence regarding socioeconomic differences in nutrition knowledge, reviewing the components of nutrition knowledge that have been assessed, the dietary intake or food choice outcomes considered, and the socioeconomic indicators used. In addition, this paper considers how socioeconomic differences in nutrition knowledge may arise, and potential determinants of inequalities in the application of nutrition knowledge. It highlights issues to consider when developing strategies to improve nutrition knowledge and facilitate knowledge application among those of lower socioeconomic position.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Communicating epidemiology - the example of young
           adults and nutrition
    • Abstract: Allman-Farinelli, Margaret A
      Communications from nutrition research always prove popular with the mass media. To successfully deliver messages to the target demographic it is important to understand their knowledge, beliefs and preferred communication channels. Young adults can be difficult to reach with preventive nutrition messages because of their self-perceived invincibility, but their widespread engagement with social media opens new opportunities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Public health communications about sedentary behaviour
    • Abstract: Burton, Nicola W
      A behavioural epidemiology framework purports that public health responses should be informed by research on health associations, prevalence and variations, determinants, and interventions. This framework is used in the first section of this article to provide a brief introduction to sedentary behaviour epidemiology, including 'what' is the problem, 'who' has the problem, and intervention approaches. This evidence base can inform public health communications in terms of identifying message content and the target audience. Three challenges for communicating this evidence base are identified: defining sedentary behaviour and what is 'too much'; differentiating sedentary and inactive; and differentiating the behaviour and the context and understanding associated values. To further inform public health communications, and improve understanding of motivation and support advocacy for change, more research is needed to understand the factors associated with sedentary behaviour other than sociodemographic and health-related correlates.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - The risks and benefits of different approaches to
           communicating research to the media: A personal reflection
    • Abstract: Halliday, Jane
      Two examples of media interactions are presented here, the first is one in which the researcher reacts to media interest, opening one up to the risk of there being an existing message the journalist wants to use to attract attention. The second example is where the researcher is proactive, spending a lot of time preparing the message, not only what to say, but who to say it and in what setting.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Communicating the imperfect protection from today's
           influenza vaccines
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Sheena G; Barr, Ian G
      This paper discusses some of the misconceptions about influenza, the influenza vaccine and the difficulties of developing comprehensive vaccination guidelines. Susceptibility to infection and the effectiveness of the vaccine vary within the population. Although the vaccine is estimated to have an effectiveness of roughly 60%, some members of the population may experience greater protection and others, such as the elderly or immunocompromised, may experience lower levels of protection. An additional caveat is that an influenza vaccination when given every year, as recommended, may reduce the effectiveness of the vaccine in some years but this has not yet been shown conclusively. Communicating these complex issues to the public in a succinct public health message is challenging.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Communicating the epidemiology of skin cancer - is
           anybody listening'
    • Abstract: Strickland, Mark; Fritschi, Lin
      Epidemiological research is a strong contributor to our knowledge of skin cancer. Many individual pieces of research combine to create our current understanding of skin cancer and the risks of over exposure to UV radiation. Creating the public behaviour change that is indicated by the research is not easy. Here's an opinion on the status quo from the West.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - AEA membership
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
 
 
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