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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
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Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
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Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
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Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
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Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
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Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
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Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
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Journal Cover AIMA Bulletin
  [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1447-0276
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Issue 17 - Preface
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra
      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - List of tables
    • PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - List of figures
    • PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Index
    • PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 18: Epilogue
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra; Henderson, Kandy-Jane; Derrien, Bernard; Bigourdan, Nicolas; Le Touze, Evelyne
      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 7: The excavation of the wreck at Mermaid Atoll, site
           analysis and interpretation
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra; McCarthy, Michael; Sledge, Scott; Baker, Patrick
      Few vessels of the British South Seas whaling industry have been discovered in an archaeological context. Apart from the Rowley Shoals shipwreck, the remains of three British registered whalers have been discovered in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (O'Regan et al. 2008-09). The 320-ton 'Pearl' and 262-ton 'Hermes', lost in April 1822 at Pearl and Hermes Atoll, were located in 2004, and are the oldest discovered wrecks in the Hawaiian Islands; and, the 428-ton 'Gledstanes', wrecked in 1837 at Kure Atoll, was located and studied in 2008 (O'Regan et al. 2008-09: 16). A wide variety of material culture specific to the whaling industry has been recorded and recovered from these sites, and is contributing significantly to the historical and archaeological record of this era of South Seas whaling.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 4: Preliminary archival research
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra; Henderson, Graeme; Sledge, Scott
      From early 1980, when the quest for the 'Lively' began, museum staff started to access shipwreck databases, shipping registers, archival and literary resources in an attempt to identify the vessel marked on the 1829 chart. Accessing information from overseas repositories was not as easy as it is now; there was no Internet and only a few of the major archival institutions had even begun to think about computerising catalogues and other information about their collections. Information gathering, therefore, was dependent upon personal networks established between Australian and overseas researchers; the goodwill of employees in overseas libraries and national archives to respond to written requests; and, the overseas research and communication undertaken by various members of staff during periods of leave.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 1: The quest for the lively
    • Abstract: Henderson, Graeme; Stanbury, Myra
      The discovery and exploration of shipwrecks and maritime archaeological sites off the Western Australian coast tell us more and more about European involvement prior to the establishment of the Swan River Colony in 1829. Often the wrecks were the result of ships blown off course. Many of these were EastIndiamen heading for the Indonesian Spice Islands, such as the English East India Company ship Trial (1622) (Green 1977a), the United Dutch East India Company vessels Batavia (1629), 'Vergulde Draeck' (1656), 'Zuytdorp' (1711) and 'Zeewijk' (1727), and the American China trader 'Rapid' (1811) (Henderson 1980a and b, 1981, 1986a, 2007; Green et al. 2004; McCarthy 2012). Others were engaged in commerce of a different kind, they were searching for the ambergris and oil from the whale.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Introduction
    • PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Abbreviations
    • PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Acknowledgements
    • PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 3: Inspection of the Rowley Shoals unidentified wreck
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Michael; Stanbury, Myra; Henderson, Graeme; Baker, Patrick; Kimpton, Geoff
      In December 1980, Mr Peter Sartori filed a formal report to the Commonwealth Minister for Home Affairs and Environment (the Minister then responsible for the Commonwealth 'Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976'; until September 2013 the Minister for Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities [SEWPaC]; and now, the Australian Government Minister of the Environment) in accordance with Section 17 (1) of the Act (WAM File MA 7/80). This section of the Act requires the 'Discovery of shipwrecks and relics to be notified' as follows:

      A person who finds, in a fixed position in Australian waters or waters above the continental shelf of Australia, the remains of a ship or part of a ship, or an article associated with a ship, shall, as soon as practicable, give to the Minister a notice setting out a description of the remains or of the article and a description of the place where the remains are or the article is, situated, being a description of that place that is sufficient to enable the remains or article to be located.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 2: The Rowley Shoals
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra; Henderson, Graeme
      The Rowley Shoals is the most south-westerly of a series of isolated reefs and banks on the edge of the north-western Australian shelf (lat. 17 degrees 10'S, long. 118 20'E) (Fig. 6). Located approximately 296 km (160 n miles) north-west off Broome it comprises three separate annular reef structures classified on the basis of morphology as 'shelf atolls' (Fairbridge 1950; Berry 1982, 1986; Berry and Marsh 1986; Done, T. and C. and Thomson 1994). The atolls arise from the Scott Reef/Rowley Shoals platform on their landward sides and drop away to depths of between 300 and 700 m on the seaward side (Berry and Marsh 1986). They are exposed to an extreme tidal regime, with semi-diurnal tides ranging from 3 m at neap tide to over 10 m at springs (Brewer, Lyne, Skewes and Rothlisberg 2007, cited in Commonwealth of Australia 2011: 5); and, oceanic swell that results in a very high-energy environment, which influences the atolls' structure, height, and floral and faunal diversity. From north-east to south-west the atolls are Mermaid Reef, Clerke Reef and Imperieuse Reef, each atoll covering an area of about 80 to 90 km2.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 6: The 'Abeille' - a French prize
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra
      From the time Daniel Bennett purchased his first ship Lively, in 1786, peace between the European nations was elusive. However, in the decade after the American Revolution, larger premiums for whale oil, offered in 1786, and extensions of fishing limits, may have encouraged the more adventurous and entrepreneurial investors, merchants and shipowners to enter the Southern whaling trade (Jackson 1978: 111). An additional inducement was the profit to be made. Early catches of whales, particularly sperm whales, had been made with relative ease, the better quality oil being much in demand and fetching high prices - two to three times as much as common Right whale oil (Jackson 1878: 111-112). The early 1790s were thus regarded as the 'great years of activity in the Southern Fishery' (Jackson 1978: 113). By 1793 Daniel Bennett had increased his fleet to nine vessels, ranging in size from 150 to 316 tons, with an aggregate tonnage of c. 1 774 tons. Another nine ships were purchased between 1794 and 1799, some of which remained in service for several years.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 5: Daniel Bennett and the London whaling trade
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra
      The American War of Independence from 1776 to 1783 had a significant effect on the British whaling industry. Until the American Revolution, the bulk of Britain's peacetime oil supplies came from the New England colonies (Jackson 1978: 91). While the turmoil of the Revolutionary war encouraged the Northern Fishery, it gave rise to the competitive Southern Fishery. American whalemen of pacifist persuasion, notably the Quakers of Nantucket, refused on moral and religious grounds not only to take up arms, but also to contribute by other means to the war effort (Du Pasquier 1990: 6). In an attempt to remain loyal to Britain, some of them moved north to Newfoundland and others south to fish in the ocean between Cape Verde and Brazil. Many, like the Enderby family of Boston, Massachusetts, left America and moved to Britain (London) where they helped to establish the Southern Fishery in England (Jackson 1987: 92; Jones 1981b; 1986: 266-269). Across the English Channel, Quaker whaling families from Nantucket predominantly installed themselves in France, at Dunkirk and Port-Louis, where their whaling expertise contributed to a revival of French whaling and its expansion to the Southern Fishery (Du Pasquier 1990).

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 14: Corrosion of cast and wrought iron on the Mermaid
           Atoll site
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra; MacLeod, Ian D
      The application of corrosion science to the management of maritime archaeological sites is an invaluable aid in understanding the corrosion mechanisms and modes of deterioration of ferrous and non-ferrous materials on underwater sites. Research has demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a clear understanding of the nature of corrosion and deterioration forces working on a shipwreck through the in-situ application of both surface pH and corrosion potential measurements (see North 1984; Brown, Bump and Muncher 1988; MacLeod 1989a, 1989b). Understanding the mechanism of corrosion is important in determining the conservation process required for stabilizing artefacts against further deterioration, and the conservation procedures for separating corrosion products from iron and other metallic objects (North 1976; MacLeod 1989a).

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 13: Ordnance and small arms
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra; Carpenter, Jon; Green, Jeremy; MacLeod, Ian D
      Six cast iron guns were found on the Mermaid Atoll wreck site, with a possible seventh gun lying in the turbulent waters at the shallow end of the gully (Rowley Shoals Day-book No. 109: 152). The six guns were located in close proximity to one another, in a 6 x 3 m area towards the reef end of the gully (see a-f on site plan Fig. 58 page 81). The discovery of the guns was not unexpected given the need for late 18th and early 19th-century merchant ships, sailing in little known waters and potential war zones, to be capable of defending themselves (see Chapter 5; O'Regan et al. 2008-09).

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 12: Archaeological evidence for whaling activities from
           the Mermaid Atoll shipwreck
    • Abstract: Rodrigues, Jennifer
      The hunting and processing of whales and the storing of the whale oil products carried out on board a whaling vessel meant that there had to be sufficient hunting and processing equipment as well as storage containers to be able to carry out these tasks efficiently. By the early 19th century, try-works technology had revolutionized the operation of extracting whale products aboard ship instead of transporting the heavy carcass to port. This made it possible for whalers to remain on voyage for up to 3 to 4 years. This also meant that the combination of the try-works structure, try-pots, whale oils casks, whaling gear and implements, whale-boats as well as the blubber and provisioning was the reason that whale-ships were considered to be heavy and slow moving. They were built as such to withstand long periods of time at sea and also to facilitate the processing of whales.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 11: Copper and copper alloy artefacts: Contemporary
           experimentation and modern analyses
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra; Kasi, Kalle; MacLeod, Ian D
      The study of copper alloy fastenings and fittings from 18th and 19th-century sailing ships wrecked on Australian shores has provided a wealth of information about the composition of the alloys and their possible influence in determining the overall condition and fate of these vessels (MacLeod 1991; MacLeod and Beng 2000; MacLeod and Pennec 1990; MacLeod and Pitrun 1986, 1988; McCarthy 1996, 2005; Samuels 1983; Stanbury 1998,1994; Taylor and MacLeod 1985; Viduka and Ness 2004).

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 10: Timber analysis - an Australian connection
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra
      By 1787 when the 'Abeille' was built, both France and England were experiencing a critical shortage of timber for shipbuilding, in particular home-grown oak and compass timber - a name given to curved or arched timbers used in wooden ship construction. Both nations relied on foreign imports of timber to supplement their shipbuilding requirements, especially for the maintenance of their naval fleets. Timber from abroad, however, was often judged to be of inferior quality to oak and other timbers grown on home soil.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 9: The artefacts: Ship's hull and associated fittings
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra
      As referred to in the previous chapter, the main objective of the artefact analysis is to identify whether the findings are consistent with the wreck having been a French-built vessel. Evidence for this would principally be found in the structural components of the ship and their correspondence with the Lloyd's survey data for the Lively (Abeille), and information contained in Blaise Ollivier's report (Boudriot 1983a). Movable items, such as the anchors and ordnance may also provide clues as to the ship's origin, although they are more likely to represent replacement objects, either because the originals were not sold with the vessel after its capture as a prize, or they were unsuited to a new function for the ship. In this regard, on-board equipment, such as the whaler's try-pots and whaling implements may be viewed as part of the refurbishment that the vessel would have had to undergo in preparation for its new commercial operations.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 8: A French merchant ship?: A framework for
           artefact analysis
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra
      Information concerning the construction of French merchant ships in the 18th century is extremely rare. One of the most important sources is Blaise Ollivier's manuscript dictionary that was written in the 1740s, but unfortunately the illustrations he refers to in the text no longer accompany the original document (Boudriot 1983a: 271). Ollivier's description, however, serves as a useful basis to gain some idea of the construction of a merchant ship such as the Abeille might have been. It will serve as a useful framework within which to analyse the archival data to hand, and the archaeological remains.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 17: Summary and conclusions
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra
      This report details the initial circumstances that led to the knowledge of a vessel having been lost in the Indian Ocean, some considerable distance from the Australian mainland, and the archaeological and archival research undertaken to elicit further information. The site is an important one since it provides an insight into early shipping and whaling activity off the western Australian coast in the period leading up to settlement-1780s to 1829-about which little is known. Whilst documentary evidence can provide answers in some cases, this was a situation that required archaeological excavation to conclude the questions asked.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 16: Personal and shipboard objects
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra
      Very few artefacts that can be classified either as personal possessions or objects associated with life on board were recovered from the Mermaid Atoll shipwreck. From the Log of Daniel Bennett's whaler Kingston, a 300-ton (306-tonne) ship, we can estimate how many people would have been on board the Lively, and the amount of supplies and provisions that would have been required for the voyage. The Kingston mustered 18 men, including the Master, and 5 apprentices for the three-year whaling voyage in the Southern Whale Fishery to the Eastward of the Cape of Good Hope (Dennis 2006: 1). The men included: two Mates and Harpooners; a second and two third Harpooners; three Boatsteerers; four Seamen; a Cooper, Carpenter, Landsman, Cook and Steward - a total of 23 people.

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Issue 17 - Chapter 15: Navigation equipment
    • Abstract: Stanbury, Myra; Nutley, David
      By the late 18th and early 19th century, navigational aids for use at sea had become far more accurate. Many of the essential instruments for making observations in navigation, such as chronometers, pocket watches, sextants and telescopes, and for plotting courses on paper charts, were readily available from scientific instrument makers. From the early 18th century, England's instrument-making trade had become centred on London. Here, instrument makers not only catered to the increasing public demand for popular optical and natural philosophical instruments, but also to the growing need for high-quality precision instruments for mathematical and astronomical measurement, in particular the instrumentation and Nautical Almanacs for determining longitude at sea by the lunar-distance and chronometer methods (Bennett 1985; Stanbury 1991).

      PubDate: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 23:21:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 The wreck of the VOC 'retourschip Zeewijk': An archaeological
           and historical puzzle
    • Abstract: Green, Jeremy
      The Dutch East India Company (VOC) ship 'Zeewijk' was wrecked on Half Moon Reef in the Pelsaert (southern) Group of the Houtman Abrolhos, off the Western Australian coast in 1727 (Fig. 1). The survivors remained on a nearby island, eventually building a rescue boat and finally reaching their intended destination of Batavia (modern Jakarta) after 16 months. At the time of the wreck the survivors reported evidence of another shipwreck in the area. Following European settlement in Western Australia in 1829, a number of early explorers noted evidence of the wreck of the 'Zeewijk', recovered material they found from the wreck on the islands and recorded material that they thought came from another wreck. In 1953 cannon were recovered from part of the wreck site, but this was clearly not the main site. In 1968 the main site was discovered in deeper water. The wreck site was protected under State legislation ('Maritime Archaeology Act 1963') and subsequently under Federal legislation ('Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976') and the Western Australian Museum was given responsibility for the site under these Acts.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Risks, resources and significance: Navigating a sustainable
           course for marine development-led archaeology
    • Abstract: Firth, Antony
      Our world is as dependent on the sea as it has ever been, for transport, raw materials, energy, communication and other basic needs. Satisfying these needs requires infrastructure and activity that have effects on marine and coastal environments, including elements of the historic environment. In consequence, marine development sits at the sharp point where archaeology meets today's society. Archaeological investigations prompted by marine development present an enormous opportunity to understand and safeguard aspects of the past that are hitherto little explored. But such investigations also require daily negotiation of the principles, ethics and role of archaeology in society. This paper takes the combined purposes of archaeology - research, conservation and public engagement - as a framework for examining practical questions raised by marine development-led archaeology in respect of risks, resources, and the significance of the past.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Notes to authors
    • PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Closing in on the 'Fortuyn': A progress report
    • Abstract: Henderson, Graeme; Viduka, Andrew; Parkinson, James; Moss, Alexander
      Two gatherings in the lead up to the 400th year commemoration of Dutch skipper Dirk Hartog's 1616 landing in Western Australia (the first recorded landing by a European) were the inspiration for the 'Closing in on the 'Fortuyn' search project. These were the Stakeholders' Meeting on Australia-Dutch Cultural Heritage Activities, held at the Western Australian Museum in February 2011, and the Australia-Dutch Heritage Day debate, held at the same Museum in February 2012. At these meetings considerable interest was also shown in a project to search the Houtman Abrolhos for the Dutch VOC ('Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie') shipwreck 'Aagtekerke', lost between the Cape of Good Hope and Batavia (Jakarta).

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Preliminary investigations on the wreck of the SS Solglimt,
           Marion Island
    • Abstract: Boshoff, Jaco; van Niekerk, Tara; Wares, Heather
      The sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands, which lie approximately 2 180km south-east of Cape Town in the Southern India Ocean are made up of two island territories now known as Marion Island and Prince Edward Island. Marion Island is of volcanic origin with a terrain of hills, marshes and lakes. Vegetation is limited to mainly mosses, fern and lichen. Due to strong westerly winds and abundant rain and snow, there are no trees and the ground is boggy. Marion Island spans 19km in length and is 12km wide (de Villiers et al. 2011).

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Taka pesawat: A German U-boat wreck site in the Java Sea
    • Abstract: Mochtar, Agni Sesaria; Adhityatama, Shinatria; Ramadhan, Ahmad Surya; Noerwidi, Sofwan; Sulistyarto, Priyatno Hadi; Utomo, Bambang Budi
      No less than 463 shipwrecks are thought to lie in Indonesian waters, with only 10% of these having been positively confirmed in terms of exact location (Kompas 2010). Most activities conducted at these wreck sites involve commercial salvage operations - both legal and illegal - in order to acquire as much of the cargo (mostly ceramic but also gold, bronze and gems) as possible. The Indonesian government has to date permitted 13 legal salvage operations since 1990 (Kelompok Kerja Penyelasaran Data Kelautan dan Perikanan 2011: 40). One example includes the recovery of the Tang Cargo (9th century ad) by Maritime Explorations in 2000 (Flecker 2000: 199 - 217; 2008: 384 - 386), which led to many questions later arising on the nature and method of the salvage. On the contrary, archaeological investigations on these sites have been very scarce.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Locating the 'Mahogany ship': The geography of a legendary
           shipwreck
    • Abstract: Snoekstra, Ruurd
      There have been many searches for the so-called 'Mahogany Ship' in recent times, all unsuccessful. These include McKiggan's searches from 1974 to 1981 (McKiggan 1985: 34-35, 38-45) and the Victorian state government's 1992-93 reward searches (Sherwood and Forth 1994: 57-68). The shipwreck was first discovered by Europeans in 1836 (Johns 2011: 61-66) but has remained a mystery since. Locating the shipwreck site is the only way to resolve what the shipwreck is, where it came from and what happened after it came ashore. This research reviews many eyewitness accounts to attempt to identify the Mahogany Ship's location.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Port Phillip Bay on fire: Burnt ships of Victoria's gold-rush
           era and a study of an archaeological footprint
    • Abstract: Taylor, Peter
      Since Victoria's earliest colonial days, a number of wooden vessels have caught fire and been burnt in Hobson's Bay at the northern section of Port Phillip Bay, adjacent to the City of Melbourne. During the Victorian gold-rush of the 1850s, the number of vessels arriving into Melbourne increased exponentially. On arrival, crews would often desert their ships and make their way to the 'diggings'. The eagerness of crew to get to the gold fields suggests a link to the number of burning events. It may also be that when ships arrived to depressed markets, others further up the class hierarchy - be they merchants, captains, owners or their agents - could have played a part too. With the number of burning events taking place in Victorian waters, Port Phillip Bay was literally on fire. Major news stories were generated by these events in contemporary newspapers and, while the causes were often not confirmed, arson was alleged in many cases. These incidents appeared to be endemic to Victoria alone, with no other states or territories suffering anywhere near the same frequency of serious shipboard fire incidents. As the wrecks were considered hazards, they were subsequently either salvaged or demolished, possibly removing all traces of these important, historical events.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Addendum to Fujita: A firsthand account of Darwin's post-war
           salvage program
    • Abstract: Steinberg, David
      This paper draws on recently donated records and newly acquired firsthand knowledge to revisit the salvage story of Darwin Harbour's wartime shipwrecks. It intends to correct some past assumptions and develop a greater appreciation of the story from both a technical and social history perspective. In 2009 the author published a paper in the 'Bulletin of the Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology' detailing the salvage of Allied wrecks sunk in Darwin Harbour during the first Japanese air attack on 19 February 1942 (Steinberg 2009). That article detailed the history of the salvage of those vessels and focussed on the 1959-1960 work of the Japanese owned Fujita Salvage Company owned and operated by Mr Ryugo Fujita. During these operations the bulk of the hull structures were cut down and shipped back to Japan to be absorbed into that nation's post war industrial boom, leaving behind the ship floors, debris and in some cases cargo. What remains on the seafloor still constitutes a significant part of the archaeological record and is heritage listed for its monumental value under the Northern Territory 'Heritage Act'.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Stone anchors from Mombasa, Kenya: Evidence of maritime contacts
           with Indian Ocean countries
    • Abstract: Bita, Caesar; Tripati, Sila
      Since prehistoric times, people have used some kind of watercraft to cross rivers, seas and oceans, reaching far-off places - and they most likely used stones as anchors. After several centuries, watercrafts changed dramatically, i.e., construction changed from log to plank, plank to hull and from wood to steel; rowing and sailing were replaced by mechanical power; and carrying capacity increased. Similarly, anchors changed from stone to wood, from lead to iron and iron to steel. These aspects have been confirmed by evidence from various maritime archaeological investigations and shipwreck findings throughout the globe (Pulak 2005: 43; Tripati et al. 2014: 115-143; Curry 1999: 17-23; Wachsmann 1998: 255-293; Upham 1983: 3-25).

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Understanding the interactive nature of 'in-situ' processes for
           management of submerged cultural heritage material
    • Abstract: Winton, Trevor
      The purpose of this paper is twofold. Firstly, it provides an overview of the physical, biological and chemical processes, along with their environmental and anthropogenic influences that can operate on submerged archaeological sites; secondly, it demonstrates that many of these processes are interlinked, forming interactive systems that need to be adequately understood in order to effectively manage sites 'in situ'.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Seeing Narungga (Aboriginal) land from the sea: A case study
           from Point Pearce/Burgiyana, South Australia
    • Abstract: Fowler, Madeline; Roberts, Amy; Graham, Fred; Sansbury, Lindsay; Sansbury, Carlo
      The concept of 'seeing land from the sea' (Cooney 2003: 323) has gained currency since the themed World Archaeology issue, 'Seascapes' (2003), building upon 'maritime cultural landscape' studies by Hunter (1994: 261), Jasinski (1999: 14-18), Parker (1999, 2001) and Westerdahl (1992, 2002). Since this time, however, few case studies have explored the practical methods that can be employed to incorporate such thinking into maritime archaeology studies. Are maritime archaeologists around the world embarking on survey vessels and pursuing a 'seaward perspective' (Phillips 2003: 376) or are there 'water views' (Guthrie and Kohen 2005: 16) that are yet to breach the conceptual barrier of the office door?

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 A response to the article, 'A possible pre-Tasman canoe landing
           site, or tauranga waka, in Golden Bay, South Island, New Zealand', by R
           diger Mack and Rosanne Hawarden, published in the 'Bulletin of the
           Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology' (2014), 38: 111-124
    • Abstract: Wallace, Patricia Te Arapo; Anderson, Grahame; Jenkin, Robert; Horry, David
      As a group of fellow scholars who took part in the Abel Tasman 370 Seminar hosted by Ambassador Arie van der Wiel of the Netherlands in June 2012, including other interested parties, the authors were fascinated to read of the research undertaken by R diger Mack and Rosanne Hawarden, and were pleased that this period of New Zealand history continues to attract such interest. However, all research is only as good as the evidence it draws upon. In the interest of accuracy, the authors of this paper feel obliged to point out that one element of the Mack and Hawarden evidence is severely flawed.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 The Butuan Boats of the Philippines: Southeast Asian edge-joined
           and lashed-lug watercraft
    • Abstract: Lacsina, Ligaya
      Within regional boat studies, edge-joined and lashed-lug plank boats constructed without metal fastenings are widely understood to characterise Southeast Asian boats. The earliest written accounts of Southeast Asian boats were largely brief but often remarked on this trait. Archaeological remains of these boats from throughout the region confirm this and show that this was accomplished in several ways. The boats' planks were edge-joined either by using stitching supplemented by dowels, dowels supplemented by stitching, or exclusively by dowels (Manguin 1993; McGrail 2001). Another trait only occasionally remarked upon in historical accounts, but is most obviously recognisable in some of the material remains, is the series of drilled lugs protruding from the insides of the boats' planks. The lugs, as described in the most detailed accounts, functioned to secure frames and thwarts to the hull by means of lashing rope or rattan to the lugs' holes.

      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 23:10:29 GMT
       
 
 
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