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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
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Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
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History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover AIMA Bulletin
  [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1447-0276
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 33 Notes to authors
    • PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Towards an understanding of the importance of the HMAS Sydney
           and HSK 'Kormoran' sites. Part 2: The inordinate delay in commencing a
           search
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Michael
      The over 13 million 'hits' on the Finding Sydney Foundation (FSF) Website during the successful 2008 search attests to national and international interest in finding HMAS Sydney and its adversary HSK Kormoran. When the two ships were eventually located within a few nautical miles of the positions given in WWII by the German survivors and also appearing in a number of Royal Australian Navy (RAN) analyses in 1941, the question why the search took so long to be launched was foremost in many minds.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Towards an understanding of the importance of the HMAS Sydney II
           and HSK 'Kormoran' sites. Part 1: The genesis and evolution of the
           controversies
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Michael
      What follows is the first of a three-part series that seeks to explain to fellow maritime archaeologists why the wrecks of HMAS Sydney II and the German raider HSK Kormoran are two of Australia's most significant maritime archaeological sites. In this paper the genesis and development of the controversies surrounding the loss of the two ships is examined. Allied to this is a second paper examining the reasons why the search for the two wrecks took so long in commencing, despite both lying very near the positions provided by the German survivors and within a few nautical miles of each other. In the third paper the archaeological evidence will be examined and conclusions drawn against the issues raised in the first two papers.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Neolithic and early Bronze Age reed boats and watercraft from
           Mesopotamia and the Persian Gulf: An overview
    • Abstract: Bigourdan, Nicolas
      This paper is partly based on a research topic from a thesis conducted by the author as part of the requirement for the fulfillment of an Honours Degree in Archaeology (Bigourdan 2003) and submitted at the Universite Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne in 2003 (Paris, France). The focus of the original study was the naval architecture of boats and watercraft from Mesopotamia and the Persian Gulf (see Fig. 1) from 5000 BC to CE.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The 'surprise': Australia's first steamship
    • Abstract: Sexton, RT
      The Surprise was the first steamship to be either built or to operate in Australia. As a result it received an unusual amount of attention in the contemporary press from which its interesting career can be traced in considerable detail. No pictorial record of the vessel seems to have survived; however, the wealth of information in a variety of sources provides a solid basis for a reconstruction of the ship's probable details. This extends to the machinery, perhaps the most remarkable thing about the Surprise. The vessel was fitted with lightweight plant developed by (Sir) Goldsworthy Gurney (1793-1875), one of the pioneers in the design of steam carriages. This included his patented water-tube boiler, the forerunner of those which with improved technology came to prominence towards the end of the century.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Archaeology of an Australian steam tug: The SS 'Dumaresq'
    • Abstract: Tracey, Michael MacLellan
      Inhabitants in Australia, an island continent, have depended on some form of watercraft for thousands of years. Upon European settlement traditional dug-out and bark canoes gave way to introduced shipbuilding technology. Although timber suitable for shipbuilding was available in the Colony of New South Wales its properties were poorly understood. Similarly, the timber industry depended upon men of decision, dedication and management, as well as workers and work boats to fulfil various entrepreneurial dreams. Work boats, such as steam-tugs were forgotten by history. This paper is an archaeological narrative of one such vessel.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Site formation process (wing inversion) at Catalina flying boat
           wreck sites lying in roebuck bay, Broome, WA
    • Abstract: Jung, Silvano
      I believe most of them [the flying boat wrecks] that were [dredged] up, blown up and taken further out and exploded. So they've been disturbed a lot already (Bibby 2001). The ten World War II (WWII) flying boat wreck sites lying in Broome's Roebuck Bay reported in Jung (2007a) are argued in this paper to be in situ, and their layouts indicate how they sank. Wreck site layouts reveal a signature pattern, or regularity in aircraft elements. A depositional site formation phenomenon relating specifically to Catalina flying boats referred to as 'Wing Inversion', is defined in this paper. A burning Catalina, therefore, produces a distinctive pattern in the distribution of its archaeological material (Fig. 1). A hypothetical break-up sequence, based on archaeological data, is suggested for the Broome wreck sites, but is also applicable to all Catalina flying boats that have sunk as a result of fire. Post depositional impacts, such as salvage, on the wrecks are discussed, but it is argued that the wrecks are a continuous site type; the surviving archaeological material in Roebuck Bay represents a remarkably in situ battlefield assemblage.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Raising the war: Japanese salvage divers and allied shipwrecks
           in post-war Darwin
    • Abstract: Steinberg, David
      The first Japanese air raid on Darwin Harbour on 19 February 1942 was a major event in Australian wartime history. This demoralising attack of a port within Australia resulted in over 200 dead and the sinking of many ships and planes. It heralded the beginning of Japanese attacks on Australia's homeland that included the infamous attacks on Broome and Sydney Harbour. The ships that were sunk in Darwin Harbour were partly salvaged for scrap metal seventeen years later, ironically by a Japanese salvage company. Leaving behind the ship floors the rest was shipped back to Japan to be absorbed into that nation's post-war industrial boom.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The archaeology of military mismanagement: An example from New
           Zealand's colonial torpedo boat defences, 1884-1900
    • Abstract: Hunter, James W
      In 1882, New Zealand's colonial government purchased four torpedo boats from J.I. Thornycroft and Co., a British firm that specialized in the manufacture of such craft and boasted an impressive clientele - including the national navies of Great Britain, France, Italy and Russia, among others. These small, manoeuvrable, steam-powered vessels had their origins in the American Civil War (1861-1865) and were specifically designed to attack large warships within the confines of harbours and inland waterways. They utilised a bow-mounted 'spar torpedo' which, quite unlike the guided, self-propelled weapons of today, was essentially a canister containing several kilograms of black powder affixed via a long pole or 'spar' to the bow of the torpedo boat. During an attack, the spar would be extended forward of the bow as the torpedo boat crew attempted to ram the explosive charge at its forward extremity against the hull of an enemy vessel (Gray 1975: 79-80). Torpedo boats were an integral component of the New Zealand Government's efforts to develop coastal defences for the colony's most important ports, and part of a larger Australasian response to regional threats and other defence-related concerns. Foremost among these were perceived Russian military designs on British territories in the South Pacific, the withdrawal of Imperial British troops from Australia in 1870, and subsequent rumours of potentially aggressive foreign naval deployments to the region (Nicholls 1988).

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Managing an Australian midget: The imperial Japanese navy type a
           submarine 'M24' at Sydney
    • Abstract: Smith, Tim
      The discovery in November 2006 of the 'missing' third Japanese midget submarine from the 1942 Sydney raid closed one of Australia's enduring naval mysteries. The vessel was the most successful of the boats used in the audacious attack and its disappearance created a legacy of intrigue. Under command of Sub Lieutenant Katsuhisa Ban (aged 23) and Petty Officer Namori Ashibe (aged 24), M24 entered the harbour, attacked the visiting United States heavy cruiser USS Chicago (CA-29), missed, and sunk a naval depot ship killing 21 men. Importantly M24 escaped, whereas its sister midgets Ha-14 and Ha-21 were destroyed and later recovered. Four submariners were confirmed killed, with the two-man crew aboard M24 also presumed lost. All were posthumously awarded high Japanese naval honours.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Discovering new ground - AIMA's mapping the Australian coast
           database project
    • Abstract: Anderson, Ross
      In 2006-07 AIMA successfully bid for an Australian Historic Shipwrecks Program grant to create a database of maritime archaeological sites relating to 'Mapping the Australian Coast'. This came about as 2006 was the 400th anniversary of the first recorded European charting of the coast, in 1606, by Dutch Captain Wilhelm Janszoon in the Dutch East India Company's jacht Duyfken.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 The story of a few lead bale seals
    • Abstract: Kleij, Piet
      During the archaeological investigations of remains of the Dutch East Indiamen that sank off the Western Australian coast - Batavia (1629), Vergulde Draeck (1656) and Zeewijk (1727), several lead bale seals were raised from the seabed. Generally, the problem of lead seals is that their markings are often poorly legible or sometimes completely missing. Even if they are legible however, their meaning or significance is still not always clear. This applies to part of the lead seals found on the Dutch shipwrecks along the Western Australian coast. The origin of one of these lead seals, that has not yet been identified, plus the textile material to which it was attached, will be discussed here. A close study of this particular lead seal will yield information vital to the understanding of others from Western Australia's Dutch shipwrecks, and one found upon the rediscovery of the Dutch East Indiaman Hollandia that sank in 1742 in the Isles of Scilly, off the south-west coast of England.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 The discovery, identification and site formation processes of a
           weapon related to the landing of HSK 'Kormoran' (1941) survivors at Quobba
           station, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Anderson, Ross; Garcia, Richard
      During the Easter holidays in 2007, nineteen-year-old Geraldton surfer Tom Goddard discovered the remains of a weapon while diving to search for lost fishing lures at Red Bluff, Quobba Station 130 km north of Carnarvon, Western Australia, and shortly afterwards reported his find to the Western Australian Museum. The weapon was discovered in a hole in a submerged rock ledge just off the beach that is normally subject to a heavy surf break.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Virtual modelling and 3D photogrammetry for maritime heritage:
           Exercises in EOS 'PhotoModeler'
    • Abstract: Richards, Nathan; Diveley, Brian; Liss, Michelle; Seeb, Sami
      In fall 2005, East Carolina University Faculty offered a course entitled Deep Water and Advanced Survey Methods for Underwater Archaeology as a special topic in the Program in Maritime Studies. The material covered aspects of technologically focused and computer-dependent maritime archaeology methods, including: remote sensing techniques, remotely operated vehicles, and site recording software. Class assessment revolved predominantly around explorations of emerging technological options in the area of maritime heritage, as well as the preparation of a three-dimensional photogrammetric model of a maritime object of the student's choosing. Participants created a report outlining his or her experience of the process, and their assessment of the finished product. The software used for the production of these was EOS PhotoModeler (version 5). PhotoModeler is one of a number of software programs available for close-range photogrammetry (such as Autodesk's ImageModeler, Supresoft's VirtuoZo, and DCS Incorporated's iWitness, and McNeel's new photogrammetry beta within Rhino), and exists as an alternative to other technologies such as those that use reflectorless total stations or laser scanning systems.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Research, heritage tourism and diver education: The 'undersea
           explorer' expedition 2007
    • Abstract: Viduka, Andrew; Raupp, Jason
      In 2002-2003 the Maritime Heritage Section (ex Maritime Archaeology Section) of the Queensland Museum's Museum of Tropical Queensland (MTQ) recognised that the ability of the program to undertake fieldwork activities was severely limited due to scant human and financial resources. In an attempt to find a cost effective solution to this issue, an effort was made to develop a collaborative arrangement with a commercial dive operator. The benefits of this approach were two-fold: first, it would provide museum staff with sea-time and allow them to monitor shipwreck sites; second, it would enable the museum's representatives to work with diving guests on the live-aboard to increase awareness of underwater cultural heritage. This proposed public outreach program was curtailed initially due to a change of business direction of the then prospective collaborative partner Mike Ball Dive Expeditions.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 The last remnants of 'New Zealand's first navy' - PS Rangiriri
    • Abstract: Dodd, Andy
      In 1863 the New Zealand colonial government placed an order with Sydney-based P.N. Russell and Company for two iron-hulled paddle steamers. The steamers were designed to assist with the invasion of the Waikato and traverse previously unnavigable sections of river into the stronghold of the Maori King movement. With the Waikato campaign effectively over by April 1864, the Rangiriri never saw active combat, but did assist with the subsequent transport of troops and supplies up the Waikato River. On 24 August 1864, the PS Rangiriri went on to land Captain Steele and the 4th militia settlers at Kirikiriroa to found Hamilton, now New Zealand's fourth largest city.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 e-Research and archaeological datasets
    • Abstract: Hardy, Dianna; Chang, Nigel; Atkinson, Ian
      In the 2006 edition of the AIMA journal (Hardy et al. 2006) we reported preliminary research undertaken in order to determine the effectiveness of combining the federation of maritime archaeological data with semantic search to enable archaeologists to share data. The central question for this research has been to discover whether archaeological information can be made available via a data sharing mechanism. Two additional research questions were also considered: 1. Are there tools available to federate or combine these datasets' 2. How can the search results be appropriately targeted when searching across a variety of data sources'

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Survey of maritime infrastructure at the Sarah Island penal
           settlement
    • Abstract: Nash, Michael
      As part of its management responsibilities the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service has recently carried out a detailed archaeological survey of the Sarah Island Historic Site, which operated as a penal settlement on the Tasmanian west coast between 1822-33 and 1846-47. The site is noteworthy for its massive areas of land reclamation and maritime infrastructure (slipways, docks and wharves) that were built using convict labour and local resources. During the course of the survey a proportion of this maritime heritage was recorded in detail, and the results are outlined below. Given the increasing interest in the non-shipwreck aspects of maritime archaeology this survey work adds to the body of knowledge that is now being gathered on these types of sites. In the Tasmanian context the study is directly related to the considerable research that has been undertaken during the past decade on the maritime infrastructure at the Tasman Peninsula - the site of the Port Arthur penal settlement and a suite of outstations that were largely connected by marine transport.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Analysing iron knees to aid the identification of historic ship
           remains
    • Abstract: Moss, Alexander
      Iron knees are a product of transition in ship construction technique, making their first appearance c. 1670 and culminating in established usage in the 19th century. Their purpose was to strengthen the inside of the frames and beams (Abell, 1948: 106). The archaeological remains of ships from this period may be characterized by the presence of these structural supports. This was indeed the case with the 'Alcoa Jetty Wreck', which lies in the shallow water near Fremantle, Western Australia. Many iron knees were seen on the site, as demonstrated by a survey carried out by the author. An attempt was subsequently made to make a positive identification by drawing together the archaeological remains with historical documents. An analysis of the iron knees proved to be successful not only in providing evidence for the size, lines and proportions of the vessel, but also its orientation. It is proposed that this kind of analysis may be of use on similar sites to establish identification of a vessel and site formation processes. The possible use of iron knees as diagnostic of these factors can be seen to be equivalent to the study of human remains in archaeology, where bone fragments are used to help ascertain the sex and age of an individual. In this case the 'bones' of a ship being analysed are its iron fittings. A dramatic illustration of this concept can be seen in an historic photograph taken of the burnt out remains of the Abemama (McCarthy, 1981: 243). Here the wooden hull of the vessel has been completely destroyed, leaving upstanding knee riders that indicate the vessel's dimensions and orientation.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Interim report of a shipwreck at Pointe aux Feuilles, Mauritius:
           'Le Coureur' (1818), an illegal slave trader'
    • Abstract: Metwalli, Ibrahim A; Bigourdan, Nicolas; von Arnim, Yann
      A shipwreck was discovered at Pointe aux Feuilles in the Grand Port Bay on the east coast of Mauritius (Fig. 1a) on 10 October 2004 by Armiyo Vurdapa Naiken, head diver of the Fish Farm of Mahebourg. The Prime Minister's Office (PMO) was immediately informed by the Mauritius Marine Conservation Society (MMCS), followed by the Mauritius Museums Council and the National Heritage Fund. With the support of the PMO two underwater archaeologists were requested to inspect the newly discovered wreck. Since Mauritius has been populated exclusively by migrants coming from the sea, this wreck holds a particular potential to uncover and understand part of the unknown maritime past of this island. According to some preliminary archival researches, only two known local ships wrecked in the vicinity of the one recently found, namely le Coureur and l'Actif. It will be shown that all evidences gathered tend to endorse the opinion that the wreck at Pointe aux Feuilles is the slave trader le Coureur. Hence, this paper aims to present the status of the research undertaken during more than two years on the wreck, and which was focused on illustrating part of Mauritius maritime history, understanding Mauritius ship construction, and identifying it.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Kangaroo Island shipwreck shelter huts
    • Abstract: McKinnon, Jennifer F; Smith, Andrea; Moffat, Ian
      During the 19th century maritime trade and traffic was expanding rapidly along South Australia's coastline (Parsons, 1983: 5; Griffin and McCaskill, 1986: 20; Jeffery, 1989: 52; Coroneos, 1997: 19). These increases in shipping in combination with the rugged and relatively sparsely populated coastline led to an increase in shipwrecks, cargo loss, and loss of life. As a result, lifesaving stations and shipwreck shelter huts were erected along the coast and on Kangaroo Island in an effort to decrease the effects of these maritime disasters, aid in the recovery of shipwreck survivors and cargo, and prevent further deaths from occurring once individuals made it ashore.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Artefact patterning at the Holdfast bay jetty: Part 2, an
           interpretation of the archaeological deposit
    • Abstract: Lewczak, Chris; Richards, Nathan
      From 1974 to 1978, the Society for Underwater Historical Research (SUHR) excavated a coastal marine deposit of cultural material from around the remnants of two old jetties at Holdfast Bay in the South Australian seaside suburb of Glenelg. In 2000, the SUHR re-excavated portions of the Holdfast Bay seafloor with a range of research questions, and public outreach designed to correspond with the Centenary of Federation celebrations in 2001. Previously published material regarding this project has been including in an accompanying article (see Lewczak and Richards, 2007). This article follows the previous examination of the non-cultural site formation processes existing at Holdfast Bay. This paper proposes that we might understand the various non-cultural site formation processes by combining three-dimensional spatial data and diagnostic material culture with density and material type analyses. In the end, we can see if artefact patterns according to density or material may serve as an indicator of site formation processes in shallow coastal deposits.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Artefact patterning at the Holdfast Bay jetty: Part 1, a
           consideration of non- cultural site formation factors
    • Abstract: Lewczak, Chris; Richards, Nathan
      From 1974 to 1978, the Society for Underwater Historical Research (SUHR) excavated a coastal marine deposit of cultural material from around the remnants of two old jetties at Holdfast Bay in the South Australian seaside suburb of Glenelg. Initial findings were published by the SUHR in 1983 (Drew, 1983), and subsequently studied and published by Jennifer Rodrigues (1999, 2002a, 2002b, 2002c). In 2000, a newly constituted SUHR carried out a series of test excavations at the site, sampling a number of cultural activity areas to examine issues of site formation. The research design and methodology of this project was presented in the Bulletin of the Australasian Institute of Maritime Archaeology (Richards and Lewczak, 2002), and the analysis of the material retrieved in 2000 was the subject of an honours thesis at Flinders University (Lewczak, 2000). Additionally, SUHR members John Perkins and Terry Drew designed a museum exhibit interpreting the vast majority of material from the 1975-1978 and 2000 excavations, which has been on permanent display in the Bay Discovery Centre (Glenelg) since 2001 (see Perkins, 2001: 1, 3-4; Kloeden, 2003: 37).

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Working backwards: Broome's World War II flying boat wreck sites
           reconstructed from archaeological non-disturbance surveys
    • Abstract: Jung, Silvano
      The students, sitting in a classroom cluttered with a variety of twisted and broken airplane parts, study the image. A few hands hesitantly go up...'It looks like he overran the runway,' one student says...'No,' Wall retorts, clearly ready for just that sort of response. 'Describe factually what you are seeing, and leave your opinions at home'...The rest of the hands go down. Wall helps them out: 'The right side of the forward fuselage has compression buckling. The props are not feathered. There is substantial deformation with crushing. And see these people walking around' Have they touched anything' You now have a contaminated investigative area.' For this group of 33 aspiring air crash investigators, school has begun (Adams, 2001: 1).

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 A defabrication method for recording submerged aircraft:
           Observations on sunken flying boat wrecks in roebuck bay, Broome, Western
           Australia
    • Abstract: Jung, Silvano
      Following from the initial investigations of the World War II (WWII) Darwin Harbour Catalina wreck sites, 1997 to 2001, in what was described as a 'deconstruction method', this paper develops the method to take into account the circumstances of the loss and depositional history of another group of flying boats (Jung, 2001: 124-128). Fifteen flying boats were lost in Roebuck Bay, Broome, Western Australia, on 3 March 1942 as a result of a Japanese air raid (Coster, 1942; Crommelin, 1948; Prime, 2004). Unlike the Darwin Catalina wrecks, where deposition events are separated by years, the Broome flying boats were sunk within a matter of minutes of each other. Site formation process at Darwin was a key indicator for determining the identity of wreck sites, since the flying boats there had sunk as a result of causes reflected in those processes. The Broome flying boats, however, were sunk by the same cause, i.e. set on fire by incendiary 20 mm cannon shells fired from Mitsubishi A6M2 'Zero' fighters of the Imperial Japanese Navy.

      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 13:33:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Notes to authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 21:45:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Cultural resource and acoustic survey of the Australian ketch
           'John Robb'
    • Abstract: Stankiewicz, Francis; Kowlessar, Jarrad; Kahn, Amer; Benjamin, Jonathan; Baggaley, Paul
      This article represents an historical overview of the site history and the results of a geophysical survey, confirming or denying the presumed location of the ketch 'John Robb'. A team from Flinders University, in partnership with the Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR), undertook the geophysical survey in an ongoing site-Monitoring project. Methods, results and management implications are presented and discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 21:45:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Refining conservation treatments for iron shipwrecks: Lessons
           learned from experiences with the USS 'Monitor' (1862) and the 'SS Xantho'
           (1872)
    • Abstract: MacLeod, Ian D
      This review was presented at an international seminar in Hasselt University in Belgium in 2009 which was assessing what archaeological and conservation options were applicable to the wreck of the Belgian Antarctic exploration ship 'Belgica' (1897-1901). The 'Belgica' was a barque-rigged sailing vessel with reinforcing iron plates on the bow and a steam engine to assist with propulsion. In the last phase of her life she was being used for storing high explosives and was scuttled in 1940 by the Allies as the German forces advanced on Norway. The engine and large parts of the drive train had been removed but the overall construction of iron knees and timber planking make it a massive composite conservation challenge. The combined experiences of the Mariners' Museum team with the USS 'Monitor' (1862) and the Western Australian Museum team on the SS 'Xantho' (1872) were considered to be relevant to the 'Belgica' project and to other composite vessels. A comparison of the corrosion processes found on the USS 'Monitor', and the Australian colonial steamship SS 'Xantho' provides a useful introduction into the complexities of conserving large items recovered from historic shipwrecks, and the potential issue of conserving complete iron shipwrecks. Under the guidance of the UNESCO charter on the management of submerged cultural resources, it is essential that appropriate preparations are made to receive the artefacts prior to any recovery of a major shipwreck or the recovery of significant objects from the site (UNESCO 2001). The 'Monitor' site was the first historic shipwreck zone to be declared a protected sanctuary under the control of NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The 'Monitor' sank in a storm off Cape Hatteras as it was being towed to assist in the blockading of Fort Sumter in Charleston on New Year's Eve in 1862. Two of the crew were entombed in the turret, which separated and descended first and sank upside down, and the upturned hull descended half on top of the turret. Under the auspices of NOAA the site was carefully examined, documented and some basic 'in-situ' conservation measures were adopted prior to any recovery of major materials. In order to ensure that small 'at risk' objects were not lost a number of portable and socially significant items were taken to the conservation laboratory of The Mariners' Museum in Newport News, 'Virginia', for treatment before the major recovery operations involving the turret, engine and condenser being removed from the site. Details of the progress on the treatments over the past decade can be found in the conservation literature (Cook and Peterson 2005; Brossia et al. 2007; Remazeilles et al. 2010) but the operational challenges will remain for more than 15 more years as large objects undergo final stages of treatment (Hand et al. 2005; Johnson 'et al.' 2011). It is noted that there is a continuing battle for recognition of the long-term conservation needs of massive cast and wrought iron objects that last well beyond the tenure of many directors of museums and of their employees, as well as that of corporate sponsors.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 21:45:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 World War II graveyard of the Pacific: Palau
    • Abstract: Browne, Kim
      The Pacific is well known amongst wreck diving enthusiasts, World War II (WWII) veterans and military historians for its impressive collection of wartime heritage. This paper focuses on the Republic of Palau, located within the geographical region of Micronesia. Palau was a powerful Japanese naval base during the Pacific conflict (1941-1945). Today, the region's waters contain over sixty sunken Japanese ships and its islands' jungles and caves are a treasure trove of wartime memorabilia. The focus of this paper is primarily on the small island of Peleliu, an island state of Palau and the site of one of the most brutal battles in the Pacific.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 21:45:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Military-related studies by the department of Maritime
           archaeology At the WA museum: An overview after 45 years
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Michael
      As an adjunct to its better-known studies, the Department of Maritime Archaeology at the Western Australian Museum has been active in the inspection, and in some cases, the excavation of sites and objects, that have resulted from, or are linked (either directly or indirectly) to, war, battle and military conflict.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 21:45:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 3DMAPPR: A community-based underwater archaeological
           photogrammetry program in Perth, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Edwards, Kevin; Bigourdan, Nicolas; McCann, Ian; Cooper, Darren
      The Maritime Archaeology Association of Western Australia (MAAWA), in collaboration with Tempus Archaeology (TA) and with the support of the Maritime Archaeology Department of the Western Australian Museum (MADWAM), recently initiated the 3D Maritime Archaeological Project - Perth Region (3DMAPPR). Intended primarily as a community-oriented capacity-building exercise, the overall objectives of the initial stage of the project were twofold: (i) to assess the viability of employing a low-cost underwater 3D photogrammetry package to document maritime archaeological sites; and, (ii) to provide MAAWA members with a set of operational guidelines, training, and experience in underwater 3D photogrammetric recording and data processing techniques. It was intended that avocational 'citizen scientists' would then be able to help address current management priorities by making meaningful contributions to the ongoing documentation and monitoring of maritime archaeological sites in the Perth metropolitan region. Combined with another MAAWA initiative (the Shipwreck WA website and smart phone application, http://www.shipwreckswa.com), this data has the potential not only to inform ongoing management of maritime archaeological sites, but also to be used as a resource for research, public education and outreach. This paper provides an overview of activities undertaken as part of 3DMAPPR during the first year of its operation. After outlining the project background and rationale, the authors review several case studies and highlight the opportunities afforded by the adoption of underwater multi-image 3D photogrammetry in a non-specialist context.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 21:45:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Managing a sigh of relief: The wreck of USNS 'Mission San
           Miguel'
    • Abstract: Price, Melissa; Raupp, Jason T; Keogh, Kelly; Burns, John
      The United States Naval Ship (USNS) 'Mission San Miguel' wrecked at Maro Reef in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands on 8 October 1957. A World War II (WWII)-era tanker with a distinguished career, the remains of the 159 m-long ship were discovered in August 2015 by a team of archaeologists conducting maritime heritage surveys in Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument (PMNM). The shipwreck site consists of the substantial and largely intact aft portion of the vessel, as well as numerous concentrations of disarticulated wreckage scattered over a relatively discreet area. The identification of the shipwreck as that of USNS 'Mission San Miguel' was supported by its close proximity to the United States Navy's (USN) reported location of its loss, as well as numerous diagnostic features and the fact that no other large steel-hulled vessel of this type is historically known to have been lost at Maro Reef. While the location of this wreck is without doubt of intrinsic historical and archaeological value, perhaps the most important contribution that it makes is the environmental information that it revealed. This paper provides a brief overview of the history and loss of USNS 'Mission San Miguel', the location of the site and interpretation of archaeological data, and the significance of the site to the management of PMNM.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 21:45:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Notes to authors
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Historical sealskins from the Archipelago of the Recherche,
           Western Australia Ross Anderson
    • Abstract: Anderson, Ross; Berry, Oliver; Loo, Isa
      The Archipelago of the Recherche consists of 105 islands and numerous uncharted reefs on the continental shelf off Western Australia's south coast. The islands provide habitat for breeding populations of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus australis forsteri) and Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea) (Gales et al. 1994). Sealers visited Western Australia's south coast in search of sealskins and seal oil from at least 1803 until the 1920s and, like elsewhere, had a devastating impact on seal populations.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Geophysical investigations at the Anuru Bay trepang site: A new
           approach to locating Macassan archaeological sites in Northern Australia
    • Abstract: McKinnon, Jennifer F; Wesley, Daryl; Raupp, Jason T; Moffat, Ian
      This paper presents the results of a magnetometer survey and initial archaeological excavations of Macassan and Indigenous features conducted at the Anuru Bay Macassan trepang processing site. The archaeology of this area is complex, containing both material reflecting the Indigenous utilisation of coastal resources and the periodic visits of the Macassan trepangers from Indonesia.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 A recent approach to shared heritage management - the Coral Sea
           declaration of USS 'Lexington', USS Sims and USS Neosho
    • Abstract: Viduka, Andrew; Luckman, Grant
      The majority of Australia's approximately 8000 historic shipwrecks are not of local manufacture, viewed 20 August 2013). There are 2786 Australian-built vessels recorded as having been wrecked along the Australian coastline (Veth et al. 2011), which means that at least 65% of the historic shipwrecks in Australian waters have originated from overseas and have shared heritage values with other countries. Many of Australia's famous wrecks exemplify this status such as HMS Sirius (United Kingdom), Batavia (Netherlands), HSK Kormoran (Germany) and midget submarine M24 (Japan). From a heritage management perspective, there is a practical need to engage with all stakeholders when considering declaring a site protected or when proposing to carry out activities that may impact on a site.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Camden Harbour reconsidered
    • Abstract: Souter, Corioli
      This paper provides a synopsis of the archaeological research conducted at Camden Harbour, West Kimberley, and examines a category of material culture not previously examined. Beyond the failed pastoral settlement of 1864, this region has the potential to reveal material evidence for Aboriginal, European and Indonesian culture contact. The Camden Harbour settlement has been subject to increased visitation, particularly by the coastal cruising industry. It is yet to be the subject of a formal excavation or management plan although the Calliance wreck site and associated terrestrial remains were deemed as archaeologically significant and included in the National Heritage List assessment (Souter 2009). The settlement is also referred to in the Australian Heritage Council's National Heritage values of the West Kimberley (Australian Heritage Council 2011). Research questions and other commentary up to this point have concentrated on European responses to a new environment. Following the most recent survey in 2009, it is acknowledged that archaeology at Camden Harbour and on the West Kimberley coast generally, requires a multi-faceted approach, one that acknowledges an intercultural interpretation of historical archaeological deposits. The adoption of historical material such as glass and ceramics by Aboriginal people at Camden Harbour has not been considered, despite being observed by archaeologists since the 1960s. This latest survey and continued project is important, as there are various perceived threats to the archaeological sites including increased tourism, resource development and loss of knowledge from both Aboriginal and European perspectives.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 The new Australian National Shipwreck Database - its
           development, features, functionality, potential and utility for regional
           capacity building
    • Abstract: Luckman, Grant; Viduka, Andrew
      Resulting from discussions at the 1985 Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology (AIMA) Annual General Meeting, a relational database was developed by AIMA in conjunction with the Department of Maritime Archaeology at the Western Australian Maritime Museum (now Western Australian Museum), using funding provided by the Australian Government. This database was called the Australian Shipwrecks Database and its purpose was to fulfil a requirement of the Commonwealth Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976 to hold a register of historic shipwrecks in Australian waters.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Searching for the yellow fleet: An archaeological and remote
           sensing investigation of the prison hulk wrecks Deborah and Sacramento
    • Abstract: Duncan, Brad; Gibbs, Martin; Sonnemann, Till F
      In 2003, the authors were shown a chart which contained an obscure reference to 'hulks' that were located along the entrance to the Yarra River at Melbourne, Australia. Local researchers had identified that the vessels on the map may have been the remains of former gold-rush era prison hulks which were once located off Williamstown, in Hobsons Bay. If true, these buried vessels represent a significant resource for understanding the nature of this nineteenth century form of incarceration. However, geo-referencing of historic plans indicates that the last known position of the hulks is now beneath reclaimed land. With limited scope for invasive testing, an interesting methodological question emerged of how to confirm the archaeological potential for physical remains to survive in situ.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Finding the last missing piece of the Catalina puzzle in Darwin
           Harbour: Discovery of 'Catalina 6'
    • Abstract: Jung, Silvano
      Three United States Navy (USN) Patrol Wing Ten (PatWing-10) Catalina flying boats were sunk during the first Japanese air raid in Darwin, Northern Territory, on 19 February 1942. Two wreck sites were located in the harbour's East Arm by unknown divers, perhaps in the 1980s, and are popular fishing spots today, but the third wreck was lost from living memory. It was thought that the missing Catalina may have been salvaged, or that it was completely buried in mud. Jung (see 1996) believed that it was still in East Arm and that it was worthwhile searching for it, as it must lie undisturbed since the day it sank. Perseverance prevailed and after 66 years it was eventually discovered, virtually intact in East Arm. Its discovery completes the pieces of a puzzle, which was determining what happened to Darwin's Catalinas (see Jung 2000). This paper presents the historical context for the new wreck site, details the predictive model for its location and describes its condition. It is the last recorded Catalina of the six to have been sunk in Darwin Harbour. The seventh Catalina wreck in Northern Territory waters, however, lies outside the harbour and is yet to be discovered.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 A lonely grave: The fishermen's bend WWII gravesite, Lt (jg)
           Osamu Kudo, 3rd 'Kokutai', imperial Japanese Navy?
    • Abstract: Jung, Silvano
      A gravesite at Fishermen's Bend in Broome's Roebuck Bay was recently reported to be that of Lieutenant junior grade - Lt (jg) Osamu Kudo, 3rd Kokutai (translation: Naval Air Group) Imperial Japanese Navy. His Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 'Zero' was shot down during combat on 3 March 1942. Anecdotal information first suggested that his body was found washed up on a beach (Prime 2004: 28; see also p. 26). In a new twist to the story, he was found hanging from a parachute and later buried in a nearby grave. This author argues that the discovery of a body in a gravesite at Fishermen's Bend may provide the physical evidence that Kudo has been found.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Digitizing 'Xantho': Notes on a project to digitally record an
           assemblage of complex engine components from a 19th-century steamship
    • Abstract: Edwards, Kevin; Cooper, Darren
      This paper details the preliminary outcomes and issues encountered in a pilot project to employ three-dimensional (3D) digitisation in the documentation of an assemblage of complex engine components from SS Xantho (1848-1872) held in the Department of Maritime Archaeology at the Western Australian Museum (WAM). The project was initiated at the suggestion of Xantho project director Dr Michael McCarthy following discussions with the authors regarding the feasibility of using (relatively) inexpensive close-range laser scanning hardware as part of the collection recording and management process. It is intended that the resulting digital archive will not only form part of the final report on SS Xantho, but also constitute a research and educational resource in its own right, in that the results will also enter the public domain via the web. There, archaeologists, heritage engineers, engine modellers and members of the public will be able to view and manipulate the components in 3D according to their interests. Finally, in being returned to the engine as part of the on-going rebuild, many of the objects being scanned will no longer be visible or readily accessible. By having scans available via remote web access and in a 3D interactive display in the gallery, this negative feature of the engine rebuild will be ameliorated.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 A framework for recording shipwreck landscapes: A case study
           from Port MacDonnell, South Australia
    • Abstract: Fowler, Madeline
      Maritime archaeology has not fully explored the relationship between shipwrecks and their impacts on local communities. Shipwreck events play a part in a long-term process where the place continues to alter the surrounding environment and becomes a landscape. When a wreck occurs near shore or onshore in a remote area, it impacts on the land and creates archaeological signatures. However, when a ship wrecks near a settlement, its impact can also alter the actions, attitudes and dynamics of local communities. The effects of wrecks can affect the landscape over time through artefacts being moved and removed, folklore and place names. Duncan (2006: 241, 281) suggests a need to look beyond the shipwreck site to the archaeological material associated with it, which is no longer in situ; as the opposite, site-specific interpretation ignores the impact of shipwrecks on the surrounding landscapes, including coastal communities. Gibbs (2006: 18) notes that material and artefacts follow many trajectories away from shipwreck sites often much further afield than the original wreck location. Gibbs (2006) and Duncan (2000; 2006) also suggest that communities prepared for the incidence of wrecks, for example through risk mitigation, and that such incidents influenced the structure of community relationships.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Exploring the potential for the archaeological application of
           remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs) in the Australian context
    • Abstract: Gately, Iain
      Since the first major archaeological investigations by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in maritime archaeology in the late 1980s and early 1990s (McCann and Freed 1994; McCann and Oleson 2004), they have steadily gained prominence. Recent volumes such as Archaeological Oceanography (Ballard 2009) and Ships from the Depths (S reide 2011) have further increased the standing of this new field of archaeological science, and all the while archaeologists are looking for new ways in which the technology can be put to use (S reide and Jasinski 2008; Webster 2009; Bingham et al. 2010; Ford et al. 2010). Yet although efforts have been undertaken internationally to both make use of and explore the potential of ROVs in archaeology, the same cannot be said of Australia. With the exception of David Mearns' (2009) well-publicised search for the HSK Kormoran and Sydney II, most efforts by archaeologists making use of ROVs in Australian waters have passed relatively unnoticed.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 The 'first option' in underwater cultural heritage management: A
           plea for the establishment and application of universal terminology and
           best practices
    • Abstract: Shefi, Debra
      As early as the Athens Charter for the Restoration of Historic Monuments (1931: Sec. 5), practitioners have identified that 'the removal of works of art from the surroundings from which they were designed is, in principle, to be discouraged'; thus, highlighting when appropriate, archaeological sites should be left in situ. At the time of the Athens Charter, however, underwater cultural heritage (UCH) was not expressly identified as a classification of 'historic monuments'. In more recent years, the professionally-derived International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) introduced the Charter on the Protection and Management of Underwater Cultural Heritage (1996), which provides practitioners with guidelines regarding UCH management, including the desired 'first option' of in-situ preservation. The ICOMOS Charter (1996: Art. 1) also stipulates that excavation or the removal of samples and artefacts for research and public display while not prohibited, are not regarded as the preferred method for site management. Subsequently, the intergovernmental United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) enacted the first international legislative document pertaining to UCH management - the 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage - which similarly establishes in-situ preservation as the recommended 'first option' for protecting submerged material culture.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 The Australian historic shipwreck preservation project 2012:
           First report on the background, reburial and 'in-situ' preservation at the
           'Clarence' (1841-50)
    • Abstract: Veth, Peter; Philippou, Cassandra; Richards, Vicki; Staniforth, Mark; Rodrigues, Jennifer; Khan, Amer; Creagh, Dudley; Viduka, Andrew; Barham, Anthony; MacLeod, Ian; Harvey, Peter
      The Australian Historic Shipwreck Preservation Project (AHSPP) is a collaborative national project funded by an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant, which began in early 2012. With ten state, territory and federal Partner Organisations working with three universities, this is the largest inter-institutional maritime archaeological project run so far in Australia.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 02:22:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 'Part of the normal beach scenery': Shipwreck investigations at
           Port MacDonnell, South Australia
    • Abstract: Fowler, Maddy; McKinnon, Jennifer
      The flotsam of the sea has a queer fascination to dwellers along the coasts. It has been gathered and used ever since the earliest times and folk were ever on the watch for the prizes the sea brought to their doors. It was found under the rocky headlands swirled high and dry upon shingle and ledges. The winter storms sweep it into inlets and creeks or piles it upon the masses of grey chert where some low point juts seaward. Houses and sheds were built of it. Furniture and fixtures, tables, and chairs that stand in old houses fashioned from the timbers of long forgotten wrecks (Perryman n.d.).

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 11:20:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Preliminary analysis of copper alloy fastenings from an
           unidentified shipwreck in Koombana Bay, Western Australia
    • Abstract: McAllister, Madeleine
      In November 2011, the City of Bunbury Council and the Western Australian Museum investigated anomalies identified during remote sensing surveys of two vacant blocks on the Bunbury foreshore, Koombana Bay (Anderson & McAllister, 2012 forthcoming). The aim of the excavation was to determine if the anomalies were historic shipwrecks and therefore protected by the Western Australian Maritime Archaeology Act 1973 (Anderson 2010: 4). The project involved significant public outreach in the form of tours and local public lectures, as well as enlisting archaeology students as volunteers.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 11:20:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Australia's privately held historic shipwreck collections: A
           current overview and proposed management strategies
    • Abstract: Rodrigues, Jennifer A; Richards, Vicki L
      Souvenir hunting and scrap metal collecting from shipwrecks off Australia's coast as well as inland waterways during pre-legislation years (and sometimes post-legislation years) have resulted in an incalculable volume of archaeological evidence being removed from wreck sites and its fate largely unknown. State and Commonwealth maritime cultural heritage management agencies have attempted over the decades to deal with this issue and have met with both success and failure. The problem is ongoing and, despite introducing protective shipwreck legislation, declaring shipwreck amnesties and regulating custody transfer of historic shipwreck relics, there are still unsatisfactory aspects that exist or that persist in the management of this dimension of Australia's underwater cultural heritage. The reasons are varied-a severe lack of resources; gaps in information about collections that are also geographically widespread and not easily accessible; inability to change certain diver attitudes; varied attitudes among maritime cultural heritage managers about the worth of privately collected shipwreck objects; an antiquated Historic Shipwrecks Act and the secretive and sometimes deceitful nature of some collectors in contributing information about their collections and activities or in their willingness to co-oporate with authorities. In this paper, the authors examine the current situation with privately held historic shipwreck relics in terms of its impact on the integrity of sites, the condition and fate of these collections and what practical strategies can be applied to deal with deteriorating collections and those where the collector may no longer be around. There is, thus, a need to address the management of existing privately held collections, which still linger in the background.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 10:09:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Australian timbers: Their significance in early Australian
           shipbuilding
    • Abstract: Clayton, Kellie
      Australian colonial shipbuilding is an important theme in Australian maritime archaeology and heritage studies. One key question is how colonial shipbuilders adapted to the Australian environment, which, by necessity, must have required them to develop an understanding of the properties and best applications of local timbers (Bullers 2005: 117; Orme 1988: 31). The quality of early Australian shipbuilding has been another major focus for research (for a recent review, see Bullers 2007: 14-16). These questions have been approached through timber sampling at wreck sites and historical research over the last 30 years, requiring maritime archaeologists to develop an understanding of Australian timber species. The purpose of this paper is to provide additional data through sampling the timbers of an historic vessel, as funded by a 2011 AIMA Scholarship, and to present a compilation of Australian timbers used in shipbuilding, according to early economic botany literature, that may help demonstrate how Australian shipwrights developed an understanding of local timber characteristics and applications.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 10:09:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Underwater aircraft sites in Australia: A summary of what has
           been learnt so far
    • Abstract: Wilkinson, Danielle
      Most aircraft wrecks in Australia date from the 1940s and there are still documents, plans, and photographs that survive relating to their history and wreckage. However, there is a danger in assuming that aircraft construction and history is so well documented that there is nothing new to obtain through archaeology (Nutley 2006:90). This paper shows how archaeological work on underwater aircraft sites in Australia demonstrate the importance of wrecks as a resource, in more ways than one.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 10:09:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 The future of Chuuk Lagoon's submerged WW II sites
    • Abstract: Jeffery, Bill
      Chuuk Lagoon (formerly Truk Lagoon) is well known amongst shipwreck diving enthusiasts, Japanese war survivors, and United States of America military historians. The 50+ shipwrecks, many retaining considerable integrity, located in a lagoon of warm, clear water have become a diver's paradise and are advertised as such through numerous websites, publications and films. They are also the final resting place for about 4 000 Japanese. To the United States of America (US) they are important historic sites associated with the US pushing back the Japanese military on their way to finalising the War in the Pacific in 1945. They are a major economic resource to many Chuukese through dive tourism, dynamite fishing and artefact souveniring that causes much conflict in their management. These conflicts are a result of the different site values and uses in addition to past colonialism and neo colonialism; issues that have been explored by the author (Jeffery 2007).

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 10:09:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Excavation box: A technical brief on the lateral application of
           a cofferdam
    • Abstract: Shefi, Debra
      In 2009 a research project was developed by a Flinders University maritime archaeology doctoral student to investigate the possibility of accelerating and maintaining an anaerobic environment by altering sediment particle size during the initial reburial phase on shipwrecks. Specifically, the experiment tested two sediment particle sizes, one larger and one smaller, against the standard backfilling of surrounding sediment to compare the rates of anaerobic development after reburial. The environment surrounding the historic wooden shipwreck Clarence in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria was utilised for this experiment. This project was established in response to data provided by archaeologists and conservators demonstrating the detrimental impact disturbance surveys have on the stable environment encapsulating a shipwreck site (Oxley and Gregory, 2002; Keith, 2002). Were it possible to increase the rate at which an anaerobic environment develops within a shipwreck site after exposure, researchers could theoretically preserve that site more effectively in situ once it has been disturbed.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 10:09:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 1976 and beyond: Managing Australia's underwater cultural
           heritage
    • Abstract: Viduka, Andrew
      The Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities is the Commonwealth's underwater cultural heritage management agency in Australia. It administers the Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976 and advises the Commonwealth Historic Shipwrecks Delegate and Minister in regard to policy decisions. The Department is also the coordinating body for Australia's Historic Shipwreck Program and is responsible for the delivery of uniform management outcomes around Australia.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 10:09:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 A review of recreational wreck diver training programmes in
           Australia
    • Abstract: Edney, Joanne
      Wreck diver speciality training programmes provide ideal opportunities to educate divers about the values and importance of shipwrecks as well as ways to avoid or minimise diver impacts on these sites. This research compares current recreational wreck diving training programmes with those from the 1980s to determine whether such programmes educate divers about the impacts of recreational scuba diving and how these impacts may be avoided or minimised.

      PubDate: Fri, 19 Oct 2012 16:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Notes to authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:10:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 In-situ conservation management of historic iron shipwrecks in
           Port Phillip Bay: A study of J7 (1924), HMVS Cerberus (1926) and the City
           of Launceston (1865)
    • Abstract: Steyne, Hanna; MacLeod, Ian D
      Heritage Victoria (HV) is the State government management agency for non-aboriginal heritage in the south-east Australian state of Victoria. The locations of 239 historic shipwrecks dating between 1831 and 1942 are known and of these 39% are steel or iron-hulled vessels. Approximately one third of all the Victorian shipwrecks lie within Port Phillip Bay, of which 20 (25%) are steel or iron-hulled vessels. This paper presents elements of the work being undertaken in Victoria that aims to establish the condition of iron and steel-hulled wrecks in Port Phillip Bay, and to determine the effectiveness and viability of in-situ conservation measures on this significant shipwreck resource.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:10:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Survey of 12th to 15th-century wharf structure and House of the
           Concubines Mua/Lapaha, Tongatapu, Kingdom of Tonga
    • Abstract: Hawarden, Rosanne; Alexander, Bruce; Schab, Corey
      This preliminary survey is the first detailed mapping of the ancient wharf and residence of chiefly women in the Fanga'uta Lagoon off Mua/Lapaha, Tongatapu, Kingdom of Tonga dating to the 15th century or earlier. Satellite imagery shows that the wharf is part of a much larger ancient port. Two phases of harbour building are suggested, incorporating massive land reclamation and the ancient canal system. Extensive use of large Porites lutea coral micro-atolls is a feature of this site. The legend of the gigantic catamaran Lomipeau reputedly buried in the landfill of Mua, is deconstructed. This reveals elements of maritime construction practices from the extensive inter-island voyaging in the pre-contact period. By creating islands from coral and sand with intervening canals, the wharf could accommodate double-hulled canoes of legendary size.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:10:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Fear of the deep: Cockburn Sound's World War II anti-submarine
           boom defence
    • Abstract: Anderson, Ross
      During World War II anti-submarine boom defences were constructed to protect Fremantle harbour, and the northern and southern approaches to the Allied naval base at Garden Island, Cockburn Sound, Western Australia. The Cockburn Sound northern boom defence is believed to have been the longest boom defence in the world spanning 9.37 km of seabed, and was a major engineering project. In 1964 the timber pylons and dolphins were demolished with explosives, and the steel mesh nets were cut and dropped onto the seabed (Jeffery 1988). There are still visible above-water remains of timber Dolphin No. 60 north-east of Garden Island, and extensive underwater remains. This paper focuses on the remains of the boom defence at the northern approaches of Cockburn Sound and summarises recent historical research, underwater archaeological surveys and management of this site.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:10:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Dampier's Roebuck
    • Abstract: Sexton, Robert T
      The whereabouts, form and appearance of William Dampier's famous ship Roebuck have been the subject of considerable speculation in the centuries following its loss on Ascension Island in 1701. Many works dealing with the voyage were produced though information about the ship was sparse and in some instances misleading. Commemorative images of the Roebuck, a former fireship, also appear to have been based on fanciful notions and these were regularly reproduced in subsequent works. Research that led to the Western Australian Museum locating the site under the sands of Clarence Bay in 2001 shed new light on the ship's loss and yielded clues to the existence of other primary source materials (McCarthy 2002; 2004). After this author had joined the Museum's team with the object of providing it with the best possible analysis and representation of the vessel - partly with a view to understanding that archaeological record - the material was examined further and greatly extended. This led to a raft of comparative studies into the fireship type and the location of the long-lost contract for building the Roebuck itself. Also located in the search for comparative data was the draught of the Griffin, another fireship built to the same specifications as Roebuck. The draught depicts the ship in original condition preparatory to rebuilding in 1702, and appears to be the earliest surviving for any named English ship complete with deck plans and an indication of basic hull shape. Together with a contemporary model of the Griffin, these primary sources are of considerable significance to maritime archaeologists and naval historians.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:10:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Archaeology and the HMAS Sydney
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Michael
      This paper is the final in a three-part series appearing in the AIMA Bulletin. The first examined the genesis and evolution of the many controversies surrounding the loss of HMAS Sydney with all hands on 19 November 1941 (McCarthy 2009a); and, the second examined the reasons behind the inordinate delay in commencing a search for it and the wreck of its adversary the disguised German raider HSK Kormoran (McCarthy 2009b). This last paper in the series looks at what has and has not been resolved by the March 2008 finding and inspection of the two wrecks. In that analysis the essential role of archaeology in solving what was once Australia's greatest maritime mystery becomes readily apparent. Reference is also made to the behind-the-scenes role of the Department of Maritime Archaeology at the Western Australian Museum and to the support of the Commonwealth Government's historic shipwrecks unit in that process.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:10:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Preliminary assessment of an early historic (2000-year-old)
           shipwreck at Godawaya, Sri Lanka
    • Abstract: Gaur, AS; Muthucumaran, R; Chandraratne, WM; Orillandeda, BC; Manders, M; Karunarathna, S; Weerasinghe, P; Dayananda, AMA; Zainab, T; Sudaryadi, A; Ghani, KABA; Wahjudin, J; Samaraweera, N
      An international team comprised of experts in diving and underwater archaeology from Sri Lanka, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines participated in the assessment of a shipwreck at Godawaya, Sri Lanka. The main objective of the exploration was to make assessment of the wreck site based on the data generated during the fieldwork. The shipwreck is lying or trapped in an isolated reef (which virtually surrounded the wreck and only the northeastern part is exposed) in 31m water depth. The observation of surface distribution suggests that the site is spread over an area of 40m by 22m. The important findings include various sizes of jars, carinated cooking vessels, quern stones and unidentified cargo and possible ship structure. The analysis of pottery retrieved earlier and observed during the present investigation suggests that the pottery is not similar to those found from the shipwrecks of the 10th century ad onwards. Comparative study of pottery and stone artefacts indicate a possible time bracket for this wreck to be between the 4th century BC and the 2nd century AD.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:10:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Notes to authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Submerged whaling heritage in Papahanaumokuakea Marine National
           Monument
    • Abstract: Raupp, Jason T; Gleason, Kelly
      Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument (PMNM or Monument) encompasses the islands, atolls and reefs that comprise an area commonly referred to as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). In the early 19th century whalers began venturing into the region en route to the newly discovered Japan Grounds located to the north-west of Kure Atoll. Over the decades of the early to mid-19th century, ten American and British whaling ships are known to have wrecked within the boundaries of PMNM. Information about each of these wrecks gleaned from primary source documents has provided the basis for the rediscovery and investigation of five of these sites. Due to the extremely remote location and the protection status provided by the Monument, these sites represent well-preserved examples of the physical remains of whaling vessels that operated in the Pacific. The range of time represented by these wrecks (i.e. from the earliest period of whaling in the northern Pacific to the approximate end of whaling activities in Hawaii) offers a unique opportunity to learn more about whaling activities in the Pacific.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The Dunbar: A melancholy obsession
    • Abstract: Hosty, Kieran
      Every state in Australia has its iconic shipwreck - shipwrecks like the Loch Ard in Victoria, the Admella in South Australia and the Yongala in Queensland - a shipwreck that has captured the imagination of the public and become engrained into the living consciousness of the state through the nature of the disaster, the loss of life and the wreck's social, cultural and economic impact on the state.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Managing invisible sites: Developing a management approach for
           inaccessible shipwreck sites
    • Abstract: Steyne, Hanna
      This paper presents some of the management issues and approaches Heritage Victoria is taking in an attempt to manage over 10% of the located historic shipwreck sites that lie in water deeper than 30 m, and which are otherwise inaccessible to Heritage Victoria. With increasing numbers of divers able to access shipwreck sites in water up to 100 m, increased coastal development and changing weather patterns, it is becoming more important than ever that heritage agencies develop a way to 'see' and manage inaccessible or 'invisible' shipwreck sites.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Victoria's sunken navy: The auxiliary gunboats 'Batman and
           Fawkner'
    • Abstract: Taylor, Peter
      Before Federation in 1901, and the formation of the Commonwealth Naval Forces in 1904, each Australian colony had its own naval forces for seaboard protection. Victoria's navy was the best equipped, with a fleet consisting of the monitor class vessel, HMVS 'Cerberus', four torpedo boats, two gunboats, and sixteen auxiliary craft made up from Melbourne Harbor Trust (MHT) and coastal vessels (Gillet 1982: 134). These vessels were fitted out with a variety of weapons, which included mines and torpedoes. Much has been written about the 'Cerberus', but there had remained a number of unanswered questions with regards to the auxiliary fleet.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 In-situ preservation and storage: Practitioner attitudes and
           behaviours
    • Abstract: Ortmann, Nicole; McKinnon, Jennifer F; Richards, Vicki
      In the last few years, trends in submerged cultural heritage management have been towards in-situ preservation and storage for a number of reasons, such as financial and curatorial considerations. In-situ forms of preservation and storage are consistently being emphasised as the preferred option under most circumstances for preserving submerged and waterlogged cultural heritage for future generations (Babits and Van Tilburg 1998: 590; Bergstrand and Nystrom Godfrey 2007: 7; Corfield 1996: 33; Dean and The Nautical Archaeology Society 1992: 332; Green 2003: 470; 15; International Council on Monuments and Sites 1996: 1-5; Oxley 1998: 159; Stewart, Murdock and Waddell 1995: 793; United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization 2001: 56-61). The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) underscores the use of in -situ methods in its 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization 2001: 51, 58-60) as does the 1996 Charter for the Protection and Management of the Underwater Cultural Heritage adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (International Council on Monuments and Sites 1996: 2). Many other organisations, while not formally installing in-situ preservation into their by-laws or constitutions, still stress the importance of this concept in their educational programmes; the Nautical Archaeology Society (NAS) in the United Kingdom is one such group.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Excavation of a fine instrument mechanism: Conservation of an
           aneroid barometer from a marine environment
    • Abstract: Coignard, Marie-Amande; Garcia, Richard
      In 1990, the barometer (EMB3682) was found on Eighty Mile Beach, near Broome, and donated to the Western Australian Museum, without any further details. It is likely to have come from the wreck of one of the numerous pearling luggers active in the Broome area. On the Eighty Mile Beach zone, 56 boats are known to have sunk, of which 46 were involved in pearling and 34 were luggers. Most of them are reported to have sunk in cyclonic conditions.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Interpreting a coherent post-medieval shipwreck: A qualitative
           spatial approach supported by GIS
    • Abstract: Nicolardi, Mariangela
      This paper aims to discuss some methodological considerations regarding the interpretation of finds' spatial distribution for investigating site formation processes of a post-medieval and coherent submerged shipwreck site.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 ICP-MS Trace Element Analysis for the potential reassignment of
           separated skeletal remains of a 'Batavia mutiny' victim
    • Abstract: Franklin, Daniel; Scadding, Cameron; Stanbury, Myra; Watling, John
      On 4 June 1629, the Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC) retourschip Batavia wrecked on Morning Reef in the Houtman Abrolhos, approximately 65 km off the Western Australian coast. The macabre events that followed the wrecking resulted in more than 100 individuals meeting their untimely demise at the hands of mutineers bent on establishing control of the surviving crew and passengers. A further 40 individuals died by drowning, disease and illness; the latter largely due to a lack of fresh water and food. Cultural and physical material directly associated with the Batavia mutiny has since been recovered, primarily from Beacon Island, which was the focal area of the mutinous attempts to establish control.

      PubDate: Thu, 18 Oct 2012 10:09:57 GMT
       
 
 
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