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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 400 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 400 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover Education, Research and Perspectives
  [12 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0311-2543
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [400 journals]
  • Volume 43 The changing landscape-state policy-making: Public service and
           teacher education in Ireland 1950-1980
    • Abstract: Herron, Donald; Harford, Judith
      Radical economic policy change from the 1950s had major implications for Irish education which had traditionally drawn its values and orientation from Catholicism and cultural nationalism. While change to the economically-related administrative structures were bold and innovative, responses in the sphere of education were less so. This article outlines the change and forms of administrative response in teacher education and the implications for the administration of teacher in-service professional development.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Confessional theology and contestation in a secular University
    • Abstract: O'Donoghue, Tom
      Issues arising from relationships between academic departments in universities and external stakeholders are numerous and complex. The matter is illustrated in this paper by focusing on a dispute in the theology department at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, which came to a head from 2004 to 2007. The dispute itself is detailed and developments influencing it at the local, national and global (worldwide theological education) levels are considered. A number of education issues that were at stake in the dispute are then examined in relation to models of leadership, models of teaching, student learning, equity, and the place of stakeholders.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Ministerial councils and Australian school education:
           Cooperative federalism and the progressive years
    • Abstract: Rodwell, Grant
      During period 1919-39 through rather passive and uncontroversial means under the banner of cooperative federalism the Commonwealth instituted some major and long-lasting school educational policy. During this period it was generally acknowledged that the Commonwealth should eschew involvement in school education, yet, the politics of the time, with the additional imperatives of the dominant zeitgeist, drove Commonwealth involvement in school education through ministerial councils.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Re-examining the curriculum development centre: Coordinative
           federalism and Kingdon's agenda-setting (1975-87)
    • Abstract: Rodwell, Grant
      During period 1975 through to 1987 the Commonwealth ventured into curriculum development, hitherto an activity for states and territories. Unlike the ACARA Curriculum of the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd governments, there was nothing mandatory about the CDC's curriculum development activities. Here, the dominant influence was coordinative federalism. This paper advances a thesis that Kingdon's Agendas is a useful lens in examining the historical circumstances bringing this educational policy into being, principally because it requires an examination of the political circumstances of the time, in this case including the politics of the administration of the CDC.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Telling tales - cruelty and abuse in schooling in Ireland
    • Abstract: Jeffers, Gerry
      The report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse (Government of Ireland, 2009) - the Ryan Report - shocked Ireland and the wider world with its chilling descriptions of abuse that was systemic, pervasive, chronic, excessive, arbitrary and endemic. Subsequent debate has, rightly, centred on the 'religious' arena, highlighting the appalling breach of trust in institutions that were church-run and staffed by members of religious orders. Discussion of broader educational values and perspectives has been limited. Exploring the perspectives of writers on schooling, in autobiography, memoir or through their fiction, can contribute to the educational debates that should arise from the Ryan Report. This article considers the insights of selected writers. A strong authoritarianism tradition within Irish schooling is identified as contributing to cultures of docility and compliance. The relevance of such issues for current practitioners is also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Examining the language factor in mathematics assessments
    • Abstract: Kan, Adnan; Bulut, Okan
      This study investigates whether word problems and mathematically expressed items can be used interchangeably regardless of their linguistic complexities. A sample of sixth grade students was given two forms of a mathematics assessment. The first form included mathematics items with mathematical terms, expressions, and equations whereas the second form included the same items as word problems. Explanatory item response modeling was used for examining the impact of item type and gender on difficulty levels of items and test scores. The results showed that word problems were easier than mathematically expressed items. Gender and its interaction with the linguistic complexity of mathematics items did not seem to have any impact on student performance on the test.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Focus group outcomes of the happy kids program
    • Abstract: Anderson, Karen; Ferguson, Neil; Partington, Gary; Byrne, Matt
      In this article, the outcomes of The Happy Kids project, a strategy to improve the social and emotional well-being of primary school students, were examined. Results indicated that the Happy Kids program had demonstrated positive social and emotional outcomes for students in all schools, in particular, a positive impact upon students' confidence, social skills and well being. In addition, the program has demonstrated positive improvement in students' attendance. Given its positive impact in schools in both metropolitan and regional areas of WA, it has demonstrated transferability and adaptability to local contexts. It can only be hoped that its impact can be felt in later years as the students involved continue with secondary education.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 A theory for educational research: Socialisation theory and
           symbolic interaction
    • Abstract: Potts, Anthony
      This article develops a theory of socialisation based on the Chicago School of symbolic interactionism but infused with new and important insights offered by contemporary scholars and their writings on roles and relationships in the twenty first century and life in the informational, network and global world. While still rooted in the seminal ideas of Mead and Blumer who originally formulated the key theoretical stance that lays behind symbolic interaction this article adds to and refines their important contributions. It thus offers an updated and contemporary version of interactionism and socialisation that may be utilized by those seeking a framework to understand important aspects of education. The article while drawing on the core contributions of Mead and Blumer notes how they wrote for different times and places. The article argues that what is now needed is to understand a new world with new roles, relationships, selves and identities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Engaging in networked learning: Innovating at the intersection
           of technology and pedagogy
    • Abstract: Oakley, Grace; Pegrum, Mark
      This paper reports on a case study of university lecturers' professional learning about digital technologies over four years, and their development of associated innovative teaching practices. During the first year, new hardware and software, as well as planned professional development (PD) opportunities, were made available to assist lecturers involved in initial teacher education in a Faculty of Education at an Australian university to integrate digital technologies into their teaching. Over the 2011-2014 period, some transformed their teaching practices substantially. It turned out that the provision of formal PD was only a trigger - much unplanned and unanticipated professional learning occurred through informal interaction, with lecturers co-learning with colleagues, and indeed with students, in an environment of enthusiastic experimentation. Formal learning was thus complemented by a networked model of the spread of knowledge and skills among colleagues, students, and wider educational communities. This paper, which focuses on the learning of two staff members who changed their practices considerably, suggests that educators benefit from a combination of formal and informal professional learning strategies when it comes to integrating digital technologies into their practices in pedagogically innovative ways.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 The relationship between perceived transformative class
           experiences and subsequent prosocial intentions
    • Abstract: Harrell-Levy, Marinda K; Kerpelman, Jennifer L
      The present study tested a model showing how different aspects of high school courses focusing on social justice and prosocial development predicted prosocial intentions of students (N= 362) 2 to 29 years after they had completed the courses. Results indicated that students reporting more transformative class experiences (higher critical self-reflection, more charismatic forms of instruction, and relatable course content and methods) were significantly higher on prosocial intentions than students who did not. Unexpectedly, more well-integrated service learning did not directly predict higher prosocial intentions. Implications for gender and SES were explored. Overall, results suggest that certain parts of such classes can predict prosocial development.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Insights into departure intention: A qualitative case study
    • Abstract: Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Siddique, Salina
      Efforts to address attrition rates at universities have been driven by Tinto's (1975) model of student engagement with its focus on student: (a) pre entry attributes; (b) academic engagement; and (c) social engagement. Using an ethnographic approach, the study involves interviews with business students to explore the links between these aspects and departure intention. The results demonstrate that pre entry attributes were an important influence on student departure intention whereas a student's academic and social experiences were less influential. The analysis provides insights for educators and in particular business educators in the development of strategies to address various aspects of student engagement and attrition.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 A multi-level simultaneous analysis of how student and school
           characteristics are related to students' English language achievement
    • Abstract: Guvendir, Emre
      This study examines how student and school characteristics are related to Turkish students' English language achievement in Evaluation of Student Achievement Test (OBBS) of 2009. The participants of the study involve 43707 ninth year students who were required to take OBBS in 2009. For data analysis two level hierarchical linear modeling was conducted. The findings of the study show that many variables that fall outside of the domain of language related variables influence the foreign language performance of students. Since it creates an awareness of student and school characteristics that are related to English language achievement, the study is significant for foreign language teachers and language teaching policy makers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Exploring justifications and enactment of justification
           curriculum in elementary classrooms
    • Abstract: Store, Jessie C
      Standards for mathematics teaching require teachers to employ teaching practices that promote justification of mathematical ideas. This expected teaching practice is situated in substantial research on students' and teachers' difficulties with justifying mathematical ideas. This study shows different ways elementary school students in grades three through five may justify mathematical conjectures about pattern-finding activities. It also shows that even when teachers are capable of justifying particular tasks, enactment of such tasks in ways that encourage students to go beyond example-based justifications may be problematic. Video and audiotapes of class activities, students' written work, and curriculum materials were sources of data.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 A philosophical twist to the scholar-practitioner tradition
    • Abstract: Bailey, Scott; Gautam, Chetanath
      A new breed of leader is needed for American public schools, one who can both promote the public good and meet modern accountability demands. Often referred to as a scholar-practitioner, this type of leader blends theory with practice, philosophizing practice while practicing a philosophy. Such blending in a person is not simple, however, because practical and theoretical knowledge are qualitatively different. Instead, a blending of spectator-knowledge and participant knowledge is needed. Coupled with a thorough understanding of organizational realities, an awareness of these types of knowledge enables leaders to empower individuals within the schools, simultaneously fostering democratic principles, ensuring social justice, and giving voice to all.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 The use of literacy materials in early childhood English
           language and literacy programmes in Singapore: Local responses to global
           trends
    • Abstract: Tang, Alice
      This paper explores local responses by Singapore pre-school teachers to the global trend towards English as the medium of instruction at the early childhood level of education. The paper reports research into how teachers have responded to the national literacy agenda, as outlined in the Curriculum Framework for Kindergartens in Singapore, using literacy materials in an early childhood English 'literacy adoption' programme over a period of one year. The study identified three interrelated and interdependent dimensions of influences on teachers' use of literacy materials: choice of literacy materials; teacher beliefs and experience; and the literacy environment of the learner.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 The target of the question: A taxonomy of textual features for
           Cambridge University 'O' levels English
    • Abstract: Benjamin, Shanti Isabelle
      This study investigates the typical textual features that are most frequently targeted in short-answer reading comprehension questions of the Cambridge University 'O' Level English Paper 2. Test writers' awareness of how textual features impact on understanding of meanings in text decisions will determine to great extent their decisions on kinds of textual features to target when designing questions. Novice test writers such as teachers preparing students for international examinations like the Cambridge University Ordinary Level Papers often lack the experience and knowledge (linguistic analysis) to develop the expertise in the "art of test development" (Pierce, 1994) particularly in terms of targeting appropriate textual features. This study therefore attempts to fill this gap in teacher knowledge by developing a taxonomy of typical textual features that can be used as a supporting framework and resource for test design work. This paper reports on an analysis of 15 years of test papers to develop a taxonomy of textual features targets to support the selection of appropriate texts and the design of short answer reading comprehension questions that better approximate the linguistic complexity of the Cambridge papers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 English literatures in post-colonial Singapore
    • Abstract: Dass, Rozita
      The emergence of a vibrant literary, culture and arts scene promotes Singapore's claims as a hub for arts and culture in the Asian region, and as a global arts city by the 21st century. The richness and variety of Singapore literature from the early post-colonial years are evident in the evolution of a Singapore literary culture. The diaspora of Singapore writers and their facility with English as a global language simultaneously allows them to contribute to world literature and to internationalization of Singapore's literary heritage as transnational writers. Despite this, there seems to be a disconnection between literature education in schools and the broader literary and arts culture of Singapore. This paper explores the state of the subject Literature in secondary schools in the context of this progressive, vibrant and diverse Singapore environment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Doing business in the global village: Japanese professionals on
           EL needs in Singapore
    • Abstract: Yoneda, Mitaka
      This paper presents an analysis of English language (EL) education from the perspectives of Japanese and non-Japanese professionals in Singapore, based on their experiences of "doing business" in Singapore. As established career business people, the perspectives of Japanese participants offer a retrospective evaluation of their experiences of EL education in Japan over a range of years. The findings resonate with reforms attempted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT, 2002). The study also reveals a discrepancy between skills these Japanese professionals learned in the EL education system in Japan and actual EL skills required for their work in an international business environment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 The challenge of English language collocation learning in an
           ES/FL environment: PRC students in Singapore
    • Abstract: Yang, Ying
      This study aimed to seek an in-depth understanding about English collocation learning and the development of learner autonomy through investigating a group of English as a Second Language (ESL) learners' perspectives and practices in their learning of English collocations using an AWARE approach. A group of 20 PRC students learning English in Singapore were engaged in a qualitative collective case study. Findings from the study revealed major patterns of difference between the collocation learning perspectives and practices of students who made significant learning attainment in English language proficiency and those who made marginal attainment. Interpretation of the data, through an inductive development of theory, led to a description and explanation of the learners' processes of learning English language collocations in four main areas. A collocation learning trajectory was discovered. A group of more successful learners were found to travel along this path at a faster rate than the less successful learners. Based on the findings from the study, and discussion of pedagogical implications, a differentiated teaching model is proposed for pedagogical attention and practices in three main areas. Recommendations for future research and pedagogical development are made.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Policy analysis of the delivery of primary and secondary school
           mathematics and science in English
    • Abstract: Mohandhas, Pratheepa
      This paper offers an analysis of the development and implementation of the policy to teach Science and Mathematics in English (PPSMI) in Malaysian primary schools, commencing in 2003, in the context of the 2009 reversal of the policy. The original study focused particularly on the impact of the policy on the children of the Federal Land Development Schemes (FELDA), arguably among the most economically disadvantaged groups in Malaysia, and with the least access to English Language. The analysis is set in the context of successive changes to the national language policy that followed, towards the Malaysian Education Blueprint 2013-2025, and the aspiration for Malaysia to achieve a developed nation status to compete in the increasingly globalised world economy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Teacher education: English language and literature in a
           culturally and linguistically diverse environment
    • Abstract: Kayad, Florence G
      As part of Malaysia's aspirations to achieve developed nation status by 2020, and become a key player in the global economy, the government has sought to improve the English language proficiency of its citizens while maintaining the status and significance of the Malay Language as the national language. Recent strategies have involved incorporating literature component in the English Language subject in primary and secondary schools but despite more than a decade of literature instruction, results in national and international tests show that literacy and proficiency in English among Malaysian students are below standards. With students' poor performance in English linked to teachers' apparent lack of proficiency in English and the expectation that all teachers of English in Malaysia are able to teach literature, it is necessary to examine how prospective teachers are being prepared for the task. The study reported in this paper explored the experience of pre-service and conversion teachers of English in dealing with studying literature as part of their teacher education at tertiary level. This experience reflects the interface between theoretical and pedagogical knowledge of literature, conceptualised as literary literacy. The findings provided new insights literature education in the non-native context, with implications for policy and practice in literature education of English teachers in Malaysia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 English language literacies of undergraduate students in
           Malaysia's culturally and linguistically diverse environment: Casualties
           of national language policies and globalisation'
    • Abstract: Wahi, Wahiza
      The issue of Malaysian graduates' unemployment, attributed largely to their flawed English language competence, has been a major concern in the country for many years. The study reported in this paper sought to better comprehend future graduates' perspectives and practices in dealing with the English language literacies prior to graduation. This paper deliberates on the patterns and dimensions of the undergraduate students' perspectives on the challenges they endured, together with the educational and environmental factors influencing their current English language competencies. The qualitative case study drew on data primarily from focus group interviews with 21 undergraduates from the Engineering faculty in a Malaysian public university. Individual interviews with the students, non-participant classroom observations, field notes and written summary sheets supplemented the focus group data. These data were contextualized with documentary resources from students and their teachers. Key findings centre on the complexities of students' English language academic literacies and their pessimistic outlook on their marginal competencies in English. This study contributes new knowledge and new dimensions to understanding university students' predicaments at the intersection of English language literacies, undergraduate studies, and the struggle for employment. These outcomes are predominantly beneficial for informing policy makers' agendas in producing competent graduates for future local and global workforce.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Globalisation, internationalisation and English language:
           Studies of education in Singapore, Malaysia and Australia
    • Abstract: O'Neill, Marnie; Chapman, Anne
      The impetus for this special issue arose from our interest in the ways in which the processes of globalisation and internationalisation influence the organisation and delivery of education in the South East Asian region. A key feature of these processes at all levels of education is the global trend towards English in schooling, teaching and learning and international or global competitiveness. The central interest in the papers is on the relationship between English language (EL) and globalisation, as the two seem to be mutually reinforcing. The common focus of the studies reported in this issue is on language, and inevitably the dominant role of English and its status in post-colonial South East Asia. The contributors are all educators who have taught and researched in the South East Asian region in the past ten years, and whose work has engaged them with the emergence of English as a global language. The interests and concerns of the studies reported in this collection vary in their particular focus, and in the regional scope and educational level.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Status of Tamil language in Singapore: An analysis of family
           domain
    • Abstract: Kadakara, Shanmugam
      This paper addresses the phenomenon of Language Maintenance and Language Shift through a qualitative study of Tamil language in the family domain in Singapore. The influence of Singapore's bilingual policy and the institutional support offered for maintenance of Tamil language provide the context in which the central research problem of the status of Tamil language in the family domain is addressed. Discussion of the findings considers the pressure on the Tamil language and possible consequences of continued language shift for the future of Tamil language in Singapore.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Teaching and Learning through the Eyes of Culturally and
           Linguistically Diverse Postgraduates and their Lecturers in Australia and
           Vietnam: Implications for the Internationalisation of Education in
           Australian Universities
    • Abstract: Dobinson, Toni
      International and transnational education has become common place. Australian universities have embraced the rise in international enrolments from students in the Asia-Pacific region. There are many considerations, however, if these courses are to avoid being labelled neo-colonial exercises, not least of which is the necessity for informed dialogue about practices and beliefs in teaching and learning between all stakeholders. With this in mind, this paper draws on a larger study which examined the teaching and learning experiences and perspectives of a group of culturally and linguistically diverse postgraduates and lecturers from the Asian continent and Australia. All of the participants were involved in an MA program offered by an Australian university and all were, or had been, English language teachers. Findings indicated that while participants from Vietnam, China, Indonesia, Taiwan, Japan, India, Bangladesh and Saudi Arabia all appreciated (to some extent) educational discourses imported from 'the West', many of them also valued local educational discourses and felt that these latter discourses were often viewed as 'different' at best or 'deficit' at worst by educators and academics outside of their locality. The implications of these findings for universities involved in international and transnational education are discussed with recommendations focusing on the need to develop more metacultural sensitivity on the part of university academics (both fly-in/flyout (FIFO) and home), greater appreciation by home universities of diversity in stakeholders' perspectives on teaching and learning and increased respect for, and confidence in, local expertise in the Asia-Pacific region.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Servant leadership in a Catholic school: A study in the Western
           Australian context
    • Abstract: Striepe, Michelle; O'Donoghue, Thomas
      Over the past two decades faith-based schools have expanded in number, grown in diversity, and become an important part of education systems worldwide. As a result, a rich research agenda in the field has emerged. One aspect of this agenda relates to school leadership. What is particularly neglected is research on the impact of leadership theory on school leaders in faith-based schools. While large scale surveys are to be welcomed in this regard, these should be complemented by a large number of case studies. This paper, which arose from a study on a Catholic school in Western Australia, illustrates one direction which such case study work could take. It portrays how leadership theory has found its way into the cognitive frameworks used by leaders in the school to guide their work and the nature of the particular leadership theory they have assimilated within these frameworks. In particular, it indicates how one model of school leadership, namely, that of 'servant leadership', has been embraced as an overarching guide within the cognitive frameworks used by the school's leaders to guide their work and that it is an approach that is seen as being appropriate for a Catholic school.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Are Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the
           United States a Single Institutional Group': Evidence from educational
           outcomes
    • Abstract: Simms, Kathryn; Bock, Sara
      Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been studied consistently as a single institutional group. However, at least ostensibly, HBCUs are relatively heterogeneous. Consequently, we evaluated the homogeneity of three educational outcomes that have been recognized as potentially distinguishing features of HBCUs (i.e., STEM major, GPA, and degree completion). Hierarchical linear and nonlinear modeling conducted on two large databases suggested greater variability within HBCUs than between HBCUs. This variability tended to be explained by HBCUs' public versus private status, advanced degrees offerings, and enrollment. We conclude that HBCUs' institutional characteristics are relevant, but that they may underscore differences within one institutional group.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Characteristics of appraisal systems that promote job
           satisfaction of teachers
    • Abstract: Deneire, Alexia; Vanhoof, Jan; Faddar, Jerich; Gijbels, David; van Petegem, Peter
      This article examines if and how characteristics of appraisal systems used for secondary school teachers affect job satisfaction. Using multilevel analyses on data of 3 473 teachers in Flanders (Belgium), we found that appraisals with a developmental purpose and appraisals perceived as being a fair judgement, both have a positive impact on job satisfaction. Also clarity of appraisals and appraisals perceived as a judgement of quality add to a specific view of job satisfaction. These findings provide significant implications for educational policy at diverse levels, aimed at designing and implementing more effective appraisal systems, which affect teachers in their careers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Self-directed activity-based learning and achievement in high
           school chemistry
    • Abstract: Bassett, Meighan M; Martinez, James; Martin, Ellice P
      The effects of student-directed activity-based learning (SDABL) were examined in two high school chemistry classes. Students in the SDABL class were given pretest results, a list of standards to be mastered, and a chart of learning activities categorized by difficulty level. They selected activities to meet their needs and preferences. Significantly greater achievement gains and more consistent participation were found in the teacher-led instruction class. Overall, most students believed they learn better by teacher-led instructional methods. SDABL may have the potential to be effective in high school chemistry classes if more student preparation is part of the strategy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Flipping the learning: An investigation into the use of the
           flipped classroom model in an introductory teaching course
    • Abstract: Vaughan, Michelle
      With a classroom full of millennial learners, it is essential that teacher educators adjust their pedagogy to meet their students' needs. This study explores the use of a flipped classroom model to engage preservice teachers in an Introduction to the Teaching Profession course. In addition, it explores the need for teacher education coursework to model innovative teaching strategies, such as flipped classrooms, in an effort to prepare preservice teachers for future students. Results indicated that students displayed a higher level of reflection and inquiry in their coursework and a greater number of instructional strategies were modelled within the course.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Insights gained from analysis of performance and participation
           in a flipped classroom
    • Abstract: Hodkiewicz, Melinda R
      A flipped classroom uses technology to move lectures outside the classroom reserving the time inside the classroom for learning activities that connect concepts with practice. There has been limited research looking at student behaviours in a flipped learning environment and the extent to which students actually prepare for the face to face workshop experience as anticipated in the flipped learning model. Data collected from the learning management system (LMS) is used to examine the relationship between participation in pre-workshop activities and performance in a flipped learning class. The study cohort is a large class of final year bachelor and master of engineering students studying Risk, Reliability and Safety. Results show that participation associated with looking at pre-workshop materials and engaging in discussion boards is positively related to performance in summative assessments. There are lower levels of participation by international students in pre-work and discussion boards compared to their domestic counterparts; this may be related to language and the need to improve 'engineering business' skills. This work shows how technology, in the form of the data on participation collected in the LMS, can also be used to examine student behaviour, inform flipped learning teaching practice and identify future research questions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Storytelling scientists: What do PhD students get out of going
           back to school'
    • Abstract: Dook, Jan E
      A common response to headlines such as: "There is a crisis in science and mathematics education" is for educational or research organisations such as universities, to offer outreach programs either based in schools or on campus. The SPICE program at The University of Western Australia is one such program. A strategy adopted by SPICE to support school students is the Travelling Scientist project. Travelling scientists are doctoral students who visit secondary students and talk about their science journey. While the overall aim of the Travelling Science project is to broaden study and career options of secondary students, this paper focuses on travelling scientists. Narrative accounts are used to describe their experiences and through these gain some insight into professional and personal benefits and drawbacks. A framework of graduate attributes as a measure of professional value shows clear benefits from being a travelling scientist, but these benefits must be weighed against time management issues.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Identifying threshold concepts in first-year statistics
    • Abstract: Khan, RNazim
      Every discipline has a limited number of fundamental concepts. Discipline experts will identify some of these as threshold concepts. An understanding of threshold concepts is expected to provide an insight into the discipline and enhance learning and understanding. In this paper I will investigate threshold concepts for first-year business statistics, which is a compulsory unit for all business majors in the School of Business at The University of Western Australia. The investigation will be based on analysis of examination scripts. As this is an initial investigation, I will focus on identifying threshold concepts in one topic only.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 How students experience learning to program
    • Abstract: Cardell-Oliver, Rachel
      This study seeks to understand how students experience learning computer programming, and the implications of those experiences for the quality of their learning. In order to identify the essence of the experiences, different types of artefacts produced by students during teaching are analysed including program code, programming assignment demonstration interviews, course feedback surveys, emails, and comments written on examination papers. The main contribution of this paper is the description, using narratives, of four distinct student experiences of a first programming course: thriving, surviving, drowning and lost. Each narrative shows a unique combination of effective and ineffective learning behaviours.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Student perspectives on peer learning: From 'genius friends' to
           'learning twice by teaching'
    • Abstract: Ghisalberti, Marco; Haupt, Jaqueline
      Peer learning, whereby students learn with and from each other, is an integral component of learning in a university setting, yet is rarely formally incorporated into the classroom. Team-Based Learning is an alternative to lecture-based instruction where the majority of class time is spent with student teams working on complex problems and where the majority of the unit assessment is based on team submissions. Phenomenographic analysis of student interviews in a Team-Based Learning unit reveals clear student appreciation of the benefits of structured peer learning, irrespective of individual student capability. Furthermore, the students see team activities as representing a set of 'opportunities', namely to: (1) demonstrate contribution to the team, (2) learn from the team, (3) teach other team members, and (4) develop superior team capability. Students who utilise the opportunity to learn from the team emphasise the identification of a highly capable individual (a 'genius friend') within the team. Students who utilise the opportunity to teach the team point to the teaching of peers as a means of consolidating and testing their own understanding. The highly-structured team activities inherent to Team-Based Learning, as well as a consequential peer evaluation scheme, are seen to be vital in harnessing the benefits of peer learning.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 'Where do you switch it on'': A case study of the
           enhancement and transformation of University lecturers' teaching practices
           with digital technologies
    • Abstract: Oakley, Grace; Pegrum, Mark
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 The development of a scale to explore the multidimensional
           components of good student-teacher relationships
    • Abstract: Wilkins, Julia
      The Student-Teacher Relationship Survey: Student Version was developed and assessed for factor structure using principal components analysis. No instruments measuring students' perceptions of student-teacher relationships have been developed for high school students, and scales that measure related constructs tend to view good student-teacher relationships as a unidimensional construct. Participants were 274 students in grades 9 through 12 attending large urban high schools in the northeastern United States. The principal components analysis identified a seven factor structure: (a) Providing Academic and Personal Support for Students, (b) Showing Concern For and Interest in Students, (c) Motivating Students and Attending to Their Personal Interests, (d) Treating Students with Respect, (e) Being Compassionate to Students, (f) Being Accessible to Students, and (g) Understanding and Valuing Students' Opinions and Feelings. The factors had internal reliabilities ranging from .74 to .94. The findings of this study indicate good student-teacher relationships have many components and should therefore be viewed as a multidimensional construct.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 A Large Class Engagement (LCE) Model Based on Service-Dominant
           Logic (SDL) and Flipped Classrooms
    • Abstract: Jarvis, Wade; Halvorson, Wade; Sadeque, Saalem; Johnston, Shannon
      Ensuring that university graduates are ready for their professional futures is a complex undertaking that includes, but is not limited to, the development of their professional knowledge and skills, and the provision of empowering learning experiences established through their own contributions. One way to draw these complex processes together for a large undergraduate class setting may be through a teaching and learning framework that centres on engagement. Engagement precipitates deeper learning, based on student-centred knowledge and skills development through co-creation. This conceptual paper proposes the Large Class Engagement model (LCE), which integrates high levels of student cognitive involvement and participation as antecedents to engagement, and treats engagement as a co-creation process between educators and students. The model applies services theory to conceptualise engagement in large flipped classes. The case study in this paper adds a new perspective to higher education. More specifically, it illustrates how a service dominant logic can be used to foster co-creation and thus enhance the learning experiences and outcomes in very large classes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Group supervision and Japanese students' successful completion
           of undergraduate theses
    • Abstract: Yamada, Kiyomi
      This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of zemi or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing. The study also investigates how the zemi contributed to completion of their theses. It was found that the zemi provided contexts for teaching and learning in which, via assigned tasks, formal teaching, oral presentations and discussions, students acquired new knowledge and skills for undertaking research and completing a thesis. The solidarity, friendship and close bonds which were built among the members of the zemi motivated and encouraged them to achieve their goals.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 The Relationship between Principal Leadership and Teacher
           Collaboration in Turkish Primary Schools: A Multilevel Analysis
    • Abstract: Gumus, Sedat; Bulut, Okan; Bellibas, Mehmet Sukru
      The purpose of the current study is to reveal the relationship between the specific leadership behaviors of principals and teacher collaboration in Turkish primary schools, controlling for several school characteristics, such as school size and average class size, and the demographic characteristics of teachers, such as level of education and years of experience. The data of this study come from the 2008 administration of Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) conducted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. A hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used for analyzing the TALIS data where teachers are nested within schools. The results of this study indicate that there is an important link between various components of principal leadership and teacher collaboration in Turkish primary schools. In general, the implementation of instructional leadership approach by principals associated positively with teacher collaboration, while administrative leadership attitudes negatively correlated with teacher collaboration.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Conceptualising the epistemic dimension of academic identity in
           an age of neo-liberalism
    • Abstract: Adam, Raoul J
      This paper explores the epistemic dimension of neoliberalism in the context of higher education. Much critical commentary depicts neoliberalism negatively in terms of knowledge commodification, marketisation, productivity agendas, accountability regimes, bureaucratisation, economic rationalism and micro-managerialism. The paper offers a conceptual model (Binary Epistemic Model) to theorise the implicit epistemic conflict between some academic identities and the neoliberal paradigm. The model is used to support a paradoxical two-part thesis: (1) that neoliberalism, in its na ve form, is a threat to the necessary epistemological diversity of the academy, and (2) that epistemological diversity has a space, albeit a contested space, for neoliberal identities and ways of knowing. The premise for the model is that it offers a dialectical and evaluativistic way of understanding the influence of neoliberalism in the academy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Developing and implementing educational policy in a hung
           parliament: The Tasmanian Green-Labor accord (2011), and Kingdon's agendas
           
    • Abstract: Rodwell, Grant
      This paper details how educational policy is developed in an educational authority in a political environment of a hung parliament. The paper begins by looking briefly at the difficulties facing educational policy rollout in Tasmania during the years 2000-2011, and then details how an educational policy dealing with school closures was reshaped in the face of intense political pressure, as it came under pressure from a multitude of interest groups. Analysis is provided through the lens of Kingdon's Agendas.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 The promotion of teaching excellence in higher education: A
           comparison of the Australian and New Zealand approaches
    • Abstract: Abbott, Malcolm
      In this paper a comparison is made between the structure and operations of the Australian Learning and Teaching Council and the Ako Aotearoa National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence of New Zealand. Both of these organisations were established in the mid 2000s and were created at a time when higher education institutions in both countries were attempting to increase their research profiles in response to changing funding criteria. Although the two organisations were established for similar reasons they did not operate in quite the same fashion and with the same degree of focus. Instead large differences in the scale of funding has meant that the Australian agency undertakes far more activities than its New Zealand counterpart, although the relative influence of the two bodies in their respective jurisdictions is similar.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Meeting the needs of all students: How student teachers identify
           individualization
    • Abstract: Anderson, Derek L; Lubig, Joe; Smith, Markisha
      The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to examine how 64 student teachers at one mid-sized rural Midwestern university identified their students' needs and perceived the ways in which they met their students' individual needs. The authors used constant comparison methods and focused coding to examine, verify, and draw inferences from 4,668 student teacher journal entries. The student teachers met their students' needs in 27 different ways across four themes: cultural, behavioral, social, and curricular. Though student teachers described a variety of methods for addressing classroom management and learning differentiation, they exhibited deficiency in meeting students' cultural needs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Contributors to this issue
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Validity and reliability in social science research
    • Abstract: Drost, Ellen A
      Concepts of reliability and validity in social science research are introduced and major methods to assess reliability and validity reviewed with examples from the literature. The thrust of the paper is to provide novice researchers with an understanding of the general problem of validity in social science research and to acquaint them with approaches to developing strong support for the validity of their research.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Examining mathematics teacher content knowledge using
           policy, state certification tests and transcripts
    • Abstract: Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Eddy, Colleen McLean
      This study examined mathematics teacher content knowledge in terms of policy maker recommendations, college coursework and teacher certification mathematics test scores. Transcript analysis indicated poor alignment of national policy maker recommendations for mathematics teachers and college degrees in mathematics. Teacher certification test results based on mathematics coursework preparation suggested that state educator standards require knowledge of content taught in middle school, high school, and in introductory college mathematics courses. Policy makers are asked to consider the validity of content tests, which align poorly with college degrees in mathematics and are used as primary gatekeepers to teacher certification.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - The problems public schools face: High school
           misbehaviour in 1990 and 2002
    • Abstract: Fish, Reva M; Finn, Kristin V; Finn, Jeremy D
      Misbehaviour in high school impacts learning and instruction in the classroom as well as the educational climate of the institution. In this report, changes in administrators', teachers', and students' reports of misbehaviour between 1990 and 2002 were examined using two national US databases. There was little change in administrators' perspectives on the severity of misbehaviours, with some reported increase in verbal abuse of teachers and decrease in alcohol use. School urbanicity was not related to administrator reports of misbehaviour. Students reported less fighting and skipping class in 2002, but an increase in disruptions by other students and drug availability was found.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - 'Half-pregnant with Bartlett's baby': Contested
           policies in Tasmanian post-secondary education - 2007-2010 - through the
           lens of Kingdon's 'Agendas'
    • Abstract: Rodwell, Grant
      Tasmania Tomorrow was highly politicised, and Tasmanian post-secondary education policy became a central issue in the 2010 state elections. The purpose of this paper was to analyse the dynamics of Tasmanian post-secondary education policy, and determine what education policy analysts can learn from this episode in Tasmanian education history. Tasmania Tomorrow was positioned in relation to United Kingdom research into a similar event of contested education policy. The veracity of a number of elements of John Kingdon's theory of public policy evolution was then examined as a lens through which to analyse contested Tasmanian post-secondary education policy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - To market, to market: An historic account of how
           schools have marketed themselves over the past 150 years
    • Abstract: Hooper, Carole
      This article provides an historical account of how fee-charging Victorian schools have marketed themselves over the past 150 years (via the use of advertisements, brochures, and prospectuses) in order to promote those aspects of schooling believed to be of most importance to potential customers (parents). While some of the features - most notably the success of pupils at examinations held at the completion of schooling - have always been emphasised in promotional material, others deemed worthy of attention in the nineteenth century, have now been replaced by quite different features in contemporary advertisements.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Chapman, Elaine
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - A tutorial programme to enhance psychiatry learning
           processes within a PBL-based course
    • Abstract: Hood, Sean; Chapman, Elaine
      This paper describes a tutorial programme developed at the University of Western Australia (UWA) to enhance medical students' learning processes within problem-based learning contexts. The programme encourages students to use more effective learning approaches by scaffolding the development of effective problem-solving strategies, and by reducing examination anxiety. The programme adds to a growing body of work on methods to augment problem-based teaching practices in psychiatry education.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - An overview of undergraduate training in cultural
           competency and cross-cultural psychiatry
    • Abstract: Lyons, Zaza; Laugharne, Jonathan
      Multiculturalism is a familiar concept in many developed countries. While cultural competency training is part of most medical curricula, training in cultural psychiatry at the undergraduate level is typically minimal. It is important that medical graduates are both culturally competent and able to respond to the mental health needs of patients from diverse cultures. This paper provides an overview of the teaching of cultural competency and cultural psychiatry to medical students, and discusses aspects of cultural psychiatry that could be included in medical courses. It was concluded that there needs to be more attention given to teaching of cultural psychiatry in the undergraduate curriculum. The challenge for medical curricula is in the provision of cultural psychiatry content to ensure that students are able effectively to communicate, assess and treat patients from different cultural backgrounds by the time they graduate and begin their professional careers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Communication skills in medical education: An
           integrated approach
    • Abstract: Bennett, Kellie; Lyons, Zaza
      The importance of teaching communication skills in any undergraduate medical curriculum cannot be overstated. Effective doctor-patient communication is widely recognised as an essential aspect of quality patient care. A communication skills module developed for first year medical students at the University of Western Australia (UWA) is described in this paper. This module aimed to enhance students' skills in medical communication and increase their understanding of the importance of addressing the patient's perspective. Results of a preliminary evaluation suggested that the module may significantly improve student's communication skills and their appreciation of the role of communication in the doctor-patient relationship. The involvement of patients, both real and simulated, and the use of role play, were reported to be the most significant module features for increasing understanding of the importance and value of communication in the doctor-patient relationship.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Stigmatisation of psychiatrists: Experiences of
           psychiatrists and psychiatric registrars in Western Australia
    • Abstract: Bassiri, Mojdeh; Lyons, Zaza; Hood, Sean
      Stigmatisation among mental health professionals can have a significant impact on individuals who work in the area, and on recruitment of people into the mental health workforce. This study aimed to investigate the source, type and impact of positive and negative comments, attitudes and behaviours experienced by psychiatrists and psychiatric registrars. Thirty psychiatrists and registrars responded to a survey. Results indicated that negative experiences were reported at a significantly higher frequency compared with positive experiences. Other psychiatrists contributed positively to experiences regarding their profession in mental health. In contrast, doctors from other specialities and the media contributed negatively. Notwithstanding these negative experiences, there was high morale among respondents. This survey has shown that despite gains in addressing stigma towards mental illness within the community, stigma towards psychiatrists remains a significant issue. Psychiatry as a profession needs to address this in order to enable the discipline to overcome these damaging negative attitudes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Stigmatisation of Mental Illness and its impact on
           recruitment of medical students to a career in Psychiatry
    • Abstract: Lyons, Zaza; Hood, Sean
      The stigmatisation of mental illness in Australian and other Western societies is now well documented. This article presents a description of the 'stigmatisation' problem associated with mental illness, and discusses the impact that this problem has had on the demand for Psychiatry as a career. The approach taken at UWA to address the 'recruitment crisis' through the use of innovative teaching strategies is then described. Preliminary evidence on the efficacy of the approach is also presented. These strategies may provide a model for other universities making effort to bolster the numbers of medical students who pursue careers in Psychiatry.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - The recruitment problem in psychiatry: A critical
           commentary
    • Abstract: Stampfer, Hans
      The continuing shortfall in recruitment to Psychiatry is examined with suggestions for affirmative action. Recruitment may improve in the near future because of the high demand for psychiatrists, the incentives offered, greater competition for other specialities and a pool of international graduates willing to work in Psychiatry. There remains the long term challenge of how to inspire positive vocational interest given the persisting stigma of mental illness, a legacy of negative attitudes towards Psychiatry, stressful aspects of the work and increasing encroachment on Psychiatry's jurisdiction in the treatment of mental illness. Accepting the importance of giving students and graduates a good exposure to Psychiatry it is also important to make a critical appraisal of what they see. Realistic disincentives may be overlooked against a background of stigma and prejudice and arguably insufficient attention has been given to addressing realistic disincentives. It is suggested that the emphasis on reductionist explanations in Psychiatry today will not benefit recruitment or Psychiatry. Open acknowledgement and discussion of problematical theoretical and practical issues might lead to greater vocational interest and attract graduates interested in advancing and not merely practicing the Psychiatry.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Contributors to this issue
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Using history to enhance student learning and
           attitudes in Singapore mathematics classrooms
    • Abstract: Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine
      Numerous researchers have pointed to the potential benefits of providing students with a relevant historical context when introducing new mathematics concepts. This paper discusses the ways in which this approach may be applied to enhance student learning and attitudes in Singapore mathematics classrooms. While evidence on the efficacy of this approach remains limited, studies to date suggest that students who confront new mathematics concepts within a meaningful historical context will develop more positive attitudes toward the subject matter. Using history in mathematics teaching is likely also to help students recognise interrelationships between the disparate concepts to which they are introduced, and thus develop a more integrated view of the field as a whole. Relevant classroom activities, based on the Singapore junior college mathematics curriculum, are outlined.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Online reading comprehension strategies among fifth-
           and sixth-grade general and special education students
    • Abstract: Chen, Hsin-Yuan
      The present study targeted the online reading strategies of upper-elementary and middle school students with and without learning disabilities in the U.S. and in Taiwan. Several aspects of the comprehension process were studied, including: (1) Internet navigation strategies and behaviours, (2) sensitivity to the organisational structure of hypertexts, (3) online search strategies, and (4) online reading strategies. Data collection involved surveys, structured metacognitive interviews, observations, reading comprehension activities, and online search tasks, completed by 119 American and Taiwanese students in the fifth and sixth grades. The results suggested that students (1) had opportunities to use computers and use the Internet, but they were not taught sufficient online reading and search strategies, (2) were easily disorientated by the non-linear nature and unfamiliar structure of online texts, especially when websites or web pages lacked appropriate tabs or organisational cues for informational passages, (3) did not employ recommended online search strategies, and (4) had weak before-reading strategies as well as difficulty distinguishing before- and during-reading strategies, although their after-reading strategies were often advanced.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Shaving cream and cowboys: A descriptive study of play
           differences between typically developing and developmentally delayed
           preschoolers
    • Abstract: Rowe, Melinda
      Through play, children develop cognitively, socially, emotionally and physically. Preschoolers go on a journey of self-discovery during play activities, learning self-regulation and how to accurately represent themselves in the environment. This study explored the play behaviours of eight different children in two different schools. Four children were typically developing; the other four were developmentally delayed. The results indicated that despite developmental differences, the children were all able to play in similar fashions. Play can be used for all children and a label of a developmental delay should not limit the type of play in which the child is allowed to engage. If play is developmentally appropriate, then children should be able to successfully engage in the activity.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Strengthening positive school discipline practices
           through professional development
    • Abstract: Marchant, Michelle; Christensen, Lynnette; Womack, Sue; Conley, Laura; Fisher, Adam
      This exploratory study addressed the scarcity of research into professional development for school-wide positive behavior support. A train-the-trainer model was designed. These principles were embedded within the recommended guidelines for implementing school-wide positive behavior support. School-based individuals were selected by building administrators to become trainers. Once trained, they instructed school faculty. Content knowledge, skill acquisition, and social validity were assessed. Results indicated substantial improvement in the development of educators‟ skills and understanding of SWPBS. Participants offered mixed perceptions of acceptability. Future research is recommended for investigating the acceptability and effectiveness of SWPBS professional development.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Public schools in Australia from the late 1970s to the
           late 1980s: The seeds of change
    • Abstract: Barcan, Alan
      The period from the late 1970s to the late 1980s were transition years for most public (government) school systems in Australia. A reaction was developing against the neo-progressive and radical (neo-Marxist) innovations of the late 1960s and 1970s such as school-based curricula, activity methods, and 'open education'. By the early 1980s the emerging economic rationalist, neo-liberal ideas favoured devolution of administrative responsibilities to schools ('the entrepreneurial school'), central control of the curriculum, and an emphasis on vocational training. This change was facilitated by a new form of political control of the administration: ministers for education, premiers and prime ministers and their political advisers determined policy, no longer relying heavily the advice of educational professionals. A new senior executive level in Departments was staffed by politically-approved administrators. Neo-liberal education was enthusiastically adopted in New South Wales and at the Commonwealth level. Victoria soon joined in; Tasmania and Queensland lagged behind.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Chapman, Elaine
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Defining and assessing generic competencies in
           Australian universities: Ongoing challenges
    • Abstract: Chapman, Elaine; O'Neill, Marnie
      In this paper, we discuss ongoing challenges in defining and assessing generic competencies in Australian universities. The paper begins with a discussion of factors that led to, and later fuelled, the focus on generic competencies in Australian higher education. Broad constructs that have underpinned research and practice in the field are then discussed. We next consider obstacles that have been confronted in efforts to identify the particular competencies that are most important both within and across given discipline areas. The paper concludes with a consideration of the practical issues that emerge in designing tasks to assess generic competencies within specific contexts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Problems and prospects in competencies-based
           education: A curriculum studies perspective
    • Abstract: O'Donoghue, Tom; Chapman, Elaine
      The fundamental premise of this paper is that a broad rather than a narrow definition of "competency" should inform discussions on "competencies-based education". Also, while we see value in drawing on a broad definition when designing curricula, we hold that it is not sufficient on its own for such design if education is to be a humanizing activity along with being a preparation for the societal demands of life. To take this position is to promote a curriculum studies perspective to analyzing competencies-based education. The paper clarifies what we mean by such a perspective. A variety of difficulties inherent in competencies-based education that have been outlined over the last thirty years by significant curriculum theorists are then outlined. The paper concludes with a brief exposition on how a broad-based view of competencies-based education can be accommodated within a curriculum framework that addresses these difficulties and views education as a liberating activity, while also allowing for its contribution to economic and social concerns.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Non-technical skills in undergraduate degrees in
           business: Development and transfer
    • Abstract: Jackson, Denise; Hancock, Phil
      The development of discipline-specific skills and knowledge is no longer considered sufficient in graduates of Bachelor level degrees in Business. Higher education providers are becoming increasingly responsible for the development of a generic skill set deemed essential in undergraduates. This required skill set comprises a broad range of non-technical skills encompassing analytical/reasoning skills and "soft skills", widely considered to be transferable across a range of scenarios including the classroom and the workplace. Yet graduate skill gaps persist in Australia; questioning the extent to which this required skill set is truly generic and thus transferable from higher education to the workplace. The process of, and ensuing problems with, transfer from the classroom to workplace contexts is discussed and future research needs identified.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Generic engineering competencies: A review and
           modelling approach
    • Abstract: Male, Sally A
      This paper puts forward the view that engineering educators have a responsibility to prepare graduates for engineering work and careers. The current literature reveals gaps between the competencies required for engineering work and those developed in engineering education. Generic competencies feature in these competency gaps. Literature suggests that improving the development of generic competencies in engineering graduates has met with barriers. One identified problem is that a relatively low status is assigned to generic competencies in engineering education. This review focuses on competencies that are required by professional engineers across all engineering disciplines, in Australia, Europe, New Zealand, and the USA. The literature suggests that engineering educators should focus on developing "generic engineering competencies" rather than separate generic competencies and engineering competencies. A method, developed at the University of Western Australia for identifying the generic engineering competencies required by engineers graduating in Australia, is outlined.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Generic competency frameworks: A brief historical
           overview
    • Abstract: Young, Jolee; Chapman, Elaine
      Significant efforts have now been made to identify the generic competencies required to succeed across different workplace contexts. The aims of this paper were to: (i) outline factors that contributed to the increased demand for generic competencies seen over the last three decades; and (ii) review the early generic competency frameworks developed in Australia, New Zealand, the US, Canada, the UK, and other European countries. It is concluded that whilst there were significant areas of commonality amongst the frameworks, regional differences were also apparent. The paper provides a historical context for more recent research into the generic competencies that should be emphasized within tertiary-level education and training curricula.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:34 GMT
       
 
 
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