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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria
  [3 followers]  Follow
    
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   ISSN (Print) 0044-9075
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 36 Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 In the shadow of a hero [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bullen, Margaret
      Review(s) of: In the shadow of a hero, by Herbert, Jenny (2014), Arcadia: Melbourne, ISBN: 9781925003765.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Early Holocene Aboriginal occupation at Blackfellows Waterhole,
           Barrabool Flora and Fauna Reserve, south-west Victoria, Australia
    • Abstract: Richards, Thomas
      Archaeological excavations at a source-bordering dune adjacent to Blackfellows Waterhole in south-west Victoria revealed in situ stratified Aboriginal occupation deposits. Radiocarbon dating of charcoal associated with flaked stone artefacts indicates three periods of occupation, radiocarbon dated to 150-320 cal BP, 1,320-1,400 cal BP and 8,790-9,010 cal BP. The presence of dated early and late Holocene occupation deposits adds time depth to our understanding of Aboriginal land-use documented for Blackfellows Waterhole, which includes post-contact residential remains and well preserved and abundant pre- and post-contact evidence for bark removal in the surrounding forest. Early Holocene occupation evidence of any kind is rare in south-west Victoria, and outside of Blackfellows Waterhole, is only known from a few cave and rocksheltersites and coastal shell middens.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 The old Melbourne cemetery
    • Abstract: Heddell-Stevens, Phoebe
      This paper investigates changing attitudes towards the Old Melbourne Cemetery since its opening in 1836. It examines how changing social, cultural and economic values have led to the redevelopment and subsequent destruction of the site. Since its closure in 1921, the cemetery has undergone significant changes that have greatly impacted upon the integrity of the site, with the majority of burials lost underneath the Queen Victoria Markets. This paper gives a brief overview of the cemetery's history and the changing social perspectives on it, before situating these perspectives within a broader context. It aims to provide further insight into why the cemetery was decommissioned and allowed to be built over. The article also raises the question: how will attitudes towards the cemetery change in the future?

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Three uncommon artefacts from the Pilbara coastal plain, Western
           Australia
    • Abstract: Villiers, Linda E
      Three unusual artefacts found during monitoring of a gas pipeline project on the southern Pilbara coastal plain are described and discussed in this paper. Ethnographic information shared with us by a local Aboriginal elder identified their significance and the geology and archaeobotany of the area further helps to contextualise their possible uses. Resource acquirement strategies are noted and the distinctive nature of many of the coastal plain sites discussed. The closest similarity of the artefacts within standard artefact typologies and classes in the literature is with chisels but the lack of a close fit and their multi-purpose nature led to developing an alternative approach to the typology of these and other repurposed core artefacts. The widely used classification of chisels' may contain a number of subsets of different tools, differentiated by regional as well as functional criteria. Their occurrence in the sites discussed below appears to reflect some overlooked aspects of the available economic resource base and the lithic requirements for their acquisition and processing. The paper ends with discussion of a number of matters requiring further study.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Geocaching and cultural heritage
    • Abstract: Rowland, Michael J
      Geocaching is a game using Global Positioning Systems (GPSs). It involves hiding small caches for other GPS users to locate. Many are placed in or near natural or cultural heritage places. There has been no discussion of geocaching in the Australian cultural heritage literature but reports of damage to heritage places via increased visitation and direct impacts have been reported internationally. Geocaching online sites appear to be self-regulating and comments posted by geocachers indicate a general appreciation for cultural heritage values. Brief investigation of two sites in Brisbane could not identify negative impacts on the sites related to geocaching activities though a longer term study is required. Because geocaching is organised via the internet it is difficult to control and cultural heritage managers should focus on providing geocache web sites with educational materials and guidelines. State and local governments also need to develop guidelines on geocaching. The aim of this paper is to initiate a broader discussion and research into the impacts of geocaching and similar applications on natural and cultural heritage places in Australia.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Editorial
    • Abstract: Schaffarczyk, Sylvia; Rowland, Mike
      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Editorial
    • Abstract: Schaffarczyk, Sylvia
      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Introduction: Understanding Koorie plant knowledge through the
           ethnobotanic lens. A tribute to Beth Gott
    • Abstract: Rhea, Zane Ma; Russell, Lynette
      This paper considers the extraordinary career of ethnobotanist Beth Gott and examines her changing interests over her long involvement in research into Aboriginal plant use in south-east Australia. Combining the insights of a botanist with a detailed appreciation for the historical record and in particular the early observations of missionaries, protectors and squatters, Beth Gott created a knowledge base that is valued by Aboriginal communities throughout the south-east. Indeed we argue that her work on plant food knowledge and fire/ burning strategies have had impact on both the scientific and Aboriginal communities. This paper is offered as both an exploration of this work and a celebration of its importance.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Usewear and phytoliths on bedrock grinding patches, Pilbara,
           north-western Australia
    • Abstract: Fullagar, Richard; Wallis, Lynley A
      Bedrock grinding patches were recorded in the Fortescue Metals Group Ltd (FMG) Rail Corridor within the Wooodstock/Abydos Aboriginal Heritage Area 130 km south of Port Hedland, Western Australia. WA State Ministerial conditions required the salvage of representative samples, residue analysis and other detailed microscopic study to investigate the technology and function of these grinding patches. Following a pilot study and experimental work, we undertook microscopic study of 159 samples - including PVS (PolyVinyl Siloxane) peels and water extractions - from 81 grinding patches, collected at six sites. The worn stone surfaces are microscopically similar to traces found on experimental and Aboriginal stone artefacts used for grinding seeds, although the development of wear patterns is variable. The most common residues were phytoliths, which indicate that grinding patches were utilised for grinding grasses of the Panicoid and Chloridoid sub-families, although the open nature of the sites means issues of taphonomy need to be considered. Spinifex phytoliths suggest seeds from this plant may also have been exploited. No traces of pigment or ochre were found. We suggest that the grinding patches are linked with food processing associated ceremonial gatherings and rock art.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Yam landscapes: The biogeography and social life of Australian
           'Dioscorea'
    • Abstract: Atchison, Jennifer; Head, Lesley
      Yams have been at the centre of key archaeological and anthropological debates, particularly as a starchy staple food. While yams have many features of relevance to both hunter-gatherer and agricultural lives, there is considerable geographic, ecological and social variability in their use and cultural significance. In the spirit of celebrating Beth Gott's historically and ecologically grounded approach to ethnobotanical research, we review the Australian biogeography of Dioscorea as well as the ethnography of yam use by Aboriginal people. Three themes emerge from this review of the literature: 1) geographic variability of yam species across the continent has important consequences for the scale and intensity of Aboriginal collection and landscape transformation, 2) gender, particularly the role of women as harvesters, figures as an important cultural dimension in yam biology, and 3) landscape knowledge, connection to country and memory are significant factors contributing to food supply and regulation. Yams have been at the centre of key archaeological and anthropological debates, particularly as a starchy staple food. While yams have many features of relevance to both hunter-gatherer and agricultural lives, there is considerable geographic, ecological and social variability in their use and cultural significance. In the spirit of celebrating Beth Gott's historically and ecologically grounded approach to ethnobotanical research, we review the Australian biogeography of Dioscorea as well as the ethnography of yam use by Aboriginal people. Three themes emerge from this review of the literature: 1) geographic variability of yam species across the continent has important consequences for the scale and intensity of Aboriginal collection and landscape transformation, 2) gender, particularly the role of women as harvesters, figures as an important cultural dimension in yam biology, and 3) landscape knowledge, connection to country and memory are significant factors contributing to food supply and regulation.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 'Heritage knowledge': Indigenous people and fibre plants on the
           NSW South Coast
    • Abstract: Nash, Daphne
      On the South Coast of New South Wales, Koori artists are renewing their 'heritage knowledge' of plant resources inspired by a desire for artistic expression and cultural revival. As well as depicting plants in their paintings, individual artists at Boolarng Nangamai Aboriginal Art and Culture Studio in Gerringong are using native and exotic species in the construction of fibre art works and material objects from past lifestyles. Their interactions with plants extend beyond art and craft to a range of resource management strategies, such as planting, protecting, harvesting and processing of significant species including Commersonia fraseri, Lomandra longifolia, Baumea rubiginosa and Cyperus gymnocaulos. Together with other species, these plants are being used in both old and new ways. This paper focuses on the production and transmission of plant resource knowledge, as it is known from the past and through newly developing practices. Koori artists show how close attention to the technical processes involved in the production of fibre objects offers further insight into traditional and modern plant knowledge. The South Coast experience demonstrates that innovation from cross-cultural engagement genuinely promotes the production, representation and the transfer of ethnobotanical knowledge.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Trees from the dreaming
    • Abstract: Hercus, Luise
      It was always difficult to find someone to identify plants collected on fieldwork, particularly if one was as inexpert at preparing specimens as I was and still am. But when I sent in some plants to the Melbourne herbarium for identification in late 1979 I very promptly got back a carefully prepared identification list of my plants and a letter dated Nov. 15th, 1979 which offered to return the specimens by mail and asked me 'would you prefer some other arrangement which would assure their arrival in an undamaged state?' Never had my plant material been treated with such respect! The letter ended with the words 'please call me if there was anything else I can do' and it was signed 'Beth Gott'. This letter is typical of Beth Gott who was then and is now always willing to share her unique knowledge of the Aboriginal plant world and always ready to help others. This paper, dedicated to Beth, does not contain restricted information. The people who spoke about the trees in the Lake Eyre Basin and sang the traditional songs for them, Mick McLean, Maudie Naylon, Bingee Lowe and Sidney Stuart, were all most anxious that everyone should know about these trees, so that they would not be harmed because of ignorance.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Murnong: Much more than a food
    • Abstract: Cahir, Fred
      Unquestionably, the most impressive historical evidence for Indigenous plant management in south-eastern Australia has been brought to our attention through the work of Dr Beth Gott. Gott's (1983) paper 'Murnong - Microseris scapigiera: a study of a staple food of Victorian Aborigines' stands as an epoch in Australian ethnobotany as it clearly defined the importance of murnong as a staple food for Victorian Aboriginal people. This chapter seeks to further examine the importance of Aboriginal vegetable foods in south-eastern Australia such as murnong, from a cultural, political and economic perspective in the midst of frontier rupture during the 19th century.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Knowing country, knowing food: Food security and
           Aboriginal-settler relations in Victoria
    • Abstract: Rhea, Zane Ma
      Examining Indigenous-settler relations through the lenses of food and food security, this paper finds that, in the case of Victoria, there was ample record of contestation about food for about 50-70 years after the beginning of the establishment of the colonial foothold, first in coastal encounters, and later through inland exploration and settlement. Between the 1840s and 1960s, a period of adaptation and absorption, familiar foods became reliably available to the settlers and Aboriginal people were absorbed into the emerging cash economy, being restricted in access to their traditional estates, and their subsistence way of life. Over the last 50 years, with the insistent concerns about the sustainability of European farming practices on the Australian continent raising questions about ongoing food security, the re-emergence of Koorie food cultivation methods and practices and the growing niche marketability of 'Bush Tucker' is causing renewed interest in traditional Aboriginal land care philosophies and management practices.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 The world and work of Beth Gott: An interview
    • Abstract: Gott, Beth; Russell, Lynette; Rhea, Zane Ma
      In this interview, Beth speaks with Lynette and Zane about her work and what has interested and inspired her throughout her career. Throughout a wide-ranging conversation, Beth discusses the development of her ideas about Aboriginal plant use and the ways that Indigenous people managed plants. She speaks of the early years of her methodical botanical research, of fieldwork trips, and of her growing knowledge of Victorian Koorie communities and the plant knowledge they shared with her. She reflects on the debates and disagreements she has had with academic colleagues - ecologists, archaeologists, historians, and scientists - challenging the epistemological foundations of their research about the interaction of Aboriginal people with their lands and waterways. Beth speaks candidly and positively about Indigenous plant food management practices and the need for all Australians to understand what Aboriginal people know about this country. She pays respects to Aboriginal people who have shared their knowledge with her and speaks of her gratitude towards them. In this interview, one gains a sense of Beth Gott, the person for whom this collection of papers has been written, and why she is held in high esteem by her colleagues, friends, and peers.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Waterlilies: Confessions of a failed ethnobotanist
    • Abstract: Clarke, Anne
      The illustrated short story presented in this volume dedicated to celebrating the ethnobotanical work of Beth Gott is intended to do a number of things. For one thing, it is my attempt to break away from writing about community archaeology in the formal language of academia. Community archaeology started out as a way of breaking down the barriers of archaeological fieldwork to encompass different ways of knowing and different paths of practice. Inevitably, it has become an area for academic discourse and debate far removed from the interactions that shaped the everyday experiences of living and working in a community context. By writing a story around events that really happened I want to honour and remember all the people and families on Groote Eylandt who helped me, with endless patience, learn about country, learn about culture, learn about doing things 'just like us' as my friend Mary would say, and of course, learn about plants. This brings me back to the remarkable life and achievements of Beth Gott. As you will see from the little vignettes presented here, my attempts at ethnobotany fall firmly within the realm of the enthusiastic and somewhat clumsy amateur. I am, and will continue to be, in awe of the depth of knowledge about the world of plants held both by my friends on Groote Eylandt and by Beth Gott. In my defence, I am always happy to take a bite out of any culinary offerings and to make the tea.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 A plant macrofossil identification tool for South-Western
           Victoria
    • Abstract: Lewis, Tara M
      The 'Seeds of South-Western Victoria' database is presented here. The database is a digital collection of seed information that can be searched based on a range of seed morphological characters. Additionally it provides colour photographs of seeds and ecological detail of the plant species. It aims to facilitate plant macrofossil studies in Australia by aiding the identification of unknown sub-fossil seed material. It contains descriptions of 156 commonly occurring species of the Victorian Volcanic Plain, but design allows for continual addition of species from this region and elsewhere. The application of the database system to plant macrofossil identification, from both surface and fossil samples allows, for the first time, comparability of fossil assemblages and modern vegetation at a resolution of relevance to ecologists and conservationists. The taxonomic refinement of the pollen data provided by the macrofossils adds to a better understanding of recent vegetation dynamics and management, demonstrating the applicability of the technique to palaeoenvironmental analyses. A current application is to better understand the past environments and activities of Indigenous people on the Mt Eccles lava flow and assist in landscape restoration for potential World Heritage listing.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Digging up a past [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bullen, Margaret
      Review(s) of: Digging up a past, by Mulvaney, J.D., (2011), University of New South Wales Press Ltd: Sydney, ISBN 978 174223 219 5 (hbk).

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Cache or refuse?: A pitchstone artefact assemblage from pamwak
           rockshelter, Manus Island, Papua New Guinea
    • Abstract: Spry, Caroline
      Caching involves the intentional gathering together and setting aside of objects for future use. However, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between caches and different types of refuse in the archaeological record. A unique collection of pitchstone artefacts from Pamwak Rockshelter, Manus Island, in the Bismarck Archipelago to the north of mainland Papua New Guinea has been consistently described by its excavators as a cache. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the context and characteristics of this pitchstone assemblage, which suggest that it represents a collection of discarded tools and flaking debris, some of which was recycled, but not a cache.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Winds of trade and maritime tides: The Phoenician Mediterranean
           in the iron age
    • Abstract: Bell-Ogilby, Joy-lyn
      Phoenician trade in the Mediterranean region during the Iron Age was governed by maritime expertise and the access this gave to raw materials, craftspeople and markets. This may not have been possible had suitable landing places and negotiation with indigenous people not been carefully observed. The Mediterranean winds and currents defined the suitability of routes, times and speed of voyages, however tidal activity, shallow waters and low-lying shorelines germane to certain areas have hitherto not been considered as an important contributor to the location of Iron Age Phoenician settlements. This paper suggests that a significant knowledge concerning the activity of tides and associated with coastal topography may have caused the Phoenicians to seek out specific locations as early landing sites and later settlements. If so, this in conjunction with indigenous co-operation may have been a major factor in their pre-eminent position regarding maritime trade in the Mediterranean region.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Editorial
    • Abstract: Schaffarczyk, Sylvia
      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - Badu 14: Osteo-biography of a Torres Strait Islander
    • Abstract: Donlon, Denise; David, Bruno
      While skeletal remains from the Torres Strait Islands have been examined in museums, none have been described in situ. The indigenous people of Badu requested such an investigation. This paper describes the skeletal remains from Badu and examines the osteo-biography, that is, the life and death of a man who lived sometime between 550 and 100 years ago. This man displayed severe injuries as well as probable evidence of an agricultural lifestyle. It is hoped that such in situ investigations can provide local communities with important information about their ancestors.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - From humble beginnings: Vanderwal's 1972 fieldwork and recent
           theories on settlement, subsistence and trade in Torres Strait
    • Abstract: Carter, Melissa
      In 1972 Ron Vanderwal conducted the first archaeological reconnaissance of Torres Strait, effectively pioneering archaeological research in a unique region where the Australian and Melanesian worlds converge. His research focused on the broad, yet critical questions of the antiquity of human occupation in Torres Strait, development of the region's marine and horticultural subsistence systems and the time-depth of the historically-recorded trade networks. Although the outcomes of fieldwork did not allow resolution of these major issues, Vanderwal's recognition that answers to these questions lay largely with investigation of the Eastern and Western Islands - two of the four biogeographic island groups which comprise Torres Strait - paved the stepping stones for future archaeological research. This paper explores the outcomes of two major archaeological research projects undertaken in Torres Strait over the past 15 years, and outlines their major contributions to hypotheses on the history of human settlement and subsistence first postulated by Vanderwal almost 40 years ago.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - 'Oh wonderful beach': The Marind-anim of Papua and ethnographic
           foundations for an archaeology of a littoral sea people
    • Abstract: McNiven, Ian J
      Following Ron Vanderwal's ethnographic approach to initiating archaeological research in Torres Strait, this paper lays ethnographic foundations for initiating archaeological research amongst the coastal Marind-anim of tropical southeast Papua, Indonesia. Relevant research topics include testing the notion of the coastal Marind-anim as a littoral sea people; understanding the long-term sustainability of subsistence-settlement strategies in the context of dynamic and rapidly prograding coastlines; investigating the long-term relationship between ceremonialism, feasting, horticulture and headhunting in underpinning Marind social integration; and documenting the history of Asian maritime traders in the region. Excavation of old villages and mounded garden sites across a sample of dune ridges and swales extending inland from the present coastline will help answer these questions.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - Mound-and-ditch taro gardens of the Bensbach or Torassi River
           area, southwest Papua New Guinea
    • Abstract: Hitchcock, Garrick
      Mound-and-ditch agricultural systems are a significant component of the archaeological record in central-southern New Guinea and the Torres Strait Islands, but few detailed accounts of them exist. This paper examines the construction, use and abandonment of this garden type in the Bensbach or Torassi River area, in the extreme southwest corner of Papua New Guinea, based largely on ethnohistorical research. It is argued that complex vegetational and hydrological changes were primarily responsible for the decision to abandon this form of agriculture, with demographic and technological shifts likely contributing factors.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - Prehistoric Papuan axe/adzes: A spatial and temporal analysis
           of form
    • Abstract: Rhoads, James W
      This study expands on Vanderwal's early interpretation of Papuan axe/adze shapes by exploring the potential for axe/adzes types to inform the current debate about coastal Papuan prehistory. A multivariate analysis of 158 specimens from 16 assemblages reveals spatial and temporal patterns consistent with current interpretations of pre-contact exchange systems. Moreover, the highly restricted range of axe/adze forms between about 2000 and 1000 years ago promotes the view that social, rather than just utilitarian factors played an influential role in inter-regional exchange.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - Carving a gope board
    • Abstract: Frankel, David
      Gope (spirit) boards are characteristic carvings in the Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea. The processes involved in laying out the design, carving and painting a gope board are described using information gathered in Kinomere Village in 1981.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - 'Scenes hidden from other eyes' - Theodore Bevan's collection
           from the Gulf of Papua in the South Australian Museum
    • Abstract: Craig, Barry
      In 1888, the South Australian Museum purchased an ethnological collection from New Guinea that had previously been sent by Theodore F. Bevan and Messrs Burns, Philp and Co. for display at the New South Wales Court of the Queen Victoria Jubilee Exhibition in Adelaide in 1887. The identity of this collection subsequently became obscure prior to commencement of systematic registration of the Museum's collections in 1911. This paper reviews photographic, archival and published evidence to restore the identity of this collection, to uncover its indigenous cultural context and to relate it to comparable collections in Australia and overseas.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - Migration sites of the Miaro clan (Vailala River region, Papua
           New Guinea): Tracking Kouri settlement movements through oral tradition
           sites on ancient landscapes
    • Abstract: Skelly, Robert; David, Bruno; Barker, Bryce; Kuaso, Alois; Araho, Nick
      Local responses to shifting coastlines feature prominently in the oral histories of the Gulf Province (Papua New Guinea). Stories told in the Kouri district, east of the Vailala River, tell of a past when villages that are today located 6 km from the sea were then coastal settlements with communities actively engaged in regular exchange relations with seafaring Motu traders. Archaeological excavations at Meiharo provide further insights into such relations around 500 cal BP, apparently shortly preceding the period of oral tradition. In doing so, Meiharo further contextualises the history of the ethnographically recorded hiri exchange system, a network of exchange partnerships which affected the lives of people living along at least 400 km of the PNG southern lowlands. This paper focuses on the excavations and ceramics from the site of Meiharo 1.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - Revisiting Papuan ceramic sequence changes: Another look at old
           data
    • Abstract: Allen, Jim
      This paper revisits early attempts to categorise the prehistoric ceramic sequence from the south Papuan coast. New dates from several key sites allow a better understanding of the Early Papuan pottery (EPP) phase of the 2000 year sequence. The paper attempts to define more closely sequence breaks in each of the four regions where research has been concentrated - the Gulf, Yule Island, Port Moresby and Mailu. It offers an argument for the divergence of the Mailu area from those areas further west even during the EPP phase and re-emphasises my view of the centrality and importance of the Port Moresby sites in systemic disturbance in the Yule Island and Gulf sequences. Finally it explores an ENSO forcing explanation for sequence changes in the prehistoric record.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 33 - Editorial
    • Abstract: McNiven, Ian J; Green, Mike
      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 32 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 32 - A catalogue of Cypriot antiquities at the University of
           Melbourne and in the Ian Potter museum of art
    • Abstract: Webb, Jennifer M
      A catalogue of Cypriot antiquities at the University of Melbourne and in the Ian Potter museum of art, by Sally Salter, Preface by A. Sagona, Introduction by R. S. Merrillees., Macmillan Art Publishing. Melbourne 2008. Pp. 271, figures I-VII. APN: 9781876832698, $99.00RRP.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 32 - Memoirs of the Queensland museum, cultural heritage series,
           volume 4, part 2 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hitchcock, Garrick
      Review(s) of: Memoirs of the Queensland museum, cultural heritage series, volume 4, part 2, by Briuio David, Louise Maims and Michael Quinndll (eds), Queensland Museum, South Brisbane, 17 October 2008, Pp. 503, ISSN 1440-4788, Price AUD $15.00.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 32 - Exchanging totems: Totemism in Baldwin Spencer's overseas
           exchanges
    • Abstract: Knapman, Gareth
      Between 1899 and 1908, the director of the National Museum of Victoria, Walter Baldwin Spencer dispatched, as either gifts or exchanges, multiple collections of Aboriginal objects to museums in Europe and North America. He initially used these collections to promote his and Francis Gillen's ideas and research into totemism. Totemism was one of the hot debates of early twentieth century sociology/anthropology, and the collections constructed by Spencer and Gillen were representative of illustrations published in their books. In building his collections, Spencer developed a hierarchy of totemic symbols and 'manufactured' the nurtunja (Anartentye) as an Arunta (Arrernte) equivalent of the American North-West Coast totem pole. In placing importance on the nurtunja, Spencer used material culture to develop and promote facets of social theory. This paper reflects on how material culture influenced aspects of Spencer's own 'social theory' and, in turn, how social theory was used to shape 'trade' in material culture among museums. In doing so, the paper also examines how Spencer's ideas on totemism changed over time.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 32 - Archaeological research by the University of Melbourne in the
           middle and upper Euphrates valley, north Syria
    • Abstract: Jamieson, Andrew; Kanjon, Youssef
      Developments in north Syrian archaeology in the middle and upper Euphrates River valley have been to some extent determined by salvage excavations resulting from the planned construction of hydroelectric dams. The evidence from sites excavated in the Tabqa and Tishreen dam flood zones in this area of north Syria has supplied information on the existence of a broad range of periods, cultures and traditions. Researchers from the University of Melbourne have been involved in excavations at three sites within this region. A planned Syrian-Australian cooperation is underway for further rescue work and the creation of an archaeological artefact repository which will build on ongoing excavation and research.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 32 - Broad scale palaeo-environmental reconstructions of Southern
           Victoria, Australia
    • Abstract: Canning, Shaun
      Ethnographic narratives are often used in the creation of models of Aboriginal land use. While this is not problematic when the land use model is concerned with historically known periods, projecting more recent ethnographic phenomena back in time is highly problematic. Radical environmental changes through time have altered the way people have interacted with the environment in southern Victoria. Available archaeological data, albeit sparse and mainly limited to stone artefact assemblages is incorporated where appropriate to link archaeological signatures to the environmental reconstructions. This paper provides palaeoclimatic reconstructions of various periods over the last 30,000 years in order to better understand how humans might have utilised their landscape.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 32 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Schaffarczyk, Sylvia
      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 31 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 31 - Lithics in the land of the lightning brothers: The archaeology
           of Wardaman country, northern territory [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mulvaney, Ken
      Review(s) of: Lithics in the land of the lightning brothers: The archaeology of Wardaman country, northern territory, by Chris Clarkson, ANU E Press, Australian National University, Canberra, ISBN 9781921313288, ISBN 9781921313295 (Online), Published September 2007 $49.50 (GST inclusive).

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 31 - Cave art: A guide to the decorated ice age caves of Europe
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Franklin, Natalie R
      Review(s) of: Cave art: A guide to the decorated ice age caves of Europe, by Paul G. Bahn, Frances Lincoln Limited Publishers, London, 2007 224pp. (Paperback), ISBN 10: 0711226555, ISBN 13: 9780711226555, R.R.P. $39.95.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 31 - The archaeologist's fieldwork companion [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tunn, John
      Review(s) of: The archaeologist's fieldwork companion, by Barbara Ann Kipfer (ed), Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2007, Pp. 488 + 55 illustrations (Paperback), ISBN-10: 1405118865, ISBN-13: 9781405118866, Price AUD $56.95 (Paperback).

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 31 - Can archaeology be ethical?
    • Abstract: Sato, Noriaki
      Many contemporary archaeologists would agree that archaeology can be, and should be, practised in an ethical manner, Following this incentive, current archaeology seeks to formalise the practitioners' understanding of the ethical practice of archaeology, usually by examining the morality of archaeologists' actions in the practice and/or the ethical consequences of archaeology. In this paper, I will discuss a potential consequence of this institutional formalisation of disciplinary ethics, which tends to isolate the archaeologist's ethical intention from the practice of archaeology.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 31 - French Island ruins: An archaeology of chicory production in
           Western Port, Victoria
    • Abstract: Davies, Peter
      Chicory was widely grown in Victoria's Western Port region from the 1870s to the 1960s. The roots of the plant were dried in kilns and used as an additive or substitute for coffee. While most production occurred on Phillip Island, there was also a substantial chicory industry on French Island for much of this period. Today there are about 30 chicory kilns remaining in the Western Port area, forming a distinctive element in the rural landscape. This paper describes the archaeology of the kilns on French Island, and the evidence they reveal about experimentation and adaptation to local conditions.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 31 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Tunn, John; Schaffarczyk, Sylvia
      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 30 - Miscellanea
    • PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 30 - Dictionary of artifacts [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Griffin, Darren
      Review(s) of: Dictionary of artifacts, by Barbara Ann KIPFER (ed), Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2007, Pp. 360+ 121 illustrations (Hardback), ISBN-10: 1405118873, ISBN-13: 9781405118873, Price AUD $206.00 (Hardback).

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 30 - Tangtangjal Cave revisited
    • Abstract: Gunn, RG; Whear, RL
      Tangtangjal (Tandandjal) Cave is a pivotal site in the history of rock art recording in Australia. It was one of the first rock art sites to be published from southern Arnhem Land, and it became a key example highlighting the need for knowledgeable informants when interpreting Aboriginal art. The site, located with the aid of Prof. A. P. Elkin's field-notes, was recently visited for inclusion within the Jawoyn Association's developing Cultural Sites database. The artwork, recorded by N. W. G. Macintosh in 1950, has deteriorated markedly over the past 50 years. In contrast, the artwork at nearby Torriya Kuta-luk, a second site recorded by Macintosh at the time, remains little altered. Dating charcoal samples collected by Macintosh at the time, remains little altered. Dating charcoal samples collected by Macintosh suggests that Tangtangjal Cave began to be used in the late Holocene, most probably during the last 800 years.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 30 - Dating a Chinese fish curing camp at Port Albert, Victoria
    • Abstract: Bowen, Alister M
      During Australia's colonial period Chinese people played a crucial role in the development of Victoria's fishing industry. The excavation of a 1860s Chinese fish curing site in Victoria's South Gippsland region has provided new evidence concerning the local colonial fishing industry and aspects of the Chinese involvement in it. This paper discusses the dating of that site and demonstrates how material remains were successfully combined with documentary evidence to establish occupation periods at the site.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
  • Issue 30 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Tunn, John
      PubDate: Fri, 9 Jun 2017 14:32:54 GMT
       
 
 
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