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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 397 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 397 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)

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International Journal of Employment Studies
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1039-6993
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [397 journals]
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Front line managers and employee outcomes: The role of
           interactional justice and supportive culture
    • Abstract: Cafferkey, Kenneth; Townsend, Keith; Khan, Sofiah Kadar
      The contributions of front line managers (FLMs) are traditionally assumed to have a profound impact on the performance of individuals but few studies have examined the role of front line managers in the process through which positive work behaviour and attitudes are realised. This research introduces interactional justice and supportive culture as two potentially key conditions under which positive outcomes result. Using original data from Academics in Malaysia, a collective culture, we test the proposition supportive FLM will influence work outcomes and also interactional justice with a supportive culture. Academics totalling 324 from private universities in Malaysia participated in this study. Findings suggest that interactional justice mediates the relationship between support FLM and proactive behaviour and work attitude. Supportive culture moderated only work attitude. Overall, our findings illustrate that supportive FLMs play critical role in developing positive work behaviour and attitude, however supportive culture was not a necessary condition in eliciting work behaviour. The implications for these findings are discussed and important areas for future research are presented.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jun 2019 00:33:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Editorial introduction
    • Abstract: Mustafa, Michael J
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jun 2019 00:33:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Affective events and emotions during performance
           management processes: A study of general workers in Malaysia
    • Abstract: Hoh, C C; Ramos, Hazel Melanie; Hooi, Lai Wan
      As performance management system is often tied to monetary reward and career development, the emotional and behavioural reactions from the workers would be intense, and are theorised to influence the quality of work relationships. This study aims to explore and identify the affective events and the corresponding emotions during the process of performance management system. The focus participants of this study were the Malaysian general workers from manufacturing industry. In-depth interview and content analysis were employed to enquire, to code then to group the reported events into categories. Matrixes of event categories and corresponding emotions were developed from the findings. Five major positive event categories were identified. The corresponding commonly felt emotions were 'enthusiastic', 'trusting' and 'thankful'. Likewise, twelve negative event categories were identified. The corresponding commonly felt emotions were 'resentful', 'worry' and 'acquiescent'. 'Monetary reward', 'act of management', 'act of co-workers' and 'goal setting' emerged as the most important affective event categories among the participants. Implications of the findings are discussed vis a vis existing literature.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jun 2019 00:33:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Private and public sector bargaining in Canada:
           1980-2015
    • Abstract: Rose, Joseph B
      Since 1980 collective bargaining has been influenced by significant economic, technological, political and legislative developments. This study compares the impact of these developments on selected collective bargaining indicators in the private and public sectors, including: union membership and density, the duration of collective agreements, settlement stages, wage settlements and strike activity. A key issue is to assess the overall impact of environmental pressures on collective bargaining trends and compare bargaining patterns between sectors. The study is based on unionization figures compiled by Statistics Canada and a special tabulation on other bargaining indicators provided by the Workplace Information and Research Division, Employment and Social Development Canada. Except for unionization, most bargaining indicators trended in the same general direction. However, there were notable differences in the magnitude and timing of these trends, and the underlying factors contributing to them. The findings reflect the erosion of the relative bargaining power of unions.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jun 2019 00:33:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Employees' perception about change in jobs and
           organisational orientations
    • Abstract: Bhatt, Prachi
      Changing workplace influences employees' perception towards change impacting organisation effectiveness. To succeed, human resource (HR) practices in organisations need to constantly adapt to the rapidly changing environment. In this context the present research explores employee perception about changes in job practices and the perceived organisation's orientation in high-performing banking organisations. Using data of 412 respondents, t-test and regression analysis was employed. Results highlight the difference in the perceived change by the employees belonging to public and private sector banks. Results reveal that public sector banks have undergone considerable changes as compared to those in private sector. Both public and private sector bank employees feel that their job profiles have changed with respect to interest, significance, challenge and responsibility involved. Models emerged in the study identify the changing focus of high-performing banks in the changing environment context. Practical implications for HR managers are also drawn regarding high-performance HR practices in the relevant changing milieu.

      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jun 2019 00:33:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Human resource management, theology and meaningful
           work
    • Abstract: Fremeaux, Sandrine; Michelson, Grant
      Human resource management (HRM) has been widely considered an important way to enhance organisational performance. Many firms have adopted a range of HRM policies and practices to more clearly demonstrate the contribution of their workforces to the bottom line. The objective and practices of HRM are not without their critics, however, and while there have been a number of ethically-oriented analyses of different aspects of HRM, there remains scope for additional research. In this article, we seek to highlight the 'human' in HRM as this permits us to treat the human actor as an end rather than merely as a means (or resource) to some organisational goal. While this argument resonates with a Kantian logic, we go further by drawing on a theological/spiritual perspective to show how work can also be a means of being, of creating, helping and serving others. In this context, we explore the notion of meaningful work as a way of ensuring that the emphasis on 'human' within HRM theory can occur. We conclude that HRM is not necessarily ethically problematic if there is an appreciation for such a theologically-informed perspective.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Normative commitment in the ICT sector: Why
           professional commitment and flexible work practices matter
    • Abstract: Ross, Peter; Ali, Yunus
      This research examines commitment factors amongst ICT workers. It further reappraises the role and impact of normative commitment as a separate facet (Meyer and Parfyonova, 2010) by taking a novel approach that focuses on the impact of normative commitment on ICT worker behaviour, without an associated examination of affective organisational commitment variables. The study found that ICT workers' commitment to their profession and flexible working practices were positively linked to normative commitment. Australian ICT firms tend to be small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) that lack the resources to compete with larger firms on pay rates. Non-wage benefits, such as flexible working hours, may therefore be a more effective strategy for SMEs looking to increase organisational commitment, than wages alone.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Antecedents and consequences of speaking Spanish at
           work
    • Abstract: Guerrero, Laura; Valdiviezo, Saul R; Hernandez, Claudia Araceli; Posthuma, Richard A
      As the population of US Hispanics grows, the use of Spanish at work is likely to increase. This study tested antecedents and consequences of speaking Spanish at work. Speaking Spanish in general was related to speaking Spanish with customers, co-workers and managers. Density of Spanish-speaking customers was related to speaking Spanish with customers and co-workers, but not with managers. We found no support for work-related outcomes, including perceptions of employability, job satisfaction, job performance and intentions to quit. Future research should investigate whether work-related outcomes are more likely to have impact in cities with lower density of Hispanics in the workplace.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Emerging issues in employment relations
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - The wide ranging impact of sexual harassment in the
           workplace: An Australian pilot study
    • Abstract: Birinxhikaj, Mimoza; Guggisberg, Marika
      Some limited literature indicates that sexual harassment in the workplace has serious social, emotional and physical consequences for those individuals subjected to such harassment as well as for family members and friends. While the true prevalence of sexual harassment in the workplace is unknown, low victimisation reporting has been observed in the literature. The purpose of the study was to investigate effects of workplace sexual harassment to understand victimised individuals' help seeking behaviours and negative impacts. Six in-depth interviews were conducted with males and females with a recent history of sexual harassment. Key findings indicated that the concept of sexual harassment in the workplace is poorly understood, perpetrators are female and male co-workers or superiors, and that individuals with a history of sexual harassment experienced deep emotional scars. Victims struggled with self-blame, loss of job satisfaction, mental health problems as well as negative impacts on their interpersonal relationships. Participants responded by escaping the environment, seeking counselling or reporting the incident. However, this was the least likely outcome. Sometimes it was impossible to leave the employment for reasons including financial dependence. The study concluded that better responses to sexual harassment in the workplace are needed to prevent, identify and appropriately intervene in cases of sexual harassment in the workplace. Recommendations are offered in an attempt to work towards positive changes.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Editorial introduction
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Notes to Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Employer association renewal and adaptation: The
           experience of the national retail association
    • Abstract: You, Kevin
      There has been a lot of research on trade unions' responses to labour market reforms in Australia over the last few decades; but unfortunately, those of employer associations have largely been overlooked in the industrial relations literature. This paper seeks to contribute to our understanding of employer association adaptive responses by offering insights from a case study of the National Retail Association, an employer body operating in one of Australia's most dynamic environments. It investigates how this association operates in today's decentralised industrial relations landscape and in turn deepens our understanding of the ways employer associations seek to remain relevant today. In 2004, Sheldon and Thornthwaite developed a model that places employer associations' responses to labour market reforms along a spectrum. On the one side is the identity of a traditional association, with its core activities being the provision of collective goods such as industry representation and multi-employer bargaining. On the other side is that of a more business-like organisation, which provides individualised services in return for a fee. Insight into the National Retail Association calls for a development of this model to recognise that an association can continue to maintain a collective identity while engaging predominantly in new, non-traditional activities. Therefore, building on Sheldon and Thornthwaite's model, this paper offers a two-dimensional approach to describing how employer associations can operate in modern Australia's industrial relations landscape. The first dimension measures the degree of movement from core employer association activities prior to the reforms, while the second looks at the nature of change, in the form of a spectrum between collective/ associational on one hand and individualistic/business-like on the other.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - The utilisation of repatriate knowledge by
           multinational companies: An interview study
    • Abstract: Appafram, Nana; Sheikh, Abdullah Zafar
      This paper seeks to study the degree to which organisations use their knowledge following repatriation and to explore whether or not there are any underlying hindrances to knowledge sharing from a people, process and systems perspective. Eleven in-depth interviews undertaken in the UK branch of an American corporate blue chip multinational formed the basis of a single case study. Consistent with current literature, the practical failures in the home-country mentoring scheme appear to hinder repatriate knowledge sharing and transfer. Repatriates' perception of a lack of 'organisational' value attached to their acquired knowledge resulted in their withdrawal from freely sharing that 'know-how'. Findings underscore significant managerial implications for managing repatriate knowledge sharing. In particular, the study challenges academia's desire for operational business managers in MNCs to always think strategically about repatriate knowledge transfer and sharing, given the ever present operational pressures and financial target objectives within the complex global environment.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Exploring the behavioural options of exit and voice in
           the exit interview process
    • Abstract:
      Exit interviews are often considered to be a powerful tool for providing information to monitor and analyse employee turnover. The main objective of this study was to analyse the exit interview procedure adopted by a large professional publishing organisation. In doing this the effectiveness of the exit interview process was examined as a tool for employee voice on departure from an organisation. The exit and voice components of the 'Exit-Voice-Loyalty-Neglect' model were used to determine the efficacy of the exit process. The results indicate that, despite the praise awarded to exit interviews for employees to voice their dissatisfaction, the exit interview process may not be as effective in practice as we have been led to believe.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Socio-demographic predictors of secondary school
           teacher absenteeism in Trinidad
    • Abstract: Balwant, Paul Tristen
      Despite the popularity of absenteeism in general as a research topic, school teacher absenteeism has received only moderate interest. Over the past decade, school teacher absenteeism has been becoming increasingly problematic in Trinidad. To address this issue, this study aims to provide policy implications based on socio-demographic predictors of secondary school teacher absenteeism. In so doing, the study partially replicates Rosenblatt and Shirom's work, but with notable changes. Specifically, this study (a) focuses on absence duration rather than spells, (b) uses a more comprehensive measure of education, and (c) measures number of young children rather than all children. Using a sample of 146 teachers across eight secondary schools in Trinidad, the results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicate that teacher absenteeism can be predicted by prior absenteeism, age, and form teacher position. The findings also partially support gender and number of young children as marginal absenteeism predictors. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and policy implications are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Teachers, crisis and education: 'material poverty' and
           'moral collapse
    • Abstract: Ziontaki, Zoi
      The main purpose of this research is to investigate teachers' perceptions towards the financial crisis and its potential impact on school education in Greece. In this context, the focus is not only on the practical consequences of the crisis, but also on the very nature of the crisis, the mechanisms of its transmission, as well as its political and social implications. In this sense, the school is directly related to the economic, political and social spectrum. At a second level, it identifies specific "profiles" of teachers, according to the ways they choose to defend the integrity of the educational process against the developing crisis. The research draws on twenty interviews with teachers in primary and secondary schools, from central, western and eastern Thessaloniki, as well as the city's periphery. The analysis of the interviews is conducted through an ideology-critical discourse, based on the principles of critical pedagogy. The paper concludes that most of the teachers view the impact of financial crisis on education as a multi-dimensional social, political, moral and educational phenomenon, which requires recognition of the need for radical transformation of educational process.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - The determinants of self-employment in Greece:
           Exploring business start-ups
    • Abstract: Vlachos, Vasileios A.
      This paper explores the determinants of engaging in business start-ups in Greece, which, from an occupational choice point of view, means entering into self-employment. Data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor covering the period 2001-2008 is disaggregated by gender and analysed with a logit model and seven hypotheses are tested. The findings indicate that age is not related with business start-ups, while educational attainment is inversely related only for males. Males also appear to be less opportunity driven than females. Employment increases the probability of engaging in business start-ups and past experience is not important as opposed to indirect experience and the perceived ability to manage a business. Socio-cultural factors are also important to both genders' decisions to engage in business start-ups.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - "Narratives of flight": Accounts of precarious
           employment relations and emigration from Greece. A critical discursive
           social-psychological perspective
    • Abstract: Kesisoglou, Georgios; Figgou, Lia; Dikaiou, Maria
      Recent survey data attest that young professionals and graduates massively opt to emigrate from crisis-ridden Greece. Drawing on interview data by young professionals (18-26 years old), in urban centres of Greece, this study attempts to explore the discursive practices which informants mobilise to account for the prospect of migrating abroad, as well as the constructions of agency and subjectivity within these ways of accounting. Analysis drawing on insights from critical discursive social psychology indicates that participants articulate a 'narrative of personal effort': a) by characterising and evaluating through metaphors of the Greek labour and migration regime as context; b) by asserting their effort and agency, tracing their mobility to their psychological properties; while c) accounting for the ambivalence of 'fight or flight'. Analysis also points out how participants orient themselves to a dilemma of stake and accountability, being concerned to position themselves as effortful and entrepreneurial subjects, opting to emigrate.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Greek academics' intention to migrate during financial
           crisis: A moderated mediation model
    • Abstract: Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bellou, Victoria; Petridou, Eugenia
      Amidst financial crisis in Greece, migration seems to have become an alternative for highly skilled individuals who wish to develop their career. As such, the purpose of this study is to examine the intention of academics to leave Greece. In doing so, we incorporate work overload as a predictor and we highlight both the mediating role of a novel construct, that is thriving, and organisational tenure as a moderator of this indirect relationship. Data were collected from 273 academics employed in a large public university of Greece. Results offered support to our hypotheses showing that thriving mediated the relationship between work overload and intention to leave Greece and, further, this indirect effect is contingent on organisational tenure.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Changing political discourses in the EU: Reinventing
           youth potential
    • Abstract: Boutsiouki, Sofia
      The recent economic crisis has caused an unprecedented and complex socioeconomic turbulence in the European Union (EU). Not only did the crisis exacerbate the financial outlook of most European economies, but also aggravated the social implications. Eventually, the crisis led them into a phase of serious instability. Young people seem to be paying the highest price as they face the most adverse conditions, which seriously undermine their future prospects. Youth employment constitutes a main policy area that is being strongly challenged by such unfavourable circumstances. The paper attempts to monitor the development of the official discourse in the EU regarding the issue of youth employment during the economic crisis. The political narrative projects a gradual shift from being closely connected to the economic context towards a more socially sensitive approach. The roots of such a change can be traced in the pressures exercised on the European political entities by the escalation of social friction and of the personal malaise caused to many Europeans. The paper analyses the 'lost generation' narrative, a concept that often appears in the ongoing debate, through two different streams of political discourse. First, it presents the narrative expressed by particular political entities and then explores the one reflected in distinctive EU legislative documents and official communications. Both streams of political discourse reveal the changing mindset and guide the broader initiatives at European and national level in regard to youth employment. Also, it tries to indicate the considerations to be weighed and to define the transformation of the European mindset and ideals indicated through the development of the political discourse. The political expressions reveal the way this crisis is perceived and understood and highlight the need to redefine youth dynamics and to invest in their potential.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - The Greek crisis 2009-2015: A comprehensive analysis
           of the EU-IMF financial assistance programs
    • Abstract: Kyriakidis, Alexandros
      The Eurozone crisis has constituted one of the most dramatic events in the history of the European Union (EU), and has been the reason for an extensive overhaul of the EU operating framework (particularly for the Eurozone). The first Eurozone Member State to resort to the then ad hoc EU-IMF financial assistance cooperation was Greece, opening the door of the Eurozone to the IMF and, simultaneously, to the further integration of the Economic and Monetary Union. Today, of the five Eurozone Member States that eventually requested EU-IMF financial assistance (Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Spain, Cyprus), Greece is the only one still receiving assistance. Despite the importance of the case of Greece, further contributions can be offered to the existing scholarship in relation to the specifics and modalities of the assistance programs and their transference within the Greek ordre public, something otherwise mostly absent from the field. The aim of this article is to provide a detailed analysis of the Greek crisis from its beginning in late-2009 until today, and investigate how exactly the measures assumed in the context of financial assistance unfolded.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Crisis, austerity and work: employment relations in
           today's Greece
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Royal family business in Qatar and the Emirates
           through sports club management: "Green washing" or a sustainable
           model' The cases of FC Barcelona and Manchester City
    • Abstract: Rabasso, Carlos A; Briars, Martin; Rabasso, Javier
      How can family business at an international level have an impact on state policies related to corporate social responsibility and democracy in the home country' Is this the strategy of Qatar and the Emirates through sports management' How will the responsible activities of FC Barcelona and Manchester City have an impact on social issues and on the brand images of Qatar and Emirates around the world' These questions are the point of departure for this comparative study of two of the most influential football clubs in Europe, where Qatar and Emirates have had a strong presence in the management and/or the sponsoring of these new sports brands over the past few years. The multicultural histories of these two clubs becoming corporate sports giants through the game of football are a key element in determining what kind of relationship these two football organisations have with global responsibility and sustainability. The purpose of this study is to try to understand what lies behind the new business strategy of these sports organisations and how the corporate cultural differences with Qatar and Emirates can be overcome with the emergence of a responsible vision through the activities of their foundations.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - A conceptual model explaining the employment
           relationship between Caddie and PGA tour golfer
    • Abstract: Schlereth, Nicholas
      The PGA Tour caddie is a position many people see but fail to recognise when they enjoy a PGA Tour event. Caddies serve a vital role to the Tour player, aiding in club selection, as well as course and atmospheric conditions during a round of golf (Bruce, 1999). The dyadic employment relationship between caddie and player is one that has been neglected in the literature. This paper will examine the concept of the psychological contract as it relates to caddies and the means in which they receive rewards. In an attempt to explain rewards, the paper applies Lawler and Porter's (1967) model to the psychological contract. It is the first time for the application of the psychological contract to Lawler and Porter's model of motivation with respect to creating a model to explain the employment relationship between a caddie and the PGA Tour player.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Employee stock options in China: Impacts on employees'
           psychological ownership and job behaviours
    • Abstract: Chan, Andy W; Tan, Zhanchao
      This study investigates the effects of employee stock options (ESOs) on employees' psychology and job outcomes in China. We found employees' organisational citizenship behaviour toward the organisation (OCB-O) was positively related to their participation in ESOs and mediated by psychological ownership. However, there was no such association with job performance. Psychological ownership was positively related to OCB-O but not job performance. Besides, job control was found to be more strongly associated with employees' psychological ownership than participation in ESOs. When providing employees with stock options, management should empower employees with more job controls, helping employees feel like 'owners' of the enterprise.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Critical challenges of human resource development in
           Macao
    • Abstract: Udani, Zenon Arthur S; Cuervo, Javier C; Rayo, Edgar Alan N
      Human resource development (HRD) is a strategic issue in Macao, a Special Administrative Region of China. It is a critical element for sustainable socio-economic development amid pressing concerns about severe labour shortages. More qualified human resources will be needed by the growing service and hospitality industries as Macao postures itself as a world tourism and leisure hub. Large and small businesses alike will need to hire more foreigners to fill their labour needs, but government labour policies have remained very restrictive toward migrant workers. During the past six years, the government has also advocated more aggressive localisation of various jobs and positions. Human resource issues and challenges of Macao are examined through in-depth interviews with key stakeholders and recommendations are made for policies and strategies to sustain the development of human resources in the region.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - The wage response in exporting firms: Evidence from
           machinery and chemical industries in India
    • Abstract: Kar, Saibal; Majumdar, Devleena
      There is little consensus that the effect of more openness to international trade has a high and significant impact on employment and wages in a country. In terms of economic intuitions drawn from, as well as leading to, evidence across a large number of developed and developing countries, it appears that more trade via removal of erstwhile distortions have been responsible for loss of jobs in several industries in all trading countries. The loss of jobs has predominantly been owing to relatively inflexible unionised wage contracts in formalised private firms. On the other hand, for publicly operated firms, the impact has translated into a low level of output with reasonable offers of benefits with early retirements or 'golden handshakes'. It is so because layoffs are often difficult in public organisations usually endorsing stronger labour laws (see, for example, Dougherty, 2009 for India). The pattern is not very different across developed and developing countries, because everywhere government-controlled firms are always less flexible than private firms, even within the same industry structure.1 However, the proliferation of international trade has given rise to newer activities, including relocation of jobs to the 'unorganised' sectors of the economy, where wages are determined by interactions of demand and supply of labour for such jobs. The informal sector is largely outside the purview of formal regulations and unionised negotiations. It is then expected that the average wage will drop on account of this labour market transition, raising both within industry wage inequality and overall pressure on the labour market. Would the organised sector be able to sustain relatively higher wage payments under the circumstances' Further, what implications are there for the wage movements in purely exporting firms' This paper investigates if the exporting firms belonging to two rather large industries in India, namely, machinery and chemicals, display positive wage movements as functions of export earnings and a vector of important explanatory variables. In this context, we use a number of control variables that alongside the volume of exports can also explain the direction and magnitude of wage movements in exporting firms belonging to these two industries.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - The impact of socio-cultural factors on professional
           aspirations in emerging markets
    • Abstract: Shah, Grishma; Elliot, Esi A
      Globalisation, complemented by the demographic dividend has set the stage for an unprecedented transformation in India (Shah, 2009). While many countries grapple with aging populations and rising dependency ratios, India will continue to foster a large and growing workforce for the next two decades. Understandably, this demands a thorough understanding of the dynamics that motivate and aspire the Indian workforce, a crucial emerging market (Sankhe et al., 2010). In this paper, we examine how the cultural values of collectivism influence career aspirations in different contexts. Specifically, this study investigates how socio-cultural factors influence professional aspirations by surveying more than one thousand middle class Indians on collectivism and career aspiration. The results suggest that collectivism is positively related to career aspirations for the growing middle class Indian population. We illustrate how collectivist relationships are found overall to accrue psychological career resources, which in turn motivate and drive career growth and aspiration.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Employment relations in the Indian Railways A strong
           tripod'
    • Abstract: Pereira, Vijay; Malik, Ashish
      This paper is part of a larger program of study conducted on the Indian Railways (IR), through a grant by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), USA, focusing on Indian Railways' human resource management and industrial relations practices. In this paper we contribute by focusing on the employment relations (ER) scenario in the Indian Railways against the backdrop of a wider industrial relations institutional environment in India. Dunlop's ER framework identified the key actors in an ER system: unions, employers and the state, also commonly referred to as the tripod of ER. In the context of the Indian ER environment, scholars have argued that ER in India is akin to a 'lame tripod'. It is in this light that we analyse empirical data collected during the 2010-2011 period and investigate whether the 'lame tripod' thesis holds good for the Indian Railways (IR). Evidence from our study suggests that this is not the case, thus, suggesting the presence of a robust and 'strong tripod' of ER in IR, as advocated by Dunlop.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Editorial commentary: Employment relations in today's
           India
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George; Malik, Ashish
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Modernity and the marginalisation of Indian workers
    • Abstract: Selvaraj, Patturaja; Jagannathan, Srinath; Vijayakumar, P
      It is necessary to interrogate the experiences of workers in India in the context of neoliberal policies that are being advanced by the Indian state. We engage with workers from marginal spaces in India such as refugees, informal economy workers, contract workers and trade union activists to understand how the discourses of modernity structure insecurities for workers. Modernity legitimises the corporation as an agent of economic development and the rights of workers are subordinated to the economic interests of the corporation. Further, modernity authorises cultural majoritarian provisions which lead to the experience of ethnic violence. Finally, modernity structures experiences of illegality for workers in the informal economy leading to an erosion of their rights.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - The role of trade unions in creating sustainable
           inclusive growth: Ghana and Singapore
    • Abstract: Owusu-Kodua, Derrick
      The study examines the role of Ghanaian trade unions in creating a conducive environment for sustainable inclusive growth using Singapore as an example in this context. The dynamic nature of the economic environment and the intensification of global competition have placed new pressures on the national industrial relations regime. Consequently, this unsettling status quo has weakened the role of Ghanaian trade unions in protecting the interest of their members. On the contrary, the mechanisms of trade unions in Singapore have made monumental contributions to economic and social development. The study compares trade unions in Singapore with those in Ghana to recommend possible changes that could be implemented in the work of the Ghanaian trade unions. The significance of the study is to provide solutions to resolving some of the challenges, to underpin a sustained and concerted development effort for trade unions in Ghana.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Improving talent retention in an SME in the Nigerian
           environment : Reflections on a case study
    • Abstract: Epie, Chantal
      Much of the research on talent retention has taken place in Western populations. More studies are needed in developing countries for two reasons: 1) with globalisation, more organisations seek to establish themselves in other countries and need to be attuned to the characteristics of their local workforce; and 2) skills are scarce in developing countries, which means that employing organisations must strive to retain talent when they find it. This article draws from the literature on factors of talent retention to guide the interpretation of lessons from a particular case study: that of Sports Radio Brila 88 fm whose CEO solved within a short time a problematic employee turnover. Discussion of the case leads to recommendations for theory building, research and practice. The case highlights the relevance of including two often neglected variables in research on factors of talent retention: 1) national or ethnic culture, and 2) quality of employer s intention.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Graduate attributes and talent perceptions:
           Reflections on the first year of graduate employment
    • Abstract: Scott, Bernadette
      The effective management of talent in today s global workplace is an organisational necessity (Barlow, 2006). Global skills shortage, particularly in high-end jobs is rife, with 50% of employers having difficulties filling positions in the last year (CIPD, 2013a). As the gulf between high and low skilled positions continues to widen, the term talent becomes more than the ability to work in high demand/low supply positions. Talent underlines personal qualities which boost organisational performance, over and above skills, knowledge and previous experience (Sector Skills Development Agency, 2008: 3). Linkages between graduate qualities (attributes) and organisational talent are well documented (Connor & Shaw, 2008), with many global organisations seeking graduate talent to supply talent pipelines to ensure strategic succession for continued success. This paper considers the role of graduate talent in this provision, with particular emphasis on graduate perceptions on their transitional first year of employment post-graduation. Primary findings are based on the experiences of thirty members of the LinkedIn Alumni society of Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU). Adoption of an interpretivist approach facilitated the achievement of empathetic understanding of graduate talent across a wide range of social contexts, with an action research strategy engaging the researcher in research outcomes and practical interventions simultaneously. Empirical data was collected via an on-line survey method to a graduate LinkedIn sample of thirty respondents, with emergent themes providing the basis of recommendations for all stakeholders in the employability debate.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Fairness, free agency and Franklin: The forever
           complex nature of industrial relations in sport
    • Abstract: Smith, Meg; Moore, David
      Free agency was introduced at the end of the 2012 Australian Football League (AFL) competition season after a concerted campaign by the AFL Players' Association. Free agency operates as a highly conditional offset to significant labour market controls exercised by the AFL, controls sanctioned by the collective bargaining agreement. The acceptance of free agency is, however, mixed, a state of affairs exemplified by its recent use by Lance Franklin to change clubs. The response to Franklin's relocation revealed competing and complex discourses, frequently cohering around themes of fairness (to the competition) and equalisation rather than a direct commentary on free agency and players' rights. Yet some commentators continue to identify free agency as an attack on the fabric of the game, and the AFL has utilised the Franklin transfer to shape the terms of a review of free agency scheduled prior to the next collective bargaining agreement. This response suggests that AFL players' rights to less restrictive labour market controls face ongoing challenges.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Editorial introduction
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - Emotion regulation and burnout among Malaysian HR
           managers: The moderating role of big five personality traits
    • Abstract: Mustafa, Michael; Santos, Angeli; Chern, Gwi Terk
      The role of personality and emotions amongst employees with extensive interpersonal interactions has been identified as critical for both individual and organisational performance. Emotional labour, or the process of regulating one's emotions in line with organisational display rules during service encounters, has been associated with burnout. Using a sample of 136 HR managers, we further explore the emotion labour-burnout relationship and whether the Big Five personality traits moderate this relationship. Results indicate that surface acting, but not deep acting, was a significant direct predictor of personal and work-related burnout. The Big Five personality dimensions exhibited differential direct effects on the three dimensions of burnout. In terms of moderating effects, extraversion had a reverse buffering effect on the relationship between surface acting and personal and work-related burnout, but a buffering effect on deep acting and client-related burnout. Conscientiousness was found to buffer the relationship between deep acting and work-related burnout and emotional stability buffered the relationship between deep acting and personal burnout. Our findings make timely and important contributions to the emotion regulation and personality literature in general, and more specifically, the literature on HR managers.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - Antecedents and outcomes of perceived gender inequity
           in the Chinese workplace
    • Abstract: Ngo, Hang-Yue; Loi, Raymond
      Perceived gender inequity (PGI) refers to individuals' perception of differential treatment received by male and female employees in an organisation. The present study explores some antecedents and outcomes of PGI in the Chinese workplace. Drawing upon some organisational behaviour theories, we first evaluate the effects of procedural justice, gender comparison, and supervisor's gender on PGI. We then examine how PGI affects organisational commitment, intention to leave, and personal experience of gender discrimination among employees. Additionally, these relationships are expected to be different for men and women. Our data set consists of 591 Chinese employees in three different firms. The results of regression analyses support all the hypotheses. The present study advances our understanding of employees' perceptions of gender inequity in the workplace.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - Understanding CSR culture and subcultures: Consensual
           and conflicting narratives
    • Abstract: Barker, Bree; Ingersoll, Louise; Teal, Gregory
      Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is now considered a fundamentally important concept that must be embedded in an organisation's strategies, policies and culture. Nevertheless, it is only recently that academic literature has begun to consider the links between CSR, organisational culture and subcultures, with many authors suggesting that this area of research is underdeveloped. Using recent qualitative case study research that examined CSR initiatives in an organisation operating within the cement industry, this paper explores the dynamics of CSR culture and the link to subcultures and suggests that this is a necessary, yet complex, aspect of contemporary CSR analysis and research. By analysing the perceptions and experiences of multiple internal stakeholders, this research offers insights into the role of CSR, organisational culture and subcultures. The paper argues that subcultures play a significant role in determining the level of internalisation of dominant CSR values, beliefs and principles, and as such have the potential to influence the level of commitment to CSR within an organisation. Therefore, this research can provide insights into the implications for fostering a CSR culture and the key role of internal stakeholders.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - Agency work and agency workers - employee
           representation in Germany and Singapore
    • Abstract: Mitlacher, Lars; Waring, Peter; Burgess, John; Connell, Julia
      Comparatively new forms of work, such as temporary agency work, have led to changes in employment relations systems resulting in various consequences for temporary agency workers. To date, analysis of such changes and their effects have been quite limited, especially with regard to comparative, international perspectives. Consequently, the intention of this article is to partially address that gap by considering temporary agency work and workers in Germany and Singapore. These countries were selected as both have experienced significant growth in agency work while possessing different features in their employment relations systems. The paper provides insights relevant to the contradictions and tensions inherent in the position of agency workers in the German and Singaporean system of employment relations, making suggestions for a new regulatory approach of the temporary agency industry.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - Editorial introduction
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Institutional perspectives in HRM and MNC research: A
           review of key concepts
    • Abstract: Najeeb, Ali
      Institutional theory has been widely applied in human resource management (HRM) and organisational research, particularly in the study of multinational companies (MNCs). Despite this, there is no consensus among institutional scholars about the relevance of some of the institutional concepts used in HRM and MNC research. This paper critically reviews the key concepts of institutional theory in relation to HRM and in the context of MNCs. The paper highlights the aspects of these concepts that researchers may consider when applying institutional theory to future HR and MNC research.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - The mediating role of belongingness in the
           relationship between workplace incivility and thriving
    • Abstract: Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Kalampouka, Panagiota; Petridou, Eugenia
      Extant empirical studies have shown the detrimental impact of workplace incivility on a plethora of employee outcomes. However, limited research has addressed the explanatory mechanisms that account for this negative effect of workplace incivility. In parallel, there is an emerging literature regarding the antecedents of thriving at work. Taken together and drawing on belongingness theory, we examine the mediating role of belongingness in the relationship between workplace incivility and employee thriving. Data from 163 private employees indicate that belongingness serves as a mediating mechanism in the aforementioned relationship. Limitations, areas for future research and practical implications are also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Cultural diversity as a tool for caring and productive
           resistance. The case of FC Barcelona: A responsible perspective
    • Abstract: Rabasso, Carlos A; Rabasso, Francisco Javier; Mantere, Saku
      This paper demonstrates the influence of plural identities on caring in global responsible environments. The research examines FC Barcelona as a case of a caring organisation developing a global identity via productive resistance within a regional national culture. FC Barcelona is a deviant example in its display of a caring relationship towards others. This study highlights productive resistance as a practice of caring and discusses the reciprocal relationship between the caring organisation and resistance. The purpose of this study is to explain how domination can induce productive resistance, which can lead to the creation of caring organisations. Positive exposure to diversity reinforces plural identities, which are amplified by acts of productive resistance. This research builds on the notion of caring as a productive form of resistance in an effort to explain the increasing emergence of caring organisations on the international stage. The study shows how caring can be a productive response to domination. Resistance, in the case of FC Barcelona as an institution of a minority culture, is understood as a form of care.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Work stress in the banking industries of Australia and
           South Africa: Drivers of stress and legislative responses to the issue
    • Abstract: Bunn, Anna; Guthrie, Robert; Smit, Nicola
      This paper examines workers' compensation and occupational health and safety issues as they relate to the banking industry in Australia and South Africa. In particular it focuses on the issue of workplace stress. The paper reviews a number of studies on work stress and the drivers of stress within the banking sector and generally. It also examines the extent to which workers' compensation and occupational health and safety laws in the two countries may impose liability on banks to compensate workers for mental harm. The authors find that, whilst the workforce and economy of the two countries are different, there are a number of similarities in relation to workplace stress in the respective banking sectors. Common drivers of stress in the banking sector include a continual process of restructure and change, combined with additional stressors arising from economic uncertainty and the macroeconomic climate extant in 2012. However, the paper also considers other potential stressors in the banking workplace which may be reflective of the specific issues faced by and the demographics within the banking sector in these two countries. This paper adds an international perspective to the issue of work stress by comparing stressors and legislative responses to work stress within the banking sectors in two major Southern Hemisphere economies. A number of recommendations for further research are also made.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 2 - Editorial introduction
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Decisions of consequence: Employer strategies, union
           renewal and workplace activism
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      Over the past three decades, the neoliberal ascendancy in the main Anglophone democracies has been accompanied by extensive restructuring and reorganisation of public services. Focusing on the UK and Australia, Fairbrother, O'Brien, Junor, O'Donnell and Williams explore a central paradox: how, despite differing political regimes, the public services in both countries have been similarly transformed according to a New Public Management (NPM) model. Whereas this process began in the UK under the Thatcher government's protracted anti-union assault, in Australia it gained momentum under the Hawke ALP government's Accord with the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), which even extended to the occasional flirtation with industrial democracy. Both nominally social-democratic and conservative governments in the two countries have since been committed to the establishment of a 'managerial state' within an increasingly entrenched neoliberal order of privatisation and marketisation.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Perceived job insecurity, psychological capital and
           job attitudes: An investigation in Hong Kong
    • Abstract: Ngo, Hang-Yue; Loi, Raymond; Foley, Sharon
      This study examined the effects of perceived job insecurity and psychological capital on employees' organisational commitment and job satisfaction. It also explored the moderating role of psychological capital in the relationships between perceived job insecurity and the two attitudinal outcomes. Drawing upon literature on work stress, psychological contracts and positive psychology, several hypotheses were developed and tested with a data set consisting of 257 workers employed in various occupations in Hong Kong. Regression analyses showed that perceived job insecurity had a significant negative effect on both organisational commitment and job satisfaction. As expected, the three components of psychological capital (ie hope, resilience and optimism) predicted organisational commitment and job satisfaction in a positive manner. This study also showed that only resilience, but not hope and optimism, moderated the relationships between perceived job insecurity and the attitudinal outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - A managerial analysis of labour mobility: Evidence
           from the case of Greece
    • Abstract: Bouranta, Nancy; Salavrakos, Ioannis-Dionysios
      The intellectual aspiration of this paper is to highlight a nexus between personality characteristics and cross border labor mobility. A total of 243 Greek employees, across different industries (food industry, banking industry, tourism, insurance, shipping, retail business) participated in this study. These employees were spotted in two different universities completing postgraduate level studies (MBA). The primary data were analyzed using factor analysis, correlations and regression analysis. The study reveals that after accounting for control variables of gender and international exposure, openness to experience of the five personality traits, cultural acceptance, travel orientation, and language acceptance significantly related to business employees' intention to undertake international assignment. The results of this study enhance our knowledge about the factors that influence someone's decision to work abroad, thus supporting expatriating firms and those with international orientation to make targeted decisions.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Olympic volunteering for the unemployed: Who benefits
           and how'
    • Abstract: Gornostaeva, Galina; McGurk, Patrick
      This paper investigates the benefits of volunteering at the Olympic Games. It draws on theories of human capital and social capital to conceptualise the intended outcomes of volunteering, and applies these to the context of the Olympics. The paper argues that Olympic volunteering has become an instrument of active labour market policy, aiming to encourage social participation among the unemployed and transition them into employment. A case study of the outcomes of a major events volunteering initiative for the unemployed in London is presented. The paper concludes that the development of human and social capital through Olympic volunteering will be limited and unevenly distributed across three distinct groups: traditional volunteers; close-to-labour market volunteers; and hard-to-reach volunteers. The paper thereby adds to understanding of how volunteering relates to the development of human and social capital, in particular how this relationship is mediated by institutional arrangements and individuals' experiences of unemployment.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Issue 1 - Editorial introduction
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Assessing the probability of employment in Greece
           between the 2004 Olympics and the Global Financial Crisis: The cases of
           the Northern Aegean and Ionian Islands
    • Abstract: Rodokanakis, Stavros; Vlachos, Vasileios A
      This study investigates the probability of employment in the Greek regions of the Northern Aegean and the Ionian islands in 2006, when Greece exhibited the highest GDP growth rate (purchasing power standards) since the introduction of the euro, and a year before the eruption of the financial crisis which transformed into an economic and sovereign debt crisis with unprecedented consequences in the country's post-war economic history. Based on data from the Labour Force Survey, the analysis depicts the impact of gender, age, marital status, area of residence, level of education and immigrant status on the prospects of finding a job. The findings indicate the existence of gender differences and the vulnerable position of job-seeking youths. Finally, regional differences are present only in the case of educational level completed or area of residence.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Work differences by sector for medical specialists:
           Evidence of a public sector ethos
    • Abstract: Ellershaw, Julia; Gulyas, Andre; Demir, Defne; McWilliams, John; Johnson, Dianne
      Work-related characteristics representative of the ethos for medical specialists have been relatively unexplored, particularly compared to the array of research on primary care physicians. Analyses of 4,166 specialists, from the first wave of the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) study, revealed that specialists have a choice between either challenging work in the public sector or straightforward yet well-paid work in the private sector. Despite more challenging conditions, health and intent to leave were not key issues for specialists in the public sector, with specialists in private rooms more likely to leave the profession despite more positive work conditions. This result may be due to the public sector ethos suggested in other studies. Ultimately this study provides evidence that suggests differences in the ethos between medical specialists in the public and private sectors.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Who called the physician': HR risks and challenges
           for German hospitals using locum tenens
    • Abstract: Mitlacher, Lars W; Welker, Andreas
      In recent years, Germany has seen atypical forms of employment rising in the healthcare sector. Many hospitals now employ locum tenens on a regular basis. In hospitals that are not covered by collective agreements and where union influence is not strong, the deployment rate of locum tenens might be higher than in hospitals bound to a collective agreement. This leads to new risks and challenges for Human Resource Management activities in these organisations. For example, the deployment of locum tenens might lead to higher labour costs. Another area of concern could be loyalty and commitment issues within work teams and lower investment in training and development programs for regular staff. However, studies that focus on this special group of atypical employees are rather scarce. This paper explores the HR risks and challenges associated with deploying locum tenens in German hospitals. To test the paper's propositions, a survey was conducted in the anaesthesiology departments of 39 large German hospitals as these frequently use locum tenens.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - The Lao Federation of Trade Unions: A classic dualist
           union
    • Abstract: Fry, Simon
      The Lao Federation of Trade Unions, the state sponsored, sole trade union in Laos since the communist revolution in 1975, has attracted little attention outside Laos, and what has been written has been almost entirely negative. This article argues that an understanding of the Lao Federation of Trade Unions requires that it be viewed as a form of Leninist classic dualist union which, according to Pravda and Ruble (1986), was characteristic of communist states throughout the twentieth century. The article acknowledges there are other theoretical formulations of communist trade unions, but argues that Pravda and Ruble's model is best suited for an initial examination of the fundamental nature of a national union undertaken in this study. The article identifies the unique characteristics of the Lao classic dualist union and points to the specific contextual factors which have contributed to those distinctions. Although there have been some changes to the activities of the Lao Federation of Trade Unions since the adoption of market-based economy in Laos in the late 1980s, the Lao Federation of Trade Unions remains essentially a classic dualist union.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Collaboration between unions in a multi-union,
           non-exclusive bargaining regime: What can Canada learn from New
           Zealand'
    • Abstract: Harcourt, Mark; Lam, Helen
      The Canadian union certification system guarantees workers rights to organise, bargain collectively, and strike only when a majority of co-workers favours unionisation. This contravenes International Labour Organisation standards, in which the freedom to associate is unqualified by majority support. In recent years, the Supreme Court of Canada has drawn on ILO principles to interpret constitutional rights as covering organising and collective bargaining activities related to freedom of association under section 2(d) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. However, it has not as yet ordered Canadian governments to enact labour relations laws consistent with these new constitutional rights. Neither has there been a general call for such legislative change. Instead, many fear that statutory support for non-majority unionism would lead to multi-union representation and intensified inter-union competition, but fail to consider that sharing the workplace might actually promote inter-union cooperation against a common adversary in management. This study addresses this shortcoming by looking at the extent and nature of inter-union collaboration in New Zealand, where non-majority, non-exclusive representation exists already. Collaboration was found to be common, not only over bargaining and lobbying, but also in organising. Implications for Canada are explored.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Introduction
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Putting the public first' Restructuring the West
           Australian human services sector
    • Abstract: Rainnie, Alistair; Fitzgerald, Scott; Gilchrist, David; Morris, Lucy
      Focusing on the social, welfare, and community workers who are employed in public, not-for-profit (NFP), and commercial organisations within the human services sector, this article examines the implications of a recent Western Australian government report 'Putting the Public First', which advocates a further round of public management reform. It explores why the option of outsourcing the majority of state human services activities to NFP organisations, as advocated in the report, raises serious concerns about the quality of service delivery and the conditions of employment for workers in this sector. Drawing on experience from the United Kingdom and Australia, this article explains how this policy will reinforce a shift to a contract culture in the NFP sector that leads to mission drift and role distortion. A central outcome is the further deterioration in the employment conditions of NFP human service workers. This article concludes that, notwithstanding some rhetorical shifts, the present push to transform the human services sector is driven by an adherence to New Public Management principles that, some three decades after their initial ascendancy, remain central to public sector reform processes in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Employment relations in the context of professional
           rugby union: A case study
    • Abstract: Alonso, Abel Duarte; O'Shea, Michelle; Morton, Harry
      Organisations, including professional sport clubs and leagues, are experiencing significant change. Rapid technological developments, competition, and other impacts related to globalisation are affecting the sport business context. Professional sports' ongoing commercialisation, player salaries, player trading, and the emergence of social media are some factors influencing managers' and marketers' strategies to achieve competitive balance, and enhance organisation revenues. Recent events in the Southern Hemisphere's Super Rugby competition, with expansions at league and national team level, illustrate the dilemma organisations face in finding ways to secure their financial sustainability. The present study adds to the limited body of research concerning these recent developments, addressing them from the perspective of several professional sport organisation 'stakeholders', including managers, coaches, and players. The findings illustrate the constraints labour market controls in the form of salary payments pose, and the opportunities and challenges regarding the imminent Championship expansion. The implications of the findings are further discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Functional economic regions and labour
           underutilisation
    • Abstract: Baum, Scott; Mitchell, William F
      This paper addresses labour underutilisation and considers the factors that are associated with underutilisation risk of individuals embedded in diverse labour market regions. Taking survey and census data for Australian functional economic regions, this paper applies a broad framework that presents the risk of underutilisation as a function of individual characteristics, personal circumstances, and labour market characteristics. The analysis finds that employment outcomes are associated with individual characteristics and circumstances plus regional labour market conditions. The findings indicate that policy designed to address labour underutilisation needs to focus on the outcomes of a multilevel framework in order to be effective.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Employee socialisation: A platform for employee
           engagement'
    • Abstract: Lewis, Anthony; Thomas, Brychan; Bradley, Owen
      This research paper critically explores the concepts of employee engagement and the induction process. More specifically it explores the induction and socialisation of an employee into a bakery organisation and what affect this can have in relation to employee engagements, barriers and enablers. Furthermore, this research investigates the levels of employee engagement in the initial stages of employee careers in relation to key employee engagement theories. It also evaluates induction and socialisation processes and considers their effectiveness through the two differing levels of employment: permanent employees and temporary employees. The research critically explores the current employee engagement and induction literature in an attempt to view any theoretical links. The origin of employee engagement has also been explored in order to elucidate current management practice. This research gathered data through a triangulation of methods in order to gain an holistic perspective of the potential employee engagement-induction link; it also took an inductive approach in order to allow the findings to shape theory and not limit the potential findings. Finally, this research paper aims to make a positive contribution to the current employee engagement literature through evidence that the induction process can have a positive influence on employee engagement, bearing in mind that this is highly dependent on certain variables that an organisation must attempt to control.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Ageing academics: Workforce priorities for
           universities
    • Abstract: Larkin, Jacqui; Neumann, Ruth
      Australia's ageing academic workforce presents an unprecedented human resource crisis for its universities. In order to gain an insight into how universities are dealing with this significant HRM matter, this paper reports the extent to which academic staffing matters, specifically ageing of academics, are portrayed in the audit reports of the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) for 2006 - 2009. The purpose is to determine from these reports, whether universities are adopting HRM approaches that are reactive or proactive to an ageing academic workforce. It was found that there are university variations and only modest progress on academic staffing matters following AUQA Cycle 1 audit report recommendations. Overall, the HRM approaches by universities are reactive and ad-hoc, designed to respond to immediate needs and lack an organisational strategy to workforce planning. They exhibit an inconsistent and unstable pattern of adjustment to their internal and external environments, making them vulnerable in a competitive situation.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Work-life balance accounts, strategic human resource
           management and demographic change - the case of the German chemical
           industry
    • Abstract: Mitlacher, Lars W
      Demographic change will have an impact on organisations in two ways in the future. First, they will find fewer young workers that can be employed and the average age of the workforce will increase. Additionally the mandatory retirement age has been increased in the past years - for example in Germany from 65 to 67 years - and it will continue to rise as the current public debates show. This demographic shift yet is only beginning to be addressed by many companies as a strategic HRM challenge. Especially the questions on one hand how to guarantee a smooth transition into retirement for those workers who are not able or not willing to work until the maximum retirement age, and on the other hand how to retain key employees and their knowledge longer in the company, have to be addressed. One possible instrument is the implementation of work-life balance accounts. Especially in Germany this instrument has received much attention as the government has put into force new regulations on the design and handling of work-life balance accounts through the so called Flexi II rules. Employees are putting parts of their remuneration into these accounts and have the possibility of using the saved money later on in their working life for either a long-term vacation (sabbatical) or for an early retirement. Using the chemical industry as a case study for regulation, the analysis will focus on how regulation in this specific collective agreement supports the HR goals of companies with regard to implementing work-life balance accounts. Therefore propositions will be developed that are then contrasted with the regulation in the chemical industry in Germany. A summary of the key results and further avenues for research conclude the paper.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Unfolding the way valued knowledge workers decide to
           quit
    • Abstract: McWilliams, John
      A shock, or jarring event, which challenges habitual ways of thinking about one's work situation, inducing new thoughts about the prospect of quitting, is the crucial component of the unfolding model of turnover (Lee and Mitchell, 1994). However, there is a dearth of information about the nature of such shocks, even though Lee, Mitchell and their colleagues regard it as critical to investigate the types of shock that people report (Holtom, Mitchell, Lee and Interrieden, 2005). This paper reports a qualitative investigation of the experience of shock. Drawing on principles from the psychology of memory we interviewed 62 Australian knowledge workers who had voluntarily quit their jobs in a global high technology engineering company during the past two years. Company human resource records classified their departure as regrettable with a criterion that they would be re-hired at any time should they wish. Interviewers attempted to gain an understanding of conditions leading up to their decision to quit including the moderating variables of job embeddedness and organisational identification, which should influence quitting decisions. The majority, of both antecedent factors and shocks, were related to management behaviour and I speculate about the role of leader-member exchange as an antecedent condition. Embeddedness and identification were both found but in, and with, industry, customers and co-workers, rather than the company.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Independent contracting in low skilled, low paid work
           in Australia
    • Abstract: Gunasekara, Chrys
      Cleaners, construction workers, beauticians, call centre workers and drivers are among a growing, and under researched, group of workers engaged as independent contractors. Focusing on the Australian context, this paper reviews existing literature, and proposes a theoretical framework within which we can comprehend the growing trend towards independent contract work.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Rewarding leaders in the UK public services: What's
           happening to executive pay'
    • Abstract: Farnham, David; White, Geoff
      This exploratory article examines the phenomenon of 'top people's pay drift' in UK public services in recent years, focusing on the senior civil service, chief executives in the National Health Service, and chief executives in local government. The article discusses why there is growing interest in the level of chief executive pay in these public services, which has culminated in the coalition government commissioning a 'Review of Fair Pay in the Public Sector'. Drawing on recent evidence in the field, the article explains how top people's pay is determined, top pay trends in these three sub-sectors, and the relationship of the pay of chief executives with that of lower level public servants. It concludes that levels of remuneration for chief executives in public services have been increasing faster than those for other public service workers and that top people's pay is emerging as a public policy issue.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Language needs and benefits of cultural mediators in
           overseas Japanese Companies
    • Abstract: Okamoto, Kazue
      Management of white-collar staff in overseas Japanese companies is recognized as challenging (Byun and Ybema, 2005; Kameda, 2005). For instance, the relationship between Japanese expatriate managers and their non-Japanese host country staff is criticized as being a distant relationship (Yoshihara, 2001). Others such as Chikudate (1995) argue that 'bicultural' staff could be used to assist in improving the relationship between Japanese expatriates and their non-Japanese co-workers, especially in managing intercultural conflict in overseas Japanese companies (Hayashi, 1996).

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - The relentless revolution: A history of capitalism
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hunt, Brian
      Review(s) of: The relentless revolution: A history of capitalism, by Joyce Appleby, W. W. Norton and Company, 2010.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Assessing the relationship between diversified
           workforce and reward on employees' performance in the organisation: An
           exploratory study of private organisations in Bangladesh
    • Abstract: Rahman, Muhammad Sabbir; Hussain, Mehdi; Hussain, Bashir
      Managers and scholars agree that proper financial reward systems and diversity in the workforce can play a positive influence on individual employee's performance. However, this assertion remains largely untested on the workforce in a country like Bangladesh. To examine this implied relationship under the developing country's workforce perspective, this study investigated the impact of financial rewards and diversified workforce on employees' performance in a sample of 300 male and female respondents from various private organisations in Dhaka city, capital of Bangladesh. This study formulated two hypotheses and analysed the data by using exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling. Surprisingly results from this research indicated that the majority of employees believed that financial reward practices by the firms had a significant effect on their performance followed by diversified workforce culture in their workplace. The outcome of this research shows a comprehensively integrated framework for academics and mangers to understand the several dimensions that are influencing employees' performance in the organisation. The present study makes useful additions to the current knowledge of employee's performance which was tested through rewards and diversity variables under the workforce environment of a developing country.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Blended learning: Issues, benefits and challenges
    • Abstract: O'Connor, Christine; Mortimer, Dennis; Bond, Sue
      This paper discusses the use of 'blended' learning where the use of traditional lectures and tutorials is supplemented, and often replaced to some extent, by new approaches to learning such as computer and on-line simulations, and other interactive on-line packages designed to cover more basic aspects of the curriculum (or provide remedial support) in the students' own time. It reviews some of the reasons for the introduction of blended learning and addresses the potential benefits and some of the potential issues that need to be considered when using innovative teaching strategies in a blended learning setting. The authors draw from examples of their experiences with blended learning. It is argued that new approaches to teaching such as student centred and blended learning offer considerable possibilities to enhance the student experience, but only if proper attention is paid to integrating the 'new' and 'old' aspects of the teaching program, as well as to the development of appropriate administrative systems and support.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Educating responsible transcultural managers for open
           environments and organisations
    • Abstract: Rabasso, Carlos A; Rabasso, Javier
      The paper shows how understanding from different perspectives certain concepts related to management and organisations can contribute to the creation of open organisations implementing corporate systemic practices with the help of humanists' expertises (social and human sciences thinkers).To understand how to develop a critical thinking approach towards the education of a transcultural manager in a poststructuralist environment, we start by deconstructing some basic concepts related to the teaching on how governance of corporations is basically understood. The purpose, deconstructing traditional practices for unique models of management, is to demonstrate how a background in humanities and liberal arts are necessary tools for the education of responsible leaders. The emergence of transversal approaches for the configuration of alternative management models in open organisations helped to better understand the importance of transcultural management education in the 21st century globally responsible environments. The web of relationships that transversal managers establish in the interdependent and self-transcending ecosystem gives the possibility to embrace a revolutionary vision in a second European Enlightenment responsible period. Since the emerging of the concept of "global village" 50 years ago, it can be seen how the impact of new technologies in the geopolitical environments are being experienced in management practices.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Factors affecting the adoption of high performance
           work systems in foreign subsidiaries: An empirical investigation in Hong
           Kong
    • Abstract: Ngo, Hang-Yue; Foley, Sharon; Loi, Raymond; Zhang, Ling Qing
      High performance work systems (HPWS) have been increasingly used in multinational corporations (MNCs). Drawing upon institutional theory and alignment theory, we examine the determinants of the adoption of HPWS in foreign subsidiaries of MNCs. Our data were collected via a survey of HR directors/managers of MNCs operating in Hong Kong. The results of regression analysis show that the use of HPWS in foreign subsidiaries is related to headquarters' control, strategic HRM orientation, and adaptability of HRM, but not related to mimetic HRM orientation. We further find that strategic HRM orientation and adaptability of HRM has a significant interaction effect on the adoption of HPWS.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Notes to Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:18:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Editorial comment
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 16:16:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Employees' perceptions of organisational justice -
           implications for job satisfaction in Nigeria
    • Abstract: Ogbechie, Rose; Adefisayo, Olubunmi
      This study investigated the ability of organisational justice to predict job satisfaction in the Nigerian context. Sample data were obtained from alumni of a Nigerian business school. A confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical regression analysis approach were adopted as methods for analysis. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis showed that a three-factor model of organisational justice - distributive justice, formal procedural justice and interactional justice - provided a good fit for the dimensionality of justice in the context of this study. Hierarchical regression was used to test the ability of each justice dimension to predict job satisfaction. The result showed that interactional justice was the only significant predictor of job satisfaction. Theoretical and practical implications for the study are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 16:16:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Impacts of workplace bullying on workers' free will to
           communicate
    • Abstract: Sheikh, Abdullah Z; Akoto, Tuaneri
      Restructurings and downsizings have the potential to increase workplace bullying. This study looks at the impact of workplace bullying on victims' free will to communicate, during a large-scale restructuring process. The data were collected through semi-structured qualitative interviews. The findings suggest that managers are the predominant bullies and that they attempt to control employees by silencing them and by impacting on victims' free will to communicate. The study revealed that workplace bullying impacts on a victim's free will to communicate and bullies often achieve this through exploitation of a victim's insecurities and vulnerabilities. Lack of senior management support, retribution, distrust and exploitation of hierarchical position are some of the other factors which exacerbate bullying in the workplace. The findings have significant implications for managerial practices in regard to allowing victims of workplace bullying to exercise free will to communicate.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 16:16:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Drivers of employee commitment: Evidence from the 2011
           workplace employment relations survey of employees
    • Abstract: Bonau, Sarah
      This study explores determinants of three measures of employee commitment - shared values with the organisation, loyalty, and pride in working for the organisation - using data from the 2011 UK Workplace Employment Relations Survey of Employees. Variables represent employees' attitudes towards the job, the workplace and working at the workplace. Outcomes of descriptive modelling (ordered probit analysis) are contrasted with predictive modelling (decision trees using Gini-index and Gain-ratio splitting measures). Findings show two types of influence: aspects that encourage employee involvement, and those that foster development of the employee's skills. Pay satisfaction has been found to be negatively correlated to commitment. Findings are discussed and specific opportunities for leaders to leverage these insights are provided.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 16:16:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 16:16:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Perceived over-qualification and organisational
           cynicism: The role of work-related boredom and empowering leadership
    • Abstract: Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Vatou, Anastasia
      Recently, organisational cynicism has attracted increasing attention in the literature. However, we know little about how employees' experience of over-qualification relates to organisational cynicism. To address this gap, this study investigates the relationship between perceived over-qualification and organisational cynicism through the mediating role of work-related boredom and the moderating role of empowering leadership. Data were collected from 207 Greek employees in a retail organisation. Results offered support to our moderated mediation model indicating that work-related boredom mediates the link between perceived over-qualification and organisational cynicism and further that this indirect relationship is contingent on empowering leadership.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 16:16:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Change management and managerial subjectivity in an
           Indian commercial vehicle manufacturing plant
    • Abstract: Venkataraman, Anuratha
      This paper is an outcome of my doctoral ethnographic fieldwork spanning over ten months in TKDWAG9, a constituent of VehicleCo, one of India's oldest and largest commercial vehicle manufacturing firms. The primary goal of the paper is to understand the interplay of managerial subjectivity with context and infrastructural constraints, including the reception of transplanted templates of change management and work reorganisation by senior and middle-level managers in brownfield plants. It also seeks to explore how competing priorities and managerial subjectivity negatively impacted corporate management's change management program at various levels of plant management. It also registers that this reluctance to embrace the change rhetoric extended to workers as well. The paper integrates managerial sense-making with the conception and operation of change management and lean manufacturing in brownfield automotive plants.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 16:16:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Social support and expatriate spouses' wellbeing: The
           mediating role of cross-cultural adjustment
    • Abstract: Ramos, Hazel ML; Mustafa, Michael; Haddad, Anisa Rae
      International assignments constitute a significant life-changing and stressful event for the spouses of expatriates. Social support and cross-cultural adjustment has consistently been identified as critical determinants of overall expatriate assignment success. Social support constitutes a critical component of individuals' daily lives and can affect an individual's wellbeing. For expatriate spouses on international assignments, such social support can have added significance. However, to date little is known empirically of how the sources of expatriate spouses' social support affect their wellbeing. The current study seeks to address this issue from a cross-cultural adjustment perspective, by proposing a model which examines the mediating effects of cross-cultural adjustment on the relationship between sources of social support and expatriate spouse wellbeing. Based on a sample of 280 expatriate spouses we find that social support from family, friends and significant other effects wellbeing. However, cross-cultural adjustment only mediated the relationships between social support from friends and wellbeing.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:06:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Editorial comment
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:06:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Selecting staff for creative industries: The case of
           UK theatre companies
    • Abstract: Pritchard, Claire; MacVaugh, Jason
      This paper presents a study of the managerial use of Person-job and Person-organisation fit in the selection of non-artistic staff (such as technical, marketing, or front of house) in the creative industries. Using qualitative methods, senior UK theatre company recruiting managers were interviewed about the practices, values and rationales used during selection. Analysis was conducted using a narrative approach. Values congruence, assessed through interviews and pre-offer socialisation, is the decisive selection criterion due to the distinct working environment of the theatre, regardless of employment relationship, contract, or role. Person-organisation fit is applied during selection in this context to ensure cultural conformity to theatre in general, and to the current performance specifically.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:06:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Notes to contributors
    • PubDate: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:06:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Locum doctors - curse or blessing for hospitals'
    • Abstract: Ruiner, Caroline; Apitzsch, Birgit; Hagemann, Vera; Salloch, Sabine; Schons, Laura Marie; Wilkesmann, Maximiliane
      Against the background of healthcare reforms in Western European countries, hospitals increasingly engage locum doctors. As independent contractors, they work at the organisational core and are key players in the provision of high-quality healthcare services, making their engagement vital for organisations. Since little is known about locum doctors, and the effects of engaging them at the organisational core, we analyse the work attitudes and behaviours of locum doctors as independent contractors using the example of German hospitals. The analysis is based on a mixed-methods approach combining (1) a qualitative interview study of 21 interviewees, consisting of locum doctors, permanently employed physicians, and hospital representatives to explore the locum doctors' work engagement and to derive testable hypotheses, and (2) an online survey (n = 96) with a between-subjects experiment (group 1 n = 53, group 2 n = 49) as a formal test of the hypotheses. The results indicate that locum doctors are more engaged than permanently employed physicians and have the potential to significantly elevate the organisation's performance.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:06:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Convergence or divergence: The impact of globalisation
           on employee relations in India and china
    • Abstract: Jha, Jatinder Kumar; Varkkey, Biju
      This paper explores the underlying principles of employee relations and the pattern of their evolution in India and China, in the context of globalisation. Globalisation has deeply influenced the way economies function and altered the national patterns of employee relations. Using evidences from available extant literature, we mapped the approaches taken by both India and China to highlight the impact of globalisation on employee relations and found that competition, followed by globalisation, and changes in the trade union structures, have prompted the introduction of the 'human' element to employee relations practices, particularly at the enterprise level; besides, a lucid convergence in employee relations patterns is also witnessed, alongside some divergences in the approaches. The points of convergence include the introduction of the human element in employee relations, labour flexibility, reduction in union membership and increased focus on individual employment contracts. Divergence is primarily witnessed in the degree of involvement of trade unions and governments in employee relations. The differences in patterns observed between the countries can be attributed to the unique institutional factors of each country.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:06:31 GMT
       
 
 
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