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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover
International Employment Relations Review
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1324-1125
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Part-time or contingent employment: The Australian
           experience, 1994-2014
    • Abstract: Caddy, Ian
      This paper looks at part-time or contingent employment in the Australian economy. First it conducts an historical review of Australia's economic performance in which the worst effects of the global financial crisis (GFC) were avoided. For example, since the onset of the GFC, Australia has only experienced two quarters without economic growth out of 24. Indeed, as the data for the last two decades indicate, Australia has experienced reasonable economic growth during most of this period. Over the same period, the Australian labour force (similar to many other developed economies) has seen a fundamental change with the rise of part-time or so-called contingent employment. After conducting a literature review to determine the main issues concerning contingent employment, the paper then uses statistical time series compiled by the Australian Bureau of Statistics to determine the impact that increasing use of contingent employees has had on economic performance. The paper concludes that contingent employees, or the introduction of more flexibility into the Australian labour market, cannot be seen as merely a response to economic downturns. Moreover, looking at the Australian experience, use of contingent employees represents a fundamental shift in the way organisations employ people and to some extent has been accepted by the broader society, even though there are social disadvantages attached to contingent employment as an acceptable form of employment. That is, contingent employment represents a fundamental shift in the way many people now work in Australia and is not merely an economic aberration.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: O'Connor, Christine
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Understanding academic development: A case study at
           the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS)
    • Abstract: Sinthunava, Kittiwan
      Following the mergers and amalgamations of colleges within universities in Australia in the early 1990s, many academics in Australia needed to make a transition from a mainly teaching-only role to a teaching and research role. These changing work roles at universities have put considerable pressure on human resource development policies and professional development strategies. However, the majority of Australian academics across all universities have successfully adapted to achieving this new career trajectory. This research uses a qualitative methodology and action research to examine the key factors that allowed one university to succeed in changing the behaviour and attitudes of its staff through university-initiated professional development programs. In-depth interviews with the executive administrators and successful academics at this university have been analysed and compared with the university's human resources policies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Politicians and public service employment - a study of
           the experiences and preferences of NSW Australia local government
           councillors
    • Abstract: Spooner, Keri; Haidar, Ali
      More than two decades ago, with the introduction of the Local Government Act 1993, NSW experienced fundamental changes in the power relationship between councillors and council staff but almost no serious study exists that assesses the views of councillors about this relationship. This study, based on a survey of well over one hundred councillors, triangulated with interviews across urban and rural councils, finds that councillors perceive that they are not powerful enough to carry through their policies, and prefer to have more power over the employment matters of the council staff. We argue that the reasons behind such preferences of councillors are increasing politicisation of councils and a reluctance of council staff to punctually implement council policies as expected by councillors.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Designing jobs: Universal principles or strategic
           choice'
    • Abstract: Mortimer, Dennis; O’Connor, Christine
      The latter half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century have seen significant interest in redesigning jobs to stimulate employee motivation and job satisfaction. It has been argued that employees will perform better if they can utilise a variety of skills in performing tasks which have meaning and significance for both the employees and for those who consume the end product, and where the employees have considerable autonomy in carrying out these tasks. This paper examines the literature on job redesign and considers the question as to whether these principles should apply in all cases, or whether other factors such as business strategy and managerial choice should be considered in determining the applicability of job redesign principles.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 2 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - The linkage between elements in the strategic planning
           process: A qualitative study
    • Abstract: Choonhaklai, Sirirat; Wangkanond, Ratthasirin
      A qualitative study was conducted on the Ministry of Justice in Thailand, a pilot agency that implemented strategic planning in the levels of ministry, cluster and department. In this paper, the researchers focus on the linkage between determinants, strategic planning and outcomes. Although the Ministry of Justice of Thailand participated in a strategic planning pilot project, the study showed that the linkage between elements of the strategic planning process implemented by its agencies was weak. The main obstacles were found to be bureaucratic culture and work characteristics.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Work and employment in the Australian film industry: A
           research agenda
    • Abstract: Ingersoll, Louise
      Over the last decade, international scholarly interest and attention has risen significantly in terms of the contribution of creative work and industry to debates on urban development, economic prosperity and social evolution. This interest is broadly situated in two streams of analysis: the macro policy perspective and the micro impact on the individual at the core of the debate. While each stream adds to the body of knowledge, arguably what is lacking from these debates is the connection between individuality and policy-making that is necessitated by the process of employment. This paper proposes that a research agenda exists for addressing the gap in current research by focussing on the meso level of employment systems that connect the broader political economy of creative work with the experiences and perceptions of those employed as creative workers. It is suggested that the Australian film industry provides a rich context to conduct this research due to its cultural and economic significance in today's modern society.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - In a virtual world, can a community of interest inform
           practice'
    • Abstract: Wilmott, Deirdre; Knox, Ian
      For many people, virtual communities can form an important part of both their personal and professional lives. Workplace and professional organisations have long recognised that membership of a community of practice is a means of validating informal learning through peer recognition of competence and through participation in the negotiation of meaning within the community. However, membership of virtual communities unconnected to professional bodies or the workplace does not receive the same recognition. For non-professional communities, even though informal learning is a significant part of personal activities of like-minded people who contribute to them, the value of such 'interest' communities as learning environments is frequently differentiated from professional 'communities of practice' because learning is only an auxiliary function of the community. This paper asks if such a community can be a legitimate community of practice by exploring how the community of practice model applies to virtual environments where the domain of interest is not based on professional or organisation requirements and the significance of learning in these communities to business practice. If legitimate practice is recognised within 'communities of interest' this opens up a valuable body of knowledge based on informal learning, that cannot only provide effective resources but can influence recognition of competency and expertise in professional organisations. In the community studied, it was found that practice existed through sharing of resources; a unique repertoire of language; through the sustained and ongoing interaction between members; and through the member's recognition of practice in the community. The research results concluded that virtual communities, even those based around non-professional interests, do have the potential to be highly effective centres of learning when practice becomes a function of the community's life and that this learning is of value to other environments.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue 1 - Labour law, institutionalist regulation and the
           employing organisation
    • Abstract: Frazer, Andrew
      Labour law as an academic sub-discipline has been changing in response to developments in the labour market and work relationships. Especially in Australia, labour law scholarship has increasingly adopted a perspective of law as socially constitutive regulation. This approach draws on the multidisciplinary field of 'new' regulation studies. The adoption of a regulatory approach to law represents a significant departure in legal scholarship, since the idea of regulation requires consideration of the social environment and impact of law, and these dimensions have not been a particular concern of traditional legal research. This paper examines new regulation theory and its application to the field of labour law. While some aspects of regulation studies have been adopted in recent Australian labour law scholarship, the wider potential involved in a regulation perspective, in particular a pluralist approach to regulation which sees law as embedded within and imbued by social institutions, has not yet been realised. The paper explores how such a regulatory approach to labour law can be expanded by a focus on the regulation of employment relations within employing organisations.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Remuneration and gender in Australia: Background
           review and recent analysis
    • Abstract: Caddy, Ian
      The focus of the analysis and discussion in this paper is concerned with equality of remuneration (or otherwise) between Australian working men and women. A review of the current Australian legislation relating to this issue indicates that there was both recognition of inequality between men and women as well as a range of initiatives, regulations and programs introduced over time by both federal and state governments to redress the situation. After analysing recent statistics published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, as well as remuneration data disclosed in remuneration reports for Australian Securities Exchange listed corporations, it would appear that there is still some way to go before it can be claimed that there is an equality of remuneration between men and women working in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Union leadership: What is transformational leadership
           and can it make a difference'
    • Abstract: O’Connor, Christine; Mortimer, Dennis
      This paper addresses the issue of transformational leadership in trade unions, and whether transformational leadership can make a difference, both for the union's organisation, and in terms of outcomes for its members. It examines the literature on transformational leadership and develops a set of characteristics of transformational leadership based on this. This framework of characteristics is then discussed in the context of a case study, the Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees' Association (SDA), which underwent a major leadership change in the 1970s. In the case of the SDA, and based on the literature, we conclude that the leadership of the union at that time was transformational, and that this leadership had positive benefits, both for the union as an organisation, and in terms of outcomes for its members.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Bridges or barriers' Succession planning for
           doctor managers
    • Abstract: Kippist, Louise
      The purpose of this paper is to highlight that the lack of succession planning of the doctor manager role in Australia has individual and organisational implications. Succession planning is a business strategy that has not been embraced by all areas of healthcare organisations. Little research has been conducted on the succession planning strategies used to employ doctor managers in Australian hospitals. This paper is based on a larger qualitative study on the professional identity of doctor managers. Reference to the interviews that highlight lack of succession planning and implementation are used to argue for the need to recognise that currently there is a lack of succession planning initiatives for doctor managers. Effective management development and succession planning of doctor managers may provide a cadre of managers that have the motivation, skills and knowledge required to meet the challenges in providing an effective and responsive health care service. Health service administrators must plan for succession at all levels of management, including the doctor manager role. In a climate that is experiencing pressure to reach performance targets and reduce costs, succession planning is essential to identify, recruit, develop and mentor potential candidates to ensure they have the competencies and skills to meet the challenges of the current health care climate.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Unemployment and social disadvantage: A tale of five
           cities
    • Abstract: Caddy, Ian; Mortimer, Dennis
      The study discussed in this paper further explores the complicated and complex nature of unemployment. It considers various time series labour force data at national, state and local government area levels in which it can be seen that there are various factors at play with different degrees of influence in both the labour force and the various labour markets that operate within Australia. When looking at local government area data this study demonstrates that there are substantial differences in the rates of unemployment between five cities located in the Sydney metropolitan region (the cities of Blacktown, Fairfield, Parramatta, Ryde and Willoughby). Furthermore, the level of social disadvantage (or otherwise) for these cities appears to have an impact on the level of unemployment. This study also highlights some limitations in local labour force data currently being collected as well as recommending a change of policy in how unemployment should be both analysed and addressed within Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Impact of human resource interventions on quality of
           work life: An exploration
    • Abstract: Sundaray, Bijaya Kumar; Sahoo, Chandan Kumar; Tripathy, Santosh Kumar
      Maintaining the quality of such human inputs is essential for the competitive advantage and sustainability of business organisations. Therefore, organisations are required to adopt a strategy to improve the quality of work life (QWL) of employees in order to satisfy both organisational objectives and employee needs. QWL creates a sense of fulfilment in the minds of employees and contributes to greater job satisfaction, improving productivity, adaptability and the overall effectiveness of an organisation. This paper reviews the meaning of QWL and focuses on the factors influencing QWL based on past research. It also suggests various HR interventions that need to be practised effectively to improve the quality of work life of employees.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Investigating the unemployment risk in pre-crisis
           Greece using LFS micro-data
    • Abstract: Rodokanakis, Stavros; Vlachos, Vasileios A
      The primary objective of this paper is to investigate the unemployment risk, and the impact of educational level and vocational training programs on job prospects in Greece. The research focuses on the social and demographic characteristics that increase the chances of individuals in the sample population in finding a job, on how and in which cases these chances alter (if they do) after the introduction of training courses and on whether University graduates in contrast to most of the rest of the EU member states face greater difficulties in finding a job than non-University graduates. We use individual anonymised records (micro-data) of the Labour Force Survey (LFS) for both employed and unemployed. The findings of the logit model are mixed for the variables used, apart from those of gender, marital status and participation in training for which the results have no differences among years. The findings of the econometric analysis show that although concerning education the picture is mixed, the more trained a person did not improve his/her position in the labour market during the examined period.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Industrial disputes during the Rudd-Gillard era:
           Comparative perspectives and realities
    • Abstract: Perry, LJ
      This paper examines industrial disputes during the Rudd-Gillard political era. Claims made in the public arena implying a steep rise in the volume of disputes are tested. The analyses of other academic researchers are updated in the light of a longer run of data being now available. Among other things, it is found that during the entirety of the Rudd-Gillard era the (per-quarter) volume of disputes was proportionately larger during the second half of the era than during the first half. Also, during the time that the Work Choices Act was operative, the (per-quarter) volume of disputes was around half of that experienced during the Rudd-Gillard era. A different perspective on these data is gleaned, however, when making longer-term comparisons. Two preceding political eras are compared: the Howard Era of 1996-2007 and the Hawke-Keating era of 1983-1996. In its entirety, the Rudd-Gillard era registered a far lower volume of disputes than that registered in the earlier eras. The long term (three-decade) decline in the volume and frequency of disputes is noted and a number of hypothesised explanatory factors are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Monitoring the implied promise: Promotion to
           partnership in large UK law firms
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George; Shufflebotham, David
      Drawing on tournament theory, this paper seeks to shed light on the 'black box' of promotion within large UK law firms. Is there a promotion to partnership tournament which encourages associate lawyers to work hard with minimal supervision and to remain with their firms' Do these lawyers have the means by which they can monitor their firm's implied promise that a number of them will attain partnership' The paper analyses the first-hand experiences of lawyers to assess: who are the participants in the process; when partnership becomes their main source of motivation; how they calculate their promotion prospects; and how they develop the human capital, business case and internal political support required for promotion. The paper concludes that these associates acquired incomplete but sufficient knowledge to monitor and act upon the implied promise, although the promise itself differed significantly from that envisaged in the tournament model.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - How can human resources researchers help employees
           find, develop, and enjoy their work passions' And should they'
    • Abstract: David, Jannifer
      Human resource (HR) policies and practices should be looked at from the perspective of what they can do to help employees find, develop, and enjoy work passion (WP) throughout their careers. Researchers have found many positive and some negative outcomes related to WP and organisational behaviour. HR researchers have not accomplished much in determining what policies and practices could help employees identify and develop their WPs without losing control over their WPs. This article reviews the organisational behaviour research and then suggests specific HR policies and practices that should be researched to determine if they can increase the level of harmonious WP in employees. It also discusses some of the potential negative consequences of WP and raises questions about the organisational responsibilities that may result from encouraging WP in employees.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - 'Solving' unemployment: An analysis of two Australian
           policy initiatives
    • Abstract: Caddy, Ian; Mortimer, Dennis
      There has been a narrative about unemployment in Australian politics that has a lot of bipartisan support, notwithstanding the current rhetoric about which side of politics has the superior view in terms of industrial relations. Essentially this narrative focuses on two main initiatives, viz. grow the economy at a sufficient rate and unemployment will cease to become a problem, and for those who find themselves unemployed put in place suitable training programs to assist these unemployed workers back into work. This paper considers whether the underlying presumptions for both of these policy initiatives (which effectively have bipartisan agreement) do have solid support or indeed are in fact correct.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Sustaining the careers of New South Wales Department
           of Education and Training secondary careers advisers A stakeholder
           perspective
    • Abstract: Kelly, Ron
      The importance of career guidance for secondary school students has received considerable attention during the first decade of the 21st century from the Organisation for Economic and Cultural Development (OECD), and the Australian and New South Wales Governments. However such attention prompts the question as to whether the significant providers of such guidance are receiving the career management that they require for themselves. These providers are identified for the purpose of this paper as secondary school careers advisers in New South Wales Department of Education and Training (NSWDET) schools. However, it is acknowledged that similar providers exist in other State and Territory government-run secondary schools and both Catholic and private secondary schools throughout Australia. This paper uses a stakeholder perspective to investigate whether the secondary careers advisers in NSWDET schools are able to sustain their careers based on the career management that they currently receive.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Volunteering as a strategy to fill gaps in my resume!
           Findings from a study on jobless individuals in four states in Australia
    • Abstract: Tannous, WKathy; Smith, Meg
      This paper presents findings from a mixed method research study undertaken in four different states in Australia from 2009 to 2011. It involves consultation with service providers and stakeholders on their experience of working with long-term jobless individuals; and the individuals themselves on their experience of being jobless. The methodology used consisted of one-to-one interviews; focus groups discussion; and completion of an anonymous survey instruments. Data was collected from 110 individuals and over 30 stakeholders. The issues explored included barriers of using the service(s); challenges for individuals in gaining employment; gaps in services provided; and how well the services work together. A number of barriers identified have been described by other research but others, such as having a gap in their employment history, not recognised for time providing care at home or not having enough work experience are detailed. An important strategy described by stakeholders as a way to combat this is practice of undertaking volunteering in the industry of choice or performing duties that would be recognised in the employment market. This will be discussed in this paper together with qualitative data on people's experiences in using this technique.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Human resource reporting in Australian and Hong Kong
           initial placement offers
    • Abstract: Chan, Juni; Burgess, John
      Intangible assets such as knowledge, ideas, and Human Resources (HR) are recognised as being important contributors to the competitive capability of corporations (Bukh, Nielsen, Gormsen & Mouritsen, 2005). Measuring these intangibles has attracted European and international institutions interested in issues around corporate social responsibility and in social reporting (Cordazzo, 2007). However, there is no accepted intellectual capital disclosure index (Rimmel, Nielsen & Yosano, 2009; Singh & Van der Zahn, 2007) nor are there acceptable measures for measuring HR assets or performance (Cordazzo, 2007). Research has demonstrated that many corporations, especially those based in Asia, have been slow to identify and report their intangible assets, including HR (Rimmel et al., 2009; Singh & Van der Zahn, 2007; Welford, 2005). Initial placement offers (IPO) prospecti are expected to provide more information and details on a company's long term strategy and to set out all assets (tangible and intangible) of the organisation (Rimmel et al., 2009; Bukh, et al., 2005) to attract prospective investors. In this exploratory study we report on the extent to which HR are identified as being important intangible assets of 12 recent IPOs in Hong Kong and Australia, two of the most active markets in the Asia Pacific for IPOs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Work-family conflicts, family leisure activities, and
           family functioning in Hong Kong
    • Abstract: Lau, Yuk King; Lai Chong Ma, Joyce; San Wan, Po; Ka Ying Wong, Timothy; Yin Lai, Lok
      Work is perceived to be a major barrier to the amount and quality of time available for family use. Both adequate time and quality time are important for the wellbeing of a family. Among the various patterns in the use of family time, there is ample evidence of a positive relationship between participation in family leisure and family functioning. Despite the persistent trend of long working hours in Hong Kong, how work affects the involvement of workers in family leisure is under-examined in the region. Guided by an ecological-systemic perspective, a random sample telephone survey was conducted in November 2010. A total of 1,002 respondents were successfully interviewed. From the results of the survey, it was found that work-family conflict has restricted involvement in family leisure activities and increased the burden on members of the family who are responsible for organising family leisure activities. Furthermore, work-family conflict, together with the burden of organising family leisure activities, has cumulative negative impact on family functioning. A family-friendly work policy, including childcare support, flexible working hours, and employer-sponsored family leisure activities, should be further promoted in Hong Kong.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - The psychological contract in apprenticeships and
           traineeships: Comparing the perceptions of employees and employers
    • Abstract: Walker, Arlene; Smith, Erica; Kemmis, Ros Brennan
      This paper compares the perceptions of Australian apprentices/trainees and employers of apprentices/trainees in relation to the psychological contract: the unwritten mutual expectations employers and employees have of each other. A random sample of apprentices and trainees (N = 219) and employers of apprentices and trainees (N = 262) from Victoria and Queensland, Australia completed surveys. Information was collected about perceived employer, employee and training obligations and how well they had been met. Overall it was found that apprentices/trainees and employers rated similar individual employer, employee and training obligations as being the most and least important. Training obligations were perceived by both parties as being the most important obligations overall. Differences between the groups mainly related to perceptions of the extent to which obligations were met, particularly employer obligations. Despite significant differences, the overall mean ratings suggest that the psychological contract is being met well for both parties. Implications of the research for psychological contracts and for apprenticeships/traineeships are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - The evolving nature of HRM values in China
    • Abstract: Li, Stella; Nesbit, Paul L
      The opening of China to Western businesses and influences has given rise to the important question of whether the development of HRM in contemporary China will converge with the development of Western HRM or will it reflect distinctive cultural and institutional influences. This question has theoretical implications for debates on convergence/divergence within International Human Resource Management, as well as practical implications for the effectiveness of HR practices used by foreign firms in China. An important step in determining the extent of assimilation is to understand the history of HRM in China and its subsequent implications for values associated with people management. Insights into these values can provide a reference point for comparison with the people management approaches associated with continued exposure to Western HRM. To this end, this paper presents an overview of the evolving nature of HRM in China focusing on understanding the underlying values associated with HRM. A framework to categorise HRM values is presented and used to characterise and compare Chinese HRM values within traditional China, the early period of the Communist era, and in more recent times.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Who volunteers in Japanese labour unions' An
           analysis of activities by members of the Japanese trade union federation
           (RENGO)
    • Abstract: Linley, Matthew; Sano, Yae
      Although the role of labour unions in Japanese civil society has traditionally been limited, organised labour has increasingly publicised its contributions to volunteer activities. The purpose of this paper is to determine who volunteers in Japanese labour unions. We argue that the probability of participation in volunteer activities is affected by factors related to social resources, demographic and contextual circumstances, and the motives, values, and beliefs of individuals. Using data from the Life Survey 2000 of the JTUC (RENGO) Research Institute for Advancement of Living Standards, six models were estimated. Approximately nine per cent of total respondents were found to be engaged in volunteer activity. Factors found to be associated with volunteering included: work experience in the public sector and/or as a union officer; married, with children, as well as living with one's parents; of a mature age; and coming from a community with fewer than 100,000 people. Consistent with the conceptualisation of labour unions in Japan as economic interest groups, not many individuals engage in volunteer activities. However, our finding that officers are more likely to volunteer suggests that organised labour may contribute to civil society by encouraging the development of civic skills among leaders.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Disciplinary unfairness in Queensland public service
           legislation
    • Abstract: Lauchs, Mark; Webster, Julianne
      A just system of discipline within an organisation requires four characteristics: a clear set of offences, proportionate punishments clearly linked to the offences, oversight and appeals from disciplinary decisions, and independence from political masters. This paper examines Queensland public sector legislation and policy from 1863 to the present to demonstrate how well these four criteria are addressed. An analysis of the presence of these four characteristics in the Queensland context finds that the public sector legislation in Queensland is in breach of the guidelines that define a just and fair system in which disciplinary action is dispensed. We argue that creation of arbitrary powers to punish or dismiss staff is unjust if the legislation does not fully inform staff of what constitutes a breach of discipline, does not guarantee proportionate punishments to offences, and/or allow the disciplinary process to be used as a tool to coerce staff to perform in a politicised or otherwise unethical manner. We conclude by making recommendations as to how this situation may be rectified.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Are human resource professionals strategic business
           partners': Evidence from Hong Kong
    • Abstract: Chiu, Randy; Selmer, Jan
      Theoretical speculations and prescriptive discussions abound in the literature regarding the strategic importance of human resource management. However, evidence based on rigorous empirical studies that the transformation from an administrative service function to strategic partnership has taken place has been less pervasive. Based on a sample of CEOs, line managers and HR executives, this study applies both a quantitative and a qualitative approach to examine the research question whether HR professionals are strategic business partners. Although the overall quantitative results provided a weak support for an affirmative answer to the research question, quantitative analyses and the qualitative findings revealed that while HR executives regarded themselves as strategic business partners, CEOs and line managers were not sure that they played this strategic business role. Plausible explanations and fundamental implications of these findings are discussed in detail.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Implications for human resources and employment
           relations practice with regard to the integration of corporate ethics
           programmes into the culture of organisations
    • Abstract: Nel, Pieter; Nel, Liza; du Plessis, Andries
      This paper examines how useful components of corporate ethics programmes (code of ethics, ethics training, rewarding, disciplining employees and example of senior executives) are in integrating ethics into organisations' culture. Implications for human resources and employment relations practise are also considered.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - The impact of corporate social responsibility
           activities on organisational attractiveness across different cultures
    • Abstract: Kang, Seul Ki; Alcantara, Lailani Laynesa
      The relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities and organisational attractiveness has received significant attention in recent years. Yet, two gaps remain in the literature. One is that previous studies have not jointly considered the three types of CSR activities: philanthropy, business practice-related CSR and product-related CSR. The other is the lack of attention to the effect of culture on the perceived value of CSR. Thus, the objective of this study is to fill these gaps by examining how the influence of different CSR activities on organisational attractiveness varies across different cultures. Our analysis shows that all of the three CSR activities have positive effects on organisational attractiveness. Nonetheless, the extent to which each CSR activity positively affects organisational attractiveness differs across different cultures. In cultures with high uncertainty avoidance, low power distance, and high individuality, business practice-related CSR has the strongest effect. On the other hand, in cultures high in masculinity, philanthropy has the weakest effect. Even though the degree of influence varies across different cultural dimensions, business practice-related CSR shows the strongest effect in all cultural dimensions. These findings suggest that managers may be able to attract more job applicants through promoting their CSR activities, particularly business practice-related CSR activities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - The labour market, immigration and the building of
           Dubai
    • Abstract: Connell, Julia; Burgess, John
      Dubai has evolved from a sparsely populated desert region on the Arabian Gulf to a dynamic and fast growing city. The boom in construction and services has been built upon a large immigrant labour force with a labour market that is highly segregated - firstly between local and expatriate workers, and secondly among the expatriate workers depending on whether they are categorised as professional, construction or service sector workers. Despite the rapid growth and manifestations of modernity in Dubai, stories have emerged concerning the violation of human rights particularly with respect to contracted migrant workers. Despite its rapid transformation Dubai does not have in place the institutions or infrastructure that support and protect fundamental labour standards. Where there are unregulated migrant programs (as in Dubai), workers are potentially subject to exploitation. This paper examines the labour market and immigration in Dubai and considers whether growth has been compromised by promoting fundamental labour standards and whether this is likely to change post GFC.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Modelling the role of human resources management in
           the innovation chain
    • Abstract: Soliman, Fawzy
      The paper highlights the role of HRM in modern organisations, and that innovation activities are part of the evolutionary chain. The innovation chain begins with transformation into knowledge based, then into a learning organisation and finally into innovative enterprises.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Understanding strategic human resource management
           through the Paradigm of Institutional Theory
    • Abstract: Lee, Alison
      Strategic Human Resource Management is a sub-field in Human Resource Management (HRM) literature, which has been gaining wide support and recognition within organisational literature since the 1980s. However, despite the mainstream acceptance of SHRM, the theoretical grounding is still considered by many HRM and organisational scholars as weak and empirically unproven. This paper sets out to explore how the paradigm of institutional theory could be applied to strengthen the fundamental objectives of SHRM. The first part of the paper gives an outline of the institutional perspective and how it has developed since its genesis. The next section discusses how institutional theory has been applied throughout HRM literature. Finally, the implications of institutional theory leading to a better understanding of complex SHRM issues in contemporary organisations are discussed. It is with the assumption that if SHRM can align its varied approaches to gain a stronger theoretical base, then the gap between SHRM policies implemented and practice may be further minimised. Whilst this objective may not be fulfilled from this paper alone, the purpose is to elucidate the scope of institutional theory for analysis in future SHRM research.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - The identification of safety values in XYZ Hospital
    • Abstract: Budihardjo, Andreas
      It is important for hospitals to practice safety values to increase their health performance. By practising safety values, effective health treatment can be guaranteed and adverse events can be prevented. As a result, the performance of a hospital can be better as it attracts many patients to go there for medical check-up and treatment. Many hospitals claim for practising safety values; however, fact shows that adverse events still occur though not all are openly reported. This study aims to identify the practice of safety values in XYZ hospital by applying a safety-value concept proposed by Nivea and Sorra. The finding shows that XYZ has practised safety culture fairly well. However, some safety employees' behaviours are reflected more by a system rather than their values. Therefore, this finding is expected to inspire XYZ management to prepare strategic safety values inculcation plan in order to achieve high performance.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - The environmental change in Rajabhat Universities,
           Thailand
    • Abstract: Sinthunava, Kittiwan
      The environmental change in Thailand Higher Education in the last decade was initiated more from external rather than internal factors. The three important factors: the unfreezing, the moving and the refreezing had been performed by the top administrators by introducing new policies, using personal skills and experiences to persuade and control staff. Apart from that, the universities had provided many resources to increase the ability of staff to achieve the goals. Not only those change factors that are related to the changes in Human Resource Management (HRM) policies but also the role of leadership in bringing about change, the process of change and change management and the results of changes that have been implemented in their work and life.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Employee empowerment and job satisfaction: A case
           study of RC and Sabic in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    • Abstract: Hamdan Alzalabani, Abdulmonem; Nair, Reji D
      The paper analyses the important employee empowerment measures and based on attempts to develop a model for employee satisfaction. Using primary data collected from RC and SABIC, the study tries to prove that employee empowerment measures are a must for the employees' satisfaction, which is the backbone of a successful institution. The study points to the need for streamlining various measures of employee empowerment to meet the needs of the institutional objectives by ensuring job satisfaction of the employees.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Undercover boss: What Australian employees think about
           their managers
    • Abstract: Wright, Sally
      This paper presents the results of research on the attitudes of Australian employees to three key aspects of management behaviour: workplace consultation, trust in managers and perceptions of fair treatment. It was found that managerial and non-managerial employees share quite high perceptions of trust, fairness and consultation; managerial employees have higher perceptions than non-managerial employees. Factors such as length of job tenure, age, size of establishment, form of employment, industry sector, union membership, opportunities to negotiate pay and conditions, as well as perceptions of job security and workplace safety risk were found to be linked to employee perceptions of management. A number of important implications for employers, trade unions and government policy-makers are highlighted.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Defining Sustainability and Human Resource Management
    • Abstract: Spooner, Keri; Kaine, Sarah
      A great deal of contemporary attention, including the scholarly, is focused upon issues of sustainability and while much of this is specifically directed to environmental matters, the literature demonstrates a considerable and growing interest in human resource sustainability. Indeed, it would seem that concerns with human resource sustainability lie at the heart of much of the traditional as well as more recent employment relations research. It might be argued that all employment relations issues are at some level concerned with issues of sustainability. Such a broad approach to understanding the field does not facilitate focused research and limits empirical analysis. This paper aims to develop a coherent theoretical framework for examining HRM and sustainability. In this paper, the meaning of sustainability within the context of the employment relationship is examined and an analytical framework is suggested. It is argued that the key distinguishing variables which define sustainability in the employment relationship lie in the human resource management (HRM) domain and the task domain of the employment relationship. Extant literature on HRM and sustainability pays little attention to the impact of both of these domains on the individual worker rather focusing on organisational sustainability. This paper attempts to fill this gap by including the individual worker into a proposed framework for future research into HRM and sustainability.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Appropriate Difficulty and Discrimination Indices of a
           Criterion - Referenced Test Item Used in a Classroom Learning Research and
           Development
    • Abstract: Posrie, Rapin
      This study was aimed at exploring the appropriate techniques for analysing the minimum item difficulty and item discrimination indices of a criterion-referenced test used in a classroom learning research and development setting. An experimental criterion-referenced test form used in the study was the eighth-grade final exam English test of 60 items. The test was administered to 386 eighth graders in schools in Nan and Uttaradit provinces northern part of Thailand in the second semester of the educational year 2009. It was found that the criterion-referenced test item difficulty (P) was a random variable whose value varied according to the ability level of a group of students and the efficiency of the instruction. The appropriate approach to set the minimum difficulty value was through the MDIFF calculation formula derived from a P-chart technique. It was also found that the appropriate approach for analysing the item discrimination index is the r70 technique, the technique that classified examinees into pass and fail groups, and utilized only 70% of the data in each group to use in the computation of the index.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Unsafe/Unhealthy Work' Oh and S Outcomes in
           Australian Call Centres
    • Abstract: Hannif, Zeenobiyah; Lamm, Felicity; Vo, Anne
      Call centres have attracted the attention of researchers globally due to their implementation of new forms of work organisation and the implications these represent for the workforce. While there has been a great deal written on the poor working conditions within the call centre industry, and some discussion on the impact of these conditions on the health and safety of workers, there is still little known about the occupational health and well being policies and practices used in these workplaces. There has also been scant research on the health and safety experiences of call centre workers. This paper aims to address these gaps by examining whether the tasks performed and the occupational health and well being policies and practices in call centres lead to unhealthy outcomes for workers. A case study methodology is applied to explore these questions in two Australian call centres which highlight the diversity that exists in the industry. Key findings based on interviews with case study participants and key stakeholders indicate a misalignment between policy and practice, which represent various immediate and ongoing risks for employees. A number of policy concerns are raised through the data, particularly where negative occupational health outcomes can be associated with the lack of organisational compliance with employment legislation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Mandates for Change Management in the Ministry of
           Justice under the State Administration Act (No. 5) of 2002
    • Abstract: Choonhaklai, Sirirat; Sirisunhirun, Somboon; Dhanadirek, Rachada
      The Thai Ministry of Justice (MOJ) is the subject of research that reveals strengths and weaknesses, and a proposed orientation toward public-focused procedures is clarified. In order to put this guiding policy into effect, changes are necessary, and their management is discussed in detail. Qualitative and quantitative measurement of the MOJ's readiness for change permits the formulation of specific proposals that are strongly supported by theoretical and practical research in the management of change. These proposals include the institution of quality management assurance procedures, innovations in staff and executive training programs, and communications-intensive planning that give all MOJ personnel a stake in improvement.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Industrial Instruments and the Regulation of
           Employment Relations in the Residential Aged Care Sector in NSW
    • Abstract: Kaine, Sarah
      In common with most countries in the developed world, the Australian population is ageing. This phenomenon has resulted in the provision of care to the aged becoming an increasingly important economic, social and political issue. With more women engaged in paid employment, care for the aged is no longer predominantly provided by family networks. Consequently demand for residential and community care is growing. The growth in this demand has raised concerns about the sustainability of the existing aged care workforce with a number of government reports listing looming labour shortages as a significant issue facing the aged care sector. Closely related to the concerns about future labour supply is the difficulty in attracting workers to a sector which is both low in pay and low in status. Traditionally in NSW the regulation of wages and conditions has been through State awards however changes in the Australian industrial relations system have resulted in changes and variety in the types of industrial instruments used to regulate wages and conditions. This paper considers the impact of these regulatory changes on outcomes for employees in three aged care providers in NSW. Specifically, it compares the wages, conditions and attitudes to work and wages, of aged care employees working under different industrial instruments.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Termination in Australia: The Implications of Changing
           the Unfair Dismissal and Termination Law
    • Abstract: O'Neill, Brian; O'Neill, Marjorie
      Australian law relating to termination of employment has changed dramatically over the past decades which has had subsequent effects upon the number of dismissal cases that have been heard by Fair Work Australia (FWA) and its predecessor, The Australian Industrial Relations Commission (AIRC). Whilst the changing laws have had a significant impact upon the number of dismissal and disputes being heard before the tribunals we must also take into account Australia's economy as this has also had subsequent effects upon unemployment and consequently the number of termination cases. Since the introduction of the Fair Work Act 2009 we can see that there has been an increase in cases relating to unfair dismissal and disputes that have been heard before FWA. This increase has not only been caused by the implementation of the new law but also as a result of subsequent economic conditions such as the Global Financial Crisis (GFC.).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Role of Human Resources Management as a CoP
           Match-Maker
    • Abstract: Soliman, Fawzy
      This paper proposes that improvement to organisational performance could be achieved through the use of the concept of Community of Practice CoP to manage organisational internal services. This means CoP of Human Resources and CoP of Line Managers may deal with each other on the basis of services requested, provided CoP of Line Managers is supplied by the CoP of human resources. The significance of this relationship is that requested services from the CoP of human resources must be in compliance with what the CoP of human resources can deliver. Naturally differences may exist between expected and offered services. These differences may lead to gaps in quality, cost and time of delivery of services. Furthermore, those gaps may also be due to mismatch between expectations and perception of organisational CoPs. In this research services are classified as above expected, normal or below expected level of service. This paper also proposes that unless the CoP of human resources has sufficient knowledge about the perception of what the CoP of Line Managers want, the organisation may face unnecessary liabilities expenses due to non-compliance, rework and waste of resources. A central issue is quality of the service provided and the associated assessment of its performance. Inappropriate assessment of the service performance could lead to mismatch or gaps between the expectation of the CoP of Line Managers and the perception of the service by the CoP of Human Resources Management. It is envisaged that this research could assist management in streamlining their operations and control of cost and avoid wastage. This should ultimately lead to improvement in organisational performance.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - What Matter Affective Organisational Commitment - a
           Case of Thai State-owned Enterprise Employees
    • Abstract: Rungruang, Parisa; Tangchitnob, Jessada N
      Few studies have focused on identification of the antecedents of affective commitment in Thailand, especially organisational support, distributive justice, procedural justice, role ambiguity, and role conflict. In explaining affective commitment among Thai employees, a sample of 1,111 employees was drawn from a state-owned enterprise. Results of the sequential regression analysis indicated that role ambiguity (beta = -.17), distributive justice (beta = .12), role conflict (beta = -.09), and organisational support (beta = .08) had significant predictive relationship to affective commitment. Employee perception of procedural justice, however, was found to be insignificant. Theoretical and practical implications as well as suggestions for future research were also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Cultural Values and Demographic Correlates of
           Citizenship Performance
    • Abstract: Chandrakumara, Anil; Glynn, John; Gunathilake, HW; Senevirathne, SP
      This study examines the impact of cultural values on citizenship performance (CP) in the context of a developing country. Although differences in CP across cultures have been examined, the situation in developing countries is often not clear. Using a sample of 362 Sri Lankan employees, it is found that gender and education have significant impact on CP. While collectivism, future orientation, and uncertainty avoidance are found to be positively related to CP, power distance and masculinity values are negatively correlated with CP. It is also evident that the same cultural value orientation can have both positive and negative impacts on CP, depending on the particular aspect of CP. The findings reveal that developing countries are not totally different from developed countries as far as the impact of cultural values on CP is concerned. The study contributes to the advancement of CP theories of individual differences and cultural values and relevant knowledge pertaining to developing countries. Implications of findings are discussed and suggestions are offered for further research.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Human Resource Reporting and Positioning in Ten Hong
           Kong Listed Companies
    • Abstract: Chan, Juni; Burgess, John
      Purpose - This study explores the extent of Human Resources (HR) Reporting and the strategic positioning of Human Resources Management (HRM) in 10 corporations in Hong Kong. Design - Documentary analysis was conducted on 2007 annual reports and 2009 corporate websites of 10 listed companies. Senior corporate executives of the same organisations were then interviewed regarding their views on the need for HR reporting and the strategic positioning of HRM in their organisations. Findings - Findings from documentary analysis showed that HR reporting is underdeveloped in Hong Kong as compared with developed economies and these reported mainly on 'training and development'. Only a few HR managers were named as members of the senior management staff. Respondents revealed that this limited reporting reflects a low strategic positioning of HRM, indifferent attitudes of senior corporate executives towards HRM and doubts over the strategic competencies of some HR managers. HR reporting in Hong Kong was further hampered by the Chinese cultural characteristic of confrontation avoidance. Ironically, the interview respondents expressed a desire for more HR reporting and they expected HR disclosures to improve branding of the organisations, to increase share prices and to attract talent to the organisations. Limitation - This study is limited by the small sample of companies studied. Implications - There are structural and attitudinal barriers towards developing and implementing HR reporting programs; and giving a strategic direction to HRM. Originality - This is one of the few studies to combine the examination of corporate documents with interviews of senior corporate executives in Hong Kong regarding HR reporting and the strategic positioning of HRM.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - The Effect of Fixed-term Contracts on Rural Secondary
           Teachers
    • Abstract: Lierich, David; O'Connor, Christine
      In rural Victoria, attracting and retaining teachers to schools is a major concern. In many cases, the offer is a short term contract due to staffing restraints. This study aimed to replicate some of the earlier work of Feather and Rauter (2004) who investigated the effects of contingent work status. Feather and Rauter (2004) compared the work status of Victorian teachers across organisational commitment behaviours, job insecurity, organisational commitment, organisational identification, job satisfaction and work values of influence, skill-utilization and variety. This study however, concentrated on rural Victorian secondary schools of similar demographics. The effects of work values on job satisfaction and of job satisfaction on organisational commitment and identification were also investigated. Job insecurity proved to be significantly higher for fixed-term contract teachers; however results indicated no support for previous findings that contingent work status lead to an increase in OCBs. Job satisfaction proved a strong predictor of organisational commitment whilst work values of influence, skill-utilization and variety proved good predictors of job satisfaction. A high proportion of fixed-term contract teachers in rural schools were found to be 55+ years; a low proportion, young graduates. It appears the demographic of fixed-term contract teachers in rural Victoria is changing. Implications for rural principals in retaining staff impinge on enhancing work values and the fostering of commitment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - The Role of Employer Associations in Lobbying
           Government: A Cross-case Comparison of the Activities of the Australian
           Mines and Metals Association and the Australian Industry Group before and
           During 2007
    • Abstract: Woolcock, Eliza; Jerrard, Marjorie
      The role of employer associations and their impact on industrial relations change in Australia via political lobbying and representation are analysed using comparative case studies of AMMA and the AiG. A qualitative research design is used to assess how the role of employer associations has changed over time to include a focus on political lobbying as a key strategy to achieve outcomes of benefit to members. An analysis of policy submissions and reports by the associations was undertaken and semi-structured interviews with key informants from the selected employer associations, their respective members, government officials, and a consultant were conducted. The results of this research demonstrated that the role of employer associations has changed significantly in the last twelve years of the Howard Government. The associations were found to be proactive, rather than reactive, and demonstrated effective lobbying techniques on behalf of members as well as offering a range of other services.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Using Global Performance Dimensions in Human Resource
           Development and Workforce Planning
    • Abstract: Fein, Erich C
      This paper presents a framework for human resource development and workforce planning that is based on a systematic review of global dimensions within the job performance domain. The paper begins by first considering how central job performance constructs can be defined, and then demonstrates how these job performance dimensions can be applied across virtually all jobs. This process is advocated as a reliable and ordered procedure for considering how the nature of specific job tasks may change within a particular job or a series of jobs. The paper reviews five global dimensions of performance, which can be anchored in the broad distinction between specific task performance and contextual performance. Because these dimensions give managers a framework for considering how the nature of performance may change across jobs, they are, therefore, transportable across jobs for the purpose of structuring human resource development and workforce planning initiatives. In general, the performance dimensions discussed in this paper offer organisations a useful way of restructuring their understanding of core aspects of job performance in times of intense change, such as during shifts in technology or during rapid changes in the business environment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - The I.D. System: A Reliable Approach to Improve Team
           Performance
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Anneke; Dadich, Ann
      In the changing workplace environment, employee behaviour remains largely unpredictable, implicating significant repercussions for team dynamics and team performance. To maximise human capital, managers and employees need to understand those facets that impel peak performance. This paper introduces one such approach - the Instinctive Drives System. The system offers improved insight into innate drives as well as opportunities to harness these for improved individual and team functioning. The paper discusses the context that gave rise to its development and its potential value in the development and management of human resources. Through a comparison with validated tools used for similar purposes, the paper indicates that the system is theoretically grounded in organisational psychology to improve individual and organisational performance. The paper culminates with the presentation of research findings that validate the system and verify the need for further research.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - The Evolution of HRD in Australia: Rhetoric or
           Reality'
    • Abstract: Peretz, Melissa; McGraw, Peter
      The research reported in this paper describes and analyses the pattern and evolution of human resource development (HRD) in Australian organisations over the period 1996-2009. Based on the conceptual academic literature, received wisdom amongst practitioners and the extant empirical research, it is hypothesised that the HRD practices of Australian organisations will have become more elaborate and extensive. Quantitative data from 793 organisations in Australia is analysed from three iterations of the CRANET Australia survey in 1996, 1999 and 2008/9. The results indicate only limited and partial support for the hypothesis. Only those HRD practices regarding career development and performance appraisal have significantly increased in sophistication over time. In contrast, the HRD practices relating to the evaluation of the effectiveness of training have declined in sophistication over the observed period. Evidence from this study, therefore, suggests an inconsistent pattern in the developmental trend of HRD in Australian organisations, with linear increases evident amongst certain practices and between particular points in time and declines in other areas of practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Managerial Effectiveness as a Function of Culture and
           Tolerance of Ambiguity: A Cross-cultural Study of India and Fiji
    • Abstract: Pathak, RD; Chauhan, Vinit Singh; Dhar, Upinder; van Gramberg, Bernadine
      This paper explores how national culture may predispose managers to a greater or lesser tolerance for ambiguity which then has an effect on their managerial effectiveness. The concept of tolerance of ambiguity is analysed in Indian and Fijian business executives' propensity to avoid uncertainty. The research investigation adopts a 2 x 2 factorial design on a sample consisting of 84 subjects from service and manufacturing organisations in India and Fiji. The results indicate that Indian national managers demonstrate higher levels of tolerance of ambiguity and greater adaptability in comparison to the Fijian Managers. The results suggest that managerial effectiveness is enhanced in an Indian national context as a result of greater tolerance of ambiguity and greater adaptability and this may be linked to the greater homogeneity of the workforce and its associated value congruence than in the Fijian sample. The findings may have relevance for human resource managers, particularly in dealing with training and support.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - How a Welfare Approach to Maternity Has Facilitated
           Low Workforce Participation Rates for Australian Women of Child-bearing
           Age
    • Abstract: O'Neill, Marjorie; Johns, Robyn
      Australia is only one of two OECD countries that has no legislated universal paid maternity leave scheme. It also ranks eighth lowest in the OECD for the workforce participation rate of women of child-bearing age. This paper examines why consecutive Australian governments have opted to provide a welfare approach to the issue of maternity rather than encourage and embrace women's workforce participation by providing legal entitlements within an employment relations context. The paper examines the history of welfare and paid maternity leave in Australia through an institutional framework in which society, politics and the economy become the bases for the argument. By using this framework for the examination, the paper aims to provide an understanding for the comparatively low workforce participation rate of women of child-bearing age observed within Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Employee Ethical Attitudes: Contextual Differences and
           Impact on Perceived Quality of Leadership Relationships
    • Abstract: Jepsen, Denise; Hine, Don; Noblet, Andrew; Cooksey, Ray
      This study examines the differences in how employees and their supervisors view ethical dilemmas. A 20 item ethical attitudes scale of vignettes in six categories of ethical dilemmas - business, discrimination, environment, marketing, personal finances and sexuality was developed and distributed to 152 male and female employees. To determine the way employees see themselves as ethically similar to their supervisors, respondents' own attitudes were compared with their perceptions of their supervisors' attitudes to the same ethical dilemmas. A small but significant contribution to the quality of the leadership relationship can be accounted for by the ethical similarity of an employee and their supervisor. Results also demonstrated that employees have a 'more strict' moral or ethical attitude towards non-organisational than organisational ethical dilemmas.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Feeling Trusted and Loyalty: Modeling
           Supervisor-subordinate Interaction from a Trustee Perspective
    • Abstract: Deng, Jingsong; Wang, Karen Yuan
      Previous research on interpersonal trust has focused only on trusting, such as the antecedents leading to trust in management. This study explores the effect of subordinate feeling trusted in the interaction between Chinese supervisors and subordinates. We examine the mediating effect of subordinate satisfaction with supervisor and the moderating effect of trust in supervisor on their loyalty to supervisor in this interaction. The findings indicate that subordinate feeling trusted positively affects their satisfaction with the supervisor and ultimately results in improving loyalty to supervisor. The article concludes with a discussion of theoretical and practical implications for trust management in real work settings.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Australian Call Centres: Time to Search for a New
           Management Model'
    • Abstract: Connell, Julia; Hannif, Zeenobyah; Burgess, John
      As businesses restructure their operations the number of call centres is growing through ICT developments. Indeed the ACTU (2002) have argued that call centres are well placed to represent an e-commerce gateway for many companies. The scale, nature, organization and operation of call centres is extremely diverse (Burgess and Connell, 2004) although they share the ability to be organized on a continuous operational basis, they are highly dependent upon ICT platforms and call centre work is capable of being subject to extensive control and surveillance. While research has generated many bleak stories of the work experience in call centres with reference to 20th century workhouses (Callaghan and Thompson, 2001), there are also examples of high levels of job satisfaction combined with job commitment (Kinnie et al, 2001). Kjellerup (2004) has referred to two types of call centre as being either 'The Galley Slave Model' or the 'Coaching Culture Model'. We propose it is time to search for a new management model for call centres that is not at one or other end of the continuum but perhaps somewhere in the middle. For this paper the authors have focused on work in the context of two small-medium sized call centres - with between 50 and 150 seats. This is because much of the research to date has focused on large call centres, with several hundred operatives. As a result in our search for a different management model we intend to look beyond the most commonly examined locations. The purpose of the paper is to first outline the nature and dimensions of the call centre industry in Australia before analysing the drivers of organizational and workplace change in the industry. Next, we consider the substantive job quality issues that surround call centre work. The paper then considers the findings from structured focus groups with operatives and team leaders in the featured Australian call centres in order to determine how the role of management may impact on employee's perceptions of job quality, commitment and fairness given the drive to increase productivity in the current economic climate. We conclude by proposing a typology for call centre management.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Factors Influencing Australian Retailers' Decisions
           Concerning the Granting of Paid Maternity Leave Benefits to Their
           Employees
    • Abstract: O'Neill, Brian; O'Neill, Marjorie
      Australia has been a member state of the International Labor Organisation ( ILO) since its foundation in 1919 (ILO 2008) and promotes itself as 'playing an active role in the work of the Organisation. (Department of Foreign Affairs, 2008). While the 1952 ILO Maternity Protection Convention called for twelve weeks' paid maternity leave, in 2000 this was revised and the provision of fourteen weeks' paid maternity leave was recommended (ILO, 2007). Despite being a member of the ILO and having ratified some 58 out of 185 conventions, of which 47 are in force in Australia (ILO 2005), to date consecutive Australian Federal Governments have neglected to ratify any of the ILO Maternity Protection Conventions. Workers in Australia do not have a legal right to paid maternity leave and yet some employers do provide their employees with paid maternity leave entitlements. Current statistics estimate that only 25% of Australian women who work in the private sector have access to paid maternity leave (EOWA, 2007). Of this only 8% of women in the retail sector have access to paid maternity leave, compared to 56% of women in professional occupations (Burrows 2008). The purpose of this paper is to identify the key factors impacting upon whether Australian retail companies choose to provide or not provide paid maternity leave benefits for their employees, including the role of trade unions in this decision-making process. This paper will begin by analysing relevant literature concerning maternity leave and the Australian retail industry for the purpose of identifying those factors likely to influence whether paid maternity leave is established as an employee entitlement. A semi-structured interview survey of seven large retail organisations was conducted for this initial study and the results reveal a high degree of variance amongst retailers in their approach to human resource management.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Employer Strategic Choice and Traineeships in the
           Retail Industry
    • Abstract: Ingersoll, Louise
      Since the mid 1980s, the Australian Vocational Education and Training (VET) system has experienced significant reforms in terms of policies and regulatory frameworks, resulting in a system characterised by demand-side requirements that seek to cater to the needs of industry and employers. This paper draws upon research into the changes in VET policy and the implications for management strategy within the retail industry. Evidence from case study research into three large Australian retail organisations is presented as a means of contrasting employer experiences in the implementation of retail traineeships. Using a framework for analysing management strategy developed by Sisson and Marginson (2003), the paper is structured in consideration of management as a systems actor, management as a strategic actor and management as an agent of capital. As such, the research focuses on the following topics: the broader VET environment; interaction with stakeholders; retail industry labour market; internal dynamics of traineeship implementation; motivation for traineeship implementation; traineeship delivery; financial incentives; training wage; and a cost/benefit analysis of traineeship utilisation. The case studies highlight the different ways the same structural system can be adapted and utilised across different organisations with various degrees of success. In analysing the changes in VET policy and the implications for management strategy in the retail industry, it is evident that the outcomes of implementing traineeships will be reliant on the strategic choices made by the employers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Thailand's Approach to Achieving Effective Leadership:
           Culture and Outcomes
    • Abstract: Choonhaklai, Siritat; Singsuriya, Pagorn
      Thailand is facing a global challenge while public agencies are not capable of being the agents of change. Although many studies confirm a strong link between leadership and organizational culture that contribute to effective organizational performance, this is not also the case in Thai public administration due to influences of national values. This has implications for the understanding of globalization impact. Thus, to achieve effective leadership, local and culturally specific factors should be dealt with.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Management of Wage Costs at the Firm Level: The
           Singapore Perspective
    • Abstract: Chew, Rosalind
      One of the most important HR issues in Singapore today concerns the transformation of the wage system from the seniority-based wage system to the flexible wage system (FWS) based on annual bonuses in the first instance and then on the monthly variable component (MVC), which is a special case of the FWS. This paper examines the complexities involved in the transformation of the wage system which is intertwined with Singapore's social security scheme, namely the Central Provident Fund (CPF) and the tripartite National Wages Council (NWC). The paper also reports some test runs to show that the MVC is indeed variable and that workers should not take into account the MVC in their decision to meet financial commitments such as financing a housing mortgage, loan for vehicle purchase or loan to finance children's tertiary education. The recent financial crisis in the USA which was started by the sub-prime crisis shows that Singapore's macroeconomic management is insightful. It also shows that if Singapore does face a deep economic slowdown, the wage cost can be brought down via the MVC to protect employment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - New Forms of Employer-worker Relationships in
           Australian Universities
    • Abstract: Nguyen, Vien; Johns, Robyn
      This paper aims to investigate if the "high-performance paradigm" and a Unitary Strategic HRM approach of WorkChoices has brought about new forms of employer-worker relationships within Australian universities. In the context of these developments, this paper will first set out to examine the literature to help explain the transition of Australia's industrial relations system. The paper will then proceed to outline the qualitative research design before reporting and discussing the results gathered through the undertaking of semi-structured interviews with Human Resource Managers/Directors and/or representatives from Australian universities as well as acclaimed academics within the field. The results highlight that whilst WorkChoices did bring forth a new form of work practice, the new practice did not necessarily promote innovative HRM practices nor did it encourage or cultivate new forms of employer-worker relationships within Australian universities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Teacher Unions, Social Movements and the Politics of
           Education in Asia: South Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines [Book Review]
    • Abstract: O'Neill, Marjorie
      Review(s) of: Teacher Unions, Social Movements and the Politics of Education in Asia: South Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines, John P. Synott, Ashgate, Aldershot, 2002, 354 pp., (UK) 70, hardback, ISBN: 9780754615576.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Computer Programmers as Volunteer Workers: The Case of
           the Free and Open Source Software Movement
    • Abstract: Breach, Geoff
      The primary benefit of free and open source computer software to the community and not-for-profit sectors lies in the fact that it is almost always completely free of both charge and administrative encumbrance. A more detailed analysis of the context in which the software is created exposes an even greater relevance to the human resource and third sector management however - the individuals who create this software are volunteers. This paper introduces free and open source software, highlights the key technical and social factors that make it so interesting to the human resource management context, and applies the Levy (2006) framework to correlate the production of open source computer software with the Volunteering Australia definition of volunteering.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Managing Employability for the Future: Perspectives
           and Implications
    • Abstract: Clarke, Marilyn
      As jobs and careers have become more transient responsibility for maintaining employability has gradually shifted from the organisation to the individual. Organisations that once offered long-term hierarchical careers, company supported training, and the development of company specific skills in return for employee loyalty, hard work, and commitment are now expecting individuals to manage their own careers and to develop and maintain their own employability. This paper explores the concept of employability and then considers it from the perspective of the various key stakeholders - governments, educators, employers and, in particular, individuals. The paper argues that although some highly marketable employees may be benefiting from the transition from organisationally-managed to self-managed careers and employability there is little evidence of a widespread uptake among the majority of employees. The issues and implications surrounding employability self-management are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Implications of the Coombs Commission Report for HRM
           in the Public Service
    • Abstract: Spooner, Keri; Haidar, Ali
      The traditional model of public sector human resource management (HRM) in Australia exhibited features that distinguished it sharply from those evident in the private sector and which gave public servants a degree of independence from the elected government. During the past thirty years, those distinctive characteristics of the public sector career service have been removed or weakened. The pressures for these reforms were evident by the 1970's and have been identified as stemming from a range of factors including dissatisfaction with public sector bureaucracy, a desire to exert greater ministerial control over public servants and a determination to adopt private sector management approaches. Government legislative reforms and changed employment practices have been identified as undermining or even destroying the once distinctive character of public sector HRM. Yet despite the fairly considerable academic attention focussed upon these reforms and their consequences, the role played by a major government inquiry of the 1970's in setting the stage for such reform has not been examined. It is argued in this paper that the reforms to the Australian public sector over the past decades began and were influenced by the Royal Commission on Australian Government Administration (RGAGA - the Coombs Commission) and that an analysis of the impact of government reforms upon the HRM of senior public servants should begin with the Coombs Commission. The paper examines the Coombs Recommendations and analyses their implications for the future of those defining features of an independent public service. The paper concludes that although the Commission did not recommend a radical departure from the career service model, it did argue for changes in the nature of the HRM practices relating to senior public servants that would have the impact of undermining the distinctive character of public service employment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Towards Consistent Implementation of Flexicurity
    • Abstract: Tangian, Andranik
      The paper contains analysis of, critical remarks on, and constructive suggestions to Towards Common Principles of Flexicurtity of the European Commission (2007). The latter promotes relaxing the employment protection legislation while providing advances in employment and social security for flexible workforces, like fixed-term, part-time and agency workers, or self-employed. The default assumption, that relaxing labour laws can be compensated by these advances, is criticised as the compensating measures are regarded as vague and insufficient. Therefore, some additional measures are proposed to counterbalance the actual flexibilisation of employment relations, including (1) flexinsurance, a kind of progressive flexibilisation tax, meaning that the employer's contribution to social security should be proportional to the flexibility of the contract/risk of becoming unemployed, (2) elements of the basic minimum income model, (3) workplace tax for worse working conditions of atypically employed which should protect 'the working environment' in the same way as the green tax protects the natural environment, and (4) constraining financial markets. It is argued that all of these meet interests of social partners and solve contradictions between several European policies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Burnout and Organizational Factors: A Study of Chinese
           Nurses in China
    • Abstract: Jiang, Li; Wang, Karen Yuan; Crawford, John
      The problem of burnout in nursing has received world-wide attention. However, research on how work-related and social factors cause burnout within the context of China's transitional health-care system is limited. Our study examines the relationships between burnout and organizational factors within the context of hospital in China. Based on the quantitative method, the findings of the study indicate that both work overload and role conflict are positively related to Chinese nurses' burnout in China. Work demands from doctors and patients are also contributing to Chinese nurses' burnout. Social support and role ambiguity do not have statistically significant relationships with burnout. The study provides valuable recommendations for HRM in China to improve the efficiency and performance of nurses.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin
           Luther King's Last Campaign [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Dabscheck, Braham
      Review(s) of: Michael K. Honey, Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign, W. W. Norton and Company, New York and London, 2007, xx + 619, pp., (US) $ 35.00, cloth, ISBN-13: 9780393043396, (US) $17.95, paper, ISBN: 9780393330533.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - A Study of the Organisational Safety Culture of the
           Electricity Distribution Industry in New South Wales: Identifying
           Organisational Safety Culture
    • Abstract: Rutter, Arthur
      The research question involves an attempt to discover the safety culture that may exist specifically within the electricity distribution industry in New South Wales and whether it is positive or negative. I consider that the organisational culture, including safety culture could be preventing a further reduction in the accident rate within the industry. The industry is engineering based and as such is very systems orientated, there are various layers of defences used in an attempt to prevent serious incidents and damage to equipment. These defences are a mixture of hard and soft applications as defined by (Reason, 1997:8) as being hard systems such as physical barriers to prevent un-authorised access and contact; the soft defences include rules and procedures, regulations, training, permit to work and supervision. However I consider that an important factor that has not been measured and assessed is the relationship between organisational safety culture influencing attitudes and values of workers in the industry which could be impacting upon efforts to reduce the accident/incident rate. As I have indicated previously the industry is very systems orientated and has is own regulatory system, codes of practice and guidelines, in addition to the State OHS legislation and references to Standards Australia. But as (Hopkins, 2005:5) points out 'The right culture is necessary to make safety systems work', and indicates that unless everyone within an organisation is committed and constantly focussed upon safe working attitudes and behaviour the systems do not operate effectively. The difficulty is how do you effectively measure safety culture within an organisation' Is it through reduced incident/accident rates, reduction in absenteeism (sick leave), and increased productivity (it would be difficult to assign any portion of increased productivity to safety culture)' Is the safety culture positive or negative' A negative safety culture would negate the effectiveness of safety systems put in place; a positive safety culture would reinforce and complement the safety systems.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Job Search and Selection Outside the Primary Labour
           Market: The Ways in Which Undergraduate Students Find Part-time Employment
           and the Ways Their Employers Hire Them
    • Abstract: Treuren, Gerry
      Despite the rapid growth in casualised, precarious and non-standard employment in the past two decades, not much is known about the job search and matching processes for these employees. This article provides evidence about job search outside the primary labour market, looking at a specific area of the secondary labour market: undergraduate students seeking part-time employment. The article reports on how 117 undergraduate students found part-time employment, and the methods by which their employers recruited them. The majority of jobs were found through strong tie networks - family and friends - providing information about the availability of job openings, and often acting as intermediaries between the employer and potential employee. A remarkable number of people did not need to formally apply as third party contacts had secured the job without any involvement by the potential employee. Although these findings are not automatically generalisable to the broader non-primary labour market, it points to some of the different processes involved in job search and matching.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - 2020 Vision or 1920's Myopia': Recent Developments
           in Gender Pay Equity in Australia
    • Abstract: Smith, Meg; Lyons, Michael
      Progress in gender pay equity has stalled. Equal remuneration provisions in federal labour law have proven to be inadequate. New equal remuneration principles in New South Wales and Queensland held some promise for pay equity activists and were the basis of successful wage increases in female dominated occupations in those jurisdictions. These developments were sidelined by the Work Choices amendments, changes that were also prejudicial to women because of their erosion of industry awards. Federal Labor's commitment to dismantling aspects of Work Choices is well documented but its specific attention to the deficiencies of federal equal remuneration provisions is less certain.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - The Healthcare Industry: A Suitable Place for Employee
           Participation'
    • Abstract: O'Donoghue, Peter; Stanton, Pauline; Bartram, Timothy
      This article explores employee participation in the Australian healthcare sector from the perspective of key industry players drawn from the health employer association, unions and government. We analyse the views of key informants on the meaning of employee participation, their experience of participation in practice, and the facilitators and impediments to participatory practice. Findings indicate a narrow projection of employee participation, which mostly occurs after a decision has been made, a belief that the role of management is critical for employee participation to be successful, considerable scepticism about its benefits and highly variable practice. Union informants were cynical about management's motivation, as they saw participation being used to advance predetermined outcomes undermining positive participatory practice and trust between the players. The key informants identified lack of time and resources as further impediments to participatory practice. Implications are drawn for managerial practice and further research.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - The Spirit of Business: Spiritualising Otherwise
           Secular Work and Learning Contexts
    • Abstract: Crossman, Joanna
      The contribution of spiritual perspectives in otherwise secular working and learning contexts is attracting increasing interest in business and academic literature. In addition to identifying some reasons for the phenomenon, the article suggests 'secular spirituality' as a conceptual approach that may prove serviceable as a paradigm for thinking about spiritual matters in learning and employment. Lastly, drawing on the experiences of particular American businesses that have systematically incorporated spiritual approaches into their practices, some ideas about how learning organisations might begin to become more spiritually orientated are proffered.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - Employment, Trade Union Renewal and the Future of
           Work: The Experience of Work and Organisational Change [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mathieson, Hamish
      Review(s) of: Employment, Trade Union Renewal and the Future of Work: The Experience of Work and Organisational Change, Paul Stewart (ed.), 2005, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN 1403912270, pp. 290; 60.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - Trustees, Neutrals or Hired Guns: A Study of the
           Employment Relationship and Managerial Values of Australian Senior Council
           Officers
    • Abstract: Haidar, Ali; Spooner, Keri
      The employment relationship of local government senior council officers has undergone fundamental changes largely replacing tenured with fixed term contract employment. Many students of public management have argued that the employment of senior council officers on a performance contract basis would cause their loyalty to shift from the community to councillors. This paper reports the results of a survey of senior council officers conducted across Australia which focused upon council officers' perceptions concerning the nature of their employment and the values they adopt in guiding their behaviour in relation to councillors. The responses of senior council officers show that although most of them are appointed on fixed term performance contracts they never the less perceive that their employment is quite secure. Council officers do not take upon themselves the role of unelected guardians of the public interest. Neither do they respond to the unlawful demands of councillors. The officers surveyed display neutral behaviour wherein they respect their vow of silence, implement council policies even if they consider that they are against community interest and they balance community considerations and political considerations in their advice to councillors. They adopt this behaviour despite their belief that councillors are quite influential in deciding almost all aspects of their employment including renewal of contract.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - Combating Psychological Harassment in the Workplace:
           Processes for Management
    • Abstract: Poilpot-Rocaboy, Gwenaelle; Winter, Richard
      This paper focuses on the process whereby an individual at work is singled out and victimised. This phenomenon, named 'psychological harassment', is defined in terms of four interrelated phases: (1) antecedents interaction, (2) harassment behaviour, (3) responses of the victim and the organisation, (4) individual, organisational and societal effects. To help managers combat psychological harassment in the workplace, the paper proposes intervention processes based on the analysis of a single case study. An intervention tool, consisting of four diagnostic questions, is proposed to help managers: (1) identify psychological harassment behaviour, (2) decide whether to act or not, (3) develop a psychological harassment management process, and/or (4) develop a psychological harassment prevention process. The paper argues managers may effectively combat psychological harassment in the workplace when they utilise the proposed tool and consider carefully the implications of intervention.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - Absolute Ethical Principles in Mediating Employment
           Disputes: Is This a Reasonable or Desirable Expectation'
    • Abstract: Douglas, Julie
      This paper looks at the work of mediators in the New Zealand Department of Labour, (DOL) Mediation Service. Currently these mediators are not obliged to work under any code of ethics. While there are commonalities across all mediations and mediators there are also considerable differences. The question as to whether the ethical principles contained in non employment mediators' Codes of Ethics would be useful or applicable, needs to be considered when considering drafting a code for employment mediators in this Service. Principles commonly associated with mediation processes such as confidentiality, impartiality and neutrality may not necessarily be appropriate when dealing with employment disputes. Some discussion is given to the problems that may arise if these principles are adhered to or not, and also whether mediation required by legislation can act in the same autonomous way as voluntary mediations. This statutory establishment of DOL mediators also raises the question of whether there is a state expectation of mediators acting as agents of social change.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - There and Back Again: Shaping the Employment Contract
           in the Antipodes
    • Abstract: Nuttall, Pam
      This article explains the terms, effects and the details of the labour contracts. This article examines the application of common law principles to the definition of 'employee' in the New Zealand jurisprudence since the enactment of the Employment Contracts Act in 1991. The article also explores the implications of historical assumptions about the development of the employment contract and the effect of these assumptions on classifying the legal effect of working arrangements.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - The Youth Labour Market in Australia and Workchoices
           Legislation
    • Abstract: O'Brien, Martin
      The issue of youth employment and bargaining has received much attention in Australia recently due to industrial relations legislative reforms introduced by the Commonwealth Government (WorkChoices legislation). Because of their relative inexperience, youth are perceived to be in a particularly vulnerable and weak position when bargaining over wages and conditions individually with employers, which is the crucial centrepiece of this legislation. The paper starts with a review of the youth labour market (15-24 years) in Australia and compares it to the prime-aged (25-44 years) market. Specifically, their industry representation, earnings and trade union membership are analysed. These results are then assessed in the light of industrial relations reforms introduced in the WorkChoices legislation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - The Dual Participant Household Model in the European
           Countries: What Is the Role Played by Part-time Work'
    • Abstract: Villa, Paola
      European countries (EU15) differ substantially in terms of the female employment rate, the proportion of women employed part-time and the share of dual participation among couple households. In the light of data available on the employment patterns of couple households, this paper investigates the role played by part-time work in enhancing the participation of mothers, and hence in the move from the male breadwinner model to the dual participant model where both partners are in work. To be observed in all European countries is a higher proportion of part-time work in households with small children. However, contrary to what common sense might suggest, there is no clear relation between the incidence of part-time work and the diffusion of the dual participation model among households with children. Thus, a high incidence of part-time work is not necessarily associated with a larger share of dual participation households among families with children, just as a high incidence of dual participation households is not necessarily associated with a high proportion of part-time working mothers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - Flexicurity, Flexinsurance and the European
           Commission's Green Paper: Modernising Labour Law to Meet the Challenges of
           the 21st Century
    • Abstract: Tangian, Andranik
      The paper contains both critical remarks on and constructive suggestions to Green Paper: Modernising labour law to meet the challenges of the 21st century of the European Commission (2006a) which promotes flexicurity policies, that is, relaxing the employment protection legislation while providing advances in employment and social security for flexible workforces, like fixed-term, part-time and agency workers, or self-employed. The default assumption, that relaxing labour laws can be compensated by these advances, is criticised as these measures are regarded as too vague and insufficient. Therefore, some additional measures are proposed to counterbalance the actual flexibilisation of employment relations, including (1) flexinsurance, a kind of progressive flexibilisation tax, meaning that the employer's contribution to social security should be proportional to the flexibility of the contract/risk of becoming unemployed, (2) elements of the basic minimum income model, and (3) constraining financial markets. It is argued that all of these meet interests of social partners and solve contradictions between such European policies as flexicurity, make work pay, welfare-state policy, and civil-society policy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Markey, Raymond
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Notes for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
 
 
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