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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd
  [3 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1441-8754
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Psychology regulatory requirements: Revisiting our
           obligations
    • Abstract:
      Psychologists in Australia have a range of regulatory requirements with which they must comply. These requirements are set out in standards and guidelines provided by the Psychology Board of Australia (PsyBA) and the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) based on the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law. Keeping abreast of all of these requirements can be challenging for psychologists in an ever increasing professional context of rules and accountability.

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:44:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Surge in APS online Find a Psychologist service
           searches
    • Abstract: Symons, Mick
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:41:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Women prefer peace: The 2016-17 APS Intercultural
           Grant
    • Abstract:
      The APS Grant for Intercultural and/or International Projects supports innovative projects that have an intercultural and/or international focus. The 2016-17 Grant was awarded to Ms Colleen Turner FAPS, for a project titled 'Keeping ourselves safe: Women prefer peace'. The project sought to partner with the provincial government and the local university in the town of Borin South Sudan to establish a hub for women and children, providing a safe place from which to enable educational, employment and enterprise opportunities.

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:40:04 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Psychology in the bush: Providing psychological
           services within an Aboriginal community controlled health service:
           Experiences from Central Australia
    • Abstract: Davis, John Mark
      The Rural and Remote Interest Group was interested in learning about practising psychology in an Aboriginal Health Service. Toward that goal, I interviewed three non Aboriginal psychologists at the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) in Alice Springs: Michael Lawton, Bianka Shulz-AIIan, and Dr Jon-Paul Cacioli. What follows is a distillation of insights identified by them. Michael provides services in remote communities including Mutitjulu (behind Uluru), Ntaria and Utju to the west, and Ltyente Apurte to the southeast of Alice Springs. Bianka and Jon-Paul see clients in town.

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:39:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Practising psychologist alerts: Reporting obligations:
           Alleged corruption or misconduct in the public service
    • PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:34:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Compulsive buying is finally coming out of the closet
    • Abstract: Benson, April
      Despite the fact that it was first described in the psychiatric literature more than 100 years ago, it is only in the past 25 years that compulsive buying disorder has begun to be researched.

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:32:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Focus on the APS Journals
    • Abstract: Hammond, Sabine; Feast, Nicole
      The APS is proud to be the publisher of a range of peer-reviewed scholarly journals. The journals aim to inform members and a broader international readership about current research and developments, innovation and policy issues affecting your work as a psychologist, and to contribute to global research efforts in advancing knowledge in the field. Each Journal is unique in scope, however, all five share a commitment to robust peer-review, and the publication of high-quality and relevant content.

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:29:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Early-career psychology: In the spotlight
    • Abstract: Felman, Amy
      A.n interview with Amy Felman - clinical psychologist and host of 'We All Wear it Differently' psychology podcast (WAWID)

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:27:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Consumer psychology and brand
    • Abstract: Freeland-Small, Pat
      Brand is an intangible notion that exists within the minds of the consumers of products or the investors in a company's stock, yet it is one of the most valuable assets a company owns. Indeed psychology, as the study of the mind and human behaviour, has an important role to play in helping companies to build their company value via their brands.

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:25:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Psychology and market research: What's the
           connection'
    • Abstract: Chant, Graham
      Unknown to many psychologists, market research has made substantial use of psychology and psychological developments (including statistical techniques). Of course, the reverse is also true in that a large number of market researchers are probably unaware of the source of many of the approaches they apply (and in some cases, misapply).

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:24:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Consumer psychologists in social marketing campaigns
    • Abstract: Elliott, Barry
      Consumer psychologists are involved in the marketplace. They assist commercial clients regarding how best to persuade consumers to do what their client would want them to do, namely, to choose and buy their client's product or service over competing ones. To achieve this end, the consumer psychologist sets out to understand what consumers want in order to assist clients to develop offers that are consistent with these desires. This can involve assisting clients to identify and understand where their product/service fits into the lives of existing and potential customers, and identifying customers' perspective of competitive offerings.

      Consumer psychologists rely heavily on collecting and analysing qualitative data backed up by quantitative surveys or experiments. In so doing, consumer psychologists use marketing's theory of persuasion - make what the customer wants to buy at a prices/he is willing to pay The behaviour change requested is minimal: 'carry-on ' or 'modify' and 'choose ours' because it better suits your wants and needs versus the competitors. In marketing this is known as the marketing concept or customer orientation.

      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2017 13:22:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Why is being customer-centric so difficult for
           organisations and what can they do about it'
    • Abstract: Cotchett, Damian
      Attracting and retaining customers is expensive, but it is the lifeblood of companies that promote and sell their products and services. Companies spend exceedingly large sums of money on marketing communications that both promote t heir products and services, and outline how the experience they provide is the best consumers will find.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - APS Medicare Survey results: Towards a fairer policy
           position
    • Abstract: Littlefield, Lyn
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - New funding opportunities for psychologists
    • Abstract: Cichello, Anthony
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - The experience pathway to the grade of Member of the
           APS
    • Abstract: Symons, Mick; Henderson, Lainy
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Letters to the editor
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Get involved in consumer psychology
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Man up: The psychology behind the movement
    • Abstract: Ferrier, Adam
      0ne of the best behavioural-change mechanics we have available to us is 'reality TV'. This is a grand statement and it's based more on my observation - like the fact that pa rents in suburban Australia are 'plating up' their Sunday night turducken (with a chi a and soybean dessert) while watching MasterChef - more than any serious analysis. That said dancing, singing, home renovation, surf life saving have all seemingly received the benefits of the reality-TV effect.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Comfortably compliant: The hot topics in MBS
           compliance
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Did you know'
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Professional indemnity insurance update
    • Abstract: Symons, Mick
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - APS Interest Group awards 2017: Nominations now open
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - New life members join long list of prominent APS
           psychologists
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - The 2016 APS interest group award recipients
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - APS membership renewal 2017-18: Quarterly direct debit
           payments now available
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - APS Grant for Intercultural and/or International
           Projects 2017
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Aug 2017 17:05:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Letters to the editor
    • Abstract: Gerace, Adam; Dawson, Suzanne; O'Kane, Deb; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Carey, Tim
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 12:06:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - 2016 APS awards recipients
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - APS members recognised in 2017 Australia Day Honours
           list
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Did you know'
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - APS prize
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Psychology in the bush
    • Abstract: Wilson, Annmaree
      Many psychologists who work in rural and remote Australia report their work as professionally challenging and personally satisfying, with the uniqueness of the location and lifestyle an added bonus. However, it is widely recognised that psychologists working in rural and remote Australia experience a number of profess ional, organisational, and personal challenges. Psychologists in such regions often carry heavy and diverse workloads, perform multiple roles for which they may be trained but are not necessarily experienced, are exposed to unrealistic community and employee expectations, and regularly work in professional isolation. In addition, they are more likely than their metropolitan colleagues to experience multiple traumatic events, with little time to recover from one before another occurs. They often live with their families in the same small community where they work and must navigate t he professional challenges that this raises. To access support clinically or professionally, can be a challenge in terms of accessibility, downtime, and cost. Taken together, these factors increase the individual's susceptibility to stress.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Q and A ... Providing services for an employee
           assistance program
    • Abstract:
      Many Australian organisations offer an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) which provides a way for employers to promote employee wellbeing. EAP programs are funded by organisations and allow employees, and often members of their families, to access short-term counselling services to assist in a range of personal and mental health issues that may impact on their work.

      When psychologists provide EAP services it may be as a result of an arrangement directly with the employing organisation, or increasingly, it is with an intermediary company that is contracted to provide services to the employer, which in turn, subcontracts the services to private practitioners.

      EAP services can raise specific professional and ethical dilemmas for psychologists due to the short-term nature of the work, the potential for confusion around obligations to the organisation funding the services, and the varied contexts in which EAP services are provided This Q and A article considers some of these dilemmas and how they can be managed.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Practising psychologist alerts: Private practice and
           the use of CCTV
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Comfortably compliant: Medicare billing: Bulk billing
           and gap fees
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Depression in pregnancy and the postpartum period
    • Abstract: Milgrom, Jeannette
      New motherhood is a challenging time for many women. More than 1 in 10 women experience a clinically . significant depression in the first year postpartum and a similar incidence has been reported during pregnancy. This has been consistently found both in Australia and around the world, with higher rates in low-income countries. For up to 40 per cent of women identified with postnatal depression, symptoms begin during their pregnancy (Austin, 2004; Eberhard-Gran, Eskild, Tambs, Samuelsen, and Opjords, 2002; Gavin et al., 2005; Mann, Gil body, and Adamson, 2010; O'Hara and Swain, 1996; Rubertsson, Wickberg, Gustavsson, and Radestad, 2005).

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and mental
           health
    • Abstract: Dudgeon, Pat
      The disadvantage faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is well documented and has been bought to public and Government attention by initiatives such as the Close the Gap Campaign (Commonwealth of Australia, 2016). It is accepted that there is a 10-year life expectancy and health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians as well as a significant mental health gap. This mental health gap has been documented in both research and policy overviews such as by the National Mental Health Commission (2014), the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2014) and the Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage report (Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision [SCRGSP], 2016). The relatively poor condition of Indigenous Australian women's social and emotional wellbeing is an area of growing concern and is the focus of this article. In this article the term 'Indigenous' will be used when referring to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Recovering from an eating disorder in a western
           culture
    • Abstract: Skocic, Sonja
      Women continue to be more likely to suffer from eating disorders than men (Hudson, Hiripi, Pope Jr., and Kessler, 2007) and the incidence amongst young women is increasing (Smink, van Hoeken, and Hoek, 2012). The core psychopathology of eating disorders is an over-evaluation of shape, weight and their control (Fairburn, 2008). This effectively means that women with eating disorders evaluate their self-worth largely (if not exclusively) in terms of shape and weight, and their ability to control them. Aspects of western culture fuel the notion that the self-worth of a woman is tied up in appearance, discipline, purification and fragility.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Valuing the therapeutic relationship when working with
           people affected by forced adoption
    • Abstract: O'Grady, Lyn
      From the 1940s to t he 1980s there were more than 250,000 forced adoptions in Australia. Adoptions commonly involved not only state and federal governments, but also churches, charities, hospitals, medical staff and maternity homes. The experiences of those affected by the past policies and practices of forced adoption, particularly mothers, but also fathers and children, are many and varied. The impacts can be lifelong and intergenerational. To better support psychologists delivering services to people affected by forced adoption, the Australian Psychologica15ociet y (APS) was contracted by the Australian Government Department of Health to develop a suite of professional resources and tools, including elearning courses, a practice guidance document and webinars. The project forms part of the government's response to the Senate Community Affairs References Committee Inquiry's key recommendations into the Commonwealth contribution to former adoption policies and practices (SCARC, 2012).

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - The transition to motherhood: Psychological factors
           associated with pregnancy, labour and birth
    • Abstract: Symes, Emma
      The 'ordinary miracle' of pregnancy and birth is a time of enormous physiological, social and psychological change for women. How a woman and her significant others adapt to the changes in this period can influence the woman's adjustment and her chance of developing mental health difficulties. This matters for the woman, but it also matters for her baby and for the beginnings of their relationship.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Ten years of better access
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - The establishment of the two-tiered structure
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Women-centred psychological intervention for
           premenstrual distress
    • Abstract: Ussher, Jane M
      Premenstrual change is experienced by up to 90 per cent of women, with up to 40 per cent experiencing moderate distress, categorised as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and two to five per cent experiencing severe distress and disruption to their lives, categorised as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) (Hartlage, Freels, Gotman, and Yonkers, 2012). Recognition of the continuum of premenstrual distress, and overlap between the diagnostic categories PMS and PMDD, has led to the adoption of the term 'premenstrual disorders' (PMDs). PMDs includes emotional and behavioural symptoms that have a significant impact on a woman's quality of life during the premenstrual phase of the cycle, but are absent after menstruation and before ovulation. The symptoms most commonly reported include irritability, depression, mood swings, anxiety, concentration difficulties, fee lings of loss of control, and tiredness, often combined with physical symptoms such as bloating, breast tenderness, headache and genera l body aches (Rapkin and Lewis, 2013).

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Embracing a new and stronger APS governance structure
           for members
    • Abstract: Cichello, Anthony
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Why create disunity within the profession when there
           are so many threats from outside'
    • Abstract: Littlefield, Lyn
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Women and mental health
    • Abstract: Fisher, Jane
      From conception the life experiences of girls and women differ from those of boys and men. Some of these pertain to the intrinsic biological differences in female and male reproductive potential, but the more prominent differences are gender-based and reflect disparities in opportunities, responsibilities and roles throughout the life course. These have consequences for all aspects of health, including mental health.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - The APS's increasing involvement in international
           psychology
    • Abstract: Knowles, Mike
      Keen readers of In Psych will recall that in the 2014 October issue an article traced the APS's increasing involvement in the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) This was a good-news story because of the importance of the impact this has had in several key areas. This included the winning of the bid to host the 2010 International Congress of Applied Psychology (ICAP) conference in Melbourne, the increasing attendance of Australian psychologists at other ICAPs (the largest number of registrations at the Paris 20141CAP, other than the host country), the ri sing Australian membership of IAAP (second only to one other country), and the deepening representation of the APS on the IAAP Board of Directors including, at the present time, Alfred All an, Lyn Littlefield, Andrew Martin, Paul Martin and Robyn Vines.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Contracting arrangements in private practice - APS
           Ethics Committee concerns
    • Abstract: Shaw, Elisabeth
      There is growing community demand for psychological services, and a consequent number of psychologists moving into private practice, which has led to many practices recruiting psychologists to work as contractors.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Campaign for psychologists close to launch
    • Abstract: Freeland-Small, Pat
      In March, the APS will launch the first publicity campaign to promote the expertise of APS psychologists. The campaign will span an 18-month period and include television, radio, social media and print collateral. With the t heme 'Believe in Change', it is a concept that is central to the work of all psychologists.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - High-level results from the 2016 APS member
           satisfaction survey
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Results of the 2016 member satisfaction survey
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - APS review of the code of ethics
    • Abstract: Symons, Mick
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - APS code review committee: Expression of interest
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - APS advisory groups: Expression of interest
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - 2016 APS college awards recipients
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Did you know'
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Nominations for APS College awards 2017
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Projecting the future impact of advanced technologies:
           Will a robot take my job'
    • Abstract: Innes, Mike; Morrison, Ben
      Recent years have seen an upsurge of concern in the technical and popular press about the impact of automation upon employment in western societies. Once the concerns about t he development of artificial intelligence were concentrated within the realms of computer science and philosophy, debating the extent to which a robot could be conceived to have self-awareness and consciousness. Those concerns have migrated to the social and business pages where the in creasing advances of automation of jobs and skills are being recognised. The trend has been to point to the downsides of automation and the rise of artificial intelligence. This has moved further from a concern about how lower skilled jobs, such as in mass production of cars and white goods, can be supplemented by robots to a perception that the skills of many profess ions are in line for replacement. This leads in turn to contemplating the impact of automation on the profession of psychology.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - APS Disaster Response Network psychologists help in
           the field following the January Bourke St incident in Melbourne
    • Abstract: Burke, Susie
      In January a number of APS Disaster Response Network (DRN) psychologists became a part of the Australian Red Cross (ARC) volunteer workforce when they responded to our call for members to fulfil a newly created role at the ARC for a 'field psychologist'. Field psychologists accompany ARC workers into the field following a disaster in order to provide support to the workers if needed. The 'field' in this instance was the area around Bourke St in Melbourne's CBD following an incident on January 20 when a man on a violent spree deli berately drove his car into pedestrians. He killed six people, hospitalised 37, injured many more and left hundreds of people shocked, terrified and grieving.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Changes ahead for health service organisations caring
           for patients with cognitive impairment
    • Abstract: Bain, Peggy
      Psychologist s working in public health settings would be familiar with hospitals needing to meet a number of National Safety and Quality Health Service (NSQHS) Standards to achieve accreditation. These Standards were developed by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (the Commission) to drive the implementation of safety and quality systems and improve the quality of health care in Australia. In 2011, Health Ministers endorsed the Standards and a national accreditation scheme providing a nationally consistent statement regarding the level of care consumers can expect from hospitals and other health service organisations.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - If it quacks like a duck: Independent contractor or
           employee'
    • Abstract: Mathews, Rebecca; Roufeil, Louise
      This is t he final in a series of articles looking at contracting arrangements within psychology practice settings. Fair Work Australia is increasingly concerned about how contract s are implemented across various industries in the context of sufficiently distinguishing between an independent contractor and an employee arrangement.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Practising psychologist alerts: Prepare yourself for
           the new privacy compliance requirements
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Working with children: Compliance with pre-screening
           legislation
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Indigenous adults
           and the role of psychology
    • Abstract: Ralph, Stephen
      The damage done to the unborn child by the mother's consumption of alcohol during pregnancy has been long known. In 1725 the Royal College of Physicians of London referred to the consumption of alcohol as "too often the cause of weak, feeble and distempered children ." Since about 1973 the deleterious effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the unborn child have come to be known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Adults with autism: What do we know and what are the
           implications for psychology'
    • Abstract: Richdale, Amanda
      Adulthood has been a neglected area of research into autism spectrum disorder (autism) but is currently experiencing an increase in interest. Recent UK data estimate the prevalence of autism in adults at 1.1 per cent (Brugha et al., 2016). In early data from the Autism CRC Australian Lon gitudinal Study of School Leavers with Autism aged 15 to 25 years, ha lf of participants self-reported diagnosis at nine years of age or older. The Autism CRC Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism (ALSAA; age 25+ years) found that 94 per cent of self-reporting individuals received an autism diagnosis at 10 yea rs or older. Thus, many adolescents and adults with autism may not be identified until they come to the psychologist's attention when they present with other psychological problems.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Multidisciplinary management of attention deficit
           hyperactivity disorder in adults
    • Abstract: May, Tamara; Aizenstros, Joel
      Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was until recently thought to be a condition of childhood which remitted before adulthood. Characterised by difficulties sustaining attention, overactivity and problems with impulse control, the condition affects around five per cent of children. There is now an established body of research showing that in at least half of ADHD cases, symptoms continue to pose clinically significant difficulties into adulthood. The DSM-5, released in 2013, now provides adult-specific criteria, including a reduced symptom count for adults compared with children (five rather than six symptoms in each criteria) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013).

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Working with individuals with neurodevelopmental
           disorders in an adult custodial environment
    • Abstract: Hsieh, Ming-Yun
      It is recognised that people with neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., intellectual disability NULL, autism spectrum disorder [ASD] and communication disorders) are over-represented in Juvenile and adult criminal justice systems. The relationship between neurodevelopmental disorders and offending behaviour is likely to be complex, requiring a holistic case conceptualisation of each individual's psychosocial background, criminogenic needs (dynamic risk factors for reoffending) and cognitive-linguistic abilities. People with neurodevelopmental disorders often have difficulty with verbal skills, especially pragmatics (i.e., the social, non-verbal and behavioural aspects of language). Good verba l abilities are importantfor the development of emotional and behavioural regulation skills. It is perhaps not surprising therefore, that people with neurodevelopmentaI disorders often lack the inner speech to manage impulsive behaviour. They may also have difficulty accurately reading or responding to social situations, thus increasing their risk of engaging in problematic, at times antisocial, behaviours (LaVigne and Van Rybroek, 2011).

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Improving access to focused psychological
           interventions for people with intellectual disability
    • Abstract: Hagiliassis, Nick; Di Marco, Mark
      People with disability represent a diverse population. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (The United Nations, 2006) defines persons with disabilities as having long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which in interaction with various barriers may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others. This article focuses on people with intellectual disability (10) primarily, a developmental disorder affecting about three per cent of the population. The prevalence rates of mental health problems are higher for people with an 10 (dual disability) than for the general population, suggesting that they are a particularly vulnerable group.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Letters to the editor
    • PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Board behaviour: What should beneficiaries expect'
    • Abstract: von Treuer, Kathryn; McMahon, Rosie
      The Australian Psychological Society has completed a considerable review of its Board structure, so a review of the Board function, and of Board member roles and responsibilities is timely. Moreover, Board effectiveness relies heavily on the role clarity and ethical behaviour of its members. The negative impact of poor boardroom behaviour can be far-reaching across multiple stakeholders and services, including the Board itself and the members it serves.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - How to make the most of your online journal
           subscription
    • Abstract: Feast, Nicole; Hammond, Sabine
      As an APS member you have full online access to all current and past articles published in Australian Psychologist (AP) and Australian Journal of Psychology (AJP). AP focuses on current issues in the science and practice of psychology, and psychology's contribution to public policy in Australia. AJP publishes articles on all topics within the broad scope of the discipline. Access to these journals enables you to keep up-to-date with the latest research on topics particular to the Australian context as well as topics of international relevance.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - The APS Professional Advisory Service: More than two
           decades of member support
    • Abstract: Wilkinson, Jan
      When ethical issues arise that members need to discuss, the APS's Professional Advisory Service (PAS) provides a telephone and email advisory service.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Beyond diagnosis: What else matters to clients' health
           and wellbeing'
    • Abstract: Sampson, Emma
      Mental health starts in our families, in our schools and workplaces, in our playgrounds and parks, and in the air we breathe and water we drink. The more psychologists understand and take account of these social determinants of all aspects of health, the more opportunities we will have and the better equipped we will be to help people optimise their mental health and wellbeing.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - A profile of Australian counselling psychologists
    • Abstract: Di Mattia, Michael; Davis-McCabe, Catriona
      Counselling psychology is the second largest applied field of psychology in Australia, with 954 psychologists holding endorsement as a counselling psychologist (Psycho logy Board of Australia, 2016) and approximately 1,000 members of the APS College of Counselling Psychologists. While Australian counselling psychologists participated in a recent international survey of counselling psychologists (DiMattia and Grant, 2016; Goodyear et al., 2016) that enabled a global portrait of counselling psychology practice, the current survey sought to develop a more detailed picture of the characteristics and profile of Australian counselling psychologists.

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - The APS board of directors 101
    • Abstract: Cichello, Anthony
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Launch of the APS campaign 'Believe in change'
    • Abstract: Littlefield, Lyn
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Developmental disorders in adulthood
    • Abstract: Wilmoth, Deborah
      Developmental disorders {also known as neurodevelopmental disorders) are a group of conditions with onset during childhood- generally present to some degree from birth. These disorders are characterised by developmental deficits that produce impairments of personal, social, academic or occupational functioning. The range of these developmental deficits varies from relatively mild limitations of executive functioning to global impairments of social skills or intelligence. The developmental disorders frequently co-occur with mental health conditions which can make the impact of the disorders more complex (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013).

      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 14:00:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - APS members donate $30,000 for 2017 Indigenous student
           bursaries
    • PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Practising psychologist alerts: Using Skype to provide
           services to clients
    • PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Contracts in psychology practice: A protection for all
           parties
    • Abstract: Mathews, Rebecca
      Psychologists are increasingly moving away from working as solo practitioners to joining larger practices and working under a contracted arrangement. This development means that psychologists need to consider the business arrangements under which they are prepared to work and develop a thorough understanding of the implications of entering into a business contract as a psychologist. In this article, the business seeking the services of the psychologist will be referred to as the 'principal' and the psychologist providing the services will be referred to as the 'contractor:

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Comfortably compliant: Recognising and managing an
           ineligible referral under better access
    • PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Psych online ...
    • PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - New APS Honorary Fellow recognised
    • PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Introducing the 2016 APS fellows
    • PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Professional indemnity insurance: Check your type of
           coverage and know your requirements
    • Abstract: Symons, Mick
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Did you know?
    • PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Reducing dementia risk by targeting lifestyle factors
           in midlife
    • Abstract: Anstey, Kaarin
      Among older adults, late-onset dementia is highly prevalent with more than 30 per cent of adults aged over 80 years developing the disease. No cure is available and recent trials of potential pharmacological treatments have been disappointing. A key problem is that the neuropathological mechanisms underlying the disease processes are multi-factorial - particularly for common dementias like that of t he Alzheimer's and vascular types. So, treatments that target a single biological pathway are unlikely to be effective for aII cases. These multiple factors are mostly related to lifestyle and preventable chronic disease. Data from studies of many thousands of individuals followed-up over decades have shown that certain modifiable risk factors are associated with a substantially increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. These risk factors include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity, dietary intake, physical and cognitive inactivity, low social engagement, low education and depression (Anstey, Eramudugolla, and Dixon, 2014). At the cutting edge of dementia research, these findings have led to an international race to develop effective non-pharmacological interventions for preventing dementia. Given that the disease course for late-onset dementias is typically decades long, with neuropathology that gradually accumulates over that time, interventions that target vascular and lifestyle risk factors in mid life have the greatest chance of reducing dementia risk.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Family carers of frail older adults: An often
           forgotten potential client group
    • Abstract: Knight, Bob G
      As the population of Australia and the rest of the world ages and the attention of health ca re providers turns to the needs offrail older adults, the family carers of those frail older adults are often overlooked. The time frame for caring for a frail spouse or parent can last for many years and sometimes a couple of decades or more. While some find caring for a family member with chronic illness and disability rewarding, many find it quite stressful. That stress leads to high levels of symptoms of depression, anxiety and high levels of anger including elevated prevalence of clinical depress ion and anxiety compared with matched non-carers. Physical health can be affected as well, with carers found to have depressed immune system functioning and at risk for a variety of stress-related diseases. Carers who are stressed by caring have higher levels of mortality as well. In general, distress is higher in carers for persons with dementia than for persons with physical impairments who are cognitively intact (Knight and Losada, 2011).

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Building a competent geropsychology workforce in
           Australia
    • Abstract: Bhar, Sunil
      "I will not work with older adults", Sally, an early-career psychologist exclaimed during a meeting to discuss further career options. She explained that during a university placement, she spent a few days on an inpatient psychogeriatric rotation. She spoke with heavily medicated inpatients with dementia, depression and other mental health problems. Sally's rudimentary training in cognitive behaviour treatment (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) seemed irrelevant to a setting where patients had cognitive confusion, many physical comorbidities, sensory difficulties and who appeared resigned to t heir impairments. Although the placement last ed only a few days, Sally's view hardened - psychologists were irrelevant to, and ineffective with, older adults.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Opportunities and challenges in establishing an
           age-friendly practice
    • Abstract: Farmer, Madeline; Hollis, Linda; Robleda-Gomez, Sofia
      With the growing number of older adults within the Australian population, there is a vital need for practising psychologists to consider broadening their scope of practice to include older adults, and indeed to establish age-friendly practices. In this way, older adults who would benefit from psychological services will be more likely to be able to access competent evidence-based treatment. However, while this presents opportunities for the practising psychologist, there are a number of challenges associated with establishing an age-friendly practice. To learn more about the opportunities and challenges of an age-friendly practice, this article shares the insights of three psychologists in practice who are committed to working with older adults.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Innovative psychological support in aged-care
           facilities: Preliminary research and future directions
    • Abstract: Bhar, Sunil
      In Australia, nearly one quarter of a million older people live permanently in residential aged-care homes (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015). This figure will rise with the growing number of older adults. Of those living in residential care more than half have dementia (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2012) or symptoms of depression or anxiety (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013; Creighton, Davison, and Kissane, 2016).

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Social connectedness and health in later life
    • Abstract: Haslam, Catherine
      It is no surprise that we seek to connect with other people, as social ties are central to what makes us human. What is surprising to many is just how much these ties matter. It is not simply that they make our lives worth living. They are vital to extending that life, getting under our skin to buffer health and wellbeing, and build resilience in the face of the various challenges we encounter. This is the verdict from an extensive range of studies looking at the effects of social relationships longitudinally, experimentally and meta-analytically. Moreover; these relationships appear to matter more as we age, when our vulnerability to ill health increases.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Letters to the editor
    • PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Unity over fragmentation
    • Abstract: Cichello, Anthony
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Reflecting on the past and looking to the future
    • Abstract: Littlefield, Lyn
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Facts on ageing: Demographic data is key for
           psychology to support the wellbeing of older Australians
    • Abstract: Pachana, Nancy A
      Older persons form a growing segment of the population within Australia. But while this demographic is increasingly the focus of research, professional practice and the education of new psychologists within the discipline of psychology, the need for all psychologists to upskill their awareness of ageing issues is acute. Demographic data and health and wellbeing trends are important baseline information when consulting with older adults, whether in healthcare settings, organisational environments, or community contexts (Laidlaw and Pachana, 2009).

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Compass for life steers a course towards wellbeing
    • Abstract:
      The APS Compass for Life survey, released for Psychology Week 2016, found that social relationships and offline human connections are strongly associated with the wellbeing and happiness of Australians.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Outcomes and future of the Australian Indigenous
           Psychology Education Project (AIPEP)
    • Abstract: Dudgeon, Pat; Hammond, Sabine; Cranney, Jacquelyn; Darlaston-Jones, Dawn; Harris, Jillene; Herbert, Jeannie; Homewood, Judi; Newnham, Katrina; Phillips, Gregory; Page, Susan
      Consistent with the APS Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP; APS, 2012), AIPEP aimed to increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander psychology students and to enable psychologists to work more competently and responsively with Indigenous communities. The AIPEP project has now been completed and this article summarises key learnings and outcomes.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Rural and remote Australia as a unique context for
           practising psychology
    • Abstract: Roufeil, Louise
      In general, health professionals who work in the 'bush' report the experience to be significantly different to working in a city (Onnis and Pryce, 2016). Psychologists who practice in rural and remote areas commonly report unique challenges such as professional isolation, limited resources and ethical dilemmas, as well as distinctive benefits such as greater variety of work and enhanced scope of practice. The existence of APS ethical guidelines specific to psychological practice in rural and remote settings further emphasises that rural practice is somehow qualitatively and quantitatively different from practice in other contexts. Although many of the challenges of rural and remote practice also occur in urban environments, there is no doubt that these challenges are more frequent and intense in rural and remote practice.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 6 - Applying the social determinants of health in everyday
           practice: Lessons from the APS Congress
    • Abstract: Sampson, Emma; Radermacher, Harriet
      At the 2016 APS Congress held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre from 13-16 September, the APS Public Interest team convened a forum to discuss and showcase the valuable application of a Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) approach in everyday psychological practice. The forum included a panel of practitioners who shared their experiences of using an SDoH approach across different areas of practice.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 23:39:21 GMT
       
 
 
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