for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1441-8754
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Unwitting harm: Dealing with litigating parents
    • Abstract: Neoh, Jennifer
      Psychologists through the course of their work often come into contact with separating families through referrals of parents or children. Not all separating families, of course, require the family law system to deal with their disputes. There are many other avenues of assistance for parents to negotiate what can be a very difficult time in their family life. Psychologists without the necessary skills and experience in family law may in fact cause harm. Psychologists offering a therapeutic service to a child or parent, and often inexperienced in providing evidence in a legal setting, can be drawn into court disputes and unintentionally exacerbate the family conflict. Sometimes a factor in causing harm is a lack of acknowledgement that the information provided by one parent may be coloured by their motivations or emotions, and this can distort the practitioner's capacity to understand the child's situation.

      PubDate: Mon, 21 May 2018 09:55:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - The diagnostic dilemma
    • Abstract: Love, Anthony
      Psychologists are trained to assess and diagnose problems in people's thinking, emotions and behaviour. Yet in practise, many psychologists resist the use of diagnosis and may even be critical of it, seeing it as being within a 'medical paradigm'. In this article we explore the dilemma of diagnosis and the considerations for psychologists.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - A tricky problem
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Understanding suicide risk
    • Abstract:
      There are a range of circumstances in which psychologists might become involved which relate to suicide prevention. Some might find themselves working with clients who express suicidal ideation and/or intent. Others might work in environments in which the prevention of suicide is a priority, such as schools or prisons. They might also find themselves drawn into discussions where their advice is sought on how to support children and young people when suicide is discussed in the media.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Beyond 'Yes': The marriage equality debate
    • Abstract: Sampson, Emma; Burke, Susie
      The postal survey on same-sex marriage and resulting change to the Marriage Act has been a momentous time in our history, but also a period of intense emotion for many Australians, particularly Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Intersex (LGBTQI+) communities. Behind the elation felt and displayed upon the announcement of the survey outcome and parliamentary vote lay a range of experiences and feelings, including distress, discrimination, self-harm, division, relief, acceptance and joy.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - The day tragedy came to our school
    • Abstract: Schwarz, Anna
      In October 2016 a family of four was found dead in their Sydney home in an apparent murder-suicide. The psychologist involved in the school response was a recent graduate contracted to fill a maternity-leave position at the school for only a year while completing a registrar program under the supervision of Dr Gary Banks. In this article, Anna details the impact on the school community, the actions she and others took to support those affected, and the learnings for her as an early-career psychologist.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - The DGPP award 2017
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Executive Director's report
    • Abstract: Littlefield, Lyn
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - President's note
    • Abstract: Cichello, Anthony
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Analyse this
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Letters to the editor
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Being mindful of mindfulness
    • Abstract:
      Over the past decade there has been a surge of interest in mindfulness approaches in the general community as well as in the psychology profession, to the extent that it is often aligned with cognitive-behavioural approaches. Based on Buddhist principles of focused breathing and meditation, mindfulness emerged in the late 1970s in the form of a treatment known as mindfulness-based stress reduction and has been used for a range of physical and mental health problems including chronic pain, anxiety, depression, addiction, eating disorders, the list goes on. It has been adopted as a strategy for stress reduction and offered by clinicians and health and wellness centres, as well as being adopted in organisations such as schools and workplaces. However, a recent review of the literature undertaken by 15 researchers from prestigious universities calls into question our understanding of the concept of mindfulness and its utility.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Psych alert
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Comfortably compliant
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Did you know'
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Having difficulty finding a student placement' Go
           rural
    • Abstract: Kappel, Kristen
      Placements are an important part of a psychologist's training, but are increasingly difficult to secure with a growing demand for available spots and high associated costs. I, like many from my student cohort, have had to be creative and open to a variety of possibilities when seeking our clinical placements. The option of a rural workplace is one such possibility which I took on, resulting in a wonderfully rich experience. Okay, I cheated a little, it was already my place of employment, but having an intense period of supervision and reflection on my practice in this setting opened my eyes to what such a student placement can provide, and no doubt improved my practice.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - APAC's new accreditation standards
    • Abstract: Crowe, Simon; Carpenter, Michael
      Many will be familiar with the role of the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) in ensuring the quality of psychology education and training under the National Law. APAC accredits around 500 undergraduate and postgraduate psychology programs in Australia from Bachelor to Doctoral level. Underpinning this are the Accreditation Standards for Psychology Programs (the Standards), which set out the minimum requirements for programs wishing to be accredited by APAC. These have been in place since 2010, but from the 1 January 2019 these Standards will be changing. We would like to share with you why, how and what that means for our psychology.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Australia day honours
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Conduct and misconduct
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Treating depression in people with vision impairment
    • Abstract: Sturrock, Bonnie
      Vision impairment (VI) is a leading disability across the world. The existing figure in Australia is projected to rise by double with nearly 800,000 Australians living with VI by 2024 (Taylor, Keeffe, Vu et al., 2005). While some vision diseases are caused by biological vulnerabilities and come about early in life, the most common are those resulting from age-related eye diseases, the three main conditions being age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and cataract (WHO, 2010). Two-thirds of people over the age of 50 will be affected and rates rise with years of life thereafter, making changes in vision ubiquitous in older age.

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - APS awards of distinction 2017
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - APS prize
    • Abstract: Symons, Mick
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Increase in online Find a psychologist service
           searches
    • Abstract: Symons, Mick
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - What I have learned
    • Abstract: Rogers, Shelley
      I want to share with you an initiative that has taught me how to think differently about our communications with others, particularly members of the public

      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - APS awards 2018
    • PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2018 15:23:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Psychology in the bush: End Australia's regional
           health workforce drought
    • Abstract: Vines, Robyn
      The shortage of doctors and other health professionals in regional, rural and remote (RRR) Australia is a decades-old problem which is proving difficult to solve. On Saturday 21 October, the Federal Assistant Health Minister Dr David Gillespie MP announced the appointment of Emeritus Professor Paul Worley as Australia's first National Rural Health Commissioner. The aim of his new position is to remedy the current inequities in the bush where, despite an estimated higher prevalence of general and mental health disorders, appropriate services are sadly lacking. Medicare statistics indicate that, while the need is higher, service delivery for those in rural areas is less than one-third that of their 'metro counterparts'. The key objective of Professor Worley's appointment is to "get hundreds more doctors to areas of need in regional and rural Australia and to provide better services to those living in the bush", thereby remedying, as David Gillespie indicated, the "flood of doctors in the city and a drought out in the regions!"

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:30:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - In the spotlight
    • Abstract: Duhig, Michael
      This article features an interview with early-career psychologist Michael Duhig who completed a Bachelor of Psychological Science at the University of Queensland in 2009. Following a period working as a research officer, he undertook a Master of Psychology (Educational and Developmental) at the Queensland University of Technology Upon completion of his Master's degree in mid-2014, Michael was registered with the Psychology Board of Australia. He shares with us some of his experiences, inspirations and future goals.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:29:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Collaborative practices and partnerships to engage
           with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
    • Abstract: Rowland, Dale; West, Roianne; Hood, Michelle; Hirvonen, Tanja; Morrissey, Shirley
      Griffith University has one of the largest cohorts of Indigenous students, with 815 enrolments to date. The Bachelor of Psychology (Honours) and Bachelor of Psychological Science programs attract a high number of students from around the country each year. Of the 295 students enrolled in health-related degrees, 70 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students are enrolled in psychology programs.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:28:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Board-approved supervisor training
    • Abstract:
      The APS Institute has developed Psychology Board of Australia (PsyBA) approved supervisor training programs to support APS psychologists in their important work with provisional psychologists (4+2, 5+1, Master's, Doctoral students) and registrars. To maintain a high quality of training, the APS Institute reviews and updates these training programs on a regular basis.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:27:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Addressing child abuse and neglect
    • Abstract: Harris, Justine; Cvetanovic, Melanie
      Over the past few years, there has been increasing concern about children being removed from families and placed into Out-Of-Home Care (OOHC). In NSW, children and young people in OOHC have almost doubled over the past 10 years (AIHW, 2010; 2017) and the trend has been for children to stay in care for longer.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:26:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Adaptability: A key capacity whose time has come
    • Abstract: Martin, Andrew J
      In coming years, the world will undergo substantial change. To varying degrees, and in different ways, industry will be reshaped around environmental demands and pressures, medical advancements will extend the human life span, pharmaceutical developments will present new possibilities for human functioning, communications technology will be reshaped around enhanced speed and extreme bandwidth, high-level globalised computing networks will accelerate information generation and dissemination, and expansion of electronic databases and resources will transform education and learning. An individual's capacity to successfully respond to these contextual changes will be critical for their health and wellbeing.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:25:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Engaging fathers
    • Abstract: Tully, Lucy
      More than 40 years of research has shown that parenting interventions, which focus on improving the quality and consistency of pa renting, are effective for improving child mental health and wellbeing (Campbell et al., 2014; Nares and Barnett, 2010). However, the majority of parenting interventions have been developed for and tested with mothers, and rates of father engagement are very low (Panter-Brick et al., 2015). For example, one review found only 20 per cent of parents enrolling in parenting interventions were fathers (Fletcher, Freeman and Matthey, 2011). Fathers are not only under-represented in parenting interventions, but they are missing from both research and clinical practice across a wide spectrum of services for child wellbeing, including child welfare services (Zanoni, Warburton, Bussey and McMaugh, 2013), paediatrics (Phares, Lopez, Fields, Kamboukos and Duhig, 2005), as well as interventions targeting childhood anxiety (Bagels and Phares, 2008), autism (Flippin and Crais, 2011), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Fabiano, 2007) and externalising behaviours such as oppositionaI behaviour, tantrums and aggression (Tiano and McNeil, 2005). The low level of father involvement is concerning, as the re is significant evidence that parenting interventions are more effective in improving parenting and child mental health outcomes when fathers participate along with mothers (Lundahl, Tollefson, Risser and Lovejoy, 2008). Clearly, the re is a need for greater recognition of low rates of father engagement along with coordinated efforts to enhance the engagement of fathers in order to optimise outcomes across a range of services and interventions for child mental health.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:24:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Shaping children's development across the ages
    • Abstract: Negri, Lisa
      Parenting is one of the most daunting, demanding and challenging tasks that most of us will undertake. Without any training or preparation, and armed only with life experiences and opportunities, or lack thereof, the journey through parenting is fraught. The majority of parents who come to psychologists for assistance do so for the benefit of their children. However, they often come with the preconception that their best efforts will be negatively evaluated and they will be judged as the cause of their child's emotional and/ or behavioural difficulties. Crucially, psychologists need to be aware of the developmental ages and stages of children and the impact of pa renting styles and attributes that may optimise child outcomes. They also need to be able to suggest parenting approaches that fit with their child's emotional, behavioural and personality profile and furthermore, reassure parents that the interaction between parenting and child factors is complex and they can influence outcomes only to a certain extent. Since the relative influence on children's lives of peers, teachers and other community members increases across the developmental period, the direct influence of parenting on child outcomes into adulthood follows a course of diminishing returns, with the greatest impact occurring in the early infancy and childhood years. Given the impact of cognitive development on the interact ion between parents and children, and the necessarily bi-directional nature of the influence of parenting on child development, it is useful to consider the impacts of parenting with in each of Piaget's cognitive developmental stages.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:23:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Primary-school-aged children's mental health
    • Abstract: O'Grady, Lyn
      In recent years, children's mental health has become an area of discussion and debate in Australia. This has often centred on the roles of families, education settings and communities in children's development and their impact on children's mental health outcomes. Debates have focused on a range of areas, including t he challenges associated with parenting, indicators that mental health problems are increasing in children, the lack of early intervention and support for children exhibiting signs of mental health difficulties, schools' responses to bullying and the impact of technology on children's development. Recent surveys have high lighted the need for further research and interventions to ensure that children's mental health is prioritised from an early intervention perspective, and adults responsible for their care are effectively supported. Psychologists can play a critical role in this area through their direct work with children and families as well as within the systems in which children engage, particularly education settings.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:23:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Early childhood matters most
    • Abstract: Cavanagh, Sarah
      The early childhood years matter a lot - experiences in these years have lifelong consequences for health and wellbeing. The early years of development from conception until age five, and in particular the first 1000 days of development from conception to age two, have been the focus of increasing attention in recent years. The argument is that the first 1000 days are the period of maximum developmental plasticity, and therefore the period with the greatest potential to affect health and wellbeing over the life span. However, in Australia, this age group receives far less attention and funding than children of school age and young people.

      PubDate: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:23:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Introducing the 2017 APS fellows
    • PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Psychologists discuss end-of-life care and choices
    • Abstract: Radermacher, Harriet; Sampson, Emma; Gridley, Heather
      With end-of-life choices legislation proposed for consideration in several states and in the media more widely, the APS Public Interest Advisory Group identified end-of-life care and choices as a priority area for 2017-18.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Practising psychologist alerts: Using social media
           platforms for peer consultation
    • PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Letters to the editor
    • PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Low intensity mental health services
    • Abstract: Littlefield, Lyn
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Futureproofing our society
    • Abstract: Cichello, Anthony
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Things I wish someone had told me
    • Abstract: Tran, Aiden
      Since 2015, the APS Melbourne Branch Student Working Party has organised regular seminars to introduce students and provisional psychologists to different approaches and techniques in psychological assessment and therapy, and to provide opportunities to learn from the experiences of highly respected practitioners in the field of psychology. APS student members enjoy free admission to these events. In 2017, one of the most well-received of these workshops was by Janet Lowndes, Principal Psychologist and Director of Mind Body Well, on the topic, 'Things I wish someone had told me about being a psychologist'. With more than 170 students and provisional psychologists in attendance, Janet generously shared some of the knowledge that she had acquired through her years of experience as a psychologist. The following is a summary of her presentation.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - In memoriam
    • PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Did you know'
    • PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 6 - Comfortably compliant: Getting telehealth right
    • PubDate: Mon, 26 Feb 2018 20:50:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Members benefit from government project funding
           opportunities
    • Abstract: Littlefield, Lyn
      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - A takeover attempt voted upon at the recent APS AGM
    • Abstract: Cichello, Anthony
      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Obituary: Emeritus Professor Sydney (Syd) Harold
           Lovibond Hon FAPS
    • Abstract: Lovibond, Peter
      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Telehealth under the Better Access initiative
    • Abstract:
      It can be challenging for people living in rural and remote Australia to access Medicare-rebateable psychological services. While the psychology workforce is better represented in rural and remote Australia than many other mental health professions, we still struggle to meet the high level of need in these communities. In April 2017, in order to address this inequity, the Australian Government announced the introduction of psychological service delivery by videoconference (telehea!th) as part of the Better Access initiative.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Indigenous students and psychology: The current state
           of play
    • Abstract: Bond, Nigel W; Cornish, Kim; Kent, Stephen; Meuter, Renata; Machin, Tony
      Recently, the Australian Psychological Society (APS) together with colleagues from around the country completed the Australian Indigenous Psychology Education Project (AIPEP). The project looked at ways of making the psychology curriculum at the tertiary level more Indigenous friendly and at increasing the numbers of Indigenous students at all levels. Following on from this project, the Heads of Department and Schools of Psychology Association (HODSPA) held a workshop in April 2017, at the University of Technology Sydney, to start implementing the ideas raised in the AIPEP.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - The contemporary face of addiction
    • Abstract: Berry, Matthew
      According to the most recent Australian National Drug Strategy Household Survey {NDSHS, 2016), the majority of Australians use mood-altering substances (e.g., alcohol, caffeine, medications), with most people staying with in socially and medically appropriate levels. Furthermore, both alcohol and illicit drug use are significantly falling for those under the age of 30 (risky alcohol use by under 19s has more than halved since 2001).

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Letters to the editor
    • PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - lnPsych in review
    • Abstract: Mathews, Rebecca; Caiazzo, Livia
      In April we conducted an on line survey and a series of focus groups to gather feedback from members on what they would like to see in In Psych. The results have been incorporated into our plan to refresh the APS'sj!agship publication in 2018. The review of lnPsych will not only update the visual 'look and feel' of the magazine, but revise its structure and include a range of new columns and features. The primary goal of this review is to broaden the magazine's appeal for our diverse member-base, and explore topics of interest to researchers, practitioners and students alike. Another important focus of the redesign is to bring it into line with similar publications in the field of psychology. In doing so, In Psych will continue to grow and be a relevant, engaging 'voice' for psychology in Australia.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Recognising clients who may pose a risk of violence
    • Abstract: Warren, Lisa J
      Psychologists are problem-solvers whose training enables them to provide informed responses to novel and complex situations in the lives of their clients. In some cases situations have arisen where clients form plans to harm other people. This occurred when 22-year-old James Stoneham formed the plan to murder his ex-girlfriend Adriana Donato while receiving mental health care that included psychological treatment. In the ensuing investigation into the death of Ms Donato, Coroner Peter White considered several elements of Mr Stoneham's treatment, including whether there was recognition of risk and the limits to confidentiality when the clients of psychologists become a risk to others {Coroners Court of Victoria, 2017). While the published decision was redacted, preventing the fullness of the Coroner's findings being available, the case has become a reminder for psychologists of the need to he alert to the risks clients can pose to the people around them.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Apply what you know: Treating alcohol and drug
           problems
    • Abstract: Wilson, Hollie; Magor-Blatch, Lynne
      Substance-related and addictive disorders are common and psychologists are well-equipped to screen, assess and treat symptoms in their practice. Implementing effective supports and treatments into our daily practice can occur via a range of strategies. While specialist treatments exclusively targeting pathways toward reduction or abstinence are options, they are often not within the scope of many psychologists working in generalist or many mental health settings. Regardless of the perceived barriers for integrating such practice into our work, there are key principles and approaches that can be adopted to improve the outcomes for many clients. Embedding appropriate practice across our clinical work requires an openness to consider evidence-based approaches for all levels of substance-related and addictive disorders.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - The rich psychology of alcohol use disorder
    • Abstract: Gullo, Matthew; Connor, Jason; Kavanagh, David
      Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a common presentation in clinical practice. Twelve month DSM-5 prevalence rates are similar to mood and anxiety disorders, at 17.6 per cent for men and 10.4 per cent for women (Grant et al., 2015). Mild disorders often remit in young adulthood, but more severe disorders can require long-term management. While many theories of AUD emphasise biological mechanisms for problematic drinking, which are important, there is a rich psychology involved that is sometimes overlooked. PsychologicaI treatments have strong evidence of efficacy (Connor, Haber, and Hall, 2016; Kavanagh, Connor, and Gullo, 2014), but diagnosis and treatment are delayed by an average of around 18 years after onset {Chapman, Slade, Hunt, and Teesson, 2015). This is due, in part, to the stigma attributed to the disorder both by practitioners and people needing treatment (Keyes et al., 2010). An approach that could reduce stigma places AUD along a continuum of symptoms and underlying psychological processes rather than as a dichotomous diagnostic category. In this article, we review some of the key psychological processes involved in alcohol use (and AUD). We then discuss how efficacious psychological treatments that target these processes can be affected by the everyday complexities encountered 'on the ground': comorbidity, cognitive impairment during withdrawal and ambivalence toward treatment.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Ice and methamphetamine use: Clinical considerations
           and complications
    • Abstract: Brient, Lee
      For several years it has been widely reported in the media that Australia is in the grips of an ice epidemic. Within the past three years, the opinion of the average Australian household has come to rate methamphetamines as the drug of most concern (National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS), 2016). However, data shows that the number of methamphetamine users in Australia has not actually increased for at least the past 18 years.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Problematic mobile phone use: An emerging
           disorder'
    • Abstract: Meagher, Brendan
      Mobile phones are becoming increasingly pervasive in our lives. So much so that for many people, it's almost impossible to imagine life without their phone. The potential for problematic mobile phone use (PMPU) has increased as mobile phones have evolved from a device devoted to communication between two people, to smartphones which provide internet access and allow for a wide range of on line activities. As PMPU looks set to become one of the biggest behavioural addiction challenges of the 21st century there is increasing concern about the impact of this technology upon the user's mental health. This article explores PMPU as a potential diagnostic entity and target for intervention in clinical practice and encourages psychologists to consider PMPU when assessing patients in their practice.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Problem gambling and the internet
    • Abstract: Gainsbury, Sally
      One of the most significant changes to the gambling environment in the past 15 years has been the increased availability of internet gambling. Internet gambling is any gambling conducted remotely via the internet and includes gambling through computers and laptops, smartphones, tablets, and even gaming consoles, smart watches and virtual-reality headsets. This is the fastest growing mode of gambling and is changing the way that gamblers engage with different forms of gambling. Due to the high level of accessibility, immersive interface and ease at which money can be spent, concerns have been expressed that internet gambling may increase rates of disordered gambling.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Psychologists and smoking cessation: Reducing the
           burden of smoking
    • Abstract: Baird, Donita; Segan, Catherine; Borland, Ron; Baker, Amanda; Bowman, Jenny
      Psychologists are likely to see clients who are addicted to tobacco smoking. In Australia, 2.4 million people regularly smoke (A IHW, 2016). Life expectancy for smokers is at least 10 years shorter than for nonsmokers (Prabhat et al., 2013) and up to 20 years shorter for those with a severe mental illness (Callaghan et al., 2014). Many people overcome substance use disorders, only to die from a tobacco-related illness (Mendelsohn and Wodak, 2016). Stopping smoking reduces mortality risk and has numerous other health benefits.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Psychology in the bush: A rural reality: Preparedness
           for climate-change-related disasters
    • Abstract: Vines, Robyn
      Environmental disasters appear to be on the increase both in terms of frequency and severity. Hurricane Harvey adversely affected approximately 30 per cent of the USA city of Houston, wit h an estimated 80 per cent of properties designated uninsured and a project ed damage bill of $180 billion. Hurricane Irma, which has recently decimated a number of Caribbean Islands and some of Florida, was recorded as the most powerful storm on record, affecting approximately 37 million people. At the same time, devastating floods have hit Bangladesh and India (killing an estimated 2,000 people) and numerous other adverse weather events have occurred.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - The public sector space: Survey update
    • PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - World-class experts share their knowledge in sunny
           Brisbane
    • Abstract: Statham, Dixie
      The 2017 APS College of Clinical Psychologists Conference was held from 30 June to 2 July at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Queensland. The Clinical Conference, the fifth in as many years, boasted more than 600 delegates.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - 2017 IOP conference
    • Abstract: Wiggins, Mark
      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Spotlight on early career: Working in an alcohol and
           other drugs setting
    • Abstract: Klein, Michal
      I received an undergraduate arts degree, majoring in history and psychology from Monash University, followed by a postgraduate diploma at Deakin University. I completed my Master of Psychology (Counselling) at Monash University last year.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Did you know'
    • PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - APS Division of General Psychological Practice {DGPP)
           significant contribution award
    • Abstract: Marty, Judy
      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Comfortably compliant: Assessment under Medicare
    • PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Practising psychologist alerts: Out-of-office notices
           in your practice
    • PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 5 - Managing your waiting list
    • Abstract: Mcleod, Samantha
      It is not only professionally responsible but also personally important to be realistic about service provision for the sake of a practitioners' own wellbeing as well as that of clients.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 20:40:16 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-