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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 400 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 400 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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   ISSN (Print) 0046-8568
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [400 journals]
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Helping the struggling reader: The literature's
           message on effective interventions at the secondary level
    • Abstract: Townsend, Steven
      A program to address the needs of students with low literacy was introduced into a Melbourne, western suburbs school in 2007. The school had identified that almost 25 per cent of students arriving in year 7 were 2-3 years below the required reading level and if overall results were to improve, literacy levels needed to rise. This program was reviewed in detail, in 2012, as part of a Masters of Literacy Degree at Melbourne University. The dissertation below is a summary of the findings from the literature review. The literature review itself is not included but it involved extensive readings from Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The reference list included is the complete set of articles consulted for the review with only a few being mentioned in the findings below.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Habit is a great deadener
    • Abstract: Mason, Mary
      Many years ago when I first started teaching, a university professor came to the school and said to our year 12 that the most important thing they had to understand was not what their teachers knew but by the end of year 12, how their teachers thought, so that they could think and behave like scientists or mathematicians or historians or, I would argue, literary critics when they explored new subject contexts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Lessons learnt from 'Voiceworks'
    • Abstract: Jakob, Johannes
      Voiceworks is a quarterly literary journal featuring work from writers under twenty-five, including fiction, non-fiction, poetry, comics and visual art. Published by Express Media, an organisation for young writers, the journal is produced by an editor and a volunteer editorial committee who are also under twenty-five. We've produced over ninety issues since it was first launched in the eighties and in that time we've learnt a lot of lessons about how best to engage with young writers, including high school students. While Express Media does not have the practical classroom expertise of teachers, our experience with young writers has led us to believe that creative writing in schools can enhance students' performance in English and Literature and can foster the development of empathy and social inclusion.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - What does Scarlett Johanssen have to say about global
           inequalities'
    • Abstract: Settecasse, Sharon
      My experience at the VATE State Conference was incredibly positive and interesting. Teachers wondered what I was doing there...My name is Sharon Settecasse, I am the education co-ordinator at Oxfam Australia, an international aid and development organisation. And yes, what was I doing at the VATE annual conference' Fundraising' No. Campaigning with a placard' No. Promoting goats and chickens' No. Below you will get a taste of the workshop I facilitated. It is one of six activities for years 7-9 which accompanies five other activities in the years 9-10 program. Delegates also may have come to our display table which showcased a range of engagement tools and texts for the classroom, all of which can be explored at .

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Graduates and pre-service teachers: Survival in the
           early years
    • Abstract: Harding, Leonie
      Every teacher is fully aware of the demanding nature of the craft: we regularly bemoan the exhaustion that accompanies correction, planning, management of parents and endless meetings.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Peaceable kingdom
    • Abstract: Pascoe, Bruce
      Just sixteen years of exposure to Christianity and my intellectual curiosity was snuffed. I realised this last week when I arrived for work in a strange capital and stranger accommodation. I was unsurprised by the weird decor, but too tired to talk to the people I was supposed to meet and too awake to sleep. So I read the walls.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - What is assessment'
    • Abstract: Trigg, Victoria
      This article is based upon a presentation made to the Australian Voices VATE State Conference. The focus of my presentation was to stimulate discussion through prompt questions arising from the information provided.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Unravelling the puzzle of poetry
    • Abstract: McLean, David
      My approach to poetry is practical. Rather than analysing, I prefer to have my students write their own poetry and explore how poems can emerge and evolve out of the sights, sounds and impressions they encounter on a daily basis.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Get your students learning - a rationale and some
           strategies
    • Abstract: Sherman, Sue
      Recently I read a book called Change Forces: The Sequel by Michael Fullan, which discussed the 'moral purpose of teaching'. I suspect that, as teachers, we all have an idea of what our moral purpose might be and some awareness of how it is embedded in our practice. Fullan's definition of moral purpose crystallised some of my thoughts: he identifies it as 'providing access to knowledge'; and 'building an effective teacher-student connection'. The implications of Fullan's 'moral commitments to inquiry, knowledge, competence and caring' are that 'teachers [and schools] must be purposefully engaged in the renewal process'. With these principles as a clearly defined starting point, I began to reflect on how to engage and connect more effectively with each of the students in my classes. This was no easy task as, having recently retired from full-time teaching, I was doing replacement teaching at an independent school, teaching year levels I hadn't taught for 20 years. Thus, the need to engage and connect was survival strategy as well as moral imperative.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Curricula': Ephemera - reflections on the
           Australian curriculum from working party to conference
    • Abstract: McKnight, Lucinda
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: May, Jan
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - The ghosts of English past, present and yet to come
           (with apologies to Charles Dickens)
    • Abstract: Peoples, Claire
      Two sentences on the page. A quote. Not even my own words. There was a title too, nicely centred and bolded. Who was I trying to kid' It was the night before this critical autobiographical narrative assignment was due and I was still wracked with indecision and somehow paralysed by the task of simply committing my sketching and musings into words, sentences, paragraphs.... The glow from my laptop dimmed as minutes passed without so much as a slight movement from the mouse or keypad, prompting me to hastily bring the screen back into focus. My page forever blank as if subtly mocking me, the cursor flickering menacingly in a slow, rhythmic, taunting motion. Surrounded by textbooks, articles, scribbled notes ... There was everything at my disposal and in the same instance, nothing at all. Once again, the laptop screen faded gradually to blackness and this time I failed to quickly resurrect my work, as I too had fallen asleep....

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Narratives of/in English teaching and learning
    • Abstract: Parr, Graham; Bulfin, Scott; Rutherford, Sarah
      English teachers and teacher educators in Australia are now well and truly in the grip of standards-based education reforms. A range of new education policies in our country have intensified the trend to standardisation, including a national curriculum (ACARA, n.d.), a single set of professional standards for teachers (AITSL, 2012), and a centralised system of 'certification' for measuring and rewarding 'highly accomplished and lead teachers' (AITSL, 2012b). Reforms such as these in Australia and in other parts of the world have been subject to rigorous critique. Dozens of studies investigate and document the deprofessionalising impact of such policies on teachers (e.g., Bower and Thomas, 2013; Harris, Smith and Harris, 2010; Meyer and Benavot, 2013; Parr, 2010; Smith, 2013; Smith and Kovacs, 2011; Stanley and Stronach, 2013; Taubmann, 2009).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Of ghouls, vampires, witches and ... English teachers
    • Abstract: Griffiths, Elisabeth
      At the age of twelve, like all members of our country, I set out on a journey that some have called 'secondary school English'. My fellow travellers came in groups, but I arrived alone. Sorcerers stalked this land, almighty, unquestionable. Minstrels and craftsmen, warlocks, shamans, ghouls too, and the silent gatekeeper, wizened and toothless. We were the villagers, mere mortals, and amongst us, unknown to me yet, were taunting demons, jesters and mercenaries - guilds of villagers formed, as if by some invisible witchcraft. At some points on the map were marked 'here be dragons', and we could see their smoke. Even we foolish youth knew better than to poke them, or join them yet.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Squeezing the most out of ourselves (and our students)
    • Abstract: Hopkins, Jonathan
      In 2003 - nine years after I had finished high school - I was living in London, where I worked as a paralegal in a large corporate firm, my first significant legal job. London is a vital city with many riches but much of my time there was filled with morose and circular reflections on what I was doing with my life. Nearly all these reflections were provoked by my work, where I was a small cog in a large corporate wheel whose sole work consisted of drafting various contracts and financial instruments that allowed large corporations and banks to dodge tax, or to grow larger and dodge even more tax. Much law work, in fact, is tedious - quite literally a lot of crossing t's and dotting i's, and proofreading documents countless times for small errors. It is also lonely work, particularly corporate work where there are few clients, and the industry normally attracts the most taciturn and sober of our race.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Oh, Maxine ... Maxine! 'Raising the bar', standards
           and other political achievements
    • Abstract: Faulkner, Julie
      Maxine McKew, a politician I liked and a journalist I liked even more, recently published an article in the 'Financial Review' which caught my eye: 'Time to raise the bar for our teachers'. Teachers, and lately, teacher educators, have been blamed even more than usual for failure; failure on individual, national and international performance levels. Universities are accused of 'taking anyone' into teacher education and inflicting poor quality graduates on hapless students. Moreover, the profession does rather a good job of eroding its own integrity and sense of responsibility, as experienced teachers instruct pre-service teachers to forget all that they learned at university (the implication being that it's of no value).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - My journey into the unknown
    • Abstract: Hird, Jessica
      Don't let your hands shake, Jess. Do not let them shake. Watching Daniel go before me hasn't exactly calmed my nerves. He's shy. As he spoke, my eyes kept moving to his hands that struggled to contain his bundle of cue cards as if they were the Golden Snitch trying to fly off. I guess that's the power of public speaking contests: they'll make you or break you.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - The death of the English teacher
    • Abstract: Manuel, Charmaine
      When I first read Roland Barthes' famous essay, 'The death of the author', a few years ago in an undergraduate unit on literary theory, I never ever considered that it would play any role in the development of my emerging professional identity as a teacher of English and Literature. Quite frankly, at that point, I considered literary theory to be unintelligible waffle, and even today the thought of reading Spivak makes me shudder. In preparation for the writing of this critical autobiography, I re-visited Barthes' (1967) famous essay. What really leapt out at me years after first reading it, were the similarities between the binaries of Author-Reader and Teacher-Student. In his essay, Barthes critiques the traditional method of criticism whereby meaning is drawn from the intentions and biographical context of the Author. By placing the Author at the centre of the text, Barthes argues, the Author is exalted to the position of 'God', and the task of criticism becomes a form of 'theology' or 'worship', a reverential process to decipher mystic meanings imparted by a deity to humanity. As I re-read Barthes' allegory, it occurred to me that if the Author of a text is God, then surely critics and teachers of Literature are his prophets. They become the literary 'mouthpiece' of the Divine, or a high priest acting as mediator between the divine world of the text and that of mere mortals, the world of the students.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - To Summer (with apologies to John Keats)
    • Abstract: Scott, Amanda
      Season of fires and long, hot sleepless nights,...

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - English literacy for empowerment and pleasure
    • Abstract: Kelly, Sarah
      I am seven years old. I have spent much of this particularly hot Australian summer covered in sunscreen and wearing my khaki shorts. There is a scab on my right knee from where I fell on the asphalt before Christmas. As I sit crossed-legged, I pick covertly at the scab; I am a small redhaired snake charmer. From where I sit I can see my fairy tree in the garden, a dying gum choked with wisteria. It is sectioned into quarters by the window frame. I cannot go outside to play. I have to read for Dad.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - VATE Michael Clyne Prize 2013
    • Abstract: Ashby, Caitlyn
      The most effective means of communication, whether it be plain or sophisticated, is determined by who we are speaking to and what we are speaking about. Effective language users must moderate their language based on the situational and cultural context of their speech or writing. In this way their language can show respect, build rapport, entertain or fulfil a variety of other functions. This is not to say that plain language is never the most effective means of communication. Deconstructing complex language can often be vital in including all members of a community in a debate or discussion. Yet while plain language use has an important role in certain situations, in more formal contexts, sophisticated expression is important in denoting respect and showing education level. Thus what we communicate when we speak goes beyond the simple semantic meaning of our words. The lexemes that we choose to express ourselves with, the syntax we use, whether we speak the standard dialect or not all contribute extra information about us to our interlocutors. Language use is entirely dependent on context and to communicate effectively and succinctly with your audience, it is vital that you employ plain or sophisticated language depending on its relevance to the situation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - VATE Michael Clyne Prize 2013
    • Abstract: Marozzi, Jack
      Plain language (or Plain English) has an important role to play in society and is generally the most effective way of communicating; however it cannot fulfill all functions of language. The appropriateness of plain language is determined by its situational context: the setting, audience, mode, purpose and manner. When the audience is the general public, plain language is always an effective way of communicating. However in the workplace setting and for the social purpose of entertaining, it proves inadequate.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - VATE Michael Clyne Prize for VCE English Language 2013
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Teaching creative writing: A writer's workshop
           approach
    • Abstract: Welsh, Sonia
      'My name is Jake Finnigan. I'm a thirteen year old, Year 8 student at Springfield Academy. I love football, eating anything that includes meat and playing my Xbox. For the most part, I'm a fairly ordinary teenage boy except for one small thing I'm also a teenage monster hunter.' These are the opening lines of a short story my students and I have just finished writing together in a school in the South West of England. It is a small, all-male year 8 English literacy class. The boys have been grouped together because of 'low ability English-literacy skills' and 'behavioural issues'. The story of 'Jake Finnigan' and his monster hunting was one of many satisfying and enjoyable 'products' of my employing a writer's workshop approach to teaching writing with these boys. In writing this narrative-based research article, I want to explore for myself and for other teachers how and why this has been one of the most challenging and rewarding experiences of my career as a teacher of English/literacy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Framing writing in schools
    • Abstract: Lo, Steven
      As critically reflective educators, we once in a while step outside the framework that the regular discourse of mainstream schooling creates around what we do and we ask these kinds of questions to which there are no straightforward answers. I find myself currently diving deep into areas of my practice which I assumed were cohesive and clear from my experiences as a student and a student-teacher. It is an odd mix of anxiety and excitement because when we ask ourselves why we teach writing in schools and what that might look like we are essentially going through an identity crisis. Are we happy to allow our identities as teachers of writing to be 'bounded by the dominant discourse of writing pedagogy' (Gardener, 2013, p. 73) expressed through standard curriculum documents and perpetuated through the daily practices of mainstream schools' And what does that discourse look like anyway' How does this dominant discourse shape our students' identities as writers in the social space that is school' And so, deeper I dive. In grasping around for answers, I draw on an experience from my professional practicum where I began a unit on persuasive language with a class of Year Eleven students. The context for this experience was a selective government school which attracts a diverse cohort of students, all of whom undergo a rigorous selection process to gain entry to the school. The majority of them are very bright, self-motivated and high achievers. However, from their recent SAC results, and from observing their general demeanour and activity during class, it was clear that many of them could be more engaged with English. Revisiting this experience, now at some distance, I explore how teachers might create spaces for students to bring their literacies and identities as writers into the classroom for engagement and rich meaning-making - meaning-making that is of course always mediated by the dominant discourse of writing as a means of formal assessment within school.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - First impressions
    • Abstract: Anonymous
      Teaching, for me, has always been a vocation. Working with young people is a privilege, rather than a chore. I began my teaching career in the early 1980's at Sale Technical School, as it was called in those days. My biggest challenge was to broaden my mind so that I understood the differing motivations that influenced the students' thinking. I had stepped out of Shelford Church of England Girls' Grammar, straight into college, and knew little about the ways of the wider world. The concept of being disinterested in school work was foreign to me and despite my diligence as a young university graduate, my research at college did not entirely prepare me for the disarray and mayhem that my Year 9 classes in particular, presented. Full of enthusiasm, I wracked my brains to think of ways that I might stimulate the students' interests, until eventually I realised that the regular rude, sulky remarks of disaffected school children, were a much more powerful influence in the classroom than anything that I had to say. How would I address this pervasive influence'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - A quiet and polite student
    • Abstract: Anonymous
      My compulsory education spanned twelve years. Twelve years. Twelve teachers taught me English. And yet, I cannot recall a single one. Their faces are blurred, their names are blank. And I'm sure that, in return, not a single teacher would remember me. Their eyes would glaze over as they looked through me, and their expressions would become bland and unsmiling. I cannot recall any teacher ever using my name. Did any of them ever know it'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Building literacy bridges in teaching and learning
    • Abstract: Nguyen, Vian
      Our Year 12 English classroom was preparing for a SAC. It was a written text response. The original plan set by our Year 12 teachers was for us students to be allowed to bring our notes in to the SAC 'test' to help assist us during the writing of our responses, but we were not allowed to bring in the full text. I was fine with that. I thought to myself, let's just pick out the main themes, specific quotes and let's just note down the defining moments in the text. Easily done.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - The concrete zipper
    • Abstract: Grace, Tim
      Wetlands and brown fields, zipped up...

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'Chaos walking': Exploring voice, imager and suspense
           in 'The knife of never letting go'
    • Abstract: Foley, Joanne
      'The Knife of Never Letting Go', the first volume in the 'Chaos Walking' trilogy by Patrick Ness, showcases literary devices such as voice, imagery and suspense. Many students' writing is weakened by poor use of voice and imagery. This well-written text highlights these techniques and the themes provide rich material for discussion and debate. The reader is kept in suspense and must construct aspects of the narrative from the scant plot and foreshadowing provided. The novel encompasses themes of colonialism, racism, friendship and betrayal, coming-of-age, choice, moral decisions, relationships between men and women, and information overload. At times the content is violent and frightening, paralleling brutal aspects of colonialism. While the themes are challenging, the literacy demands on less able readers are not over-burdensome. The book does not use complex language, and the engaging narrative provides motivation to continue reading. The fast-paced, adventurous text will likely appeal even to reluctant readers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'All quiet on the Western front' - activities for
           chapter 10
    • Abstract: Louca, Stella
      Theme study: Camaraderie among soldier. Students should have read up to and including Chapter 10 before these activities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Implementing a literature elective course at year 10
    • Abstract: Scott, Amanda
      As the Year 12 Literature teacher of some years' standing at my school, I was approached last year by my Head of Department with the dream question 'Would I like to establish a foundation Literature course at Year 10'', 'Of course', I replied calmly (resisting the temptation to bite his hand off at the elbow ...). So I embarked on some of the most personally exciting curriculum development of my twenty years' teaching career.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Year 9 unit: This is my story - teaching 'The castle'
    • Abstract: Thiele, Philip
      The context of the unit. This unit on Rob Sitch's 1997 film 'The Castle' will take place at a co-educational state school in the suburbs of Melbourne adjacent to the airport. If any meaning is specific to the setting of the film it will register with this geographical audience. Writing from South Yarra, Peter Malone feels concern about the movie: 'Sitting at a preview in South Yarra and enjoying the comedy is a different experience from watching it at the multiplex at Airport West near where the Kerrigans live' (McFarlane, 2007, p. 145). Such angst won't apply at this school. For McKenzie Wark, ''The Castle' expresses the predicament of suburbia' (2000). Unlike other Australian films, its protagonists achieve their goals within a suburban context, not by leaving it. Again, for a literary tool that throws light on local culture and values, the text makes sense for these students.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Narratives assignment - 'Soldier boy'
    • Abstract: Brooks, Diana
      This unit has been designed for a Year 7 mixed ability class. The unit is built around the AusVELS strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. The elements of the AusVELS criteria the unit targets are included below each lesson. The teaching strategies are aimed at critically engaging a class with diverse learning needs and skills. Critical literacy is the ability to read texts in an active, reflective manner (Andrews 2005). I aim to encourage effective literacy through active learning, where learners actively participate in activities, including discussions and collaborative tasks (Henderson 2012). Grammar instruction is integrated at appropriate points. Research seems to be consistent in highlighting the value of grammar where the grammar point is taught in the context of writing (Myhill and Watson 2012).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Interview assignment
    • Abstract: Newcombe, David
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'Things a map won't show you' - a unit for year 8
           English
    • Abstract: White, Alice
      The arrival of the Australian Curriculum coincided with my arrival as the new Head of English at Wantirna College and a desire by the wonderful team there to reach out to some new texts. It seemed right to ensure we brought authentic texts that met the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander requirement into our new scope and sequence.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: May, Jan
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'The reluctant fundamentalist'
    • Abstract: Wilson, Alice
      Context: AusVELS Level 10 prescribes texts that 'explore themes of human experience and cultural significance, interpersonal relationships, and ethical and global dilemmas within real-world and fictional settings and represent a variety of perspectives' (VCAA 2013). Although included in the current VCE English text list, Mohsin Hamid's, 'The Reluctant Fundamentalist' engages across these parameters. As such, I argue that in some contexts, it should form part of the Year 10 or Year 11 English curriculum.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Teaching novels and narratives - a unit of work for
           teaching 'Don't call me Ishmael!'
    • Abstract: Brandon, Jessie
      Synopsis of the novel. Ishmael Leseur is a shy, self-doubting fourteen-year- old boy who believes that his shortcomings are the direct result of the self-diagnosed 'Ishmael Leseur's Syndrome'. According to its sole sufferer, the chronic condition turns an otherwise normal person into a 'walking disaster'. Ishmael believes that his problems stem from the bizarre circumstances of his birth, which resulted in his parents naming him after the narrator of Herman Melville's classic novel, Moby Dick. Over the course of Year 9, Ishmael has to confront many challenges: the bully Barry Bagsley, who delights in calling him names and making his life hell; his overwhelming fear of public speaking; and, his unrequited love for the 'perfect' and seemingly elusive, Kelly Faulkner. After the arrival of Miss Tarango - an inspiring English teacher - and James Scobie - a small, twitchy boy with a brilliant mind and a brave heart, Ishmael finds the courage to join the Year 9 debating team. In doing so, Ishmael learns how to appreciate individuality, befriend others (Scobie, Bill Kingsley and Orazio 'Razza' Zorzotto), overcome adversity, debate successfully, and, tentatively, enter the dating world. And, after surviving 'the toughest, the weirdest, the most embarrassingly awful and best year of [his] life', he learns the secret to being happy: be yourself.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Australian texts - where have they gone'
    • Abstract: Signorini, Annette
      'Where have they gone'' asked Amanda Dunn (The Age 29 April 2012), 'the writers who captured early Australia in print'' According to Michael Heyward from Text Publishing, 'You can't buy a new Australian copy of a lamentably large number of works that are a fundamental part of our heritage...' (The Age 23 April 2012). It was a discussion reported in both The Age and The Australian newspapers and one that I have been keenly interested in, dating as far back as my grandmother's bookcase and her collection of titles published by the Australasian Book Society (ABS), from which I have inherited two Judah Waten novels. That's the thing about books; they tell stories and we, the readers, in turn tell our own about them.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'Minecraft' as a powerful literacy prompt in the
           secondary English classroom
    • Abstract: Marcon, Nerissa
      The use of digital games in literacy teaching is now seen by many educational researchers as a powerful literacy tool (Gee, 2003; Beavis, O'Mara and McNiece, 2012; Knobel and Lankshear, 2007; Cope and Kalantzis, 2012; Carr, Buckingham, Burn and Schott, 2006). Many researchers advocate that digital game literacy practice revolves around the intricacies of digital game play, referred to as 'ludology', which involves a deep knowledge of game play in order to understand the sophisticated interactions between player and game (Beavis, 2012; Fransca, 2003; Apperley and Beavis, 2010). Since this approach requires that teachers be competent, if not expert gamers, how then might teachers without such skills incorporate digital game literacy into teaching' Adopting a 'narratology' approach, where digital game play can be interpreted as a narrative and motivation for deeper literacy practices, provides one avenue. The popular game of Minecraft, with its 'creative play' option, is an example of a digital game that can be used to support powerful literacy teaching by teachers without extensive prior knowledge of gameplay and is readily downloaded as an app or computer software program for PC. Using Green's 3D Literacy model (1988) as a framework to support teaching ideas, this discussion explores how Minecraft might be used to facilitate literacy teaching with reference to the Australian Curriculum: English and its three strands, Literacy, Language and Literature.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Teaching romanticism
    • Abstract: Reilly, Edward
      My first encounter with Romantic literature occurred on a cold afternoon, when Father Cole told us to open our anthologies and proceeded to read Keats' 'Ode to Autumn'. He was an Englishman, and spoke like some of the announcers on the BBC programs my father would listen to, quite unlike the raucous men at the Adelaide Market where I put in weekends at uncle's stall. I knew all too well the smell of ripe fruit, and was part of mother's apricot-preservation team, so the poem's imagery immediately resonated. By the end of his reading, really more of a recital, I was spellbound. Dad had recently purchased an encyclopedia on planned payments, and the last volume had just been delivered. I was allowed to read it, after tea, and only after washing my hands under mother's supervision. And there she was, '...Sitting careless on the granary floor', Ceres, looking not too unlike one of the parish girls. In later years, we had Fifteen Poets at hand, from which we read great slabs of Wordsworth, Coleridge and Keats, though the atheist Shelley was ignored.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - The flipped method in the VCE classroom
    • Abstract: Bunker, Danni
      As a teacher at a VCE senior secondary school, I have experienced an interesting dilemma in regards to ICT in my classrooms. Like many schools in the state, Swinburne Senior Secondary College has recently gone 'one-to-one', giving all students the opportunity to have access to laptops, which they are expected to bring to class.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Engaging the disengaged
    • Abstract: Beck, Paula; Atkinson, Maree
      Setting the scene. During 2012 eight diverse WA Catholic and Independent schools participated in an action research project trialing the draft Senior Secondary Australian Curriculum: English courses with their existing students and curriculum requirements. Whilst this provided valuable feedback for their sectors, it was also an impetus for experimentation in programming and classroom delivery, collaboration and change.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Macbeth
    • Abstract: Dickens, Martin
      This unit of work (available online) was developed to teach a year ten mixed abilities English class at a metropolitan all-girls school in Melbourne. In its entirety, the unit focuses on meeting the content descriptors prescribed by AusVELS (2013) for level ten English and seeks to adopt an interactive approach to student learning. The interactive components of the unit are informed by social-constructivist and individual-constructivist theories of learning, where students combine a series of group-work and online exercises to gain a deeper understanding of the events, contexts and characters in Shakespeare's Macbeth. A selection of exercises and relevant resources are included in the outline, framing the first three lessons of the unit. Outside of an understanding of particular language features and techniques, the unit has also been structured to meet a number of cross-curriculum priorities included in the AusVELS (2013) curriculum, where students explore the evolution of Macbeth in different social and historical contexts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'Macbeth'
    • Abstract: Barton, Katherine
      Explanation and discusion Context This unit is envisaged for a Year 10 English mixed ability class, in which all students are unfamiliar with Shakespeare. Macbeth will be the first Shakespearean text they have formally studied.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - The suburban gothic, an exploration of 'Edward
           Scissorhands' - design of a unit of work for year 8
    • Abstract: Caillard, Monica
      The school in which this unit will be taught is a co-educational government school in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. It is a middle-of-the-range socio-economic status school, but has approximately 60 per cent English as an Additional Language (EAL) student population (ACARA, 2013b). This has been kept in mind during the development of this unit, and the use of ICT and visual aids have been included in the planning process to enable students who do not understand English well to participate in the class.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - The power of genetics, a context study of people and
           power in 'Gattaca'
    • Abstract: Gundlach, Hugh
      Rationale and learning aims of the unit. Students examine the relation of people to dominant power structures using the film 'Gattaca' (Niccol, 1997) as the context. What is power' What types of power exist' What leads people to pursue power' How can power be used' Students consider the consequences when the welfare of less powerful people is weighed against that of the more powerful and make connections to their lives and contemporary life. Who are the dominant power groups in our society'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Reading and responding to 'Parvana', a unit plan for
           year 7 English
    • Abstract: Shoaib, Hadia
      It is an accelerated Year 7 English class of 24 students. There is no EAL student in this class, but students differ in relation to their ways of learning and their abilities: some are visual learners while others are kinaesthetic learners. The diversity could be due to the equal gender ratio as boys in this class are more extroverted than girls, and tend to dominate class discussions. The class is predominantly Anglo-Australian, which is why I chose the text 'Parvana' (Ellis 2002), a book about an Afghan girl, thinking it would provide students with a great opportunity to draw cross-cultural connections between their own and Parvana's culture. As the school is located in the Northern suburbs where the community reflects diverse ethnic backgrounds (Arabic, Asian, Australian) the students would benefit from the reading of this text as it would give them a glimpse into the culture of the community in which they themselves live. With the world becoming a global village, I have taken the position that it is important students understand cultural diversity within and beyond their immediate experiences. The AusVELS curriculum (VCAA 2013) also stresses the need for establishing intercultural links with Asia and other communities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'One night the moon' - whose reality': Unit plan
           for year 10
    • Abstract: McDonald, Callum
      This unit was originally taught to a general Year 10 English class at an inner-city, independent school. The class consists of 22 mixed-ability students. There are several boys in the class with special learning needs, but none of them are considered severe. The unit will be taught starting week two of second term and will consist of 15 x 45 minute lessons, or roughly three weeks of classes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'The arrival'
    • Abstract: Kearney, James
      Overview: This unit uses 'The Arrival' by Shaun Tan (2006) as a springboard for a range of performance-based, analytical and writing tasks that are intended to stimulate students' imaginations, develop a broad range of their literacy skills, and encourage them to consider complex ideas such as the nature of our world and our place in it.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Review - Oxford big ideas 8 Australian curriculum:
           English [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Iuricich, Miriam
      Review(s) of: Oxford big ideas 8 Australian curriculum: English

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Review - National English skills 8 workbook [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Cass, Amanda
      Review(s) of: National English skills 8 workbook

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'Chinese cinderella'
    • Abstract: Sparrow, Catherine
      This unit has been designed based on an experience of teaching Year 7 English at an all-boys independent school. It assumes a class size of 25-27 students from a range of ethnic and cultural backgrounds. A number of students (20-25 per cent) are likely to have a personal connection with Chinese culture and will be able to draw upon this during their study of the text. Approximately half of the students will have attended the junior school associated with the college and be familiar with the school ethos and studying in an all-male environment. Most of those new to the school should also be settled in, mid-way through the second term.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - 'Pride and prejudice' - year 10 unit of work
    • Abstract: McGarvie, Elise
      When designing this unit, I had in mind a class located within a co-educational government school with a high level of various learning needs and abilities. My main concern with teaching Austen's Pride and Prejudice is the issue of emphasising its relevance to a group of 16 year - olds who may never have been exposed to 19th century language before. It was with this consideration in mind that I felt it was important that my unit consisted of many different modes of the same text, which I hoped would increase engagement with the material. In terms of resources, this class all had access to a laptop which means that word processing and web-based research projects were often encouraged.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Review - Insight English skills 8 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Iuricich, Miriam
      Review(s) of: Insight English Skills 8

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Review - Macmillan English 7 for the Australian
           curriculum [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pearson, Melanie
      Review(s) of: Macmillan English 7 for the Australian Curriculum

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Review - National English skills 9 for the Australian
           curriculum [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Marcon, Nerissa
      Review(s) of: National English skills 9 for the Australian curriculum

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Reviews - The midnight zoo and The piper's son [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Brandon, Jess
      Review(s) of: The Midnight Zoo, by Hartnett, S, Penguin, Australia, 2010; The Piper's Son, by Marchetta, M, Penguin, Australia, 2010.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - VATE Michael Clyne prIze 2012
    • Abstract: Jayasekera, Anusha
      We manipulate our language to suit a variety of contexts and purposes. In a formal setting, we use formal language. Chatting with friends, we use relaxed, and more familiar language. The more prestigious the occasion, the more prestigious our language becomes, and it is formal language that is held in the highest regard. There are those who feel that informal language provides us with sufficient means of communication, thus rendering its formal counterpart redundant. However, if we look at the true function of language, to facilitate efficient and appropriate communication, we see that formal language still has a vital role to play in our society.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - VATE Michael Clyne prize 2012
    • Abstract: Pringipas, Luke
      The use of register in language provides a diverse variation of understanding in speech and a level of complexity to language. The use of the formal register provides language with varied forms of politeness and enriches language used in ceremony and tradition. It cannot be said, then, that formal language is unnecessary as long as a speaker is 'understood'; although often unnoticed by speech act participants, the role of formal language is still very much a relevant aspect to communication in contemporary Australian society.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - VATE Michael Clyne prize for VCE English language 2012
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - SeeMe project
    • Abstract: Jury, Sarah
      'SeeMe - the media, my world and me', a peer facilitated web based resource that builds media literacy skills, promotes positive body image and challenges gender stereotypes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - English eBookboxes: Using the Ultranet in the English
           classroom
    • Abstract: Box, Sean; Marshall, Susan
      The Ultranet is the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development's online learning system, which provides a state-wide, secure site that students, parents and teachers can access via the internet.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - IPad or iPhone activity
    • Abstract: Fitzsimons, Jill
      This task is designed to develop students' knowledge of the social and historical context of Charles Dickens', A Christmas Carol. It's ideal for auditory, visual and kinaesthetic learners and is just the thing for that special class after lunch.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Getting students to chatter in English: Using the
           backchannel
    • Abstract: Robinson-Lay, Louise
      While teaching a year 11 class The Crucible last year I was concerned about the fact that the classroom dialogue lacked depth so after some research I decided to try to improve this by running a backchannel. I had the same old students, always readily answering questions and being exceptionally good at playing 'guess the teacher's mind'. This was not what I wanted for them so as I was the eLearning co-ordinator at the time, I decided to use technology to assist me in improving the type of classroom dialogue we were having. I thought that introducing something like micro-blogging might be a better option. The great thing about it is that you get instant feedback on the level of understanding in the class. The problem was; how to do this and which platform to use' I did not want them on Twitter without training, and only wanted it to be one lesson, not a whole series. My research led me to Today'sMeet, a backchannel for use in the classroom (or elsewhere) where users can create a channel for a limited time and then it is deleted. I decided that two weeks would be long enough for the page to remain open. This would allow students time to revise the discussion before they had to write the outcome. I read the testimonials and some of my Twitter followers had used it in class and it seemed like the best choice. Some of the research I did is included below.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - How do I stop the students from mucking around on
           their laptops in class when they should be writing their essays'
    • Abstract: Dunsby, Kirsten
      There are some advantages (not many, but some) in having a brother a decade younger than your self. Personally, I border on the trail end of being classified as Generation X (though I am too young to understand the eighties - it just seemed freaky to me with all that hair), but I am a little too old to be part of the Gen Ys. Thus, I get that computers are useful, particularly for word documents and e-mails, but don't really understand how to use them effectively - yet. My brother, however, couldn't live without his laptop and NTEC (too cool for an iPhone) for less than a day without having some kind of horrid technology withdrawal headache.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Shaping new pedagogies
    • Abstract: Baker, Joanna
      In my short time teaching in Victoria, I've been struck by the sheer volume of professional learning opportunities related to the brave new digital world. Certainly, for many of us, the use of computers in the classroom is no longer optional. Yet, one concern seems to persist among teachers, a concern which is almost invariably raised in any discussion about technology integration: that the technology has begun to 'drive' the pedagogy, rather than the other way around.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Blogging
    • Abstract: Cook, Lauren
      We all have that special teacher friend that we talk shop with. That one person who takes you beyond moan-bonding in the staffroom about what the boys in 8C did last period, but a friend who actually gets you talking about teaching and learning.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Video games as text in the English classroom
    • Abstract: McDonald, Matthew
      This submission was completed as part of Matthew's Master of Teaching program at the University of Melbourne in 2011. Matthew is now a graduate English teacher working at St Leonard's College.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Together alone: Computer games as curriculum
    • Abstract: Elliot, David
      With the world's attention being increasingly pulled towards the lure of digital platforms and the Internet, and the promise and potential of our new technological era only just becoming realised, as education professionals we are living in dynamic and exciting times. The opportunities for the motivated and innovative teacher are limitless, as we are now offered a unique set of tools for reimagining not only what education is, but what it could be. Our students, the inheritors of the digital space, are increasingly demanding a classroom culture which is more directly tailored to a life conducted through mobile phones and laptops, where information is sequenced and structured according to the demands of emergent technologies, and where the lines that have traditionally separated work, play, and study are becoming blurred. As cultural artefact which does successfully navigate these changing paradigms, the video game is ideally positioned as a multimodal text which when successfully used in a classroom environment, can bridge the gap between in-school and out-of-school literacies, and reframe existing pedagogies as products of the digital era.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Creating online communities for collaborative learning
           Twitter, Google and Ning
    • Abstract: Roberts, Louise
      Vygotsky's notion of social environments were fundamentally about children's cognitive growth, 'Culture creates special forms of behaviour, changes the functioning of mind, constructs new levels in the developing system of human behaviour ' (Vygotsky, 1983). Therefore, the importance of designing learning spaces to suit the context of 21st century collaborative learning skills for the enculturation of those learners within future 'communities of practice' (Wenger, 2000) needs to be achieved within authentic environments. Moreover, 'Shared vision is vital for the learning organisation because it provides the focus and energy for learning' (Senge, 1990). A 'shared vision' is integral within an effective learning environment, so that motivation impels the community to develop, create cultural standards and flourish.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Changing the game plan with iPads
    • Abstract: Taylor, Judy
      The iPad has been identified as an educational 'game changer'. One of the game changing aspects of the iPad is the opportunity to redefine the notion of the classroom. The immediacy and relative speed of the iPad means that teachers can create flexible learning environments where they can explore different ways to enhance the learning of essential skills and knowledge required by the English curriculum.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Blogging about books
    • Abstract: Pierce, Alexandra
      I have been keeping a blog for many years (at www.randomalex.net), and it has developed over that time to being predominantly a place where I blog about books. (I also write reviews for 'Australian Speculative Fiction in Focus', or 'ASif!', and at Strange Horizons; I verbally review books on the podcast Galactic Suburbia.) Some books are my own, but I also get books to review thanks to the blog, and the other review outlets. I mostly read science fiction and fantasy, as well as some history non-fiction; I read too a fair number of works aimed at the young adult audience.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - 10 essential hints for using ICT in the English
           classroom
    • Abstract: Creely, Edwin
      Technology, or what is known in educational circles as Interactive Computer Technology (ICT), has an uneasy history with the English teacher in the English classroom, or at least that is my experience. On the one hand, there are the ICT prophets who cry in the wilderness about the new (and now not-so-new) interactive online world - the digital world - that is changing the whole landscape of how we, as English teachers, conceive and practice literacy(ies) (Hawisher and Selfe, 2000; Alvermann, 2002; Kapitzke, 2002; Haywood, et al, 2006; Leu, 2007; Coiro, 2008; Kenton and Blummer, 2010). They talk about literacies, about digital literacies, about digital selves and communicating in the interactive age of Facebook, Twitter, tablets and personal e-devices (Roschelle and Tatar, 2007; Parmar, 2011). It's not as if we have to think about ICT in our classrooms, according to these prophets, it is already here and in our faces, and we avoid it to our peril. On the other hand, there are the neo-Luddites (see Frobish, 2002; Bigge, 2006) for whom computers and digital devices are anathema and good teaching is about engagement with good literature, about the teacher-student connection, about the craft of writing, and about the tangibility of holding a book in one's hand and feeling its weight of imagination. Probably, like me, you sit somewhere inbetween these two positions: sensing the obligations of the digital age and also pining nostalgically for a time when writing was king, the book was queen and the pen was mightier than the sword.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: May, Jan
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - My poem about Harper Lee's 'To kill a mockingbird', in
           two parts
    • Abstract: Thompson, Tony
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - How is power and authority shown in language use'
    • Abstract: Ulus, Seval
      Individuals shape their language to be able to belong to groups, and thus language can be a powerful tool when showing affinity with, or excluding others. A speaker's sense of belonging dictates the lexemes they utter, where colloquial phrases, carefully constructed sentences, politeness and jargon is utilised by interlocutors to show effort to be a part of the 'ingroup'. Our choice of language expresses our views on what we believe to be, both in the sense of group belonging and individuality. Language is flexible, where an individual can adopt new lexemes into their idiolect, in order to reinforce group membership. Conversely, language can also limit an interlocutor when they utter what is deemed by the members of the group to be incorrect.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Erase the words, change the language and you can
           control the debate and rewrite history
    • Abstract: Loveband, Evie
      Language is power; power for influencing society, shifting reality, rewriting history, undermining perspectives and establishing solidarity. One can manipulate language for the purpose of gaining and maintaining authority or employ disguising and distorting expressions to veil the truth. Nonetheless, language too can be utilised as a tool to promote equality, to build allegiance and to endorse unity in our society. With careful selection of and modification to language, any one user has the power to control the debate and rewrite history.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Michael Clyne prize 2011
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - VATE professional development day
    • Abstract: D'Ambra, Adrian
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Teaching VCE English Contexts through art at the NGV
    • Abstract: May, Susie
      This article will describe a program for students developed by VATE and educators at The National Gallery of Victoria to teach the VCE English Contexts through original works of art. The program acknowledges and makes explicit the dual existence of linguistic and visual literacies which complement one another in the meaning making process.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Review of 'Shards - a collection of short stories'
    • Abstract: Caust, Lesley
      I had been looking for a collection of short stories for years 8 and 9 students and was pleasantly surprised to discover Shards: a collection of short stories, edited by Richard Baines. A variety of writers are represented in 24 short stories arranged in six categories such as 'Fears and Fantasies' and 'Weird and Wonderful'. Most poignant is the Preface by Baines where he compares the stories to shards, 'pieces of glazed pottery [that] speak of empires long past and worlds waiting to be uncovered'. The sense that 'short is beautiful' is reinforced as the reader becomes immersed in the fun, the surprise and the creativity of a selection of stories that keep us wanting more.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Hamlet, prince of darkness
    • Abstract: Reilly, Edward
      This paper is derived from teaching materials developed for students as part of their preparation for the VCE Literature examination. Hamlet is treated as a dilemma, whilst Hamlet himself is positioned as a non-Christian hero, demonstrating the conflict between that sense of Sin, as expounded by the Reformation, and longer-standing moral currents as explored by writers such as Jan Kott, Ted Hughes and Slavoj Zizek.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - 'The first garden' - a new play
    • Abstract: Raja, Chris
      Christopher Raja has taught English in Victorian schools and is currently teaching at St Philip's College in Alice Springs. He and his actor/writer wife, Natasha, have written a play, The First Garden that has just been published by Currency Press. Chris has kindly submitted ideas about how you could use this play (partly inspired by the new Australian Curriculum) in the classroom.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Ray Bradbury's 'Farenheit 451' fires up discussion in
           year 10
    • Abstract: Bantick, Christopher
      Ray Bradbury's dystopic novel, Fahrenheit 451 is a text that has proven to be successful at the year 10 level. With an opening line: 'It was a pleasure to burn,' this can be employed as a useful starting point for discussion as to why anyone would say it. Why pleasure and how is this related to burning'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Where can I find new ideas for English book lists and
           wide-reading lists'
    • Abstract: May, Jan
      Text selection for years 7 to 10 can be a tricky business. English teachers are avid readers by nature but sometimes it is very difficult to find time to read, let alone keep up with the latest publications and news from the world of adolescent literature. I have gradually developed a few strategies to help decide my own reading as well as offer suggestions to my students. My email box fills with publisher updates. Sometimes I get a chance to peruse the list of new releases; sometimes I don't and the emails disappear into the ether. Facebook has proved a more successful option for me. Gradually the number of publishers and bookshops I 'like' has grown and their posts seem more colourful and engaging than emails. Accompanying photos, posters and cartoons can also be useful. There are also other websites I sometimes graze for ideas as well as the adolescent fiction magazines the library staff pop in my pigeonhole. The magazines can pile up just like the emails, but here and there, it is rather relaxing to dip into one and increase the reading wish list. My students are naturally a great source of ideas. We all love the student who bounces into class and announces, 'I've just finished this fantastic book. You've all got to read it'. But the reality is that some students don't find reading to be such an affirming experience; they struggle to finish that compulsory class text or head straight for the Where's Wally' books in library lessons. I don't have the solution for this dilemma but I do hope you find some sparks of inspiration from the following list that is by no means definitive.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Choosing literary texts for the Australian curriculum
    • Abstract: Sykes, Helen
      My presentation at the 2011 AATE conference was on texts that meet the cross-curricular requirements of the Australian curriculum for years 7-10. There are three cross-curricular requirements: Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures; and Sustainability. I have been looking for suitable texts for about 18 months and have accumulated quite an interesting and diverse range, which I have presented at a number of conferences. My search for suitable texts has been aided by Deb McPherson and Ernie Tucker, my co-authors for the book Choices for English: Books, Films and Other Texts That Work (published by Nelson Cengage in 2009).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Dystopian fiction for teen readers
    • Abstract: Williams, Melanie
      Across the world everyone is talking about the new market in dystopian literature for teens. So what makes it appealing to youth and how can we capture that enthusiasm in the classroom'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - A year 7 film unit on 'Red Dog - why does belonging
           matter''
    • Abstract: Sayers, Cameron
      Red Dog, as he came to be known, started his life with the name 'Tally Ho' which in typical Australian style was quickly shortened to just Tally.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - On selecting David Almond's 'Skellig'
    • Abstract: D'Ambra, Adrian
      Without a doubt one of the finest pieces of literature I have ever selected for study in the junior secondary classroom is David Almond's Skellig (1998). I was drawn into this winner of the Whitbread Children's Book of the Year by the author's compelling style of writing, the narrative tone and the absolute refusal on the part of David Almond to write down to his audience. Too much of what passes for children's literature is predicated on the assumption that it is written for resisting-readers or non-readers and that it must therefore entertain them on their terms with copious amounts of prurience and anti-intellectualism. The range of assumptions about children, the implied perceptions about their tastes and their abilities as readers and thinkers, is terribly reductive and stereotypical. At the other extreme, concerns are often raised about the darkness or bleakness of vision presented to young readers in more serious renditions of children's literature.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - New visions: Exploring Australian identity through
           highlighting experiences of indigenous Australians
    • Abstract: Wagner, Monika; Wenlock, Jennifer
      Prior to 2011, year 8 students studied a single film as text, Yolngu Boy. This had been on the syllabus for several years, and the consensus was that it was time to review the unit, refresh the text and introduce multiple film texts that would present varying visions and perspectives of notions of what it is to be 'Australian'. We aimed to introduce our students to a selection of films with an indigenous focus to challenge existing ideas about Australian identity.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Back to Maycomb County
    • Abstract: Scholten, Chris
      Over the Easter holidays, I took my seven-year-old daughter Molly away for a week to the beach. I left my laptop at home. My iPad was there, and was usually occupied by Molly discovering the arcade games of my childhood: Pacman, Galaga, Frogger. Deprived of today's hi-tech distractions, I went back to an old habit I haven't been exercising enough in recent times: I read a book. And not just any book. I went back to Maycomb County. And the irony of sharing, as I read, extracts from Harper Lee's story with a daughter of Scout's age (or thereabouts) was not lost on me.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Thoughts on 'Mockingbird'
    • Abstract: Newcombe, David
      As a teacher of year 10 students, I found myself cajoling, coercing and almost pleading with a group of teenagers, not only to read but to take an active interest in the set text To Kill a Mockingbird. To many of the students, the text seems laborious and not easily identifiable with present day society. The classic film, starring Gregory Peck, is in black and white with a poor quality soundtrack. In all, not the best resources to convey many of the themes which should take a salient role in preparing tomorrow's generation to be well informed and critical citizens. Fortunately there was supplementary material which effectively motivated students. It created awareness that the term multiculturalism, in which Australia prides itself, continues to remain an anathema in parts of our and other societies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - In defence of 'To kill a mockingbird'
    • Abstract: Albrecht, Ann
      In response to an email from VATE titled 'Anything but Mockingbird - what texts to study in years 7-10', which questioned To Kill a Mockingbird's presence in the modern curriculum, I feel impelled to put a case for continuing to teach Harper Lee's wonderful 1960 novel. I hope Harper Lee would forgive me for speaking about her masterpiece in such a utilitarian way, but To Kill a Mockingbird is a rich teaching tool.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Thompson, Tony
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - Notes towards some principles for examining English
    • Abstract: McCurry, Doug
      It is a curious fact that there is little systematic thought about how subject English should be externally examined. A glance at the archives of English in Australia shows that there are very few articles on external examinations in the history of that publication. There are a few discussions of examinations in the journals of state and territory English teaching associations, but these articles are concerned with pragmatics rather than principles. There is very little to be found about examining subject English in the national or international research literature.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - Critical literacy and videogames in the literacy
           classroom
    • Abstract: Bacalja, Alex
      It is hard to ignore the rapid speed with which technological developments have changed the textual practices of today's students. The importance of working with multimodal and digital texts is evident in the number of workshops and presentations dedicated to these areas at last year's AATE conference in Melbourne. This article briefly looks at some of the arguments I have made for working critically with texts like videogames in the English classroom. It then provides a summary of each of the 4 activities which formed the basis of the seminar I delivered, entitled 'Critical Literacy and Videogames in the Literacy Classroom'.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - Strategies of rhetoric and persuasion for global
           citizenship
    • Abstract: Yule, Rod
      Australian students are bombarded with persuasive texts from all sorts of groups including major multinational corporations, governments, political parties and not-for-profit organisations. Typically, they are seeking to persuade the reader to buy a particular product, support a political party or engage in a form of social or civic action. Our students need to be able to deconstruct and critically analyse these texts with accuracy, fluency and purpose. The ABC program, Gruen Transfer, has been a great educational tool in this area. They also need to know how to create persuasive written and digital texts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - Teaching senior English essay writing
    • Abstract: Lenk, Karen
      How do we best teach senior English formal essay writing' Single text essays are a staple of the end of year English examination, and have been so for many years. The session I delivered for the AATE conference focused on this question. I deliberately used Shakespeare texts as examples, as these tend to be perennial favourites in schools and the resources provided should be of some use to most senior English teachers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:38 GMT
       
 
 
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