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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
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HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Journal Cover
He Puna Korero: Journal of Maori and Pacific Development
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1175-3099
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 11 Issue 2 - Inflated proficiency self-assessment and its potential
           impact on language teaching: A Taiwan-based study involving teachers of
           English in elementary school settings
    • Abstract: Wang, Wei Pei
      There is a widespread belief that communicative language teaching necessarily involves using the target language for all of the time in the classroom. However, those who advocate exclusive use of the target language in classroom settings may not always be fully aware of the potential negative consequences of this advocacy. With reference to a study involving teachers of English in elementary schools in Taiwan, it is argued here that teachers believe that their own target language proficiency is higher than it actually is, attempts by teachers to use the target language at all times can have unfortunate consequences.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 2 - The impact on language teachers of trends in the
           literature on language teaching and learning: A questionnaire-based study
           involving teachers of English as an additional language
    • Abstract: Fester, Anthea
      I report here on specific aspects of a survey of a sample of 93 teachers of English as an additional language from five different countries who completed a questionnaire that included questions relating to objectives specification and the inclusion of coherence, cohesion and genre in their teaching. The data collected suggest that although literature on language teaching and learning appears to have had some impact on the beliefs and practices of these language teachers, that impact has, in general, been a superficial one.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 2 - Preliminary findings of a questionnaire-based survey
           of a sample of teachers of Hawaiian in secondary- and tertiary-level
           institutions in Hawai'i
    • Abstract: NeSmith, RKeao
      As part of a research project involving aspects of the teaching and learning of Hawaiian as an Additional Language (HAL) in Hawai'i, I conducted a questionnaire-based survey of a sample of 30 teachers of HAL in first- and second-year classes in high school and tertiary-level institutions. Although some of those involved in the survey indicated that they had had some training in the teaching of additional languages, most did not. Furthermore, responses to a range of questions about aspects of their own teaching and about their own proficiency in Hawaiian language and that of their students suggests that many of these teachers have little knowledge of some significant developments in the area of the teaching of additional languages that have taken place since the 1970s. Given the fact that the survival of Hawaiian language and culture currently depends to a very considerable extent on the success of language teaching programs in secondary schools and tertiary-level institutions, these findings are of major concern.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 2 - Participant responses to a tertiary-level Maori
           language immersion programme: Reporting on a questionnaire-based survey
    • Abstract: Nock, Sophie
      The overall aim of the research project reported here was to collect and analyse data relating to views of students who participated in the Maori language component of a degree programme (Te Tohu Paetahi) offered by the University of Waikato in 2008. The focus here is on the responses of the 25 questionnaire respondents who were in the Hukatai (beginner) language stream. In setting up the programme, every effort was made to ensure that those factors widely regarded as impacting positively on Maori student success rates were catered for. Nevertheless, careful analysis of the data reveals that the presence of a few success inhibiting factors relating to physical and teaching styles and resources were sufficient to destabilize some learners. It also reveals the fact that almost all of the students had little understanding of language proficiency development levels and significantly overestimated their proficiency gains.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 2 - The Chinese philosophical/ rhetorical tradition:
           Debunking some myths
    • Abstract: Wu, Huang
      In the process of conducting research on the overall rhetorical structuring and internal discourse structuring of texts written in English (120 texts) and in Chinese (120 texts) by experienced and novice writers on the basis of prompts designed to elicit one of four discourse modes ('recount, argument, explanation and classification'), I reviewed literature in a number of areas. One of these areas was contrastive rhetoric where I found a number of works that seemed to be based on misunderstanding and/or misrepresentation of the Chinese philosophical/ rhetorical tradition. This short article begins by providing a brief outline of some critical aspects of that tradition, identifies some of the ways in which it has been misinterpreted and/ or misrepresented in literature in the area of contrastive rhetoric and discusses some of the potential dangers associated with misinterpretation/ misrepresentation of this type, dangers that include the creation and promotion of stereotypes based on unacknowledged value judgments.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 2 - Senior language education managers' cognition in the
           context of globalization and neoliberalism: Views from Taiwan
    • Abstract: Her, Jia-Huey
      Globalization and neoliberalism have had a major impact on the teaching of international languages, particularly English. In this context, research on language teacher cognition, which explores the interaction between what language teachers actually do and what they think, know and believe, has a great deal to offer in terms of uncovering teacher perspectives on the complexities of the situation in which they find themselves. It is, however, equally important to understand how educational managers view the current situation and how they are attempting to cope with the operational pressures they face. I report here on some of the issues that arose in the context of semi-structured interviews involving senior educational managers in one tertiary-level institution in Taiwan that focuses on language education. All of these educational managers have a background in language teaching and some of them were directly involved in the teaching of English at the point when the interviews were held. They were therefore in a position to understand the pressures under which language teachers operate on a day to day basis. The primary focus here is on the ways in which they attempt to balance the needs and interests of language teachers and language learners with the need to compete as an institution in an increasingly complex and demanding context.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 2 - Contextualizing the common European framework of
           peference for languages
    • Abstract: Valax, Philippe
      There is increasing interest around the world in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) (CoE, 2001). Many language teachers living and working within Europe, particularly those who are old enough to remember the impact of World War II, are likely to be familiar with the organization out of which the CEFR emerged (The Council of Europe) and to appreciate the reasons why that organization was set up and why it was felt necessary to develop such a framework. However, language teachers who are living and working outside of Europe may be less familiar with the background to the CEFR and, therefore, less likely to be in a position to appreciate the interaction between its political goals and its possible practical applications. In that the latter rely to a considerable extent for their likely effectiveness on the former, it is important that those involved in language education should have some understanding of the political, historical and social context out of which the CEFR developed and of the various stages in its to development. The aim of this article is to provide readers with information that will help them to locate the CEFR politically, socially and historically and, therefore, to be in a better position to make a realistic assessment of its potential relevance to the contexts in which they are operating.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 2 - Te puawaitanga o te puawananga
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane; Whaanga, Hemi
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 1 - 'Intra'-propositional relations and their signalling:
           An investigation of authentic Maori texts
    • Abstract: Whaanga, Hemi
      I report here on one part of a research project that involved the investigation of a range of authentic Maori texts in terms of two types of meaning relation - those that operate within propositions ('intra-propositional relations') and those that link propositions or groups of propositions ('inter-propositional relations'). The focus here is on intra-propositional relations (relationships within propositions). On the basis of the comparison of a number of intra-propositional relational models, a new model which draws inspiration from the work of Crombie is proposed and applied to a corpus of texts written in Maori, the emphasis being on the ways in which these relations are signalled in Maori.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 1 - Super-size your control of language:
           Inter-propositional relations as a tool for textual analysis in language
           learning
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane
      In what might be considered traditional approaches to language teaching and learning, the focus is often on lexical or syntactic issues and instruction is often limited to phrase, clause or sentence. While learning at this level is important, it is also the case that learners, in developing a high degree of control of their target language, need to be taught skills that will give them the capacity to decode and encode complete texts of a variety of types in a variety of contexts. While, over the last two decades, some researchers have made some useful suggestions about approaches to the issue of above-sentence-level language control, they generally make little reference to the role of mental operations in textual comprehension. Against a background of Crombie's work on inter-propositional relations, the overall objective of this paper is to demonstrate, with reference to a specific example, the extent to which an interpropositional approach provides a potentially rich methodological tool for language teachers and a mechanism for promoting in-depth comprehension of texts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 1 - Operationalization of genre as a categorizer of
           academic and professional texts: A review of construct validity in six
           landmark studies
    • Abstract: Bruce, Ian
      This study reviews the application of genre theory to the classification of texts in six landmark studies, specifically in relation to the issue of construct validity. The genre theories that the studies draw upon include: North American New Rhetoric (more recently termed Rhetorical Genre Studies), genre theory influenced by Systemic Functional Linguistics and the English for Specific Purposes approach. The operationalization of genre in each study is examined using a framework of knowledge categories drawn from the dual social genre/cognitive genre model of the author (Bruce, 2005, 2008b). The findings indicate that the central genre-identifying element in the reviewed studies is some form of schematic or move structure to account for the staging of content within texts. While some studies associate the schematic structure with contextual, socially-constructed knowledge, others attempt to relate its stages to what are seen as genre-characterizing, linguistic features. However, what appears to be lacking in the three theories is a comprehensive, integrated approach to account for the socially constructed, general rhetorical and linguistic elements of genre knowledge. The findings of this study emphasize the developing nature of genre theory and research, and appear to support the need for a multi-faceted approach to genre in order to operationalize adequately so complex a phenomenon.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 1 - What's in a name': The sense of reference, the
           rigidity of designators and the history of causes when determining the
           names of the two main islands of Aotearoa/New Zealand
    • Abstract: Parker, Martin
      The New Zealand Geographic Board recently revealed that the two main islands of Aotearoa/New Zealand have never been officially named. The revelation made both national and international news and led to a large number of publicly aired comments on the matter, suggesting that something so fundamental and seemingly innocuous as naming is in fact likely to generate a good deal of controversy, no more so than in a bicultural/bilingual context. This paper will examine the phenomenon of naming from a number of angles. After discussing a layperson's idea of what is meant by the meaning of names, we shall attempt to apply a number of theoretical models from the field of Language Philosophy to the case of the main islands of Aotearoa/New Zealand: the Descriptivist approach of Frege and Russell, Kripke's Rigid Designators, and Causal Grounding theory. We shall conclude that, in the case of applying the first two of these, there is a question mark over whether any of the current names for the two islands, both Maori and Pakeha, are in fact names at all; in terms of applying the theory of Causal Grounding, we are drawn to the conclusion that in history lies the key to the future.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 1 - Discourse relations, semantic relations and English in
           academic settings
    • Abstract: Paltridge, Brian
      This paper describes the use of the notions of discourse elements, 'discourse relations' and 'semantic relations' in the teaching of English in academic settings. The paper provides an overview of these notions as well as makes suggestions for how they might be drawn on in the teaching of English for academic purposes. Working with these notions can help students create the kinds of texts they need to be able to produce in their courses of study as well as give them strategies they can draw on for reading and writing texts in their future academic and professional lives.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 1 - The common European framework of reference for
           languages: Should Pacific and Pacific Rim countries get on board the
           bandwagon'
    • Abstract: Crombie, Winifred
      For many bureaucrats, the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) has an almost irresistible appeal. All that users have to do, apparently, is read its approximately 200 pages (plus appendices) and they will "find . . . all [they] need to describe [their] objectives, methods and products" (Council of Europe (CoE), p. xii). Having done that, they will be in a position to "overcome the barriers to communication . . . arising from . . . different educational systems" and "facilitate . . . mobility through . . . mutual recognition of qualifications" (p. 1). The CEFR has some very influential advocates, both within and outside of Europe. Investment in it is extensive in some areas of the world. It emerges out of an organisation whose ethical credentials are beyond question, one that has been responsible for some interesting innovations in the area of language education. In such a context, it is not surprising that many countries outside of Europe, including Pacific and Pacific Rim countries, are developing an interest in it. On the basis of a close reading of the CEFR, this article concludes that it has considerably less to offer than it claims and, therefore, advises language educators in Pacific and Pacific Rim countries, particularly those involved in the teaching of indigenous languages, to be extremely cautious about adopting the approaches it recommends too readily.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 11 Issue 1 - Te puawaitanga o te puawananga
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane; Whaanga, Hemi
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 2 - Guidelines for Final Submission of Article for JMPD
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 2 - Vocabulary Games as a Memory Enhancement Device
    • Abstract: Meihua, Chen
      The report here on a study whose aim was to determine whether any long-term vocabulary gains were achieved as the result of participation in a game program involving three vocabulary games based loosely on Poker (Pick Red), Chinese Blind Chess and Gobang. Forty six students from a language college in Taiwan participated in a twenty hour game program involving the creation of English compound words from single English words appearing on game cards and game pieces. A vocabulary test relating to these compounds was administered at the beginning of the program (the pretest), on two occasions during the program, on completion of the program and 45 days after completion of the program (the delayed test). Although the results indicated some vocabulary losses between the end of the program and the delayed test, comparison of pretest and delayed test results indicated significant vocabulary gains.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 2 - College Learner's English Learning Beliefs in Taiwan
           EFL Context
    • Abstract: Wang, Weipei; Chee, Su
      Wenzao Ursuline College of Languages (Wenzao) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan has run the 36-credit General English courses for seven years. Although it has collected information about the students' language proficiency, it has not, until now, collected information about students' beliefs about language learning. This paper reports on a survey of the beliefs about English language learning (ELL) of a group of tertiary level students learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at Wenzao. The survey instrument, the Beliefs About Language Learning Inventory (BALLI) developed by Horwitz (1987), was designed to collect information about students' beliefs in the following areas: language learning aptitude, difficulty of language learning, the nature of language learning, learning and communication strategies, and motivation and expectations. Data were collected from the 38 freshmen attending one of one of Wenzao's 36-credit English program classes. The data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), a t-test being performed in the analysis of the learners' responses. The findings reveal that survey participants overall have a strong instrumental motivation for learning English and that most of them believe that they will ultimately succeed in speaking it very well. Even so, many of them appeared to have unrealistic expectations, with as many as 37% reporting believing (or strongly believing) that it is possible to become fluent in English in less than one year if you spend one hour a day learning the language. Among the most surprising findings were the fact that as many as 34% reported believing (or strongly believing) that learning English as a foreign language is mostly a matter of translation, and as few as 39% reporting believing (or strongly believing) that learning vocabulary is essential to learning English.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 2 - Texts Written in English and Chinese by Expert
           Writers: A Genre-based Comparative Study from the Pacific Rim
    • Abstract: Wu, Huang
      On the basis of the analysis of the structure of text segments occurring in a range of journals, Bruce (2003) proposes four prototypes for the overall rhetorical structure and internal discourse structure of academic texts in English that focus on explanation, argument, recount and classification. This paper reports on a study involving 20 texts written in Chinese by native speakers of Chinese resident in Taiwan who were judged to be highly competent writers of Chinese. Five of these texts focused on explanation; five on argument, five on recount and five on classification. Analysis of these texts in terms of overall rhetorical structuring and internal discourse structuring suggests that texts written in Chinese by competent writers of Chinese may be closer to texts written in English by competent writers of English than is sometimes supposed, something that may have significant implications for the teaching of writing in English to native speakers of Chinese. However, the participants in this study were residents of Taiwan, a country that has had long-term academic and trading links with the USA and one in which most residents have some competence in English. It may be that a similar study involving native speakers of Chinese from other areas would yield different results.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 2 - Using the Curriculum Guidelines for the Teaching and
           Learning of 'te reo' Maori in Years 1 - 13 of New Zealand Schools to
           Create Lessons for Young Learners
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane; Nock, Sophie
      In 2009, The New Zealand Ministry of Education published curriculum guidelines for te reo Maori in Years 1 - 13 of English-medium New Zealand schools, that is, from age 5 upwards. These guidelines recommend a communicative approach to the teaching and learning of te reo Maori. In this article, we discuss communicative approaches and provide examples of ways in which teachers can design communicative language lessons that are appropriate for very young learners, lessons that are not only fun but also effective in developing genuine communicative competence in te reo Maori.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 2 - Teaching Maori in English-medium Schools in New
           Zealand: Teacher Responses to Aspects of the Curriculum Guidelines for 'te
           reo' Maori in English-medium School
    • Abstract: Takurua, Natana; Whaanga, Hemi
      Opinions are divided about how the content of language courses should be specified and whether educational authorities should include specifications/ suggestions about language content in national curriculum documents. Issues associated with language content are, however, not ones that can be avoided, particularly as teachers are expected to prepare students for national examinations at the upper levels of schooling and these examinations are necessarily predicated on general expectations about proficiency achievements and more specific expectations about the types of language with which students will be familiar. In this article, we explore the complex nature of some of the issues involved and the ways in which the New Zealand Ministry of Education has sought/ is seeking to resolve them in the case of the curriculum for Maori in English-medium schools. We also report on the responses of a sample of teachers of Maori in secondary schools in New Zealand to the omission of language examples from the final version of the curriculum guidelines document.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 2 - Growth Out of Loss: The Urban Discourses of
           Literatures of the Native American and Maori Literary Renaissance
    • Abstract: Waterman, Jason
      The seeds of the Native American and Maori Renaissance eras germinated amid sweeping changes in the years immediately following World War II, a time when urbanization and the consequent separation of indigenous peoples from community networks represented a major threat to culturally embedded certainties and destabilized romanticized notions of the past. This article explores parallels between the ways in which Native American and Maori literatures reflect the impact of urbanization at the height of this era and the contribution the authors make to the positive cultural growth that defines their respective renaissance periods.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 2 - Te Puawaitanga O Te Puawananga
    • Abstract: Yates-Smith, Aroha
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Guidelines for Final Submission of Article for JMPD
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Vocabulary Learning Strategies and Language Games:
           Reporting on a Taiwan-based Study
    • Abstract: Meihua, Chen
      This study investigates the effectiveness of games as a vocabulary learning strategy. Forty-six students of English as a foreign language (EFL) voluntarily joined a vocabulary extension training program, using games created by the author, for a total period of 20 hours in the summer of 2008. Oxford's (1990) Strategies Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) was used before and after the program to detect learning strategies and any changes in learning strategies before and after the program and Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used for data analysis. In terms of strategy use, there were significant differences between pretest and post-test results, particularly in the area of memory strategies. This suggests that further research in the area of games-based vocabulary enhancement, particularly in the area of strategy use and development, would be likely to be of value.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - The Entrepreneurial Spirit of the Pacific Peoples: A
           Study of Pacific Immigrant Entrepreneurship in New Zealand
    • Abstract: de Vries, Huibert P
      The difficulty associated with determining what constitutes immigrant entrepreneurial behaviour lies in the road being travelled differently by immigrants from dissimilar backgrounds, value systems, and cultural heritages. Migration and settlement issues present themselves in a multitude of different forms, depending on a complex and dynamic combination of the ethnic characteristics of the specific ethnic immigrant group and the receiving country's socio-economic infrastructure. This paper presents the findings of a case study-based approach to a description of the entrepreneurial spirit within Pacific People in New Zealand, an approach involving triangulation (semi-structured interviews with Pacific immigrant entrepreneurs; selected immigration literature, and interviews with Pacific community leaders). The case study is based on four constructs (migration profile, settlement profile, cultural profile and business profile) which were identified as impacting on immigrant entrepreneurship patterns. Conclusions relating to each of the following are presented: business drivers (e.g. generational differences and social obligation); business strengths (e.g. uniqueness, family, and community networks); and weaknesses that inhibit the entrepreneurial spirit (e.g. lack of confidence and social obligations).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Exploring Synergies between Maori Pedagogy and
           Communicative Language Teaching
    • Abstract: Nock, Sophie; Crombie, Winifred
      The primary aim of this paper is to explore potential synergies between Maori pedagogy and what is known as 'communicative language teaching'. A brief outline of some changes and developments in approaches to language teaching and learning over the last few decades is followed by a summary of some of the main characteristics of communicative language teaching (CLT) and of different approaches to the conceptualization of Maori pedagogy. Some of the primary characteristics of communicative language teaching are then explored in the context of Maori pedagogy and it is argued that there are some important synergies between the two.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - The Tradition of Facial Tattoo in Taiwan: The Case of
           the 'Truku' People
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane; Tseng, Yi-Ju; Her, Jia-Huey
      The art of body marking (tattoo), is a traditional pan-Austronesian tradition that has been lost or partially lost in many countries. In the case of the Truku tribe in north eastern Taiwan, the traditional practice of facial tattoo ceased around the 1930s and there are now only a few tribal elders (both male and female) who still bear the characteristic tribal markings. This paper reports on a research project in which a questionnaire was administered to 100 members of the Si-La-An sub-tribe of the Truku people. The findings indicate that although the respondents know that this was once a significant cultural practice within the tribe, detailed knowledge and understanding of the traditional customs and practices associated with facial tattoo is inconsistent and opinions about the value of continuing the custom vary considerably.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Te Puawaitanga O Te Puawananga
    • Abstract: Whaanga, Hemi
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Guidelines for Final Submission of Article for JMPD
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Communicative Language Teaching and Outcomes-based
           Objectives Setting: A Questionnaire-based Survey of a Sample of Tertiary
           Teachers of English in Taiwan
    • Abstract: Her, Jia-Huey
      The aim of the research reported here was to determine, using a questionnaire-based survey, the extent to which a sample of teachers of English at tertiary level (college and university) in Taiwan appear to have been affected by two of what might be described as emerging 'orthodoxies' of English language teaching - the use of approaches associated with communicative language teaching and 'can do' outcomes-based objectives setting. The findings indicate that, so far at least as the survey respondents are concerned, these approaches are much less pervasive than is sometimes supposed. This suggests that teachers of English in Taiwan may be less likely to provide a receptive audience for dominant Western discourse on language teaching and learning than is sometimes supposed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Maori Students and Issues of Hybrid Identity: The
           Response of One Inner-city State School
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane
      As a result of a more liberal national migration policy than was the case in the past, school communities in Aotearoa /New Zealand are increasingly multi-cultural, with both students and teachers coming from a wide range of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. In these global village environments, managers and governors strive (with varying degrees of success) to acknowledge, value and accommodate the heritage of new-migrant groups and to address the particular educational needs, interests and aspirations of the individuals within them. While it is extremely important to be inclusive of those students who are newly-arrived in the country, another imperative is, of course to protect and enhance, within an increasingly global educational perspective, the special status of indigenous Maori students, particularly those in mainstream education, as they explore and shape the hybrid identity (part indigenous / part global citizen) that will undoubtedly characterize their lives in the 21{st} century. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some identity-building strategies which one central-city, state, single-sex secondary school has initiated to support its indigenous students. While the strategies discussed must be considered as part of an ongoing, evolutionary process, indications are that the approach adopted is having a significant impact on the personal, social and academic development of Maori students.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - The Pene Haare Manuscript and Issues Associated with
           the Translation of Historical Texts Written in Indigenous Languages
    • Abstract: Tipene, Jillian; Crombie, Winifred; Roa, Tom
      With particular reference to a request to translate into English a manuscript dated 1923 and written by the Maori author Ngakuru Pene Haare, we identify here a range of issues and problems associated with the translation of historical texts written in indigenous languages, suggesting ways in which they might be addressed. Among the problems identified in this case are the paucity of information that is publicly available about the author, the context in which he lived and worked and the events about which he wrote, the absence, or sporadic use in the manuscript of a range of conventions associated with contemporary writing, the occurrence of archaic and/or esoteric words and expressions, and the presence of symbolism that is deeply culturally-embedded. The primary conclusion is that the translation of manuscripts such as this must be ethically-grounded and fully research-embedded. It must therefore involve the mentorship of knowledgeable elders, be guided by procedures that are appropriate in terms of the culture out of which the source text emerged, accompanied by meticulous and wide-ranging research, and take full account of the wishes of the author of the manuscript where these have been stated, or can be inferred.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Nock, Sophie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Teachers of English in Taiwanese Primary Schools
           Reflect on Their In-service Training
    • Abstract: Wang, Wei Pei; Crombie, Winifred
      We report here on the responses of a sample of ten teachers in primary/ elementary schools in Taiwan to that part of a survey (based on a written questionnaire and semi-structured interview) that related to their experiences of in-service training provision in the teaching of English. Most of the in-service training that this sample of teachers had been exposed to was in the form of one-off workshops (offered by textbook publishers, local government and cram schools). Responses to these workshops were mixed. The most negative responses related to workshops provided by publishers and those provided by local government that focused on policy issues. The most positive responses related to workshops taught by practicing teachers, workshops that sometimes covered areas that appear to have been neglected in pre-service training.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - The Teaching of Reading in English in Taiwan: A Case
           Study Involving Sustained Silent Reading
    • Abstract: Su, Chee
      Krashen (1992) has proposed an approach to the teaching of reading in second/ foreign languages which he refers to as 'free voluntary reading' (FVR). This is essentially in-class 'sustained silent reading' (SSR) conducted according to a number of 'principles'. This approach has now been used for several years in various institutions in Taiwan. The aims of the research reported here were (a) to evaluate, in the context of an English reading program conducted in a Taiwanese educational institution, the effectiveness of this approach in relation to both reading comprehension development and attitudes towards reading in English, and (b) to determine whether there was any correlation between the effectiveness of the program in particular instances and students' learning styles. The results indicate that although the students who were involved in a free voluntary reading program did express increased interest in reading in English and although their progress (in terms of reading comprehension development) matched that of students following a different reading program after one year, their progress after two years of exposure to the programme was significantly lower than that of the students following a skills-based reading program. No correlation was found between student learning style preferences and the effectiveness of the free voluntary reading program.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - The Processes Involved in Formulating a Marae-based
           Maori Language Regeneration Plan for Whakamarama Marae: Outline, Analysis
           and Evaluation
    • Abstract: Lewis, Roger; Crombie, Winifred
      We provide here a criterion referenced evaluation of the processes involved in the creation of a Maori language regeneration strategy for Whakamarama marae. Working voluntarily and often under difficult circumstances, core group members demonstrated that they possessed the essential characteristics of commitment, motivation and determination. In addition, they demonstrated the willingness and ability to use existing skills and knowledge effectively and to develop further skills and knowledge as the project proceeded. Perhaps most important, they developed a caring and effective working culture. However, the weaknesses of the project included a lack of preparation and planning prior to the commencement of the project which led to delays in producing outcomes and some loss of momentum. This also led, indirectly, to the views of two or three members of the core group being overrepresented in the language planning goals. We believe that the information and analysis provided here are likely to be of interest to any language community involved in micro-level language regeneration activities of a similar type.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Swatow: The Old Town's Colonial Centre
    • Abstract: Scott, Howard M; Chen, Xiaoli
      The old city of Swatow, a delta part at the confluence of the rivers Han, Ron and Lian rivers in north-eastern Guangdong Province of southern China, was built using colonial architectural features. Most of these buildings are now in poor condition. Unless a decision to protect and restore them is taken soon, they will be lost. This photo reportage records a selection of street scenes in old Swatow in late 2007.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Kia Maanu, Kia Ora: Stay Afloat, Stay Alive -
           Acknowledging the Significance of Tikanga Maori in Formulating and
           Communicating Water Safety Policies and Practices
    • Abstract: Haimona, Mark; Takurua, Natana
      The traditional beliefs and practices of Maori demonstrate great respect for water, for its dangers as well as its life-giving properties, and Maori have, along with other Polynesian peoples, been known for their skill in swimming, fishing and canoeing. However, Maori now outnumber others in New Zealand in terms of the proportion involved in drowning and water-related injury. In seeking to promote water safety among Maori, Water Safety New Zealand has enlisted the help of Maori communities. Its message - Kia Maanu, Kia Ora (Stay Afloat, Stay Alive) - is underpinned by an acknowledgement of the need to reinforce the traditional respect for water that permeates the Maori worldview.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Inter-propositional Relations: An Investigation of
           Authentic Maori Texts
    • Abstract: Whaanga, Hemi
      I report here on a part of a research project involving the investigation of a range of authentic Maori texts in terms of two types of meaning relation - those that operate within propositions (referred to here as 'intra-propositional relations'), and those that link propositions or groups of propositions (referred to here as 'inter-propositional relations'). In focus here is the second of these types, that is, inter-propositional relations, and in particular, the ways in which they are signalled in te reo Maori. The implications of the findings for the teaching and learning of te reo Maori are also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Is There Evidence That Traditional Moteatea (Maori
           Laments) Were Composed from a Common Stock of Oral Formulae'
    • Abstract: Roa, Raukura
      Oral formulaic composition, which involves the use of communally owned formulae of various kinds, is a common feature of verbal arts produced in many different languages. It is particularly associated with pre-literate cultures and tends to be gradually replaced by more individualistic verbal art forms when societies become literate. There are very few publications in which the analysis of moteatea (Maori laments) is linked explicitly to oral formulaic theory. Nevertheless, there is sufficient evidence in published sources to indicate that traditional moteatea (defined here as moteatea that are not fundamentally influenced by European cultural beliefs and practices) exhibit evidence of regularly recurring, conventional themes (such as death, separation, loss and travel) and motifs (such as the setting sun, the presence of rain or mist and sleeplessness). The research reported here set out to test the hypothesis that traditional moteatea were made up of verbal formulae, that is, of the same or very similar groups of words derived from a common store of poetic resources. Based on the analysis of the moteatea included in Nga moteatea, a collection initially established by Sir Apirana Ngata, I conclude that this hypothesis must be rejected.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Yates-Smith, Aroha
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - English Language Learning in New Caledonia: A Report on
           the Proficiency Achievements and Motivation of Students At or Near the
           Point of Entry to Tertiary Study
    • Abstract: Poret, Anne
      In the context of an introduction to New Caledonia and its languages, this paper reports on a research project whose aims were to provide a snapshot of the English language proficiency achievements of New Caledonian students at the point of entry to tertiary study and to investigate possible relationships between proficiency achievements, learning context and motivation. In 2006, a sample of students (274) took a C-test (one that was initially used in a major European language proficiency survey) and completed a questionnaire relating to motivation and attitudes towards the English language. The overall mean C-test score was considerably lower than that of students who did the same C-test at a similar educational stage in the European study. Some schooling contexts appear to have had a positive impact on proficiency development, as did some factors relating to motivation. On the basis of this study, it is suggested that educational authorities in New Caledonia should consider looking carefully at the factors that affect to the teaching and learning of English in schools.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Taiwanese Textbooks for Young Learners of English: A
           Criterion-referenced Analysis
    • Abstract: Wang, Wei Pei
      This article focuses on one of the problems faced by one Pacific rim country, Taiwan, in coming to terms with the increasing globalization of English, that is, the production of textbooks that are appropriate for young learners. Increasing pressure to ensure that its citizens achieve a high level of proficiency in English has led Taiwan, in common with many other countries, to reduce the age at which children are introduced to English in schools. This has lead to the proliferation of English textbooks for young learners. The Taiwan national English curriculum guidelines recommend that teaching materials should cultivate communicative ability and should include varied activities, a range of different types of text, and interesting, practical and lively topics and themes. Three textbook series produced in Taiwan are analysed and discussed here in terms of a range of effectiveness criteria. It is concluded that the textbook writers have not yet come to terms with the recommendations in the English curriculum guidelines. In that these recommendations are similar to recommendations included in national curriculum guidelines for the teaching of languages in many other parts of the world, it is suggested that language teaching materials produced elsewhere might usefully be analysed in a similar way.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Maori and English Textbooks Designed for Language
           Learners at Intermediate Level: A Comparison in Terms of the Occurrence
           and Use of Insights Gained from Research on Discourse Analysis
    • Abstract: Fester, Anthea; Whaanga, Hemi
      Over the past two decades, research in the area of discourse analysis has expanded rapidly and has yielded insights that could usefully inform the teaching and learning of languages. In this paper, we report on the results of a comparative study of a number of commercially available textbooks designed for learners of English and learners of te reo Maori at intermediate level in terms of the extent to which they can be shown to have been influenced by specific aspects of discourse analysis research. In the textbooks designed for learners of English, there is some evidence that the writers are aware of, and have been influenced by some aspects of discourse analysis research, particularly in the teaching of writing skills. In the textbooks designed for learners of te reo Maori, however, there is almost no sign of influence of research of this type. In view of the importance of the teaching and learning of te reo Maori in relation to the maintenance of the language, and in view of the fact that many young people in New Zealand now learn a range of academic subjects through the medium of te reo Maori, this raises issues that we believe need to be addressed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - The Relevance of Discourse Analysis to the Teaching and
           Learning of Te Reo Maori: A Text-centred Example
    • Abstract: Greensill, Hine-iti-moana
      In this paper, I analyse a single text written in te reo Maori in terms of two different approaches derived from discourse analysis (discourse macro-patterning and discourse relations and their signalling) in order to demonstrate the importance of deriving a discourse-centred methodology for teaching learners of Maori what is involved in interpreting and creating coherent discourses.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Language, Matauranga Maori . . . and Technology'
    • Abstract: Selby, Mereana
      In this paper, I report on a research project involving the creation of an e-learning environment for the teaching and learning of an aspect of te reo Maori, that is the preparation of mihi. It was found that learning in the context of an e-learning environment in which anonymity was assured, learners could learn in their own spaces and at their own pace and there was no pressure to perform in front of peers and tutors had the potential to reduce the potentially negative effects of whakama.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - He Reo Amiorangi
    • Abstract: Roa, Tom
      This paper discusses a project involving the translation of a learning management system (LMS), Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment (Moodle), into te reo Maori so that users of this LMS, learners, teachers and administrators who have a high level of competence in the language, can work within a fully Maori environment. Aspects of the project referred to here include adaptation of the style guide created by Te Taura Whiri for the Microsoft project, use of the Microsoft translation guidelines, the philosophy guiding the translation and the translation process itself (with examples). The process by which the project was evaluated is also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Weaving kaupapa Maori and e-Learning
    • Abstract: Neal, Terry; Collier, Hohaia
      This paper describes the creation and design of an online professional development course that aims to help educators in New Zealand to weave kaupapa Maori and e-Learning approaches together. The team sought to model weaving of kaupapa Maori and e-Learning approaches in how they worked together and the educational design for the material. The authors propose that educators with these skills are crucial if we are to effectively meet the needs of Maori learners, more than that, of all New Zealand learners, in the 21st century.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Te Whanake Online: An Interactive Resource for Maori
           Language Learning
    • Abstract: Ka'ai, Tania M; McDonald, Jenny; Moorfield, John C
      The promotion of the Maori language is regarded by Maori as essential to the survival of Maori culture, arts, history and identity. The goal of the Te Whanake Online project is to develop a series of online interactive modules to complement an established Maori language learning set of texts and related resources, called Te Whanake. Te Whanake Online supports an immersion or game-style approach to language learning. Currently the fifteen modules for the first book in the series, Te Whanake Te Kakano, have been completed. Each module begins with an animated film introducing the new language of the module. Between nine and sixteen activities in each module provide practice in a wide range of spoken and written language skills, including listening with comprehension, speaking, reading with comprehension, writing and activities to help learn grammatical structures and vocabulary. The project means that Maori language learners will have access to an online resource which is at the forefront of current thinking and practice in language learning online and firmly grounded in a successful and well-established Maori language series of texts, study guides, audio-visual resources, a dictionary-index, and teachers' manuals. This article outlines the project background, its design, evaluation and the outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Gulangyu: A Photographic Exploration of Its Colonial
           Heritage
    • Abstract: Scott, Howard M
      As Artist in Residence at the Art Centre of Xiamen University in 2005, I had an opportunity to visit Xiamen (formerly known as Amoy) on many occasions and to photograph examples of the colonial style architecture. Following a brief introduction to the history of Xiamen/ Amoy, I provide a selection of these photographs to provide some sense of the architectural novelty of this fascinating place whose buildings are symbolic of a significant aspect of China's rich and varied history.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Kuta (Eleocharis sphacelata, Cyperaceae), a Locally
           Important and Highly Valued Weaving Plant
    • Abstract: Wehi, Priscilla M
      This article introduces and discusses kuta (Eleocharis sphacelata, Cyperaceae), a tall spikerush found on the margins of shallow lakes in New Zealand, which, although often overlooked, is considered in Northland to be a valuable weaving resource.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - The Display and Conservation of Taonga Maori -
           Establishing Culturally Appropriate Display and Conservation Facilities:
           Mahi Mareikura - a Work in Progress
    • Abstract: Whaanga, Hemi; Hedley, Rangiiria
      This paper examines issues relating to the appropriate display and conservation of taonga Maori in the context of a discussion of the establishment of Mahi Mareikura, a room in the University of Waikato library that is dedicated primarily to the display and conservation of the collected taonga and works of the late Dr. Pei te Hurinui Jones and a collection of the work of his colleague and close relative, Professor Bruce Biggs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Roa, Tom
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Te Whare Wananga O Waikato: Te Pua Wananga Ki Te Ao
    • Abstract: Yates-Smith, Aroha
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - The 'Diaolou' of Zili Village: An Aspect of China's
           Architectural Heritage
    • Abstract: Scott, Howard M
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - The Teaching and Learning of te reo Maori in a Higher
           Education Context: Intensive Fast Track Immersion Versus Gradual
           Progressive Language Exposure
    • Abstract: Nock, Sophie
      I report here on a comparison of the course grades of Bachelors degree students who are following two different pathways towards a major in te reo Maori - a traditional pathway in which language courses at different levels are spread over three or four years, and an intensive, fast-track, language immersion pathway in which courses in te reo Maori are concentrated into the first year of the degree programme. My findings are that, overall, in terms of course grades at level three, students following the intensive, fast-track, language-immersion pathway out-perform other students in te reo Maori course assessments. Thus, so far as course grades are concerned, many students appear to benefit from the fast track pathway. Whether course grades can be related to proficiency achievements and whether immediate gains are reflected in long-term gains is something that remains to be investigated.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Replacing Medical and Social Models of Disability by a
           Communities-based Model of Equal Access for People of Differing Abilities:
           A Maori Perspective
    • Abstract: Hickey, Huhana
      I argue here that although the social model of disability which currently prevails in New Zealand is preferable in many ways to the earlier medical model, it is nevertheless based on a largely uni-dimensional concept of society and continues an established tradition of negativity, one that is evident in the ongoing use of the word 'disabled' itself by those who subscribe to the social model. I argue here that the social model of disability should be replaced by a communities-based model of equal access for people of differing abilities, one that is, in the New Zealand context, informed by a further developed Maori model of health and wellbeing proposed by Mason Durie, Te Whare Tapa Wha. This mode is designed in such a way as to accommodate difference and diversity. In the discussion of different models, I use the words 'disabled' and 'disability'; in other contexts, I replace 'disabled people' by 'people of differing abilities'.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - My Journey with te reo Maori: From Primary Schooling in
           the Mid 20th Century to Retirement from Full-time Academic Service in the
           Early Years of the 21st. Century
    • Abstract: Houia-Roberts, Ngaere
      This is not an academic article in the traditional sense. It is a personal account of my experiences, as a first language speaker of te reo Maori, of New Zealand's educational system from the middle of the 20th century to the early years of the 21st century, from the early days of my primary schooling, through my service as a teacher, teacher trainer and academic researcher until my retirement from full-time academic service in 2005. A great deal has been written about the ways in which attitudes and approaches to te reo Maori have changed over that period of time but very little has been written about how it felt to be part of these changes. Our society is based on facts and feelings. If our mokopuna are to understand the fabric of our society, they need to have access to feelings as well as to facts. In this paper, weft and warp, facts and feelings, are woven together. This personal account is dedicated to our mokopuna, to all of our mokopuna, whatever their origin and whatever their colour. The future of our society depends upon their understanding.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Solomon Islands: Colonisation and the Complexity of
           Nationhood
    • Abstract: Rohorua, Frederick Isom
      To many people, 'Solomon Islands' is little more than a name attached to a group of islands on a map, a place often associated with unrest and internal strife. That these islands are perceived as a totality, as a bounded entity, relates to the fact that they are identified by a single name and the fact that this name is now associated with a political entity, a nation state. Whether these islands can be said to represent a social entity is a rather different matter, one that is critical to our understanding of both the people who inhabit these islands and the political processes that have played a part in shaping their sense of identity. In this paper, I attempt to unravel some of the complexities of nationhood and identity in contemporary Solomon Islands society with reference to three readily identifiable metaphors: island, betel nut and wantok which were first used with reference to Solomon Islands by Bishop Brown (2003).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Te Puawaitanga o te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Crombie, Winifred
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Aloha Betrayed: Native Hawaiian Resistance to American
           Colonialism [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Watson, Trisha Kehaulani
      Critical analysis of: Aloha Betrayed: Native Hawaiian Resistance to American Colonialism (by Noenoe K. Silva). Review(s) of: Noenoe K. Silva, Aloha Betrayed: Native Hawaiian Resistance to American Colonialism, Durham, Duke University Press, 2004.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - The Maori Language Curriculum for Mainstream New
           Zealand Schools: Spiral Lesson/ Lesson Sequence Design
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane; Houia, Waldo
      A draft curriculum document for the teaching and learning of te reo Maori as a subject in mainstream schools in New Zealand (that is, in schools other than Kura Kaupapa Maori schools) was designed and trialled in 2004 and 2005. That draft is currently being reworked in line with the advice of those who trialled the document as well as that of a team of advisers set up by the Ministry of Education. The revised curriculum document will be submitted to the Ministry of Education in May 2006. As is the case with all new curriculum documents, the implementation phase will be critical. The extent to which this flexible, outcomes-focused curriculum document will genuinely inform new approaches to teaching and learning will depend not only upon the good will of teachers and communities, but also upon their ability to interpret the curriculum and to use it in a way that informs the design of language programmes, including the planning of units of work and of lessons and lesson sequences. In balancing language development and language practice, a communicative core and spiral approach is recommended, an approach in which there are core lessons (where the focus is language development) and spiral lessons (where the focus is language practice). In an earlier issue of this Journal (Johnson, 2003), one of us discussed core lesson design. Here, the design of spiral lessons is discussed and exemplified in the context of an outcomes-based curriculum.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - The Maori Language Revitalisation Agenda and 'Te
           Whakapiki Reo & Te Whakapiki i te Reo': Meeting the Needs of Teachers
    • Abstract: Te Kanawa, Hine Kahukura; Whaanga, Hemi
      Since 1994, and under contract to the New Zealand Ministry of Education, the University of Waikato has provided teacher professional development programmes in the context of kaupapa matauranga Maori. Because these programmes are designed to play a role in the Maori language revitalisation agenda as it relates to the teaching and learning of te reo Maori in school contexts, we believe that it is important to share our experiences with others. In this article, we discuss the context in which these programmes are delivered, some of the ways in which they have changed over time, and what we have learned from them.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Sowing the Seeds of Conflict: Britain
    • Abstract: Rohorua, Frederick Isom
      It is argued here that independent Solomon Islands was poorly prepared for the development tasks that lay ahead. That argument is based on the nature of the last two development plans produced for the British Solomon Islands Protectorate before the departure of the British. The failure of the British to take development planning seriously left the newly independent country with a range of problems that even very experienced politicians and administrators would have found extremely difficult to address adequately. As there can be little doubt that the later outbreak of ethnic tension related, in part at least, to the perception that development activities had had little effect on the lives of Solomon Islanders (particularly rural Solomon Islanders), it follows that responsibility rests not only with Solomon Islanders themselves, but also with the British.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Indigenous People with Disabilities: The Argument for
           Representation in Human Rights Legislation (with Specific Reference to the
           Development Stage of the United Nations International Disability
           Convention)
    • Abstract: Hickey, Huhana
      Until comparatively recently, human rights legislation was largely based on a universalist analysis. In treating all human beings alike, in failing to acknowledge the need for special measures to combat the marginalisation and oppression of particular groups, such as indigenous people and people with disabilities, it actually contributed to their invisibility and, hence, to their marginalisation and oppression. More recently, however, there has been a global trend towards the recognition of marginalised groups in human rights legislation. Even so, universalism, and the prejudice that so often accompanies it, is still in evidence. For example, although the United Nations is currently involved in drafting a Disabled Persons Convention, indigenous people with disabilities are not specifically represented. Their particular situation, one that involves a dual form of oppression (as indigenous people and as people with disabilities) is not acknowledged. Unless this situation is remedied, the Convention will inevitably be both less acceptable and less useful than would otherwise be the case.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Tikanga Tainui: Tikanga Whare Wananga
    • Abstract: Roa, Tom; Tuaupiki, Jackie T
      This paper is a preliminary report on an ongoing research project begun in 1999. The project involves consultation with Waikato-Tainui, the tangata whenua of the Waikato region, about the construction of guidelines for University of Waikato staff (both Maori and non-Maori) who are involved in gatherings that call for adherence to Tainui protocols. Here, the emphasis is on guidelines for the conduct of powhiri (formal welcomes) on the University Marae.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Yates-Smith, Aroha
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Te whakahuatanga i te reo Maori: Kua ahatia e tatou i
           roto i nga tau 100 kua hipa nei' (The Pronunciation of Maori: What
           Have We Done to It in the Last 100 Years')
    • Abstract: Harlow, Ray; Keegan, Peter; King, Jeanette; Maclagan, Margaret; Watson, Catherine
      In the words of the proverb: 'The land remains, but humankind vanishes.' One should perhaps extend this to read: 'The land remains, humankind vanishes, and language changes.' For languages are old, handed down from one generation to another, but no matter what, they change. Present-day English is not Shakespeare's or Chaucer's language. The pronunciation has changed, new words have entered the language, some words have been lost, the grammar is now different. Maori is like that as well. Over the last two centuries, many aspects of the language have become different. Many words have been borrowed from English, and become part of the language. Many new words have been created in recent years to accommodate the new topics now being spoken about in Maori. Many words have changed their meaning, e.g., 'putea' originally a type of basket, but now a 'fund', source of money. In the grammar, there are now constructions being used which were not correct in earlier centuries. So far as the pronunciation is concerned, how is one to observe its development' That is the substance of a research project which has only just now begun, and it is the purpose of this paper to explain the nature of that research and show some of the preliminary findings. Hence the title: The pronunciation of Maori: What have we done to it in the last 100 years' The project is supported by the Marsden Research Fund.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Sustaining Management of Indigenous-owned Resources:
           The Relevance of Multidimensional Training to the Multi-million Dollar
           Mahogany Industry in Fiji
    • Abstract: Nabalarua, Eci K
      This paper contributes to an emerging discourse relating to new pathways towards engaging in holistic development measures among grassroots communities in the Pacific Islands by using the notion of critical mass as a viable option for sustaining real growth in small rural economies. It is argued here that the multi-dimensional training techniques applied in the case of a project involving capacity building among indigenous women in Tailevu Province in Fiji could be applied with equal validity to the multi-million dollar mahogany industry in Fiji. This insight into mahogany suggests by implication that multi-dimensional training has great potential for sustaining effective management of indigenous-based and indigenous-owned resources.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - The Arguing Genre and the Explaining Genre: A
           Comparison in Terms of Discourse Relational Analyses of Texts Written in
           English and Texts Written in Maori
    • Abstract: Crombie, Winifred; Bruce, Ian; Houia-Roberts, Ngaere
      There is a commonly held belief that those who are immersed in indigenous cultures have a tendency, when constructing academic texts, to avoid sequential, deductive argumentation. We report here on a comparison of two groups of texts exhibiting two different genres - 'explaining' and 'arguing'. One group of texts was written in Maori by indigenous authors, the other group was written in English by non-indigenous authors. Our findings are that although the percentage use of logico-deductive relationships is roughly equivalent for both groups of texts/ writers in the case of the explaining genre, the Maori texts/ writers use almost twice the percentage of logico-deductive relationships as do the English texts/ writers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - The Concept of Partnership and The Treaty of Waitangi:
           Three Case Studies
    • Abstract: Morrison, Sandy
      There has been, and continues to be, considerable debate about the meaning and intent of different versions of the Treaty of Waitangi and about the extent of its relevance to contemporary New Zealand. It is in this context that a number of organisations and institutions in New Zealand, anxious to demonstrate their positive support for the creation of a just society, have attempted to restructure in ways that allow for a 'partnership' between M ori and P keh . With reference to three different case studies, I argue here that such restructuring, although generally very well intentioned and very welcome, should not be seen - as it frequently is - as an expression of the fulfilment of partnership obligations arising out of the Treaty of Waitangi. To treat organisational restructuring in this way, particularly where it does not provide both 'partners' with an equal right to determine the operational parameters and future direction of the organisation, is to misrepresent (often wholly unintentionally) the nature of the Treaty. Nevertheless, one way of resolving some of the debates concerning the meaning and intent of the Treaty of Waitangi might be to establish a principle of equal partnership in the governance and management of state institutions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Development and Care of pa harakeke in 19th Century New
           Zealand: Voices from the Past
    • Abstract: McAllum, Priscilla M
      M ori weaving is experiencing a resurgence. Some weavers are involved in the planting of p harakeke so that they have a high quality resource on hand ready for use. A number of recent scientific publications, undertaken jointly with weavers, have explored the unique fibre qualities of different harakeke varieties along with specific aspects of M ori use of these varieties. In this paper, I examine M ori planting practices of p harakeke and other aspects of resource management as revealed in literature sources from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries. Although some of the practices outlined here may have fallen into disuse over time, they may, nevertheless, continue to be appropriate for contemporary p harakeke. It is hoped, therefore, that the information provided here will be of interest to contemporary weavers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Whaanga, Hemi
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Does Direct Grammar Instruction Improve Students'
           Performance on Grammar-based Tests of English as a Foreign Language'
    • Abstract: Wu, Ellen (Hsiao-li)
      This paper reports the results of an experiment designed to test the hypothesis that direct grammar instruction has a positive impact on the test performance of learners of English as a foreign language. At first sight, the results appear to indicate that direct grammar instruction had a negligible effect overall on test performance. However, a more detailed examination of the results suggests that there was a marked positive effect in the case of some students. Furthermore, the test itself proved useful as a diagnostic tool and as a measure of student progress. Perhaps most significant is the fact that a comparison of the results of a pilot study and the experimental study itself raises issues about the significance, or otherwise, of research on teaching and learning second and foreign languages that is based on single experiments. Teachers of languages (international, community and indigenous) need to be sure that experimentally-based research is both robust and of direct relevance to the particular contexts in which they work. This is of real importance for many Pacific and Pacific-rim countries where the teaching and learning of English can have implications for economic success, and the teaching and learning of indigenous languages can have implications for the very survival of these languages.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Analysis of Errors in the Writing of First Year
           University Students of Maori
    • Abstract: Earnshaw, Lorene; Fleming, Stewart; Weatherall, Victoria; Knott, Alistair
      This paper presents a survey of the range of grammatical and lexical errors made in written Maori by University students taking an introductory course in Maori language. We begin by introducing, and discussing the motivation for, an error classification system which accommodates different classes of error. We then provide an analysis of errors in three different types of student writing: homework assignments, impromptu tests and examination transcripts. We conclude with some remarks about the patterns of error which we found.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Activating Wanau (extended family) Processes within a
           Community and School Literacy Partnership
    • Abstract: Glynn, Ted; Berryman, Mere; Grace, Hiro; Glynn, Vin
      The paper describes the positive outcomes of a home and school literacy partnership in one mainstream primary school where the principal and the large majority of students, teachers, and wh nau belong to one M ori hap (sub-tribe), Ng ti Whakaue. Participating students were identified by teachers as experiencing difficulties with reading and writing. They were assigned randomly to one of two conditions: (1) participating in their school's regular reading programme (school group) or (2) participating also in the home tutored reading and writing programme (home and school group). Students in the home and school group improved their reading and writing outcomes over and above the outcomes achieved by students participating only in the regular school programme. There were two key reasons for the success of this partnership. The first was parents and wh nau members successful implementation of both a M ori language reading tutoring programme, Tatari, Tautoko Tauawhi, and the two components of the writing programme, Tuhi Atu Tui Mai and Whakaputa Whakaaro. The second was the professional educational and cultural expertise of the home and school liaison worker, Hiro. Because of her language and cultural expertise and her mana (acknowledged authority and standing), Hiro was able to engage M ori parents and wh nau actively in the home and school project. The co-constructed narrative between Hiro and Mere (the second author) provided a salient context for understanding the power of culturally preferred pedagogy in establishing effective home and school partnerships.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Between Rhetoric and Reality: A Retrospective Look at
           National Development Policy and Planning in Solomon Islands in the 1980s
           and 90s
    • Abstract: Rohorua, Frederick Isom
      When Solomon Islands gained political independence from Great Britain in 1978, the majority of Solomon Islanders believed that this provided an opportunity to work towards the creation of a prosperous society. They also believed that central government and national leaders could, and should, take primary responsibility for social and economic development. At the same time, it was clear to the new government from the beginning that participation of indigenous Solomon Islanders in the private sector was critical for social and economic development. This paper examines the process of national development policy and planning in the 1980s and 90s in the Solomon Islands, showing how the initial optimism, fuelled by political rhetoric, became tempered over time as awareness of the realities of the Solomon Islands context increased and as this awareness began to be reflected in more realistic planning and planning forecasts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Roa, Tom
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Joe Gillayley: A Model of Cultural Hybridity in Keri
           Hulme's Novel The Bone People
    • Abstract: Cozma, Codrina
      Born and raised at the confluence of two cultures, Western and Maori, the New Zealand author Keri Hulme crafts in her 1983 novel, The Bone People, a vigorous literary discourse whose integrity and realism often topple consecrated stereotyping colonial theories. Joe Gillayley displays complex mechanisms of cultural hybridity in major areas of his private and social life. His initially ambivalent attitude towards both his Western and his Maori heritage are evident in his personal, social and economic life - in his interactions with his family, his semi-adopted son Simon/ Himi, his friend Kerewin, his work, school authorities, and tribal figures such as the mysterious prophet Tiaki Mira. Post-colonial scholarship provides the context in which the analysis provided here is conducted, an analysis that highlights the futility of colonial theories that are based on distorted, stereotypical images of both Western and indigenous life and values.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Prototype Theory and the Concept of Taonga:
           Implications for Treaty-related such as the Display and Conservation of
           'Taonga Maori'
    • Abstract: Hedley, Rangiiria
      This paper examines, in the context of prototype theory, issues and problems associated with the concept of taonga, the specific aim being to provide an approach that could assist those who are concerned with the interpretation of Article 2 of the Treaty of Waitangi and Treaty-related issues such as the appropriate display and conservation of 'taonga Maori'.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Traittore; Traduttore: Cultural Integrity and
           Translation Involving Maori and Other Indigenous Languages
    • Abstract: Roa, Tom
      Traittore; Traduttore is Italian for Traitor; Translator. I argue here that translation from or into an indigenous language such as M ori is always, whatever the content and function of the source text, a political act and that, therefore, a Code of Ethics grounded in indigenous perspectives is essential if the ever-present danger of cultural betrayal is to be avoided.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Maori Waiata: Discourse Structuring, Sub-genres and
           Aesthetics
    • Abstract: Roa, Raukura
      With particular reference to a discourse-based analysis of five waiata tangi from Ng ti Hau , it is argued here that different types of M ori waiata (songs and chants) may be characterised by different types of overall discourse structuring. It is also suggested that discourse structuring may be a significant aspect of the aesthetics of M ori waiata.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - An Analysis of the Rhetorical Organisation of Selected
           Authentic Maori Texts Belonging to the Text-types Argument and Information
           Report
    • Abstract: Houia-Roberts, Ngaere
      I report here on the findings of an analysis of the overall rhetorical structure of authentic M ori texts belonging to two different text-types - argument and information report - which were written by highly competent users of the language. I also suggest ways in which this type of analysis could underpin the development of teaching resources designed for M ori-medium educational settings.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Crombie, Winifred
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - The Reality of Culture in the Development of a National
           Special Education Training Initiative
    • Abstract: Macfarlane, Angus H; Medcalf, John; Rangi, Colin; Glynn, Ted
      The New Zealand Government is supporting a major new initiative in special education through the creation of a nationwide network of 750 Resource Teachers Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) whose role is to provide specialist mainstreamed services through direct support of teachers working with students who have moderate learning and behaviour difficulties. This paper introduces and discusses the national professional developmental programme for Resource Teachers of Learning and Behaviour (RTLB).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Genre and Authentic Written Discourse in Maori and
           their Relevance to the Education of Students in Upper Secondary and
           Tertiary Mâori-medium Educational Settings
    • Abstract: Houia-Roberts, Ngaere
      I report here on part of a research project whose primary aim was to investigate a range of authentic M ori texts in terms of the search for commonly occurring organisational and cognitive patterns, and to consider the pedagogic implications of this investigation in terms of the teaching of writing skills in M ori-medium educational settings. An examination of a range of text segments written by educated and highly proficient users of M ori suggests that, in terms of textual relationships, there are characteristic patterns of organisation that characterise the three genres that appear to be most commonly required of student writers in M ori-medium upper secondary and tertiary educational contexts, that is, the genres of arguing, explaining and describing. Another part of the project - an examination of whole texts in terms of overall, structuring - is reported in the next issue of this journal.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Putting the Draft Learning Progression Framework -
           Maori in the New Zealand Curriculum - to Work: An illustration
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane
      How language curricula are implemented in the classroom is of critical importance. Here, we take one achievement objective from the draft Learning Progression Framework for M ori in mainstream classes and demonstrate one way in which it can be realised as a core integrated skills lesson, that is, as a lesson that introduces new language (core lesson) through all four skills - reading, writing, listening and speaking (an integrated skills lesson). The lesson is preceded by a discussion of the type of planning that accompanies the implementation of language curricula.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Introducing the Draft Learning Progression Framework
           for Maori in the New Zealand Curriculum
    • Abstract: Crombie, Winifred; Whaanga, Hemi
      This paper introduces the draft Learning Progression Framework for Maori in mainstream schools which we prepared in the first half of 2003 for the New Zealand Ministry of Education. Readers are invited to contact the authors if they wish to make any suggestions in relation to the final content of the document.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Ka Mahuta, Ngati Haua and the Importance of Translation
           Theory
    • Abstract: Roa, Raukura
      In this paper, I provide an English translation of one M ori waiata - Ka Mahuta - a waiata of Ng ti Hau , along with a discussion of the relevance of translation theory and of culturally appropriate translation processes that fully involve those whose guidance, support, knowledge and understanding are of critical importance.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Te Puawaitanga o Te Puawananga: Editorial
    • Abstract: Yates-Smith, Aroha
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Sovereignty and Nation-building: The Development
           Challenge in Indian Country Today
    • Abstract: Crombie, Winifred
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - In Search of Unity: Learning from Headstones
    • Abstract: Mullan, Fintan
      This paper explores a small anomaly of Irish history. Despite the large-scale re-organisation of the state at the beginning of the 18th century in Ireland, and the divided society created by the civil authorities, the old parish cemetery escaped this segregation and continued to be used by all members of the community, irrespective of Christian denomination. This came to be regarded as a right which, if not actually protected by law, was at least protected by custom. For this reason, researchers and local communities have a rich resource from which they can learn about the past and draw lessons for the future. [1]

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Searching for Synergy: Maori/ indigenous and Scientific
           Conservatory Values - The Affinity Proposition
    • Abstract: Simon, Katerina Heremoana
      Reconciling similarity/ affinity and difference/ distinction is one of the most important development issues of our contemporary period. Yet much effort aimed at gaining support for the plight of Maori/ indigenous [3] peoples remains locked into the assertion of difference and distinction alone, those points of cultural affinity that could play an important role in processes of reconciliation and movement forward being largely ignored. What is proposed here is what is referred to as the 'affinity proposition', that is, it is argued that Maori/ indigenous development requires, for its further advancement, a focus not only on difference and divergence, but also on similarity and affinity. At the very heart of Maori/ indigenous development are issues relating to social justice, economic equity, freedom, ecological sustainability and cultural diversity, concepts which are equally highly valued in many sectors of mainstream (non-indigenous) society. Certainly, there are important differences in the ways in which these values are perceived and articulated in the context of different cultures, and these differences have recently been the focus of considerable attention and debate. However, there are also similarities which have received less attention in spite of the fact that they may hold the key to achieving a sufficient level of mutual understanding to underpin effective Maori/ indigenous development. This paper explores the development of a synergistic process of reconciliation between Maori/ indigenous values and scientific conservatory values. It reports on the preliminary findings of a research project whose focus is a cross-cultural study of environmental governance and management regimes under the New Zealand Resource Management Act 1991. The central questions addressed here are: Can reconciliation be achieved through recognition of both affinity and difference' Could such reconciliation underpin effective Maori/ indigenous development' It is argued here that a process of synergy is already under way, a process that can best be understood in terms of a theoretical framework that encompasses both the concept of modernity and the sustainable development paradigm.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Issues in Maori Language Planning and Revitalisation
    • Abstract: Harlow, Ray
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Teaching Languages to Young Learners: Asian Rim
           Experiences
    • Abstract: Johnson, Diane
      A number of Asian countries have recently developed initiatives relating to the teaching of English to young learners in schools. Many of the issues that these countries are currently facing are very similar to the theoretical and practical issues that are being faced in New Zealand where an increasing number of schools are introducing students to international languages at a younger age, and where young learners are being introduced to Maori in a range of different educational settings. Some of the issues, both theoretical and practical, that are common to young learner language initiatives in both New Zealand and in a number of Asian countries are explored here.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - 'Reclaiming the Ancient Feminine in Maori Society.'
           'Kei wareware i a tatou te Ukaipo!'
    • Abstract: Yates-Smith, Aroha
      With our constant interface with the threat of globalisation, it is timely that we reflect on the words of an ancient god who advised his brother, Tane, to return to their mother, Papatuanuku (Best, 1923, p. 111). His words, which translate loosely as 'lest we forget the Mother who nurtured us at her breast,' remind us of the importance of considering the feminine, respecting our Earth Mother, and not taking either for granted. This paper addresses several issues pertaining to the Maori feminine. The discussion of these will begin with a brief reflection on the importance of balance between the male and female in Maori cosmogony and the marginalisation of the feminine as a result of two hundred years of colonisation. The principal focus of the article as a whole will be the last two decades and the efforts made to address some of the negative effects brought about by colonisation, which could be described as forming the first waves in the tide of globalisation. The key for the ordering of Maori society lay within our cosmogonic beginnings. [2] Recent studies of Maori cosmology reveal that both male and female deities held prominent positions in the pantheon of gods (Yates-Smith, 1998). There was a strong presence of the feminine at the embryonic stage of Maori society. [3]

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Hirini Melbourne 1949-2003
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:39 GMT
       
 
 
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