for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 401 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 401 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement
  [11 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1440-6888
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [401 journals]
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Hall, Christopher
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Treating the narrative fixations of traumatic grief
    • Abstract: Williams, Joah L; Rheingold, Alyssa A; Rynearson, EK
      Traumatic grief after violent dying has a reactive, narrative basis. Closely attached survivors may be disabled by a narrative fixation - a repeated and intrusive retelling of the dying re-enactment - that supersedes the retelling of the living relationship with the deceased. In this study, 91 adult survivors of violent dying were treated with a narrative-based intervention (a manualised, short-term, group therapy designed to deconstruct and reconstruct the dying narrative) that measured the pre-/postfrequency of narrative variations (reunion, rescue, re-enactment, remorse and revenge). Pretreatment re-enactment and remorse variations occurred on a weekly basis 22 months after the dying and diminished significantly coincident with the intervention, as predicted. The dynamic objectives and techniques of the intervention (Restorative Retelling) are described and limitations of the study are presented.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Reconstructing meaning in mourning: Evolution of a
           research program
    • Abstract: Neimeyer, Robert A
      Grieving the death of a significant person entails an effort to reaffirm or reconstruct a world of meaning challenged by loss. Anchored in therapeutic encounters with the bereaved, a meaning reconstruction approach to loss has grown over the past decade to generate an increasingly substantial research base, as well as to develop and refine a wide array of contributions to psychological assessment and counselling. This brief article reviews the major models, measures and methods resulting from this collaborative work, in a way that reinforces its relevance for clinical practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - The price of love
    • Abstract: Parkes, Colin Murray
      Studies of bereavement show how the defining feature of the pang of grief is pining or missing a lost person. This develops out of, and reflects, the instinctive need to cry aloud and to search when separated from a parent. Patterns of secure and insecure attachments to parents form the blue print out of which later attachments develop. Insecure clinging in childhood was shown to predict separation anxiety and prolonged grief following bereavements in later life; insecure avoidance to be associated with delayed and inhibited grief; and disorganised grief associated with anxiety and depression. A different theoretical model was formulated to explain the reaction to the many changes in the assumptive world that accompany bereavement and other losses. These psychosocial transitions throw light on the basic assumptions that are overturned whenever unexpected major life-change events take place for which we are unprepared. Both models have important implications for services for terminally ill patients and bereaved families, which were introduced and evaluated at St Christopher's Hospice. These influenced similar widespread palliative care and bereavement services. They also proved useful in disaster areas, following genocidal killings in Rwanda and after terrorist attacks in New York and London. Recent work on responses to terrorism present possible approaches to breaking cycles of violence.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Volts of connection: Visual case studies revisited
    • Abstract: Bertman, Sandra L
      Suggesting a variety of techniques appropriate for monitoring and exercising our own therapeutic imaginations, in "Volts of Connection: The arts as shock therapy", the author argued for the use of evocative images other than solely the decorative, innocuous and "pretty" in clinical settings. Using a painting as a visual case study, this article documents the benefits of reflective writing as it acknowledges and reveals the arts' amazing abilities to pierce the isolating yet protective and appropriate silences with which grief shrouds us. It also helps connect us to others, in their grief and their silence, letting us share others' feelings without intruding on them.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Attachment, Empathy and compassion in the care of the
           bereaved
    • Abstract: Vachon, Mary LS
      Neuroscience research has extended our understanding of how early attachment experiences effect brain development and may become reactivated in times of challenge, such as illness and bereavement. Professional caregivers have their own early childhood attachment experiences, which may also become activated. Empathy and compassion are crucial in professional caregivers. Exciting neuroscience research has helped with understanding the difference between empathy and compassion in the brain. It has been suggested that what is called compassion fatigue is in fact empathic distress. This article questions whether the early and later attachment experiences of professional caregivers may leave them more open to empathic strain and empathic distress in the care of the bereaved and discusses interventions that are proving to be of help in developing compassionate practitioners.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - The active witness: Social work care of children and
           families at the time of child death
    • Abstract: Stewart, Helen; Clark, Robyn
      The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, is a large tertiary paediatric hospital and primary paediatric trauma centre. One of the more difficult realities of this setting is that not all children survive. End-of-life and immediate bereavement care of families at the time of the death of their child is an integral part of hospital social work. The work draws on a variety of theoretical frameworks and skills, and requires nuanced, responsive reading of family cues as well as carefully crafted systemic work. The clinician listens and bears witness in the immediate aftermath of the death, intervening on multiple levels to foster connections and to facilitate the honouring and leave-taking of the child in the singular way that each family desires. This article describes the knowledge that informs acute bereavement care, and the principles that guide social work clinicians in enacting this knowledge with respect for the particularity of each family.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Ethical decision maker or "champion" of the dying and
           bereaved': The contribution of the hospital social worker to
           end-of-life and bereavement care
    • Abstract: Bateman, Vivienne L
      This article explores end-of-life and bereavement care from the unique perspective of hospital social workers. It identifies key theoretical and ethical concepts that underpin social work and describes how these foundational concepts have influenced the core values, skills and knowledge base of the profession. Attention is given to the impact of patients' deaths on families, the ethical complexities relating to end-of-life decision-making, and the importance of best practice bereavement care within the hospital setting. The influence of the social worker on ethical decision making is explored, together with the constraints and challenges associated with hospitals' organisational hierarchies and interdisciplinary treating teams. Consideration is given to the affects this work may have on social workers including the stress related to conflict around ethical end-of-life decision-making. Emphasis is given to the need for hospitals to adopt a structural and systemic approach to staff support following the death of a patient, and strategies aimed at enhancing a supportive organisational culture are identified.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Thompson, Neil
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Understanding loss: A guide for caring for those
           facing adversity [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Taylor, Jacqueline
      Review(s) of: Understanding loss: A guide for caring for those facing adversity, by Judith Murray, 238pp., ISBN 9781138829466, Abingdon, Oxon Routledge, RRP $49.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Working with loss, death and bereavement: A guide for
           social workers [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Howes, Denise
      Review(s) of: Working with loss, death and bereavement: A guide for social workers, by Jeremy Weinstein, (2007), 200pp. ISBN 9781412923910, London Sage, RRP $84.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Australian grief and bereavement conference 2016
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Stories matter: A narrative practice approach to
           bereavement through suicide
    • Abstract: Sather, Marnie
      The bereaved by suicide are rapidly catapulted into not only making sense of the death of their loved one but also dealing with the multiple social prescriptions about what can and cannot be discussed. This presents those bereaved by suicide with special problems unique to the method of death. This paper discusses a narrative practice approach to therapy that has been specifically developed to counter the effects of marginalisation and stigma attached to certain forms of life experience. The founders of narrative therapy were both social workers, committed to challenging operations of power and privilege in mental health services and psychiatry. Four modes of narrative practice are reviewed - re-membering practices, multi-storied tellings, collective narrative practices and reclaiming histories - and how they assist people who are bereaved by suicide is described.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Working with the bereaved: Multiple lenses on loss and
           mourning [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bull, Michael
      Review(s) of: Working with the bereaved: Multiple lenses on loss and mourning, by Simon Shimshon Rubin, Ruth Ruth Malkinson and Eliezer Witztum (2012), 266pp., ISBN 9780415881661, New York Routledge, RRP $79.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Hall, Christopher
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Reciprocal impact of personal and professional
           experiences on bereavement practice
    • Abstract: Stebbins, Jon
      The thoughts, feelings and actions, including the inherent values that lie behind these, define our practice as bereavement counsellors. Beginning with our personal life experiences, our professional practices then grow out of an ongoing complex symbiotic interaction between our personal and professional experiences. In this paper I discuss the major life experiences that have shaped my own bereavement counselling practice. In this process I discovered that confidence in my practice came from a cohesive link between the way I handled significant personal events, and a strong conceptual base, which came from incorporating the work of significant others. Finally, I share some practice guidelines I have found assist me in my work with the bereaved.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - A reflection on the therapist's experience of loss
    • Abstract: Kosminsky, Phyllis S
      In this article I discuss the question of how my own early experience of loss influenced my professional choices, as well as the ongoing influence of that experience on my work as a grief therapist. Like many of my colleagues who work with the bereaved, my interest in death and dying can be traced back to an early, significant loss. My mother was ill for much of my childhood and she died when I was nine years old. Her death shattered my world and I spent many of the years that followed trying to avoid falling to pieces myself. The issue of self-disclosure is considered here, as is the reciprocal influence of my work on the ongoing reconstruction of my personal narrative.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Upcoming conferences
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - When the personal becomes professional: Response
           poetry in the processing of loss
    • Abstract: Neimeyer, Robert A
      Almost inevitably, grief counselling has an impact on the clinician as well as the client, invoking our empathic resonance to the client's often tragic losses and sometimes echoing our own. Likewise, the ongoing losses of our private lives can feed forward into our responses to those of our clients in ways that at best deepen our appreciation for their struggle, and at worst muddle our recognition of how it differs from ours. Left unprocessed, the cumulative weight of countless stories of bereavement can lead to our deadening as persons and professionals, and undermine our presence to those we serve. This brief article describes my use of response poetry to assist in the integration of my client's losses and my own, as illustrated in a selection of poems arising from both domains.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Interested in becoming a member of the Australian
           centre for grief and bereavement'
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Dances with grief in my own life
    • Abstract: Attig, Thomas
      Personal experiences that influenced my work include: life in a large extended family where death and loss became familiar; engagement with effective teachers; training in existential-phenomenology; resolve to be a wisdom-seeking, approachable philosopher; encouragement to teach applied philosophy; and reading countless student accounts of their most important loss experiences. In turn, my work has made me aware that knowing about loss and grief provides no immunity to brokenness and sorrow; enabled me to recognise and contend more effectively with challenges involved in relearning the world as I grieve; moved me to live in terms of what matters most to me; taught me to rein in expectations and live hopefully; and helped me become more the kind of loving partner, parent, sibling, friend and citizen I want to be.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - How did my early experiences of grief influence my
           grief counselling': And how did being a grief counsellor influence my
           later experiences of grief'
    • Abstract: Morawetz, David
      My personal experience in grieving the death of my 6-week-old son Michael was central to my becoming a grief counsellor and a teacher of grief counselling, and it taught me the value of Fulton's theory of the normal Grief Storm. Two decades later, my experience as a grief counsellor was central in helping me to grieve the death by suicide of my dear partner Jan.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Skinner, Michelle
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - What role does organ donation play in grief'
    • Abstract: Murphy, Diane
      Donor families come from all walks of life, and from many causes of death, yet share particular experiences surrounding the death of their loved one that identifies them as a unique group. Much of the existing literature on donor families has examined satisfaction with the "process" of donation. Attention to the effect the donation process has on grief has been lacking. This paper qualitatively explores donor families' shared experiences, along with the reported effect of donation on their grief journey in terms of meaning-making. Organ and tissue donation do not worsen grief but may assist in the meaning-making process related to the loss. "Words converge at the point that is most unbearable for us. It is not a matter of 'getting on with it' but finding a way to make loss a part of existence" (Leader, 2008).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Diagnosing and treating complex trauma [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Thurling, Wendy
      Review(s) of: Diagnosing and treating complex trauma, by Trudy Mooren and Martijn Stofsel (2015) 218pp. ISBN 9780415821148, London/New York Routledge, RRP $68.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Caring for donor families before, during and after
           (2nd ed.) [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hoare, Anita
      Review(s) of: Caring for donor families before, during and after (2nd ed.), by Raelynn Maloney and Alan D. Wolfelt (2010), 164pp. ISBN 9781617221361, Fort Collins, CO, Companion Press, RRP: $19.95 (USD).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - What matters and what doesn't: Organ, eye and tissue
           donor families, grief support and recipient communication
    • Abstract: Post, Michelle A
      Donor families have unique bereavement experiences due to the potential for secondary losses that occur following donation (Corr, Coolican, Moretti, and Simon, 2011). While Hogan (2015) reported the experience of saying "yes" to donation does not seem to negatively impact the bereavement experience, donor families and guidance documents from various national organisations in the United States (US) have reported that donor families need to have support from professionals trained in donor family bereavement, and donor families should have an opportunity to communicate with recipients. This article offers a review of US-based guidance documents, donor family needs, an analysis of agency staffing ratios and data regarding prevalence and frequency of communication between donor families and recipients, and anecdotal reactions to communication. Future research is discussed, such as the need to determine the psychological impact on donor families and recipients who do and do not receive communication from one another.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Improving family support throughout the organ and
           tissue donation process
    • Abstract: Mehakovic, Eva; Bell, Amanda
      The Australian Government has invested in a national reform programme to improve access to life-transforming transplants for Australians through a sustained increase in organ and tissue donation, by implementing a nationally coordinated approach to improving the donation process and systems. Important elements of this reform are: ensuring that families who are asked to consider donation are supported in their grief and empowered to make an informed and enduring donation decision, and providing a national donor family support service to provide bereavement care to donor families after donation. Research is undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of the national approach in Australia to support families before, during and after donation and to assess whether services are meeting the needs of families.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Children and young people with refugee backgrounds:
           Their experiences of change, loss and grief and the seasons for growth
           program
    • Abstract: Phillips, Melinda
      Refugees and those seeking asylum come to Australia from many countries around the world. The change, loss and grief experiences of children and young people with refugee backgrounds is explored through a consideration of their resilience and also the challenges they have faced during their life in their home country, exile and resettlement, and the normal day‑to‑day experiences of people living in Australia. The role of school in the lives of children and young people with refugee experience is discussed, and the use of a small‑group grief and loss education program, Seasons for Growth, to support these children and young people in strengthening their social and emotional wellbeing, is described.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Refugees, grief and loss: Critical debates
    • Abstract: Lane, Pauline; Tribe, Rachel
      This paper discusses the major issues facing refugees and asylum seekers who flee across international borders. It will review briefly the flight, asylum and settlement processes refugees face before considering the potential effects of these on mental health and wellbeing. The ways that any resulting distress is frequently categorised in Western countries using the dominant biomedical lens of PTSD is considered and some of the major debates reviewed, including the lack of research specifically on loss and grief among refugees. The authors suggest that the grief and loss that many refugees experience might helpfully be understood with due consideration of the culture and explanatory frameworks used by both clinicians and refugees. Some refugees experience ambiguous loss, when individuals are missing or displaced in their country of origin and, consequently, the normal grieving process may be compromised. The need to account for the meaning‑making experience of each individual refugee within their cultural, sociopolitical and familial context is emphasised, as is the importance of recognising and working with the immense resilience that many refugees display as they start to build new lives.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Refugees and asylum seekers in Australia and stories
           of loss and hope
    • Abstract: Olliff, Louise
      In 2013, 51.2 million persons were forcibly displaced as a result of persecution, conflict, generalised violence and human rights violations, the highest level seen since the end of World War II. While it is often claimed that Australia is the most generous country towards refugees and asylum seekers, in the context of global forced displacement trends and refugee protection needs, it is apparent that Australia plays a relatively minor role in international refugee protection. By looking only at numbers, we lose sight of what it means to seek protection, and of the everyday experiences of individuals and families whose journeys are often long and difficult, sometimes spanning years and continents. This article introduces some of the recurrent themes of loss that people who have been resettled or sought protection in Australia continue to speak about during the Refugee Council of Australia's annual community consultations. It argues that, while we should not lose sight of what refugees express as their losses, we should also listen to what they have gained and what they hope for.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Hall, Christopher
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - The impact of forced internal migration on Australian
           aboriginal people
    • Abstract: McKendrick, Jane; Thorpe, Marjorie
      Australian Aboriginal people rarely migrate overseas. However, since colonisation they have been forced to migrate within Australia, away from their traditional homelands, living in alien cultural settings under considerable, long‑term stress. In this respect they are in a similar position to asylum seekers or refugees who are detained on entering Australia, experiencing high rates of depression, anxiety and unresolved posttraumatic stress. Aboriginal people themselves point to the healing effects of the land, their traditional country. The interaction of Aboriginal people with country is similar to the interaction they have with people. Studies over several decades have shown that a return to traditional country and caring for country has a positive impact on wellbeing and that the wellbeing of Aboriginal people is tied to the wellbeing of the country. Healing programs based around traditional country, culture and spirituality have been shown to have a beneficial effect on the wellbeing of Aboriginal people.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Holding the threads of grief and trauma: The
           complexity of working with asylum seekers and refugees in the cancer
           setting
    • Abstract: Lethborg, Carrie; Kessel, Pauley
      The threads of grief and trauma run through many life stories. A core aspect of social work training in this area involves the skill of simultaneously holding these threads, unique to each client's narrative, along with their wider psychosocial context, the organisational context and pertinent broader sociopolitical issues. The clinician "gathers" each thread as they work with the individual to navigate through their grief and the life changes they encounter. The complexity of this process is amplified when working with asylum seekers/refugees (AS/Rs) with cancer. Two cases are presented to illustrate the intricacy of working with this population. In particular, the process of holding the threads of grief and trauma while working with an array of issues present for AS/Rs with cancer will be shown.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Complicated grief: Scientific foundations for health
           care professionals [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Groom, Jane
      Review(s) of: Complicated grief: Scientific foundations for health care professionals, by Margaret S. Stroebe, Henk Schut and Jan van den Bout (Eds.), (2013), 311pp. ISBN 9780415625050, East Sussex, UK, Taylor and Francis, RRP $72.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Treating traumatised children: Don't let sleeping dogs
           lie! [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Roberts, Michelle
      Review(s) of: Treating traumatised children: Don't let sleeping dogs lie!, by Arianne Struik (2014), 204pp. ISBN 9780415717229, East Sussex, UK, Taylor and Francis, RRP $82.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Treating complex trauma: A relational blueprint for
           collaboration and change [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Nugent, Bernadette
      Review(s) of: Treating complex trauma: A relational blueprint for collaboration and change, by Mary Jo Barrett and Linda Stone, Fish (2014), 161pp. ISBN 9780415510219, London, Taylor and Francis, RRP $71.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Become a certified bereavement practitioner
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 3 - Calling for submissions
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Understanding and managing grief after perinatal loss
    • Abstract: Brabin, Penny
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Perinatal loss: Application of loss and grief theories
    • Abstract: Wilson, Trish
      Historically, the death of a baby at or around the time of birth was not acknowledged and the loss was disenfranchised; however, it is now recognised that this is one of the most significant life events a parent will face. Over many years, loss and grief theory has contributed to our understandings of grief and bereavement and has helped to shape therapeutic interventions. This paper presents a brief review of some of the major loss and grief theories that have influenced practice in caring for bereaved parents. Each theory is considered in terms of its application to maternity care practices and ongoing bereavement care for couples experiencing perinatal loss.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - The impact of pregnancy loss on women's adult
           relationships
    • Abstract: Collins, Catherine; Riggs, Damien W; Due, Clemence
      Previous research has identified that women feel isolated and in need of emotional support following pregnancy loss. However, little previous research has focused on how pregnancy loss affects a woman's relationships with her partner, family and friends. Fifteen South Australian women (31 to 71 years old) were interviewed about their experience of pregnancy loss. Thematic analysis identified that the women's family and friends were not always an available support following pregnancy loss, either due to the presentation of their own grief, or a lack of understanding of what the women were experiencing.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Parental identity in narratives of grief following
           perinatal death
    • Abstract: Jones, Kerry
      This article considers some of the challenges bereaved parents face in claiming parental identity following perinatal death. By listening to narrative accounts of loss, the passage to parenthood for bereaved men and women represents a disruption and re‑evaluation of their identity as they negotiate the incomprehensibility of their loss. Women in particular suffer these losses as a threat to their sense of self and are plagued by guilt, blame and self‑doubt. Narratives by bereaved parents reveal how their sense of self and identity is mediated by the social and cultural milieu to which they belong and are largely disenfranchising experiences when friends and family fail to acknowledge the enormity of the loss. In trying to find meaning, the collection of artefacts (for example, locks of hair or handprints) and memorialisation are one way parents attempt to renegotiate identity as a parent of a deceased child, albeit privately and silently.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - The sound of silence: Journeys through miscarriage
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Kirsopp, Sharon
      Review(s) of: The sound of silence: Journeys through miscarriage, by Irma Gold (Ed.). (2011), 165pp. ISBN: 9781921632112, Capalaba, QLD: Mostly for Mothers AUD $24.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Supporting parents following perinatal death
    • Abstract: den Hartog, Petra N
      SIDS and Kids NSW and Victoria is a self‑help organisation supporting families whose baby or young child died suddenly and unexpectedly. Today, the majority of families supported have experienced a perinatal loss, particularly stillbirth, neonatal death or medical termination. Counsellors and trained bereaved parents work together in supporting families. This paper will describe the typical responses of parents after the death of their baby and how perinatal death has unique consequences. It brings in feedback from parents as to how this affected their key relationships, how they helped themselves to strengthen these, and what support enabled them to begin to heal and work through their grief. Support is provided via counselling (couple and individual), "Parent Supporters", self‑help resources, support groups, internet forum, and our weekend workshop "PEP" (Personal Enrichment Program).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Dynamics and dimensions: Ambiguous loss and
           disenfranchised grief of partners following a miscarriage, stillbirth or
           TOPFA
    • Abstract: Chaffey, Eswen; Whyte, John Douglass
      The significance of a pregnancy on the woman is hard to overstate, inextricably impacting and interweaving all aspects of the woman's life. This significance is exponentially compounded depending on how the pregnancy ends. While there is a substantial body of research exploring the senses of loss experienced by women after a miscarriage, stillbirth or termination of pregnancy for foetal abnormality (TOPFA), the experience of their partners has not been examined in as great a detail. Although the partner does not directly experience the pregnancy, they may have their own expectations or anticipations to loss, exposing them to the phenomena of disenfranchised grief and ambiguous loss. This raises many questions about the origins, dynamics and impacts of these types of grief on this population. What are the social, psychological, cultural or existential dimensions that might form or shape their expectations' Does this change the experience' What attributions exist' Is it God's will' Is it punishment' Is it controllable and, if so, who influenced the outcome' What are the dynamics through which grief might be denied, minimised, acknowledged or transcended following this type of loss' And what do various theorists posit as key factors to be addressed' In this article, the authors interconnect two conceptual frameworks to provide a complex context of social reality that facilitates the pursuit of much‑needed research into this phenomenon. In doing so, they also interweave understandings of personal and social dynamics to guide and negotiate explorations of this domain.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Couple communication after a baby dies: Differing
           perspectives Sherokee Ilse and Tim Nelson (2008) [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Randall, Peter
      Review(s) of: Couple communication after a baby dies: Differing perspectives Sherokee Ilse and Tim Nelson (2008), 104pp. ISBN 9781883525033, Maple Plain, MS: Wintergreen Press, USD $12.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Empty arms: Coping with miscarriage, stillbirth, and
           infant death: Surviving the first hours and beyond [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Winter, Julie
      Review(s) of: Empty arms: Coping with miscarriage, stillbirth, and infant death: Surviving the first hours and beyond, by Sherokee Ilse (2013), 98pp. ISBN 9780960945665, Maple Plain, MS: Wintergreen Press USD $12.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - When relationships hurt, too: The impact of grief on
           parents' relationships after the sudden death of their Child [Book Review]
           
    • Abstract: Butera, Janice
      Review(s) of: When relationships hurt, too: The impact of grief on parents' relationships after the sudden death of their Child, by Petra Nicolette den Hartog, in collaboration with bereaved parents (2014) 68pp. ISBN 9780992440602, Malvern, Victoria: SIDS and Kids NSW and Victoria AUD $8.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - Abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - Good grief, insight [television series episode]
    • Abstract: Dawson, Elizabeth
      Review(s) of: Good grief, insight [television series episode], by Jenny Brockie (Host), Jane Worthington (Producer), Hannah Meagher and Sarah Allely (Associate producers) (17 April 2012), 54 mins.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - The DSM exclusion criterion explained, processed, and
           problem solved [webinar] [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lopez, Miguel
      Review(s) of: The DSM exclusion criterion explained, processed, and problem solved [webinar], by David E. Balk and Jane V. Bissler (31 March 2011) 81 mins.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - Managing depression growing older: A guide for
           professionals and carers [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Dullege, Dorothy
      Review(s) of: Managing depression growing older: A guide for professionals and carers, by Kerrie Eyers, Gordon Parker and Henry Brodaty (2012) 292pp. ISBN 978-1-74237-880-0, Crows Nest, NSW: Black Dog Institute, Allen and Unwin AUD $27.99 (inc. GST).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - Bereavement and depression: Practice Issues for the
           bereavement clinician
    • Abstract: Hall, Christopher
      Rather than exploring the politics or vigorous debates that have taken place around the recent changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders regarding grief and the removal of the bereavement exclusion criterion, this paper addresses some of the practical issues for practitioners concerning bereavement and depression. How do we discriminate between grief and depression and support the grieving client, and how do we define and conceptualise the diagnostic boundary between these phenomena'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - Grief, complicated grief, depression - and the DSM-5
    • Abstract: Eyers, Kerrie
      The grief of recent bereavement is recognised, but what happens when preoccupation with the loss of a loved one impacts on the individual's capacity to re-engage with his or her life' When is a person's grief judged to be 'pathological'' And what are the consequences of such a judgement' To date, no grief staging theory has been able to map bereavement's typical course and pattern. In the latest, fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), 'complicated grief' (now termed Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder [PCBD]) is recognised as a condition meriting further study, but removal of the 'bereavement exclusion' from the criteria for diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has attracted much criticism because of risks to overdiagnosis and the implications for devaluing and medicalising grief, a normal human emotion.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - The implications for mental health professionals when
           confronted with the perplexity of complicated grief
    • Abstract: Robert-Hendren, Dominique; Lennings, CJ; Woods, Damith
      Grief is an inevitable life experience that will impact almost everyone at some stage and it is likely to occur on multiple occasions throughout one's life. There is evidence that grief can adversely impact both psychological wellbeing and physical health, especially when the grieving process is distorted. Moreover, research suggests that some clinicians are perplexed when confronted by clients who present with symptoms in the context of grief and with symptoms of depression. Indeed, there are indications that the misunderstandings experienced by some mental health professionals when working with this client group may be better accounted for by insufficient training in the area of grief. This review describes how recent changes in the newly released fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) may clarify some of the confusion and invariably change the way that some clinicians will begin to approach working with clients who present with grief. It is aimed that this review may further provide a stimulus for future discussion and progress.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Glassock, Geoffrey
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Bereavement support groups: Breathing life into
           stories from the dead [Book Review]
    • Abstract: de Willoughby, Michal
      Review(s) of: Bereavement support groups: Breathing life into stories from the dead, by Lorraine Hedtke, (2012), 147pp. IBSN, 978-0-9848656-1-1, Chagrin Falls, OH, Taos Institute Publications USD $19.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Joining forces: Leading support groups for bereaved
           individuals [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Butera, Janice
      Review(s) of: Joining forces: Leading support groups for bereaved individuals, by Dianne McKissock and Mal McKissock, (2008) 58pp. ISBN 978-0-9804617-1-8 Wyong, NSW, The Bereavement C.A.R.E Centre AUD $33.50 (inc. GST).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Setting up and facilitating bereavement support
           groups: A practical guide [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Dean, Mark Russell
      Review(s) of: Setting up and facilitating bereavement support groups: A practical guide, by Dodie Graves, (2012), 175pp. ISBN 978-1-84905-271-9, London, UK, Jessica Kingsley Publishers AUD $34.95 (inc. GST).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Hospice staff support groups: Thinking inside and
           outside the box
    • Abstract: D'Antonio, Jocelyn
      Mitigation of stress and prevention of burnout in staff has been a priority of the modern hospice movement. The literature has identified the source of stress in hospice workers to be mostly work-related issues, rather than caring for the dying. Staff support groups have traditionally been one method of providing support to hospice workers; however, support groups are not effective for everyone. Therefore, best practices in running support groups and new approaches to staff support both need to be considered, and hospices must continually develop and evaluate new and effective support programs. This article will examine the literature with respect to staff support for hospice workers and discuss some approaches to providing this support.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Ongoing support for the supporters: An outreach
           program for bereavement group leaders
    • Abstract: McNess, Andrew; Stebbins, Jon; Stebbins, Sue
      A central element of the charter of The Compassionate Friends - an international bereavement support organisation - is that all leaders of their bereavement support programs must themselves be bereaved. The underlying belief is that peer-support (the sharing of similar experiences) can provide a powerful extra dimension of support. One consequence of this leadership stipulation is ensuring that the bereaved leaders, who must balance the potential intrusion of their vulnerability against their potential for greater empathic connection with other bereaved people, receive strong ongoing support. This paper outlines the total context, then discusses the measures put in place by The Compassionate Friends Victoria to provide ongoing outreach support for the leaders of their openended support groups.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - An evaluation of the 'living after loss' intervention
           - part 2: Do bereavement-related outcomes vary by the dynamics of support
           groups'
    • Abstract: Utz, Rebecca L; Caserta, Michael; Lund, Dale
      Group-based interventions for recently bereaved spouses may provide support and friendship through the commonality of experiences that are shared among the members of the group. This study compares the experiences and characteristics of persons in 35 different support groups from the Living After Loss (LAL) study, with particular emphasis on the question: 'Does the chemistry of the group affect the longer-term adjustment outcomes associated with bereavement'' Results suggest that, perhaps, those groups that foster the greatest sense of mutual support and have the most effective group leaders may be associated with more favourable bereavement-related outcomes, especially stress-related growth. Challenges associated with evaluating the effectiveness of group-based interventions are also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - An evaluation of the living after loss intervention -
           part 1: Do bereavement-related outcomes vary by the content of support
           groups'
    • Abstract: Utz, Rebecca L; Lund, Dale; Caserta, Michael
      This article explores whether the substantive content and specific topics addressed during a 14-week support group can alter the bereavement-related outcomes of widowed older adults over time. It draws on data from the Living After Loss study, which developed a novel support group based on the Dual Process Model of bereavement and provides empirical evidence tracking the longitudinal outcomes of older bereaved spouses. Findings suggest that unless the content is universally relevant, the messaging and topics addressed during the support group do not alter the bereavement-related outcomes of widowed persons over time.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Hall, Christopher
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Case study
    • PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 17:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Hall, Christopher
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 17:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Programs and services
    • PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 17:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Abstracts
    • PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 17:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - The perspective of the bereavement practitioner
    • Abstract: Mowll, Jane
      This paper draws on a simulated case example to consider the experience of traumatic bereavement from the perspective of the bereavement practitioner. In the case study, Julia witnesses the deaths of her parents and a family friend when their boat catches fire and explodes. The importance of compassionate support, such as is provided by social workers, is described in the context of the forensic and coronial investigation of sudden and unexpected deaths. This includes providing choice to view the body and access evidentiary reports, as well as ongoing support provided in a flexible way that is attuned to the varying needs of those who are bereaved. Facets of loss and grief in violent bereavement are explored alongside resilience and adaptation in the face of devastating loss.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 17:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - Enabling public health and safety through the
           coroners' death investigation system: The principles and practice of the
           coroners prevention unit
    • Abstract: Bugeja, Lyndal; Dwyer, Jeremy
      The Coroners Prevention Unit (CPU) assists Victorian coroners to meet their prevention mandate as established in the 'Coroners Act 2008' (Vic.). This paper describes the principles and processes that inform the CPU's work in identifying and exploring opportunities to reduce preventable deaths, and how these translate into the drafting of recommendations for coroners to consider.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 17:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - The role of forensic pathology on bereavement support
           and on promoting public health through a modern medical death
           investigation system
    • Abstract: Ranson, David
      The Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine was established by the Coroners Act 1985 (Vic.), now the 'Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine Act 1985' (Vic.), to provide the State of Victoria with the forensic medical and scientific services needed by the justice system, including the State Coroner's jurisdiction. In addition to the death investigation service, the Institute provides a range of medical examination and support services to victims of physical and sexual assault. In addition to their forensic medical roles, the medical and nursing staff also provide medical information and support to families in a therapeutic setting, as well as direct medical referral to clinicians. This medical referral service takes place where a medical death investigation procedure uncovers genetic or familial disease that may place other family members at risk of future illness. In addition to the personal family health aspects of a death investigation, a death also provides the opportunity for families to donate organs and tissues from the deceased for transplantation to others to improve their health and well-being. This paper describes the principles and processes that occur in a death investigation at the Institute, and the therapeutic services that are designed to relieve the burden of disease on the community.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 17:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 2 - The coronial investigation process for unexpected and
           unnatural deaths
    • Abstract: Hinchey, Judge Sara; Bugeja, Lyndal; Burns, Jodie
      The office of the coroner was established in England in 1194, and was adopted in Australia at the time of settlement. The role of coroners was refined significantly during this period, and today the role of Australian coroners has centred on the investigation of unnatural and unexpected deaths. These investigations culminate in a written finding or determination that must state identity, cause of death and, for some cases, the circumstances of the death. This paper describes the typical key processes that comprise the coroner's investigation into an external cause death.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 17:32:07 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.90.92.204
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016