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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 398 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 398 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)

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Current Issues in Criminal Justice
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1034-5329
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [398 journals]
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Autonomy and responsibility in sexual assault law in
           NSW: The 'lazarus' cases
    • Abstract: Mason, Gail; Monaghan, James
      In 2007, significant reforms were made to the law of sexual assault in New South Wales, Australia. These reforms introduced communicative ideals into the physical and mental element of the offence of sexual assault. Ten years later, the first appellate decisions directly on these aspects of the reforms were handed down. These decisions are part of a suite of four cases emerging from the prosecution of a young man, Luke Lazarus, for the sexual assault of an 18-year-old woman in Sydney. This article analyses the judgments in these cases. It aims to provide insights into judicial thinking on key communicative aspects of sexual assault law in New South Wales, particularly the twin concepts of autonomy and responsibility that are embedded in the communicative model of consent. It argues that while there are encouraging signs of progress in judicial interpretation of women's sexual autonomy, there is reason to be concerned that law reform in this area may have had little impact when it comes to placing an expectation upon men to take responsibility for sexual communication.

      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Trends and offending circumstances in the police use
           of drug detection dogs in New South Wales 2008-2018
    • Abstract: Agnew-Pauley, Winifred Ella; Hughes, Caitlin Elizabeth
      New South Wales (NSW) was the first Australian state to introduce drug detection dogs as a street-level policing strategy. In 2006, the NSW Ombudsman released damning evidence that challenged the dogs' effectiveness. Over a decade later, drug detection dogs remain a core policing policy in NSW, and the powers surrounding their use have expanded. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of drug dog deployment since the NSW Ombudsman Review. Specifically, it analyses unit-record data on all recorded criminal incidents and persons of interest (POIs) involving drug detection dogs that led to a formal police response in NSW from June 2008 to June 2018. The analysis shows that the main target group has remained young males detected for use/possession offences, albeit that the dogs have detected a small but potentially significant population of drug suppliers, and that the circumstances for their detection differ markedly to that for consumers. The results further show that there has been a small reduction in the number of overall detections recorded by police. However, this trend has not been driven by a decrease in use/possession offences detected, and thus large numbers of use/possession offenders, as opposed to drug suppliers, continue to be policed via this policy each year. This paper discusses the implications of these findings for policy and practice.

      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Lee, Murray
      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Enhancing early detection of cognitive impairment in
           the criminal justice system: Feasibility of a proposed method
    • Abstract: Jeanneret, Ruthie; Spiranovic, Caroline; Eckstein, Lisa; McWhirter, Rebekah; Arstein-Kerslake, Anna; Scanlan, Joel; Kirkby, Kenneth; Watters, Paul; Vickers, James
      Persons with cognitive impairment(s) are over-represented in the criminal justice system (CJS), yet many instances of cognitive impairment go undiagnosed. As this article outlines, it would be both desirable and feasible to use automated alerts to flag accused persons who may require assistance in interacting with the CJS either due to a confirmed or likely diagnosis of a cognitive impairment or other relevant condition. A proposed method to develop this alert system is outlined, combining natural language processing (NLP) applied to electronic health records (EHRs) with data linkage (DL) of health and CJS data. Although there are technical barriers, this article focuses on the ethical and legal barriers of this proposed approach. It is concluded that the overall benefits of the proposed alert system would likely outweigh potential adverse outcomes. It is argued that a waiver of consent would be appropriate and that legal barriers, in terms of privacy legislation at both Federal and State levels, which apply varying requirements for the disclosure of personal information, may be overcome in part through de-identification strategies. The examples provided in this paper of criminological data linkage projects support the feasibility of the method proposed.

      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Violence in the mosh pit: Assault within the
           Australian punk scene
    • Abstract: Barnes, Ash; White, Rob
      The mosh pit is a unique crowd formation where audience members dance aggressively to engage with the music, the performers and each other. However, in this space, Australian punks may experience violations of bodily integrity. Multiple levels and types of transgression occur, as members break with mosh pit ethics by engaging in unwanted and unlawful sexual and physical violence. This case study provides an example of how group normative behaviour is confounded in liminal spaces - how transgression within such spaces undermines the supposed freedom experienced by its participants. Whilst the mosh pit is perceived to be a site governed by its own particular ethics, some defy these in word and practice. The rules of engagement are ambiguous, and offenders are able to rationalise their harms through neutralisation techniques and the diffusion of blame and responsibility. The consequence is that more often than not, offenders can use the unique physical nature of the mosh pit to execute personal vendettas and engage in intentional violence such as 'crowd killing' and sexual assault, with little social and legal consequence. Moreover, a certain culture of denial permeates participant responses to these issues. Throughout it all, the violence occurring has a decidedly masculine basis, reflecting overarching gender differences in interpersonal violence generally.

      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - From pursuit to progress: Critical reflections on
           concepts of young people and crime in Australia
    • Abstract: Gillfeather-Spetere, Sophie
      In September 2018, the bodies of two Aboriginal boys were pulled from the Swan River in Perth, Australia. Trisjack Simpson, 17, and Chris Drage, 16, had run to the river as police pursued them on foot. They had been seen jumping fences. Their story is emblematic of how youth and crime are constructed in relation to each other; in particular, how certain young bodies come to be known as criminal - or, as more criminal than others. In this 'Contemporary Comment', the story of the boys provides a focus for critically interrogating the ways we conceive juvenile crime in Australia. It argues that mainstream discourses of young people and crime are often based on, and further entrench, a colonial ideology; and that radical reform of practices is both possible and needed.

      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Parole populism: The politicisation of parole in
           Victoria
    • Abstract: Moffa, Monique; Stratton, Greg; Ruyters, Michele
      Since the death of Jill Meagher in September 2012, political rhetoric has highlighted perceived issues with parole in Victoria, establishing it as an increasingly contentious issue in political debate within the state. The clamour to politicise parole in Victoria has been indicative of a broader trend in Australia, where a sweep of policy recommendations and recent reforms have seen a politicising of parole, such as the introduction of 'no body, no parole' laws. We contend a model of 'parole populism' has emerged in Australia that strips prisoners and parolees of significant rights, hampers rehabilitation efforts and fails to deliver on the promises made to the electorate. To highlight this, we explored the politicised framing of parole in parliamentary debates by employing a political discourse analysis of parliamentary debates in Victoria from 2012 to 2017. We argue the parole has become a focus of political debate in the name of prioritising victims, community safety and appearing tough on crime, which has resulted in divergence from the original purpose of parole.

      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Aboriginal sovereignty, 'crime' and criminology
    • Abstract: Porter, Amanda
      This is a review essay of Chris Cunneen and Juan Tauri's 'Indigenous Criminology', the publication of which coincides with a series of scandals and mounting inquiries into Indigenous justice issues around the globe. The publication of this important and timely work warrants reflection on the place of Indigenous issues within Australian criminology and their importance for the development of global criminologies. In the face of rising Indigenous incarceration rates, criminologists must ask some unsettling questions: has criminology as a discipline failed Indigenous Peoples' And, if so, how can we do things differently' To what degree has criminology been complicit in the rising rates of Indigenous incarceration internationally' And what, if anything, does criminology have to offer the crises in criminal justice which have been the experience of Indigenous Peoples around the globe'

      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Our first nations people in custody: a national
           disgrace the Paul Byrne memorial lecture 24 October 2018
    • Abstract: Boulten, Phillip
      PubDate: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 20:08:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Young people transitioning from Juvenile justice to
           the community: Transition planning and interagency collaboration
    • Abstract: Strnadova, Iva; Cumming, Therese M; O'Neill, Sue C
      This study investigated the collaborative transition process for youth incarcerated for three or more months in New South Wales ('NSW') juvenile justice facilities. Qualitative methodology was employed to analyse interviews conducted with staff from both the education and juvenile justice systems in NSW to determine how the agencies involved with the transition planning for incarcerated youth collaborate. The study also aimed to determine the roles and understanding of staff in each sector with reference to the transition process. The results of the study were examined under the framework of Kohler's Taxonomy for Transition Programming and revealed that although many best practices were occurring in the area, improvements to the coordination of interagency collaboration would improve the likelihood that incarcerated youth would successfully transition back into the community.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Migration review tribunal decisions in student visa
           cancellation appeals: Sympathy, hardship and exceptional circumstances
    • Abstract: Segrave, Marie; Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Keel, Chloe
      This article examines the decisions of the Migration Review Tribunal (now the Administrative Appeals Tribunal) in relation to appeals of student visa cancellations. It draws on a 2010-11 study of appealed cases, and discusses both quantitatively and qualitatively the appeals and the decisions. The study builds on literature surrounding the regulation of migration and non-citizens within national borders by analysing the regulation of international students who occupy a hybrid space or status: as desired economic migrants and as non-citizens subject to strict migration enforcement if they breach visa conditions. The findings point to inconsistencies in decision-making, concerns regarding the internal processes of some education institutions and a broader concern with regard to how, or if, students are supported to appeal visa cancellations.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Tendency and coincidence model provisions: An analysis
           of the proposals by the royal commission into institutional responses to
           child sexual abuse
    • Abstract: Hartridge, Sam
      The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse was constituted in 2013 to investigate historical and contemporary child sexual abuse committed in various institutional settings. As part of its work, the Royal Commission investigated the criminal justice system's response to offending of this kind. This investigation has included proposing amendments to the rules regulating the admission of tendency and coincidence evidence. The comment will examine the proposed changes to those rules, and the empirical basis for them. It argues that while there is certainly grounds for reconsidering the tendency and coincidence rules, the reforms proposed by the Royal Commission drastically and improperly lower the threshold for admissibility, and do not have a solid evidential basis.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Making the modern criminal law: Criminalization and
           civil order [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Crofts, Penny
      Review(s) of: Making the modern criminal law: Criminalization and civil order, by Lindsay Farmer, Oxford University Press, 2016, 340pp (ISBN 9780199568642).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - The teaching of criminal law: The pedagogical
           imperatives [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bartie, Susan
      Review(s) of: The teaching of criminal law: The pedagogical imperatives, by Kris Gledhill and Ben Livings (eds.), Routledge, 2017, 212 pp (ISBN 978113841994, 9781315731902 (ebook)).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Youth justice, restorative justice and gendered
           violence - oh my! The rise and rise of offender 'accountability' in
           contemporary penality
    • Abstract: Richards, Kelly
      The notion of offender 'accountability' has emerged as a key concept in contemporary penality in recent years, perhaps especially in the areas of youth justice, restorative justice, and gendered violence. However, the criminological literature offers few definitions of and little critical scholarly engagement with the meanings, aims and parameters of offender 'accountability'. This comment begins to address this gap by drawing attention to this widely used but taken-for-granted concept and starting a critical conversation about offender 'accountability'. After documenting its widespread acceptance, this comment charts some of the various meanings of the term implicit in the criminological canon. It also posits a series of questions that criminal justice scholars and professionals might consider in relation to the theoretical and practical application of offender 'accountability'. It concludes with a brief consideration of future research questions.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 1 - Leave to appeal in criminal cases: The Victorian model
    • Abstract: Corns, Chris
      The right to appeal a conviction and/or sentence in criminal proceedings is fundamental to the administration of criminal justice in accordance with the rule of law. The right to have a conviction or sentence 'reviewed' is recognised under international law and, in some Australian jurisdictions, as a specific statutory human right. At the same time, many statutes in Australia provide that an applicant must first obtain leave (or special leave) to appeal a conviction or sentence (and other judgments) before the appeal proper can be determined. There thus exists a tension between the 'right' to appeal and the requirement to first obtain 'leave' to appeal. This article considers the way in which the law in Victoria, and other jurisdictions, regulates the grant of leave in criminal cases. It also addresses the broader question of whether the requirement of leave can be reconciled with what appears to be an absolute right to have a conviction and sentence 'reviewed' under international law, and under the Charters of human rights in the Australian Capital Territory and Victoria.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Homicide, gender, and responsibility: An international
           perspective [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hamilton, Gemma
      Review(s) of: Homicide, gender, and responsibility: An international perspective, edited by Kate Fitz-Gibbon and Sandra Walklate, Routledge Studies in Crime and Society, 2016, 180pp, (ISBN 9781138843479).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Restorative justice conferencing as a 'holistic'
           process: Convenor perspectives
    • Abstract: Suzuki, Masahiro; Wood, William R
      Restorative justice conferencing ('RJC') has demonstrated strengths over traditional criminal justice approaches, including victim satisfaction and redress, and offender perceptions of legitimacy and fairness. However, less is known about how and why. This research examines conference convenor perspectives concerning how and why RJC 'works' in terms of such outcomes. The convenor perspective is a poorly investigated area in RJC research, despite the pivotal role that convenors play as 'key' participants in RJC practice. Based on semi-structured interviews with convenors involved in the Youth Justice Group Conferencing program in Victoria, findings highlight that not only face-to-face dialogue, but also preparation and follow-up, play distinct and important roles in the outcomes of RJC. As preparation and follow-up phases are often dismissed or compromised in practice, this article suggests that RJC should be clearly articulated and implemented as a 'holistic' process that requires equal attention to all three phases.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - The prisoners review board of Western Australia: What
           do the public know about parole'
    • Abstract: Gately, Natalie; Ferguson, Catherine; Ellis, Suzanne; Cock, Robert
      Previous international research has indicated that the public hold incorrect perceptions of the criminal justice system and have little understanding of how it operates. This can result in a lack of confidence in the system, often stemming from a lack of knowledge and media presentation of crime stories. The present study utilised qualitative methodology to gain an in-depth understanding of the public knowledge about parole. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 38 West Australians aged between 18-63 years. Cultivation theory was used to conceptualise how particular media events at the time permeated participants' explanations of parole. This research contributes to understanding the public perception of the parole system in Western Australia and provides recommendations to enhance public knowledge of the parole system.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Paul Byrne SC memorial lecture: Uniform evidence law
           at 21
    • Abstract: Odgers, Stephen
      'The Evidence Act 1995 (Cth) and Evidence Act 1995' (NSW) both commenced in that year - 1995. Twenty-one years have passed. It is time to think about the progress of what is often called the Uniform Evidence Law ('UEL'), to celebrate the positive aspects of those reforms, to reflect on the criticisms, and to ponder the future.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - 'Now they're extraordinary powers': Firearms
           prohibition orders and warrantless search powers in New South Wales
    • Abstract: McElhone, Megan
      In November 2013, the 'Firearms Act 1996' (NSW) was amended to provide police in New South Wales with new powers to allow them to search for firearms, firearm parts and ammunition without obtaining a warrant. The New South Wales Government's ostensible aim in introducing these new search powers was to assist police to ensure that individuals who had been issued with a Firearms Prohibition Order were complying with the terms of that order, with a broader view to reducing firearms-related crime in New South Wales. However, the exercise of these powers has not always aligned with the apparent rationale for introducing them, and firearms, firearm parts and ammunition were found in just two per cent of the searches conducted by police in the two years following the amendment of the 'Firearms Act'. In this period, police also conducted more than 200 unlawful searches of people who were not subject to an Order. This comment questions the extent to which Firearms Prohibition Order search powers can be justified as an effective and necessary law enforcement tool.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - How I would spend $100 million to reduce crime
    • Abstract: Sarre, Rick
      Governments all over the world are constantly endeavouring to make their communities safer and the lives of their citizens less fearful. Fortunately, their policy-makers have at their disposal a vast array of criminological research findings that have emerged and which continue to emerge from universities and public and private research institutes. For decades now, these researchers have been asking: 'What is working to reduce crime'' 'What could work better'' 'What have we not tried, but could'' Their research reveals that there are many choices when it comes to spending public and private money on initiatives and programs designed to reduce crime and, importantly, that some choices are better than others. Research has shown that, with appropriate resourcing of preferred choices, we can stem the flow of potential offenders (and re-offenders) into the justice system. In this essay, I take 100 million dollars and place them into a suite of initiatives and programs that evidence tells us will deliver the best outcomes for crime reduction in Australia today.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - How I would spend $100 million to reduce crime: A
           reaction
    • Abstract: Mazerolle, Paul
      When first asked to provide a reaction to Rick Sarre's comprehensive essay on how he proposes to spend $100 million to reduce crime, of course I obliged. However, upon further reflection, it seemed like a potentially bad idea. I thought through the opportunity and reflected that assuming this role would be a bit like criticising Gandhi - given Rick's status in the field. As a leading academic in crime prevention, among other areas, a former President of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology, and a highly respected scholar, there is arguably little that I could add to this issue. I recognised that providing a discerning reaction would be difficult and would carry some degree of risk as it would require some very keen observations to provide insights over and above what could be expected from the ideas and interpretations provided by Rick. Indeed, I can think of very few criminologists and social policy thinkers in Australia who have contributed more to broadening our understanding in the crime and justice and crime prevention field than Rick Sarre. And while I acknowledge the risks, I am pleased to proceed given the opportunity to provide a few insights on Rick's substantial thoughts on this important topic.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 3 - Nothing works': A meta-review of indigenous
           sentencing court evaluations
    • Abstract: Marchetti, Elena
      Indigenous-focused criminal justice programs are usually evaluated and studied without an adherence to, or acknowledgement of, Indigenous epistemologies, axiologies and ontologies. Indeed, many of the evaluations conducted of Australian Indigenous sentencing courts have relied on quantitative analyses of reoffending, finding little or no impact on recidivism, despite there being some evidence, derived mainly from qualitative analyses, that they have had an impact on strengthening informal social controls within Indigenous communities. This article uses published evaluations and impact studies of Indigenous sentencing courts as a case study to gain a better understanding of how these courts have been evaluated and researched, and how the methodological approaches used to study the courts may not properly capture the Indigenous-focused and community-building aims and goals of the programs. Employing a meta-review approach, the article examines why research that evaluates Indigenous-focused criminal justice programs should rethink how evaluations are framed and conducted when trying to determine 'what works'.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - "Rack 'em, pack 'em and stack 'em": Decarceration in
           an age of zero tolerance
    • Abstract: Weatherburn, Don
      This article traces the recent history of prison population growth in Australia, discusses its causes, costs and benefits, and suggests ways in which the growth in Australian imprisonment rates may be contained or reversed without threat to public safety. Several options are discussed. They include abolishing short sentences, restoring discretion to the courts to set the relationship between the aggregate sentence and the non-parole period, giving Parole Boards greater discretion to deal with breaches of parole, reform of community corrections, and bail reform.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Sydney Institute of Criminology 50th anniversary
           1966-2016
    • Abstract: Bray, Rebecca Scott
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Investigation to exoneration: A systemic review of
           wrongful conviction in Australia
    • Abstract: Dioso-Villa, Rachel; Julian, Roberta; Kebbell, Mark; Weathered, Lynne; Westera, Nina
      Wrongful conviction is an international problem that has attracted considerable research into identifying its prevalence, causes and correlates. Australia is not void of erroneous convictions; however, the international findings do not neatly apply to the Australian context. This article considers the wrongful conviction in Australia from a wide-angle perspective of investigation through to exoneration. It considers systemic issues related to the detection, correction and consequences of wrongful conviction, identifying how and why errors may occur at different stages of the criminal justice process. The article specifically covers the investigative process and issues related to the collection and processing of physical/forensic evidence and witness evidence, post-conviction issues in the identification and correction of wrongful convictions, and the consequences of wrongful conviction for exonerated individuals in Australia.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Juvenile justice, young people and human rights in
           Australia
    • Abstract: Cunneen, Chris; Goldson, Barry; Russell, Sophie
      This article identifies the key human rights issues that emerge for young people in juvenile justice in Australia. While there is a clear framework for respecting the human rights of children within juvenile justice, the article poses the question: To what extent does Australia actually operationalise and comply with these rights in law, policy and practice' In answering, it discusses various national and international reports, legislation, academic and other research and litigation on behalf of children. It identifies substantive and procedural human rights violations affecting young people in juvenile justice, many of which fall disproportionately on two over-represented groups: Indigenous young people, and those with mental health disorders and cognitive disability. While there are review and compliance mechanisms in place, respect for young people's rights within the broad area of juvenile justice remains problematic.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Serious crime prevention orders
    • Abstract: Methven, Elyse; Carter, David
      Successive reforms in New South Wales ('NSW') have established far-reaching powers to curtail the liberties of those who were once convicted of various serious sexual and violent offences. Now, these powers have been significantly expanded, with the Executive Government asserting the ability to control the free movement, speech, association and work of NSW citizens and businesses via Serious Crime Prevention Orders ('SCPOs') under the Crimes (Serious Crime Prevention Orders) Act 2016 (NSW). This Comment surveys substantive and procedural aspects of SCPOs. We situate the orders as part of a continuing expansion of administrative detention and supervision regimes of a hybrid, quasi-criminal nature. We question whether the powers go too far by increasing the State's powers to surveil and control a person's or business's activities under the justification of preventing crime. We also canvass the possibility that SCPOs will operate in a punitive (not merely preventative) manner.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - The proposed re-introduction of policing and crime
           into the regulation of brothels in New South Wales
    • Abstract: Crofts, Penny; Prior, Jason
      Since 1995, brothels in New South Wales have been permitted to operate as legitimate businesses regulated by local councils using planning powers. Despite more than 20 years since decriminalisation and widespread support, there remains an urge by some to heavily regulate the sex industry, reflected in the recently submitted report to the NSW Government from the Select Committee on the Regulation of Brothels (2015). Although the Report supports maintaining decriminalisation, it is dominated by concern about the association of brothels with crime and the consequent need for increased policing. This article argues first that there is little to no evidence to support the criminogenic concerns articulated in the Report. Second, even if these concerns existed, there is nothing to suggest that the proposed measures would provide a solution. Moreover, these proposed reforms reflect a worrying trend in criminal law reform of the expansion of police powers modelled on anti-terrorist legislation, despite existing police powers and criminal offences that are not prosecuted.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - A partial history of localised crime prevention in New
           South Wales, Australia
    • Abstract: Clancey, Garner
      This article charts the recent history (approximately 30 years) of localised approaches to crime prevention in New South Wales ('NSW'), Australia. This partial history demonstrates the active involvement of local government in championing local forms of crime prevention and demonstrates the important role played by youth justice advocates and the focus on youth crime prevention in aiding the establishment of crime prevention infrastructure. While support continues for local approaches to crime prevention in NSW, there is some evidence of growing centralisation and a narrowing of the focus away from community development interventions to hotspots and situational prevention. More democratically developed, locally generated prevention approaches have been increasingly replaced by 'evidence-based' approaches.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Looking for Ashley: Re-reading what the Smith case
           reveals about the governance of girls, mothers and families in Canada
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Steele, Linda
      Review(s) of: Looking for Ashley: Re-reading what the Smith case reveals about the governance of girls, mothers and families in Canada, by Rebecca Jaremko Bromwich, Demeter Press, 2015, 255 pp, (ISBN 9781926452692).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Genetics, crime and justice [Book Review]
    • Abstract: McCay, Allan
      Review(s) of: Genetics, crime and justice, by Debra Wilson, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 272 pp, (ISBN 9781783478811).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Why the continuous failures in justice for Australian
           victims and survivors of catholic clerical child sexual abuse'
    • Abstract: Gleeson, Kate
      This brief comment explores the significance of a number of current lawsuits brought against Catholic Church leaders in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, in the context of enduring failures of justice for Australian victims of Catholic clerical child sexual abuse. It examines the obstacles to criminal and civil justice that have prevented Church superiors from being held to account for child sexual abuse perpetrated in Catholic institutions, and explains the responsibility of Australian governments, courts and the Catholic Church to further justice for survivors in this context.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Legalising sex work: The regulation of 'risk' in
           Australian prostitution law reform
    • Abstract: Nagy, Victoria; Powell, Anastasia
      Debates about the legalisation of sex work in Australia have tended to focus on the 'risks' of sex work that need managing and regulating. However, in some states, the framing of these risks has been dominated by socio-cultural and political concerns, such as morality and suburban serenity, rather than the concerns of workers in the industry. In this article we discuss how the risks of sex work have been envisaged and debated in two case study states (South Australia and Western Australia) since 2000, and consider why Bills have been repeatedly unsuccessful in reforming sex work law. In so doing, we apply a conceptual framework to tease apart the socio-cultural and political framings of 'risk' in crime policy generally.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Instructions to authors
    • PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - 'Public order' policing and the value of independent
           legal observers
    • Abstract: Walsh, Tamara
      This article examines the nature and effectiveness of the legal observer model developed for, and implemented at, the Brisbane G20 in 2014. 'Independent' legal observers ('ILOs'), who were all admitted lawyers, recorded interactions between police and members of the public, with a view to encouraging peaceful relations in public spaces during the event. Few arrests were made, and police were praised for their restraint. The relationship between the 'negotiated management' approach of police and the presence of the legal observers is discussed, drawing on group interviews undertaken with participating ILOs. Aspects of the Brisbane ILO model are analysed, and implications for the policing of public spaces more broadly are suggested.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Efforts by offenders to manage and overcome stigma:
           The case of employment
    • Abstract: Cherney, Adrian; Fitzgerald, Robin
      This article explores how released prisoners on parole overcome the stigma of a criminal conviction in their attempts to secure employment. Findings highlight how overcoming the consequences of stigma for finding work requires forms of identity management, and assistance by family and friends that send signals to employers that a former inmate has changed and is a capable worker. The article illustrates that employment provides opportunities for the formation of redemption scripts and a 'replacement-self' through the process of voluntary self-disclosure. We explore these issues through interview data collected from individuals serving a parole order in Queensland, Australia. The article provides insights into the effects of stigma management on offender reintegration.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - The sexuality of the night: Violence and
           transformation
    • Abstract: Race, Kane
      The figure of the resident is privileged in discussions about nightlife governance. But the 'right to the city' extends to those who use the city, and popular opposition to the lockout concerns questions of access to public space on the part of those marginalised from these policy equations. Opponents of the lockout object to qualitative transformations in the cultural atmosphere of the city. This article argues that nightlife is of greater value than governmental measures about the prevention of violence capture. Of particular significance are the constitutive omissions of the category of 'alcohol-related violence'. A better analysis would investigate the attraction of 'liminal experience' that may prompt violence on the part of certain participants. It appears that certain gendered identities have not been well equipped to handle difference. At a time of reduced support for sex and gender diversity education, the state must get better at modelling capacities to live with difference.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - What does research tell us about the impact of recent
           liquor licence restrictions on violence in New South Wales'
    • Abstract: Weatherburn, Don
      Following the success of restrictions on liquor licensing in curbing violence in Newcastle, successive New South Wales governments have relied heavily on liquor licensing controls to reduce alcohol-related violence. Research to date suggests that the collective impact of these controls has been substantial. At this stage, however, little is known about the mechanism or mechanisms through which changing liquor licensing controls have reduced violence. The article examines the little research conducted regarding the impact of liquor licensing reforms (popularly known as the 'lockout laws') on the night-time economy in parts of Sydney and identifies three key empirical issues yet to be addressed.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Sydney's lockout laws: Cutting crime or civil
           liberties'
    • Abstract: Quilter, Julia
      The catalyst for the Institute of Criminology's Forum on 'Sydney's Lockout Laws: Cutting Crime or Civil Liberties'' was a rising tide of concern that measures introduced by the New South Wales ('NSW') Government in 2014, primarily designed to reduce alcohol-related violence, may have misjudged the balance required to simultaneously deliver on two community expectations: that residents and visitors in places likes Kings Cross and the Sydney CBD should have access to a dynamic entertainment scene supported by a healthy night-time economy and that those same residents and visitors should be, and feel, safe from violence.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - The Bali Nine, capital punishment and Australia's
           obligation to seek abolition
    • Abstract: Maguire, Amy; Houghton, Shelby
      The executions of Australian nationals Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran in April 2015 brought capital punishment to the forefront of public consciousness in Australia. Indonesia carried out their death sentences, and those of six others convicted of drug offences, despite Australia's determined advocacy for clemency. Their deaths represent a tiny fraction of the numbers killed in execution of the death penalty each year, but ought to prompt a renewed inquiry into the global practice of capital punishment and Australia's position in relation to it. This article identifies the states which continue to impose the death penalty and those which oppose it. It then situates capital punishment as a human rights issue, and explores how Australia can fully undertake its international legal commitments through more prominent and effective advocacy for the abolition of the death penalty worldwide.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Public, politicians, and the law: The long shadow and
           modern thrall of Myra Hindley
    • Abstract: Pettigrew, Mark
      To understand the adamant defence of whole life orders by the British government to the perceived intrusion of the European Court of Human Rights, it is pertinent to re-examine the case which settled their appropriateness in domestic sentencing: that of Myra Hindley. Political defiance and public appetite for whole life sentences were born of Hindley's case, which settled any doubt as to the order's justifiability. European human rights proponents, already struggling to negate hostility towards the Court based on what Britain has viewed as unfavourable decisions regarding prisoner voting rights and offender extradition, have not yet been able to counteract the hardened opinion on whole life orders stemming from the case of Myra Hindley.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Justice reinvestment: Winding back imprisonment [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Clear, Todd
      Review(s) of: Justice reinvestment: Winding back imprisonment, by David Brown, Chris Cunneen, Melanie Schwartz, Julie Stubbs and Courtney Young, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 291pp (ISBN 978-1-137-44910-8).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Sydney's lockout laws: For and against
    • Abstract: Lee, Murray
      This article considers the pros and cons of the New South Wales Government's restrictions on licensed premises to curb 'alcohol-related violence' introduced on 21 January 2014. The laws, currently the subject of an independent inquiry, have polarised Sydney residents and attracted protest from diverse sectors of the community. The article presents three points for and three points against the current legislation.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Last drinks laws: A health perspective
    • Abstract: Conigrave, Kate
      The tragic deaths of two young men after unprovoked violent assaults in Kings Cross, Sydney between 2012 and 2014 prompted a public outcry. This added to existing voices of health, police and resident bodies who were calling for measures to reduce alcohol-fuelled violence. As a result, the New South Wales Government amended the Liquor Act 2007 (NSW) in January 2014 to limit last drinks to 3 am in Kings Cross and the Sydney central business district, and to prohibit entry to bars after 1.30 am and serving of shots after midnight. These legal changes were associated with a marked reduction in violent assaults in the target areas, without significant displacement of harms to neighbouring suburbs. Opponents of the laws have raised concerns about the impact of the restrictions on enjoyment of individuals or profits of local businesses. However, evidence suggests that alternative interventions, such as community education, would have been unlikely to produce benefits of this magnitude.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Child sexual abuse in Fiji: Authority, risk factors
           and responses
    • Abstract: Whitehead, John; Roffee, James
      While child sexual abuse is a problem worldwide, the risk factors for the perpetration of child sexual abuse within Fiji are unique in their relation to the traditional and communal nature of Fijian society. In this article, culturally relevant dynamic risk factors found within contemporary Fijian society are identified and understood alongside static factors contributing to abuse. Although there have been recent changes to sexual offence legislation and traditional criminal justice system responses to victims of sexual abuse, state-sanctioned responses continue to maintain victimising practices. Equally, the relative rural isolation means many Indigenous Fijian (iTaukei) communities continue to use customary restorative justice practices that may marginalise the rehabilitation of victims and offenders for the communities' benefit. However, a culturally specific amalgamation of traditional criminal justice and customary restorative responses may help to create more holistic protection for survivors of child sexual abuse in Fiji.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - The 'focal concerns' of parole board decision-making:
           A thematic analysis
    • Abstract: Buglar, Shannon
      Following the high-profile murder of Jill Meagher in Victoria in 2012, parole is once again a provocative topic in Australia. While there is a developed scholarly literature on decision-making in other criminal justice areas, less attention has been paid to parole board decision-making. The study discussed in this article begins to address this gap in the literature through a thematic analysis of publicly available parole release decisions made by the Prisoners Review Board of Western Australia in 2013. Specifically, this study tests the viability of the focal concerns perspective as a conceptual framework for understanding parole board decision-making. Its analysis reveals that focal concerns relating to offender blameworthiness, community protection and practical constraints are evident in parole release decisions, albeit in a modified form from sentencing research to reflect the backend process of parole. In particular, decisions consistently project a strong sense of offender change. This article presents the study and discusses implications of these findings with respect to the use of the focal concerns perspective in parole research.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Fighting like a girl ... or a boy': An analysis of
           videos of violence between young girls posted on online fight websites
    • Abstract: Larkin, Ashleigh; Dwyer, Angela
      How young women engage in physical violence with other young women is an issue that raises specific concerns in both criminological literature and theories. Current theoretical explanations construct young women's violence in one of two ways: young women are not physically violent at all, and adhere to an accepted performance of hegemonic femininity; or young women reject accepted performances of hegemonic femininity in favour of a masculine gendered performance to engage in violence successfully. This article draws on qualitative and quantitative data obtained from a structured observation and thematic analysis of 60 online videos featuring young women's violent altercations. It argues that, contrary to this dichotomous construction, there appears to be a third way young women are performing violence, underpinned by masculine characteristics of aggression but upholding a hegemonic feminine gender performance. In making this argument, this article demonstrates that a more complex exploration and conceptualisation of young women's violence, away from gendered constructs, is required for greater understanding of the issue.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Criminalising bribery in a corporate world
    • Abstract: Griffiths, Kelly
      This article explores how society defines acts of bribery and whether the demarcation between acts of official bribery and acts of commercial bribery retains any relevance in a world where public services are increasingly privatised and delivered by corporate actors. It examines the modern construction of bribery offences through the lens of legal moralism and liberalism to determine whether there are sufficient grounds to justify the imposition of criminal sanctions on persons and corporations who engage in such conduct. Next, it outlines the bribery laws in the United Kingdom compared with laws in Australia and discusses possible law reforms to tackle commercial bribery, as distinct from official bribery, in Australia.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Keeping the criminal law in 'serviceable condition': A
           task for the courts or the parliament'
    • Abstract: Bell, Virginia
      The Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture was delivered last year by the Hon Dyson Heydon AC QC (Heydon 2014). When Dyson Heydon left the Court of Appeal of New South Wales to take up his appointment on the High Court he spoke in flattering terms of the quality of advocacy at the appellate Criminal Bar at his ceremonial farewell (Heydon 2003). To my certain knowledge, this was not conventional flattery; it was a generous recognition, by one who had been sequestered at the Chancery Bar, of the knowledge and forensic skill of advocates appearing in the Court of Criminal Appeal. As last year's lecture revealed, Paul Byrne was in no small measure responsible for that high estimate.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - White-collar offenders and desistance from crime:
           Future selves and the constancy of change [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Simpson, Nicholas
      Review(s) of: White-collar offenders and desistance from crime: Future selves and the constancy of change, by Ben Hunter, Routledge, 2015, 210 pp., (ISBN 9781138794092).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Instructions to authors
    • PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Crime, justice and human rights [Book Review]
    • Abstract: McCulloch, Jude
      Review(s) of: Crime, justice and human rights, by Leanne Weber, Elaine Fishwick and Marinella Marmo, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 264 pp., (ISBN 9781137299192).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 3 - Marginalisation, managerialism and wrongful conviction
           in Australia
    • Abstract: MacFarlane, Joseph; Stratton, Greg
      Wrongful convictions have become a growing area of concern among legal scholars, reflecting the success of the global innocence movement that aims to exonerate factually innocent people convicted of crimes they did not commit. While research into wrongful conviction has focused on specific errors such as investigator misconduct, witness misidentification or false confessions, less attention has been given to the role of race and class in leading to these errors. This article raises these issues and the concern as to how Indigenous Australians may be particularly vulnerable to wrongful conviction as a function of a managerialist approach to criminal justice prioritising efficiency, expediency and risk management over due process. The adoption of such an approach has not only exacerbated Indigenous persons' overrepresentation, but has also heightened their vulnerability to miscarriages of justice. The vulnerability is largely due to issues of cross-cultural communication, often negative interactions with police, and increasing difficulty in accessing adequate legal representation. This article argues that wrongful convictions, much like other features of the criminal justice system, are likely to disproportionately affect people belonging to typically marginalised social groups.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Introduction: Crime, media and new technologies
    • Abstract: McGovern, Alyce
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - The 'ACA effect': Examining how current affairs
           programs shape victim understandings and responses to online fraud
    • Abstract: Cross, Cassandra; Richards, Kelly
      In recent years, numerous current affairs stories on online fraud victimisation have been broadcast on Australian television. These stories typically feature highly organised, international 'sting' operations, in which alleged offenders are arrested and investigated by law enforcement. These portrayals of police responses influence the expectations that some online fraud victims have about how their individual cases will be handled by law enforcement. Based on interviews with 80 online fraud victims, this article argues that a narrow media portrayal of online fraud by television current affairs programs - termed the 'ACA effect' - informs victims' understandings of online fraud and their responses to it. In particular, current affairs programs influence what victims of online fraud expect from police. The article further demonstrates that current affairs programs present themselves as de facto law enforcement agencies, to which victims who receive an unsatisfactory response from police might turn. Overall, the article highlights the importance of current affairs programs portraying a more realistic image of official responses to online fraud.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Expanding visual criminology: Definitions, data and
           dissemination
    • Abstract: Wheeldon, Johannes; Harris, Danielle
      There is increasing interest in the use of visual tools and techniques in criminology. Many efforts are based on cultural and critical assumptions and focus on the spectacle of images. However, visual criminology may offer a wider variety of options to produce, frame and disseminate large amounts of information in more accessible ways. Of specific interest in this article is the potential for visual criminology to better present complex research findings. To this end, we discuss visual criminological efforts that have been used to engage audiences through social media. We replicate and consider key info-graphics on issues such as mass incarceration, 'stop and frisk', and police killings. Finally, we consider some potential problems for those interested in expanding visual approaches in criminology, and present six general propositions to be tested and further explored.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Crime, deviance and doping: Fallen sports stars,
           autobiography and the management of stigma [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Warren, Ian
      Review(s) of: Crime, deviance and doping: Fallen sports stars, autobiography and the management of stigma, by Majid Yar, Palgrave MacMillan, 2014, 104 pp (ISBN 9781137403759).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Courting social media in Australia's criminal
           courtrooms: The continuing tension between promoting open justice and
           protecting procedural integrity
    • Abstract: Findlay, Leah
      Technological advancements and the rise of social media have transformed the media landscape and blurred the boundaries between journalist and citizen. Traditional media organisations have been quick to embrace the benefits of social platforms, including immediacy, audience engagement and increased circulation. As well as allowing for more detailed representations of court proceedings than may be available in a traditional article format, the capacity to relay information to a vast audience through social media has eliminated some obstacles that have historically placed media organisations in the best position to report on court proceedings. This presents significant opportunities to enhance open justice; however, concerns have been raised about inaccurate and prejudicial reporting, as well as the impact of social media reporting on the practical capacity of judicial officers to control the publication of information relating to criminal proceedings. This article examines the response of United Kingdom and Australian jurisdictions to the use of electronic devices for reporting from courtrooms to examine how the competing imperatives to promote open justice and protect procedural integrity are being balanced.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Social media sentiment analysis: A new empirical tool
           for assessing public opinion on crime'
    • Abstract: Prichard, Jeremy; Watters, Paul; Krone, Tony; Spiranovic, Caroline; Cockburn, Helen
      'Big data' presents many interesting opportunities and challenges. This article focuses on the potential use of social media sentiment analysis as a legitimate tool for criminological research to better understand public perceptions of crime problems and public attitudes to responses to crime. While a degree of scepticism should always apply to the use of unsubstantiated sources on the internet, SMSA is likely to be a rich source of valuable information. Observational SMSA research presents low-level risks in terms of human research ethics principally because the information derived is unlikely to lead to the identification of research subjects. It is arguable, but less certain, that material posted publicly online does not attract a reasonable expectation of privacy for the author. However, the strength of this argument may depend on the particular circumstances in which the material to be analysed was posted.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Performance crime and justice
    • Abstract: Surette, Raymond
      Due to enhanced audience participation and involvement in content creation and distribution, crime and justice has changed. This change came about with the emergence of new digital social media and is reflected in the growth of crime and justice performances. Performances today are ephemeral renditions created and distributed in millions of social media interactions. The irony is that performances previously were created for wide heterogeneous audiences, but access was limited by time, place and medium. In contrast, new media performances are usually directed at smaller homogeneous audiences, but access is potentially unlimited due to their digital nature. In this new social media reality, the altered nature of a performance has important implications for crime and justice. Whereas crime traditionally was comprised of low visibility events in which the actors strove to hide their identities, in the new media world surreptitious crime competes with a growing number of high-visibility crimes. This article explores how the associated evolution of performance has affected crime, law enforcement and the judicial system. The impact of performance crime and justice will continue to stress criminal justice systems and change the way crime and justice is experienced in the 21st century.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Digital evidence in the jury room: The impact of
           mobile technology on the jury
    • Abstract: McDonald, Laura W; Tait, David; Gelb, Karen; Rossner, Meredith; McKimmie, Blake M
      Wireless technology and mobile devices are transforming the way courts administer justice, with the increasing use of smartphones, iPads and other tablets by practitioners, judges and juries. In the jury room, mobile devices have the potential to simplify the provision and use of information and facilitate more efficient deliberations and overall decision-making. But before such technology can become commonplace in the jury room, courts would benefit from empirical evidence of the impact - positive and/or negative - of providing it to jurors both in terms of efficiency and preserving the fundamental prerequisites of the right of the accused to a fair trial. This article presents the preliminary findings of a project undertaken to examine the impact of tablets on the deliberation process and jury decisions.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Instructions to authors
    • PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Environmental crime and specialist courts: The case
           for a 'one-stop (judicial) shop' in Queensland
    • Abstract: Hamman, Evan; Walters, Reece; Maguire, Rowena
      The increasing international political, public and scientific engagement in matters of environmental sustainability and development has produced a rapidly expanding body of environmental law and policy. The advent of international protocols, directives, and multilateral agreements has occurred concomitantly with the harmonisation of widespread environmental regimes of governance and enforcement within numerous domestic settings. This has created an unprecedented need for environmental legal apparatuses to manage, regulate and adjudicate legislation seeking to protect, sustain and develop global natural habitats. The evolving literature in green criminology continues to explore these developments within discourses of power, harm and justice. Such critiques have emphasised the role of dedicated environmental courts to address environmental crimes and injustices. In this article, we examine the important role of specialist courts in responding to environmental crime, with specific reference to the State of Queensland. We offer a critique of existing processes and practices for the adjudication of environmental crime and propose new jurisdictional and procedural approaches for enhancing justice. We conclude that specialist environmental courts endowed with broad civil and criminal jurisdiction are an integral part of an effective response to environmental crime.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Boulton v The Queen: The resurrection of guideline
           judgments in Australia'
    • Abstract: Krasnostein, Sarah
      Fair sentencing strives to balance an emphasis on individualised justice with an emphasis on consistency, both of which are essential in promoting just outcomes. While there is an inherent tension between the values, each is essential to a fair sentencing system. In grappling with these dual demands of proportionality and equality, however, different jurisdictions have placed different emphases on these two aspects of justice. The result has been two broad, competing paradigms of fairness in sentencing: 'individualism' versus 'comparativism'. Guideline judgments are one way of promoting consistency in sentencing decisions while respecting the importance of maintaining sufficient discretion to individualise sentences. Despite statutory authorisation, however, the use of guideline judgments has been controversial because they challenge the individualist jurisprudence of the High Court, which characterises practical attempts to operationalise consistency as unduly limiting sentencing discretion. Victoria has traditionally been a proponent of this high individualism. The landmark nature of the Court of Appeal's recent decision to issue the state's first guideline judgment in Boulton v The Queen becomes apparent when viewed in this context. Though it suffers from the limitations of being forced to operate in a predominately individualist sentencing framework, Boulton hopefully signals the beginning of a more nuanced jurisprudence that recognises that fair sentencing outcomes are not just a question of the amount of discretion, they are also the product of practical appellate regulation of the decision-making process aimed at promoting sentences that are both individualised and equal between similar offenders.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Institutional influences on the parameters of
           criminalisation: Parliamentary scrutiny of criminal law bills in New South
           Wales
    • Abstract: McNamara, Luke; Quilter, Julia
      Within criminalisation scholarship, there has been little engagement with the work of 'real-world' mechanisms for promoting principled law-making, like the activities of parliamentary scrutiny committees. This article reports on an examination of the New South Wales ('NSW') Legislation Review Committee's findings and recommendations in relation to all criminal law bills during the period 2010-12 and assesses the impact of the Committee's recommendations on the passage of bills through the NSW Parliament. It considers whether the potential for scrutiny committees to play an effective role in delineating the legitimate boundaries of criminalisation is realised in practice.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Deemed supply in Australian drug trafficking laws: A
           justifiable legal provision'
    • Abstract: Hughes, Caitlin Elizabeth; Cowdery, Nicholas; Ritter, Alison
      In Australia, eight of the nine legal jurisdictions have enacted 'deemed supply' provisions for illicit drug trafficking offences that presume 'intent to supply' based on the quantity of a drug an alleged offender is found with and attach criminal liability for the offence of supply. Such laws have been enacted for more than 35 years. In this article we critically examine: the rationale for the widespread adoption of Australian deemed supply laws; and the justifiability and necessity of such laws in current legal practice. A legal and historical analysis was undertaken. Data were sourced from legislation, Parliamentary records (Hansard), case law, published research on international drug law, research on drug user behaviour and our own experience in the prosecution of drug offenders. Analysis shows that Australian deemed supply laws were introduced to overcome perceived difficulties in the prosecution and sanction of drug traffickers. Yet such laws conflict with the dominant international practice that sanctions trafficking without the use of deemed supply provisions. They contribute towards harms to users and miscarriages of justice and increase pressure to use police and prosecutorial discretion in ways that may ultimately adversely affect community confidence in the administration of the criminal law. We conclude that the laws should be subject to legislative review and/or, preferably, abolition from Australian drug trafficking law.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - A brighter tomorrow: Raise the age of criminal
           responsibility
    • Abstract: Crofts, Thomas
      A report released by Amnesty International in May 2015 highlights the alarming over representation of Indigenous young people in detention in Australia. It calls on the Australian Commonwealth Government to make a number of legislative changes to address this issue, which the report argues are necessary to ensure Australia's compliance with its obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. The foremost area in need of reform identified in the report is the low age of criminal responsibility in Australia. This note examines Amnesty International's arguments for an increase in the minimum age of criminal responsibility and agrees that the age should be raised to at least 12.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Every death counts: An argument for counting deaths in
           immigration custody in the national deaths in custody collection
    • Abstract: Powell, Rebecca; Weber, Leanne; Pickering, Sharon
      The Australian Institute of Criminology ('AIC') is the Australian Government's designated monitoring body responsible for reporting on deaths in custody in Australia under the National Deaths in Custody Program ('NDICP'). Although the Border Crossing Observatory has recorded the deaths of 77 persons in Australian immigration custody since 2000, these deaths are not included in NDICP annual reporting. In Australia, official deaths in custody monitoring and reporting have only accounted for those people who have died while in the custodial settings of prison, juvenile detention, and police custody (Lyneham, Joudo-Larson and Beacroft 2010). Official monitoring and reporting of deaths in custody in Australia does not consider, account for or report on deaths that occur in Australian onshore and offshore immigration detention centres, or deaths that occur while authorities attempt to take a suspected unlawful non-citizen into immigration custody, either in the process of offshore interdiction or on the mainland. We argue that deaths within these immigration custodial settings should be included under existing arrangements for monitoring and reporting in the interests of accountability and equity under the Australian border control regime.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Crime, policing and (in)security: Press depictions of
           Sydney's night-time economy
    • Abstract: Wadds, Phillip
      The night-time economy is a space of significant anxiety and concern. Recent high-profile incidents of alcohol-related violence in Sydney, Australia, have exacerbated community fears about the risks associated with the city after dark and placed the regulation and policing of nightlife in the media spotlight. This article is based on a content analysis of newspaper representations of Sydney's night-time economy and the policing and security of nightlife settings from 1996 to 2012. It argues that public police and private security are portrayed in contrasting ways. Print media reflects public ambivalence and insecurity by representing the private security industry as unruly and violent, and with links to criminality. In contrast, media portrayals of New South Wales Police reflect the conscious efforts of an increasingly media-aware police organisation to protect its public image and reinforce its occupational legitimacy.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Invisible children, dying to save others: A discussion
           of three fatal child abuse cases and the prevention of future deaths
    • Abstract: Sim, Janice
      This article discusses three fatal child abuse cases (two from the United Kingdom and one from Australia). Using an interactionist framework, it identifies two critical signs - the 'invisibility' of the child and certain dysfunctional parent representations - as the precursors to death in these cases. Reviewing the child death inquiry findings, it argues that acknowledging these critical indicators of risk has significant implications for preventing death in similar cases where child protection workers know the child in question.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Homicide law reform, gender and the provocation
           defence [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Raj, Senthorun
      Review(s) of: Homicide law reform, gender and the provocation defence, by Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Palgrave MacMillan, 2014, 315 pp (ISBN 9781137357540).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Instructions to authors
    • PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 3 - Evaluating towards healing as an alternative to
           litigation as redress for survivors of clerical child sexual abuse
    • Abstract: Matthews, Timothy
      Towards Healing was adopted by the Catholic Church in Australia as a mechanism to receive and respond to disclosures of clerical child sexual abuse. Parkinson (2014:131) describes the protocol as a 'radical and proactive step' in the effective provision of redress for survivors of sexual abuse by clerics within the Catholic Church. This comment questions both the necessity and viability of this scheme, as posited by Parkinson, in light of the experiences of survivors brought before the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 3 - The money problem: Reparation and restorative justice
           in the Catholic Church's towards healing program
    • Abstract: Gleeson, Kate
      Towards Healing is a restorative justice program for addressing complaints of sexual and other child abuse committed by clergy and other members of the Catholic Church. The program is upheld by the Church as leading the world in providing restorative and therapeutic justice. This article examines Towards Healing from the perspective of restorative justice standards and questions the potential for restorative justice to function in regard to Catholic clerical child sexual abuse in Australia, where civil justice is stymied in this context. A key argument of this article is that Towards Healing operates on a less-than-voluntary basis in this environment and fails to maintain the basic principles of restorative justice focused on the needs and experiences of victims. The article concludes that the Catholic Church's use of reparations to resolve liability in Towards Healing is incompatible with restorative justice ideals and best practice.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 3 - Normalising and Neutralising offending - the influence
           of health and safety regulation
    • Abstract: Schindeler, Emily; Ransley, Janet
      One form of corporate malfeasance involves violation of workers' rights to a safe workplace. This article complements the dominant functionalist discourse concerned with defining, categorising and establishing antecedent conditions for psychological injury (and attendant physical health and social harm) arising from mistreatment at work. Drawing from claims heard in Australian courts and tribunals, this analysis examines the counter-arguments presented by respondents in such cases. This preliminary evidence suggests that the normalisation and neutralisation of offending behaviours provides a justification for failing to deliver a safe work environment and for exacerbating injury when it has occurred. Further, the framing of regulation has enabled this pattern of neutralisation of offending and denial of justice for victims. This article calls for a re-examination of the way in which victimisation has been problematised and the consequent implications for prevention.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 3 - Riotous or righteous behaviour': Representations
           of subaltern resistance in the Australian mainstream media
    • Abstract: Porter, Amanda
      This article examines Australian domestic and international mainstream media coverage of subaltern resistance to police brutality. In particular, it analyses representations of subaltern resistance in Australian mainstream media with reference to riots in Palm Island, Queensland, Australia (November 2004) and in Ferguson, Missouri, United States (November 2014) and tests the appositeness of the theoretical concept of 'moral panic' to Australian media coverage of these respective events. In so doing, it exposes contradictions and anomalies in the Australian media's coverage of Indigenous resistance and offers some hypotheses for any apparent discrepancies.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 3 - Criminality, interpersonal proximity and the
           stop-snitching code: An examination of offender and non-offender
           perceptions
    • Abstract: Downing, Steven; Copeland, Bobby
      A number of studies have examined the relationship between the 'code of the street' and the concept of snitching (that is, informing the police). With some notable exceptions, these studies have generally focused on the pervasiveness of a 'stop-snitching code' or 'code of silence' among street offenders. In this study we seek to broaden understanding of the stop-snitching code by exploring perceptions of active, former, and non-offenders living in areas considered by residents to embody the street code. We find that informal cultural norms do in fact dissuade both offender and non-offenders from cooperating with police, but also that personal experience with police, proximity to offences and offenders, and types of crimes in question play major roles in the contextual framing of whether or not people choose to cooperate with the police.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jun 2019 13:19:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 1 - 'It's just about the crime, not the victim': Critical
           insights from Australian service providers working with people who have
           been trafficked
    • Abstract: George, Emma; Tsourtos, George; McNaughton, Darlene
      Human trafficking is a global public health issue, prevalent in Australia. Our study aimed to gain in-depth understanding of human trafficking and related service provision from a range of sectors, from the perspective of service providers. Adopting a qualitative descriptive approach, in-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 13 service providers from a range of organisations across three Australian states. Service providers emphasised the challenges posed by Australia's predominately criminal justice approach to trafficking, in both policy and service provision, with some suggesting the current process is re-traumatising. Results support refocusing policy and services away from a criminal justice response to a more comprehensive and holistic response that includes greater recognition of the social determinants of health and the provision of tailored services. This requires increased collaboration between service providers, some of whom have very different agendas. The findings provide support for recommendations with the Australian government inquiry into modern-day slavery and therefore have important implications for policy and health services nationally to become more holistic in responding to human trafficking.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 19:54:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 1 - Factors associated with breaches of home detention and
           returns to custody post-home detention in South Australia
    • Abstract: Cale, Jesse; Burton, Melanie
      In 2016, the South Australian Government proposed expanding the use of Home Detention ('HD') sentences. A key concern of government and community alike regarding HD sentences has to do with the eligibility of prisoners for the sanction and, more specifically, the likelihood that individuals serving HD sentences will pose a threat to public safety when they are serving their sentences in the community. The aim of the current study was to establish baseline empirical evidence about: (a) the profile of prisoners serving HD sentences in the state; (b) factors associated with breaches of HD sentences; and (c) the nature and extent of reoffending by prisoners serving HD sentences. The sample consists of a cohort of prisoners released to HD in South Australia between June 2014 and June 2015 who were followed until June 2017. The results show that the most robust predictors of breaches of HD orders and returns to custody were risk assessments while prisoners were in custody. Furthermore, prisoners convicted of violent offences who received a HD sentence were less likely to return to custody compared to those who committed non-violent offences. Finally, the vast majority of offences for which prisoners returned to custody following a HD order were administrative offences.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 19:54:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 1 - Knowledge exchange: Collaborative reflexivity on
           self-medicated victims of crime
    • Abstract: de Lint, Willem; Marmo, Marinella; Groves, Andrew; Laughton, Victoria
      Collaborative research projects with service providers and their clients are becoming increasingly important for capturing a more comprehensive understanding of criminological matters. This article examines the role of academic - practitioner dialogue and collaboration in framing the concepts and protocols for an empirical study of self-medication among victims of crime. It reflects on the dynamic and nuanced encounters between criminologists, a victim support agency and victims of crime who identified as having self-medicated. Drawing from critical realist reflections on multi-agency partnerships, we offer a discussion of the benefits and hindrances for victims of such engagements, and identify the ethical implications of the practice of victim research and academic - practitioner collaboration. We reflect on the problems of authorisation, empowerment and unexpected outcomes of such research, in particular how the victims in our study appeared to place the researchers on the therapeutic continuum and what this means for victim research.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 19:54:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 1 - Mental health and the impact of relational connections
           in incarceration: Being 'other-orientated'
    • Abstract: Eades, David
      This contemporary comment reviews the shortcomings of the biomedical approach used in isolation in dealing with stress and mental health issues in the context of incarceration and explores the benefits of the biopsychosocial approach, focusing particularly on the positive social impact this model may have on the lives of those incarcerated. Interpersonal relations have been used by those incarcerated as a way to navigate the circumstances they face. The interpersonal relationships developed can have a transformational impact. This comment explores the concept of being 'other-orientated' as a major contributor in accumulating resilience and maintaining positive mental health by those incarcerated.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 19:54:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 1 - When parents kill children: Understanding filicide
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Sim, Janice
      Review(s) of: When parents kill children: Understanding filicide, by Thea Brown, Danielle Tyson and Paula Fernandez Arias (eds.), Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, 267 pages, (ISBN 978-3-319-63096-0).

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 19:54:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 1 - New perspectives on prison Masculinities [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Simpson, Paul L
      Review(s) of: New perspectives on prison Masculinities, by Matthew Maycock and Kate Hunt (eds.), Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, 343 pages, (ISBN 978-3-319-65653-3).

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Aug 2018 19:54:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - 'Ice rushes', data shadows and methylamphetamine use
           in rural towns: Wastewater analysis
    • Abstract: Prichard, Jeremy; Lai, Foon Yin; O'Brien, Jake; Bruno, Raimondo; Thai, Phong; Hall, Wayne; Kirkbride, Paul; Thomas, Kevin; Mueller, Jochen F
      Australia's world-class drug monitoring systems have difficulty gathering metrics in rural communities for reasons due to, among other things, the size of the country and problems with recruiting sufficient sample sizes. Some rural communities in data shadows (where few metrics on substance use exist) may benefit from wastewater analysis ('WWA') as a means of estimating per capita drug consumption. Wastewater analysis could be employed when debates rise about the consumption of particular drugs in certain communities. Other ways to use WWA are examined, including long-term monitoring of community drug consumption and intervention studies to test the effectiveness of health or law enforcement drug strategies. To explore the utility of WWA, this article references media coverage of methylamphetamine consumption in a small Tasmanian town, Smithton, and presents the results of the first Tasmanian WWA pilot study of methylamphetamine consumption, conducted in 2014-15.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jun 2018 22:59:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Navigating the political landscape of Australian
           criminal justice reform: Senior policy-makers on alternatives to
           incarceration
    • Abstract: Lovell, Melissa; Guthrie, Jill; Simpson, Paul; Butler, Tony
      Political ideology and populism are often thought to be major impediments to criminal justice reform. Our research has attempted to deconstruct these ideas so that the robustness of the 'punitive turn' in criminal justice policy can be better understood. This article reports upon in-depth interviews conducted with five very senior criminal justice policy-makers, each of whom was broadly sympathetic to reforming criminal justice policy to achieve the goal of lower incarceration levels. The interviews reveal that these policy-makers conceived of prison reform primarily in terms of political risk, especially when reform was related to the adoption of prison alternatives and models that focus on 'decarceration'. Furthermore, policymakers' perceptions of political risk were intricately bound up with concerns about potential public policy and program failure. This research indicates the need to develop political will for reform, alongside the further development of the myriad evaluation and policy development processes required to enable successful reform in the criminal justice space.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jun 2018 22:59:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Australian media portrayals of domestic terrorism: The
           Sydney siege and Parramatta shooting
    • Abstract: McLinden, Cassie; Barclay, Elaine M
      Content analysis of two Sydney newspapers' coverage of two recent terrorist events in Australia examined the way Australian media portray domestic terrorism. The findings revealed the existence of Orientalism (Said 1977) in Australian media portrayals of terrorism. This produced an enemy-other frame evident in the portrayal of the offender, the Muslim community and the wider portrayal of domestic terrorism. This enemy-other frame reinforced a national identity of what it means to be Australian. Social expectations concerning employment, economic contribution and values of kindness, loyalty and multiculturalism underlined the expected behaviours of individuals, separating the offenders, and to an extent the broader Muslim community from the collective Australian identity. The results affirm that media coverage of domestic terrorism goes beyond mere reporting of a terrorist event. Rather, the media employs multiple discursive frames to establish context and societal expectations regarding acceptable behaviour, national belonging, criminal justice procedures, and the role of security agencies.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jun 2018 22:59:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Institutional violence against people with disability:
           Recent legal and political developments
    • Abstract: Cadwallader, Jessica Robyn; Spivakovsky, Claire; Steele, Linda; Wadiwel, Dinesh
      International and Australian domestic evidence suggest that the prevalence of violence against people with disability is substantially higher than for the rest of the community. Much of the violence experienced by people with disability in Australia occurs within the purview of a variety of institutions, including group homes, large residential institutions, Australian Disability Enterprises (that is, disability employment facilities), schools, psychiatric facilities, hospitals and correctional facilities. This comment discusses recent domestic and international legal and political attempts to grapple with the issue of institutional violence against people with disability, focusing in particular on a series of Senate Committee inquiries into abuse and violence, regulation related to the National Disability Insurance Scheme, the coming into force of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Australia's anticipated ratification of the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture and recent calls by Disability People's Organisations and academics for a Royal Commission into violence against people with disability.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jun 2018 22:59:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Convictions through kith and kin: Legal, policy and
           ethical issues in DNA familial matching and genetic metadata
    • Abstract: Ralph, Felix
      DNA databases are now vast libraries of genetic metadata. It is possible to match the genetic relationships of a person and their family simply through their blood ties. Such DNA searches are called 'familial matching'. Investigators can take unknown DNA and then search through their existing DNA databases to see if the person may be related to any offenders on their DNA database. While there is legitimate interest in solving crime, it is not hard to foresee a future where thousands of familial matching searches are conducted each day. Despite the existence of this capability, it has barely been debated in Australia. This article tries to balance the legitimate societal need to solve crime against the whole host of legal, ethical, political, economic and racial concerns that familial matching raises.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jun 2018 22:59:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Transphobic hate crime [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ronan, Olivia
      Review(s) of: Transphobic hate crime, by Joanna Jamel, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 115 pp, (ISBN 9783319578798).

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jun 2018 22:59:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 3 - Iwitnessed: Capturing contemporaneous accounts to
           enhance witness evidence
    • Abstract: Paterson, Helen M; van Golde, Celine; Devery, Chris; Cowdery, Nicholas; Kemp, Richard
      Eyewitness testimony can provide critical leads in all types of investigations and can be extremely persuasive in court. However, inconsistencies or inaccuracies in eyewitness accounts can undermine the perceived value of this evidence, leading to miscarriages of justice. Research shows that memory fades quickly after an event. Therefore, it is important for eyewitness accounts to be collected immediately after a critical incident. Unfortunately, it is often unfeasible for police to conduct in-depth interviews at the scene. This has led to the development of immediate recall tools that witnesses can use to record an initial account without the assistance of officers. Until now such recall tools have been limited by their inflexible paper-and-pencil format. To address this issue, a team of researchers in the fields of psychology and law have worked with the New South Wales Police Force to develop iWitnessed, an evidence-based mobile phone application. iWitnessed collects and preserves witness accounts, while providing the witnesses and victims with information about support services. Users can record information as text, images or audio recordings. This application is the first of its kind and represents a novel initiative to improve eyewitness memory evidence.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jun 2018 22:59:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - 'Of middle eastern appearance' is a flawed racial
           profiling descriptor
    • Abstract: Al-Natour, Ryan
      Arab Australian communities and social science academics have argued that the racial descriptor 'of Middle Eastern appearance' increases anti-Arab racism in Australia. These stakeholders argue this descriptor is heavily racialised, gendered, criminalised and inaccurately racially profiles Arabs as Muslims with a range of phenotypical characteristics. Identifying the flawed nature of this racial profiling descriptor, this article argues that this inaccuracy enables a range of discourses attempting to legitimise and undermine anti-Arab racism. The Cronulla pogrom of 2005 is examined as a case study that details these discourses. Ultimately, this article points out how this descriptor produces a number of paradoxes, limitations and unanswered questions common in attempts to racially profile Arab Australia

      PubDate: Tue, 13 Mar 2018 23:32:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Best practice for estimating elder abuse prevalence in
           Australia: Moving towards the dynamic concept of 'Adults at Risk' and away
           from arbitrary age cut-offs
    • Abstract: Moir, Emily; Clare, Michael; Joseph, Clare; Blundell, Barbara
      In June 2017, the Australian Law Reform Commission ('ALRC') released the Inquiry on Protecting the Rights of Older Australians from Abuse. A national elder abuse prevalence study was a key recommendation to: (1) measure the extent of this problem within Australia; (2) help arrange availability and demand for resources, and responses delivered by statutory authorities and organisations; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of services designed to prevent elder abuse (ALRC 2017). In the past, elder abuse prevalence research has relied on age 'cut-offs' to determine the older population and what proportion of this population has experienced abuse. This comment questions the validity of using static age 'cut-offs' in measuring elder abuse and suggests a move forward to dynamic measures of risk for adults in prevalence studies.

      PubDate: Tue, 13 Mar 2018 23:32:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - A queer criminal career
    • Abstract: Asquith, Nicolette L; Dwyer, Angela; Simpson, Paul
      Since the publication of Moffitt's (1993) important research on adolescence-limited and life-course-persistent offending, there has been a renewal of the often tacit goal of criminology of identifying the individual factors that facilitate and inhibit deviant behaviour. In focusing on early childhood biological, genetic and psychological development, and considering social environment only as a mediating factor, these approaches miss some of the queer pathways to crime. We argue that examining offending by queer people inevitably destabilises taken-for-granted ideas about offending and desistance from offending. Moreover, given the increasing numbers of young people identifying as queer, and that they are more likely to be sanctioned by criminal processing systems, we highlight the importance of exploring the experiences of queer young people. A queer criminological lens can offer up an alternative, queer criminal career, which starts not with bio-psychological dysfunctioning, but with social exclusion and criminalisation of identity.

      PubDate: Tue, 13 Mar 2018 23:32:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Addressing family violence through Visa Sponsor
           Checks: A step in the right direction'
    • Abstract: Segrave, Marie; Burnett-Wake, Cathrine
      In 2017, the Migration Amendment (Family Violence and Other Measures) Bill 2016 (Cth) was reintroduced. The Bill proposes to mandate character checks for people seeking to sponsor family visa applications and to refuse sponsorship applications on grounds of conviction for various offences relating to abuse and family violence. With reference to the Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee inquiry into the Bill, this comment outlines the current visa sponsoring requirements, and identifies the implications, impact and limitations of the proposed measures, exploring whether they will in fact offer protection from family violence experienced by women without permanent status in, or outside of, Australia.

      PubDate: Tue, 13 Mar 2018 23:32:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Examining the accuracy of print media representations
           of homicide in Australia
    • Abstract: Waters, Emily; Eriksson, Li; Bond, Christine
      Lethal violence is particularly 'newsworthy', and international research suggests that media representations of homicides provide a distorted depiction of the actual nature and risk of homicides. Understanding media portrayals of homicide is important given the impact crime reporting may have on public opinion and policymaking. However, much of the past research has been conducted in the United States and the United Kingdom. Using a sample of Australian newspaper articles published between 1 July 2008 and 30 June 2012, this study focuses on whether media representations of homicide are consistent with the actual characteristics of homicide in Australia (as reported in the National Homicide Monitoring Program (Bryant & Cussen 2015) data). This study revealed mixed findings. Although the reporting in the sample was generally inconsistent with official homicide victim and situational characteristics, the reported offender characteristics were similar to the actual characteristics of offenders in Australia

      PubDate: Tue, 13 Mar 2018 23:32:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - Bail justices in Victoria: perceptions and experiences
    • Abstract: Colvin, Emma
      On 20 January 2017 a man drove his car into a crowded pedestrian mall in Bourke St, Melbourne, Victoria, killing six people and injuring dozens more. The alleged perpetrator had been granted bail by a bail justice only hours earlier. In the wake of this violent event the state government announced a review of the bail justice role. Historically, bail justices have been criticised for being reluctant to grant bail, yet there is relatively little written or researched on bail justices from their perspective. This article is derived from empirical research conducted on the bail support system in Victoria from 2010-14, which included interviews with bail justices. The research provided bail justices with an opportunity to discuss their experiences and respond to criticisms of their role and raised issues in relation to diversity, training, decision-making, integrity and specific procedural issues. It concludes that continuing with the role has benefit to Victorians, particularly vulnerable defendants by offering a therapeutic, pastoral care approach, although issues raised in this article need addressing to maintain the integrity of the role.

      PubDate: Tue, 13 Mar 2018 23:32:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Issue 2 - What Went Wrong With Money Laundering Law' [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Crofts, Penny
      Review(s) of: What Went Wrong With Money Laundering Law' by Peter Alldridge, Palgrave, 2016, 81pp (ISBN 9781137525352)

      PubDate: Tue, 13 Mar 2018 23:32:09 GMT
       
 
 
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