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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
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Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Context: Journal of Music Research
  [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1038-4006
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Issue 41 - Editorial
    • PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - The Oxford handbook of music and disability studies [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Tellez Vargas, Alejandro A
      Review(s) of: The Oxford handbook of music and disability studies, by Blake Howe, Stephanie Jensen-Moulton, Neil Lerner and Joseph Straus, eds; New York: Oxford University Press, 2016, ISBN 978019933144-4, 928 pp., figs, mus. exx., ill., video, audio, index.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - We'll have Manhattan: The early work of Rodgers and Hart Oxford
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Munro, Rachael
      Review(s) of: We'll have Manhattan: The early work of Rodgers and Hart Oxford, by Dominic Symonds, Oxford University Press, 2015, ISBN 9780199929481. 360 pp, incl. 30 ill., 27 mus. exx.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - Musicians of bath and beyond: Edward Loder (1809-1865) and his
           family [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Sarah, Kirby
      Review(s) of: Musicians of bath and beyond: Edward Loder (1809-1865) and his family, by Nicholas Temperley, ed., Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer Ltd, 2016, ISBN: 9781783270781. 332 pp., incl. ill., mus. exx., bibl., index.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - New perspectives on Bach [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Frampton, Andrew
      Review(s) of: Music in the castle of heaven: A portrait of Johann Sebastian Bach, by John Eliot Gardiner, London: Allen Lane, 2013 ISBN: 978-0-713-99662-3. 630 pp., incl. ill., pl., mus. exx., index; Exploring Bach's B-minor mass, by Yo Tomita, Robin A. Leaver and Jan Smaczny, eds, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, ISBN: 978-1-107-00790-1. 314 pp., incl. ill., tab., mus. exx., indices; Johann Sebastian Bach's, by Andreas Loewe; (BWV 245): A theological commentary, by St John Passion, Studies in the History of Christian Traditions, vol. 168, Leiden: Brill, 2014, ISBN: 978-90-04-26547-9. 330 pp., incl. ill., tab., bibl., indices.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - Objects and object-like: The representation of indigenous
           culture through music in Bunjilaka's 'First peoples' gallery
    • Abstract: Motherway, Siobhan
      Music is a persistent feature of museum practice and production, but is often an afterthought, a soundtrack created around a pre-existing narrative. Music can drive engagement and facilitate immersion if successful, or alienate the visitor if unsuccessful. Because of this power, it deserves careful consideration at all stages of exhibition development. It is a gift to the museum practitioner, with the potential to communicate emotional content or knowledge without requiring perfect cultural understanding on the part of the listener. It can also break through from the background, emerging from 'soundtrack' status into something with an almost physical, object-like presence, as is the case with Bunjilaka's First Peoples.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - Glocal dialects in the Sydney Jazz Scene: Indigenisation
           through the influence of Oz Rock and Asian musics
    • Abstract: Rose, Jeremy
      There has been a growing interest in the indigenisation of jazz music around the world through a process known as 'glocalisation'-the push and pull of both local and global music forces. This phenomenon has been witnessed in nationalist interpretations of jazz music outside of the USA, where artists seek to authenticate their music through adopting local traditional instruments and folk melodic material into jazz music contexts. Distinct national jazz identities have been audible in Brazilian, Nordic, and Japanese jazz scenes, to name a few. Musicians from these countries have conveyed their national character through jazz by borrowing from local traditional cultures, often creating unique musical statements that have added to the global discussion of diasporic jazz music identities. This article, which presents the findings of eleven interviews with Sydney jazz musicians, discusses how and why Sydney musicians are observed to be favouring some of the same sources as their Asian counterparts and enacting a process of indigenisation by drawing on a distinct form of popular music native to Australian soil: Oz rock.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - 'Aborigines are true soldiers of the king': Recalling the
           regimental March, Gumleaf style
    • Abstract: Ryan, Robin; Patten, Herb
      As Mark Cann, CEO of the British Forces Foundation, remarked in 2014 on music's role in war: 'it's a shared experience that helps cohesion and team bonding. It uplifts people and takes them away from the moment they are in.' Nostalgic songs, now and in the past, have been a means of mental escape between battles, of soothing isolation and of staving off boredom, concerns which are, of course, applicable to Aboriginal Australian servicemen. The adoption of European wartime songs by Aboriginal Australians deserves scholarly consideration, particularly in light of Roland Bannister's argument that contemporary accounts of military music offer histories inclusive of all society in the cause of promoting notions of citizenship and nation building.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - Fly away Peter: Scene four, 'The war'
    • Abstract: Gyger, Elliott
      In the crucial fourth scene of my opera Fly Away Peter, premiered in 2015, the protagonist, Jim Saddler, finds himself in the trenches in France during World War I. Working with the librettist Pierce Wilcox, we decided to structure this scene as a series of disconnected vignettes: brief but intense images of horror and violence, as perceived through Jim's eyes. The excerpt shows the first three of ten such vignettes. The vignettes are framed by statements of a refrain, composed for all three voices accompanied by the full ensemble (bars 1-3, 23-7, 48-52 and 65-7). The text in the refrain fragments and re-orders the phrase 'it will go on for ever'-never heard in its entirety-while the music for each refrain is based on re-articulations of the notes of a large chord, with winds and strings following different rhythmic cycles counted in semiquavers:

      Bars 1-3: winds 3+2 / strings 3+4.

      Bars 23-7: winds 2+3+2 / strings 3+4+3.

      Bars 48-52: winds 2+2+3+2 / strings 3+3+4+3.

      Bars 65-7: winds 2+2+3+2+3 / strings 3+3+4+3+4.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - The world turned upside down: An interview with Elliott Gyger
    • Abstract: Aronowicz, Andrew; Gyger, Elliott
      Elliott Gyger is Senior Lecturer in Composition at the University of Melbourne. His undergraduate studies were undertaken with Peter Sculthorpe at the University of Sydney. Gyger then completed a PhD at Harvard University, working with Mario Davidovsky. He has composed music for various Australian and international ensembles, and has received numerous awards, including the 2013 Paul Lowin Song Cycle Award. His most recent projects include a dynamic, hour-long solo piano work for Michael Kieran Harvey, titled Inferno (2013), and Smoke and Mirrors (2014), a concerto for tenor saxophone and orchestra. Gyger's first opera, Fly Away Peter, to a libretto by Pierce Wilcox, was premiered in May 2015 by Sydney Chamber Opera. The critically acclaimed opera is based on the novel of the same name by Australian author David Malouf, and explores themes of nature, war, and the individual.

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 41 - Roger Covell: The go-between
    • Abstract: Plush, Vincent
      On a hot Sunday afternoon in December 1963, Peter Sculthorpe and Roger Covell drove to Castle Hill for lunch. Their host was Patrick White. It was not long before the 51-year-old writer and 34-year-old composer were planning projects together. In that relationship, Covell became the intermediary, a kind of go-between who negotiated the speed bumps over a testy and somewhat brief relationship-ride. For several decades, Covell remained a behind-thescenes figure as Richard Meale and David Malouf proceeded to create the opera Voss, which premiered at the Adelaide Festival in March 1986. This article examines the role that Covell had in the creation of what many hoped would come to be regarded as 'the great Australian opera.'

      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:16:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Finishing the hat: Collected lyrics (1954-1981) with attendant
           comments, principles, heresies, whines and anecdotes; Look, i made a hat:
           Collected lyrics (1981-2011) with attendant comments, amplifications,
           dogmas, harangues, digressions anecdotes and miscellany [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hurley, Peter
      Review(s) of: Finishing the hat: Collected lyrics (1954-1981) with attendant comments, principles, heresies, whines and anecdotes, by Stephen Sondheim, New York: Knopf, 2010, ISBN 978-0-679-43907-3. 445pp; Look, i made a hat: Collected lyrics (1981-2011) with attendant comments, amplifications, dogmas, harangues, digressions anecdotes and miscellany, by Stephen Sondheim, New York: Knopf, 2011, ISBN 978-0-307-59341-2. 453pp.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Wagner and the French muse: Music, society and nation in modern
           France [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Orzech, Rachel
      Review(s) of: Wagner and the French muse: Music, society and nation in modern France, by Paul du Quenoy, Academica Press, 2011, ISBN 978-1-930901-80-3. 264 pp., incl. bibl., index, ill.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Dunedin soundings: Place and performance [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mitchell, Tony
      Review(s) of: Dunedin soundings: Place and performance, by Dan Bendrups and Graeme Downes, eds., Dunedin: Otago University Press, 2011, ISBN 978 1 877578 22 9. 171pp.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Frontier figures: American music and the mythology of the
           American West [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Black, Jessica
      Review(s) of: Frontier figures: American music and the mythology of the American West, by Beth E. Levy, Berkeley, University of California Press, 2012, ISBN 9780520267787. 451 pp., incl. bibl., index, mus. exx.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Off the record: Performing practices in romantic piano playing
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Scott, Anna
      Review(s) of: Off the record: Performing practices in romantic piano playing, by Neal Peres Da Costa, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, ISBN 978-0-19-538691-2. 384pp. Hbk.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - The music of Peggy Glanville-hicks [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Graham, Jillian
      Review(s) of: The music of Peggy Glanville-hicks, by Victoria Rogers, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2009, ISBN 978-0-7546-6635-6. 279pp., bibl., hb.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - 'The music is dancing free': An interview with felicity Wilcox
    • Abstract: Nelligan, Kath
      Felicity Wilcox (or Felicity Fox as she is known for her film work) is a Sydney-based composer working in film and concert music. Her commissions include film-music scores for documentaries, feature films, television series and short dramas. She has received a number of nominations for APRA and AFI awards, and was appointed the assistant music director and composer for the opening ceremony of the 2000 Paralympics. Her concert works have been performed by the Sydney Symphony Fellows, Halcyon Ensemble and Kammerklang Vox. She recently completed a PhD in composition at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music composing three works that explore concert music in a multi-media setting.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - The early twentieth-century revival of Tudor church music
    • Abstract: Cole, Suzanne
      For the past four years I have had the privilege of devoting the bulk of my time to researching the early twentieth-century revival of 'Tudor' church music as an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow. This project, as is anticipated with these kinds of fellowships, grew out of my doctoral research into nineteenth-century attitudes towards Thomas Tallis and his music. My work on Tallis focussed predominantly on the Victorian era, a period of 'peak' reception for Tallis, when he was venerated as 'The Father of English Church Music.' I became increasingly aware, however, of a radical shift in attitudes towards not only Tallis's music, but towards early English music more generally in the final decades of the nineteenth century. The pioneering work of (Sir) Richard Runciman Terry in reviving early English choral music at Westminster Cathedral from 1901 to 1924 has been widely recognised, but the existing studies have tended to portray Terry (at least partly because that was how he liked to portray himself) as a lone wolf, a radical working in isolation. My work on Tallis suggested that this was not completely true, that Terry was just one manifestation, albeit the most prominent, of a renewed interest in pre-Reformation English music that began in the early 1880s. William Smyth Rockstro, for example, in the many articles on early music that he wrote for George Grove's first Dictionary of Music and Musicians, questioned the prevailing view that the Reformation had ushered in the Golden Age of English church music, and that very little earlier music, to quote John Barnard from 1641, was 'usefull, or pleasing to the eares.' Others, including H.B. Collins, H. Orsmond Anderton, Godfrey Arkwright, and perhaps most importantly William Barclay Squire, all wrote about, edited, and/or performed long-neglected early English music around the turn of the twentieth century. I was also struck by the prominence of Catholic musicians (Collins and Rockstro, like Terry, were converts from Anglicanism) in this revival, even though Roman Catholics still made up a relatively small portion of the English population. This suggested a possible connection between the changing social and legal position of Catholics in late nineteenth-century England and the emerging scholarly interest in pre-Reformation English choral music.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Conserving the archives of a national broadcaster in Africa
    • Abstract: Counsel, Graeme
      The archives of Radio Television de Guinee (RTG) constitute one of the most important collections of cultural material from Africa's independence era. The archive holds thousands of audio and video recordings which date to the early 1960s, and which feature some of Africa's most acclaimed singers and musicians. In 2008 and in 2009 I was given unique access to the archives as part of a Major Research Project funded by the British Library. An overview of the projects and a report of the archive's holdings follows.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - W.C. Honeyman: Vibrato detective
    • Abstract: Hurwitz, David
      Establishing a useful context for the discussion and understanding of nineteenth-century sources on vibrato in violin playing is critically important for modern performers investigating historical performance practice. Because contemporary attitudes towards the technique were heavily conflicted, they often provide little assistance as a source of practical advice. This comment, from the 1890 Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, is typical: When the vibrato is really an emotional thrill it can be highly effective, as also the tremolo in extreme cases, but when, as is too often the case, it degenerates into a mannerism, its effect is either painful, ridiculous, or nauseous, entirely opposed to good taste and common sense, and to be severely reprehended in all students whether of vocal or instrumental music.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Patronage through dissemination: Louise Hanson-Dyer's patronage
           of Gustav Holst
    • Abstract: Kaleva, Daniela
      Gustav Holst has a reputation as one of the most prominent representatives of the English national school of composition from the early decades of the twentieth century. His compositional language was highly original and was influenced by English folk song and Eastern philosophy. Although Holst composed works in a wide range of genres, he is best known for his orchestral suite 'The Planets'.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Zelenka's Ave Regina Coelorum settings (ZWV 128) of 1737: A
           case study in the transmission of Viennese liturgico-musical practices to
           Dresden
    • Abstract: Kiernan, Frederic
      In recent decades, the music of Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679-1745) has been the object of increasing interest to scholars and performers of eighteenth-century music. Zelenka was one of a contingent of Bohemian musicians working at the Dresden court during the first half of the eighteenth century, when connections between the Province of Bohemia and the Saxon city were strong. The repertoire of sacred music accumulated and performed for Dresden's Catholic court church during Zelenka's career represents one of the crowning artistic achievements of that court. However, a detailed study of the complete set of Zelenka's Ave regina coelorum settings (ZWV 128) has not yet been undertaken.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - 'Reich remixed': Minimalism and DJ culture
    • Abstract: Carter, David
      In 1999, Nonesuch Records released a CD containing selected works of minimalist composer Steve Reich (b. 1936) remixed by prominent electronica artists. Reich Remixed was billed as an homage to the father of DJ/remix culture and the liner notes cite Reich as 'the original re-mixer,' stating boldly that 'mass culture has finally caught up to and embraced the fringe ideas that Reich was exploring in the 1960s.' This is an association with which Reich is not uncomfortable. Commenting on the DJ-as-remixer, Reich has said that 'here's a generation that doesn't just like what I do, they appropriate it!' Contributing artists on Reich Remixed, including Coldcut, DJ Spooky, and Howie B (Howard Bernstein), were supplied with multitrack recordings of Reich's works, allowing them to select, isolate, sample and manipulate individual instruments and parts to include in their remixes. According to Reich, the remixers worked autonomously, and his own involvement in the project was limited to selecting from the more than twenty mixes that were submitted for the project.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Notes from the heroic age of Antarctic exploration: Gerald S.
           Doorly's 'songs of the 'morning''
    • Abstract: Philpott, Carolyn
      Antarctica has inspired artistic responses from human beings for many centuries; the earliest extant visual representations of the continent date from the second century ad, more than sixteen-hundred years before it was first viewed with human eyes. Since the beginning of the so-called 'Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration' (c. 1897-1922), increased human presence in the region has enabled first-hand experiences, as well as second-hand impressions, of the unique landscape and natural environment to inform the creative work of a large number of explorers, as well as professional artists, writers, photographers and composers. In turn, artistic interpretations and representations of Antarctica have played a significant role in enhancing general knowledge and influencing public perceptions of the continent, which for most people today remains something of an unknown, imagined place that they are unlikely to experience directly. This article explores the earliest known pieces of music composed directly in response to Antarctica: a series of songs written by Gerald S. Doorly and John D. Morrison aboard the relief vessel Morning, which was sent from England to Antarctica to locate and re-supply Captain Robert Falcon Scott and company aboard the icebound Discovery in July 1902 as part of the British National Antarctic Expedition 1901-1904. These songs not only document the journey south and the explorers' Antarctic experiences; importantly, they also offer valuable insight into a little-considered aspect of the history of Antarctic exploration - that is, what the explorers did to entertain themselves and keep spirits high during long voyages at sea and freezing cold, lonely nights in Antarctica.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 37 - Editorial
    • PubDate: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:10:14 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Italian-Australian musicians, 'Argentino' tango bands and
           the Australian tango band era
    • Abstract: Whiteoak, John
      For more than two decades from the commencement of Italian mass migration to Australia post-World War II, Italian-Australian affinity with Hispanic music was dynamically expressed through the immense popularity of Latin-American inflected dance music within the Italian communities, and the formation of numerous 'Italian-Latin' bands with names like Duo Moreno, El Bajon, El Combo Tropicale, Estrellita, Mambo, Los Amigos, Los Muchachos, Mokambo, Sombrero, Tequila and so forth. For venue proprietors wanting to offer live 'Latin- American' music, the obvious choice was to hire an Italian band. Even today, if one attends an Italian community gala night or club dinner-dance, the first or second dance number is likely to be a cha-cha-cha, mambo, tango, or else a Latinised Italian hit song played and sung in a way that is unmistakably Italian-Latin - to a packed dance floor.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 16:14:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Dreyfus, Kay
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Sounds of then, sounds of now: Popular music in Australia
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Nelligan, Kath
      Review(s) of: Sounds of then, sounds of now: Popular music in Australia, by Shane Homan and Tony Mitchell, eds, Hobart: Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies (ACYS), 2008, ISBN: 978 1 875236 60 2. 295pp. index.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Music and Victorian philanthropy: The tonic sol-fa movement
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Nelligan, Kath
      Review(s) of: Music and Victorian philanthropy: The tonic sol-fa movement, by Charles Edward McGuire, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009, ISBN: 978-521- 44968-7. xxiii+240pp. Hbk, bibl., ill., mus. exx.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - The music trade in Georgian London [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Campbell, Peter
      Review(s) of: The music trade in Georgian London, by Michael Kassler, ed., Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2011, ISBN 9780754660651. xvi+560pp. Hbk, incl. index, ill.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Life after death: The viola Da Gamba in Britain from Purcell
           to Dolmetsch [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hobson, James
      Review(s) of: Life after death: The viola Da Gamba in Britain from Purcell to Dolmetsch, by Peter Holman, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2010, ISBN 9781843835745, 432pp. Hbk, incl. index, ill.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Music at German courts, 1715-1760: Changing artistic
           priorities [Book Review]
    • Abstract: O'Loghlin, Michael
      Review(s) of: Music at German courts, 1715-1760: Changing artistic priorities, by Samantha Owens, Barbara M. Reul and Janice B Stockigt, eds, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011, ISBN 978-1-84383-598-1. xx+484pp. Hbk, incl. tables, index.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - I dance myself to sleep
    • Abstract: Twist, Joseph
      In the work I wanted to explore both sleep and innocence as general, extra-musical concepts. Sleeping has long been a fascinating and frustrating activity for me. I am a very light sleeper, if not a frequent insomniac and, when I do sleep, I often have bizarre and surreal dreams, which I assume most of us experience at some point. Sleeping is a mysterious activity: a strange altered state of consciousness that may involve sleepwalking, nightmares and fantasies, while also being an essential part of living that provides rejuvenation, relaxation, escape and peace. The power of sleep may go further. As Walt Whitman suggested, sleep is a democratising force: even murderers sleep like the rest of us, young and old, black and white.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Eclectic experience - eclectic style: An interview with
           Joseph Twist
    • Abstract: Campbell, Peter
      Joseph Twist grew up in Queensland, and undertook composition studies with major Australians artists including Philip Bracanin, Richard Mills, Graeme Koehne and Nigel Butterley, leading to the award of a PhD from University of Queensland in 2009. He is an experienced performer and composer of vocal and instrumental concert music, as well as jazz and film music. He studied screen composition at the Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS) in Sydney, and received a scholarship to study jazz piano at the Dartington International Summer School. His works have been published by Morton Music in Australia and Hinshaw Music in the United States. Twist's output includes choral, instrumental and theatre works and he continues to receive commissions from a range of sources, including the Australia Council for the Arts. He has produced arrangements for David Hobson and Teddy Tahu Rhodes, as well as works for Gondwana Choirs and the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. His film work includes the orchestral score to Brendon McDonall's acclaimed short film The Law, which was screened at the Dungog Film Festival, Sydney Children's Festival and Flickerfest.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - The outsider going in: Research and participation in 'Bata'
           drumming and 'Santeria' ritual
    • Abstract: Windress, Kent
      Like many ethnomusicologists, I have come to love a music and culture that is not my own. I have vague notions about why this occurred, but I have rarely concerned myself with the reasons. While the topics that ethnomusicology engages with have broadened considerably in the past decades, I think that all musicologists (ethno- and other) are drawn towards their chosen musical fields through a process based on feelings of affinity. Whether it is the case that they were already performers in the music of their chosen field of research, that their heart was in it from a young age, or that they developed an interest in their field through exposure later in life, there existed a strong motivation to understand a particular style of music on a deep intellectual level. As Slobin concedes, 'All that is clear at this point is that strong attractions exist.' The inherent vagueness of this notion does not affect the rigours of the analytical research that ethnomusicologists conduct, but it can help explain the diversity of approach that is apparent in ethnomusicology today.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Creating musical futures in Australian schools and
           communities: Refining theory and planning for practice through empirical
           innovation
    • Abstract: Osborne, Margaret
      The preamble to the Australian Government's 2011 National Cultural Policy discussion paper envisages an Australian society in ten years, when the arts are mainstreamed and embedded into the public consciousness via a range of economic and social portfolios. Through this policy the government acknowledges the important role that arts and creativity play in the daily lives of Australians. Indeed, the intrinsic and instrumental benefits of arts education for young people and the communities in which they live and develop has been argued strongly in reviews conducted both in Australia and internationally. Unfortunately, due to the varied methodologies employed in research seeking evidence to support the positive impact of music education, the findings are equivocal. This has fuelled an ongoing debate regarding the value of arts education generally, and music education specifically, in schools and communities. Nevertheless, the Federal Government is committed to achieving an arts-inclusive society that provides a means for all Australians to participate in artistic education and expression across the country.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Deus ex machina: The importance of non-musical formats and
           chance mechanisms in Syd clayton's Yehudi
    • Abstract: Green, Clinton
      In May, 1968, musicians Barry McKimm and Roger Holmes arrived at the recently established La Mama Theatre in Carlton to perform a new piece of music by Syd Clayton entitled Yehudi. They found a note from Clayton on the theatre's door advising that the venue had been changed to a local billiards hall (probably Caf La Streega, also in Carlton). McKimm was familiar with Clayton's unconventional leanings, having played alongside him and Robert Rooney in a trio that traversed the gap between jazz improvisation and indeterminacy; both had also taken part in several performances at Keith Humble's Melbourne-based Society for the Private Performance of New Music. During these formative years, both McKimm and Clayton had embarked upon their own explorations of graphic scores and chance-based composition. Clayton was beginning to explore performance venues outside the concert hall or theatre for his own compositions, looking to public places instead. McKimm and Holmes dutifully made their way to the billiards hall (where neither the owner or patrons appeared to have been forewarned), set up their instruments and began performing from a score written in a notational system Clayton had been developing since he began composing two years earlier. The score contained no staves or time signatures, employing instead modular forms that dictated pitch, relative register, timbre and dynamics. The score for Yehudi also contained elements of collage, a 'false intermission,' and called upon the musicians to 'become actors,' requiring the performance of physical gestures (defined in the score as 'magical gestures'); the realisation of which was dictated by musical elements such as tempi and timbre. Yehudi demonstrated Clayton's interest in developing a new form of music theatre where gesture and speech overlapped with musical elements, requiring interpretation from performers that called on their improvisatory skills. Soon the La Mama audience began arriving. As the performance continued, Clayton played the jukebox.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - 'Musical pitch ought to be one from pole to pole': Touring
           musicians and the issue of performing pitch in late nineteenth- and early
           twentieth-century Melbourne
    • Abstract: Purtell, Simon
      In 1869, English vocal teacher Charles Bishenden complained that the high performing pitch in use in England was 'ruinous to the voice.' The high pitch, he reported, was the very reason why many European singers did not perform in Britain. 'For a Continental larynx,' French soprano Blanche Marchesi (1863-1940) later explained, 'it is a real torture to sing to different pitches.' 'The muscles of a trained larynx act like fine clockwork,' she wrote, and 'a change of tone, up or down, alters the precision of their action.' For this reason, Marchesi believed that 'musical pitch ought to be one from pole to pole.'

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Australia and Asia: Tracing musical representations,
           encounters and connections
    • Abstract: Scott-Maxwell, Aline
      European-Australian musical engagement with Australia's Asia-Pacific region spans a history of over one hundred and fifty years and comprises a kaleidoscope of exoticised representations; creative adaptations, transformations and hybridisations; mediated presentations and direct musical encounters in multiple media and art forms. Direct encounters began even before white colonisation, when Yolgnu of north-east Arnhem Land witnessed the ceremonies of Makassan trepang fishermen who visited annually from (present-day) Sulawesi, Indonesia, leaving traces of this cross-cultural contact in song, dance and language. Visiting or resident performers from the Asia-Pacific region entered the European-Australian cultural sphere from as early as the mid-nineteenth century, albeit mostly in a sporadic and limited way until relatively recently. For most of post-settlement history, however, music and dance forms that involved 'imagined' representations of Asia or the Pacific and were driven by the appeal of oriental exotica have, arguably, had a more profound cultural impact than any direct contact with music or music cultures from these geographic regions. In the post-World War II period, a growing consciousness of, and sense of belonging to, the Asia-Pacific region, coupled with mass migration, the end of the White Australia policy, and the adoption of multiculturalism, has intensified and diversified musical engagement, manifest in such things as a massive increase in opportunities for European- Australians to experience musical traditions from the region, and the facilitation and production of diverse creative work by composers and musicians demonstrating Asian or Pacific influences. Engagement has also extended to the community-based Asian or Pacific migrant musiccultures that interact with their Australian urban contexts and, to varying degrees, the wider Australian community.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Popular music and memory construction in Iranian diasporic
           contexts
    • Abstract: Auliffe, Sarah
      This article examines links between popular music and the construction of cultural memory in selected Iranian diasporic contexts. It draws on Philip V. Bohlman's argument that music 'functions powerfully to facilitate both remembering and forgetting ... As a means of negotiating between past and present, then, music allows us both to enter into history and to exit from it, or, more aptly, in Eva Hoffman's ironic turn of phrase, to "exit into history".' In this article I suggest that popular music, in particular, serves as an effective indicator of the ways diasporic communities construct and engage with history, as well as a powerful force in the negotiation of collective memory and movements 'into' and 'out of' history. Music, memory, history and identity emerge here as fluid and mobile, in constant flux as they bear diverse and unpredictable traces of their antecedents.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Music and state of mind: Towards an evolutionary model of
           gender
    • Abstract: Tsitsishvili, Nino
      A considerable portion of the general population, at least in the western world, would endorse the principle of gender equality. According to this opinion, men and women have an equal, innate potential for political action, leadership, invention, and creativity in the arts and sciences. A similar attitude is shared by scholars of the humanities, including ethnomusicologists. Differences between the sexes, and specifically men's greater share in the fields of science and artistic creativity, are controversial matters. Some believe that differences in performance between the sexes are the result of social conditioning and the patriarchal social order prevalent in most known societies; others, mostly led by evolutionary psychologists, offer an explanation based on the process of human evolution and sexual selection. The topic, one would agree, inevitably leads to a politically and scientifically charged polemic.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - The gendered voice of Australian country music
    • Abstract: Smith, Graeme
      How do Australian country music singers sing, and why do they sing as they do' In his 1987 article 'Why do songs have words,' Simon Frith stresses that the words of a song constitute a very small part of the meaning of the musical act. The 'voice' of the singer, understood both as the sound produced and the discursive position that the singer occupies, is a complex vehicle for meaning, acting within musical, historical, stylistic and linguistic fields. As Australian country music emerged as a genre in the 1930s and 1940s, Australian singers produced versions of the musical styles of American performers like Jimmie Rodgers, the Carter family and others. Australian performers soon developed ways of performing localism within the music style. The genre has made persistent claims to be Australia's authentic music and the true representation of Australian experience and national identity. For its practitioners and fans, Australian country music has become a voice of the nation.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 35/36 - Alan bush's 'byron symphony' and anti-imperialism in 1950s
           Britain
    • Abstract: Waters, Julie
      Alan Bush (1900-1995) was a British composer whose substantial compositional output included symphonies, operas and many chamber works. He was also a Marxist and lifelong member of the British Communist Party. In 1960 Bush completed his Byron Symphony, the third of his four symphonies. Despite receiving high praise from composers and critics such as Ronald Stevenson, Artes Orga and Malcolm MacDonald, the work remains little known.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:47:36 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Guidelines for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Choral conducting and the construction of meaning: Gesture,
           voice, identity [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Campbell, Peter
      Review(s) of: Choral conducting and the construction of meaning: Gesture, voice, identity, Liz Garnett, Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2009, ISBN: 978-9-7546-6379-9. xiii+227pp. Hbk, bibl., index, ill., DVD.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Music and men: The life and loves of Harriet Cohen; The
           Virtuoso [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cole, Suzanne
      Review(s) of: Music and men: The life and loves of Harriet Cohen, by Helen Fry, Stroud, UK: History Press, 2008, ISBN 0750948175. 320pp. Hbk, 16 plates, ill; The Virtuoso, by Sonia Orchard, Pymble, NSW: Fourth Estate, 2009, ISBN 9780732288075. 327pp. Pbk.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Frederick the great and his musicians: The Viola da Gamba music
           of the Berlin school [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Wilkinson, Ruth; Stinson, John
      Review(s) of: Frederick the great and his musicians: The Viola da Gamba music of the Berlin school, by Michael O'Loghlin, Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2008, ISBN 978-0-7546-5885-6. xviii+253pp. ill., mus. exx.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - The esoteric musical tradition of Ferruccio Busoni and its
           reinvigoration in the music of Larry Sitsky: The operas Doktor Faust and
           the Golem [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Shaw, Patricia
      Review(s) of: The esoteric musical tradition of Ferruccio Busoni and its reinvigoration in the music of Larry Sitsky: The operas Doktor Faust and the Golem, by Judith Michelle Crispin, Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2007, ISBN 978-0-7734-5407-1. vi+311pp., mus. exx., bibl.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Cultural seeds: Essays on the work of nick cave [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Chapman, Ian
      Review(s) of: Cultural seeds: Essays on the work of nick cave, by Karen Welberry and Tanya Dalziell, eds, Ashgate Popular and Folk Music Series, Burlington, UK: Ashgate, 2009, ISBN 978-0-7546-6395-9. ix+216pp. Hbk, bibl. ind.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Experimental music: Audio explorations in Australia [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Green, Clinton
      Review(s) of: Experimental music: Audio explorations in Australia, by Gail Priest, ed., Sydney: University of NSW Press, 2009, ISBN 978-1-921410-07-9. xiii+237pp., ill., ports + CD-ROM.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Breadth of Topaz
    • Abstract: Greet, Martin
      Breadths of Topaz is a work for a single percussionist utilising vibraphone and four gongs (15" chao gong, 14" tiger gong with a descending pitch, 12" bao gong and 9" opera gong with an ascending pitch). Its minimum duration is approximately three minutes but can be extended beyond this if the performer chooses to repeat sections of the work, as described below. It was composed early in 2009. The title is taken from Emily Dickinson's poem Day's Parlor. Dickinson uses the image of 'breadths of topaz' to describe the rising sun but the composition was not directly inspired by this idea and contains no programmatic reference to it. The title was simply chosen as an evocation of the sound quality and visual appearance of the percussion instruments involved in the work.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - 'Therein lies a tale': Musical and literary structure in
           Ravel's 'Ma mere L'Oye'
    • Abstract: Kilpatrick, Emily
      In the early autumn of 1908, Maurice Ravel spent several days in Valvins babysitting two young children, Mimie and Jean Godebski. By letter, he reported to their mother, Ida, on his principal duties: Family life now resumes: laborious conversations with Miss [Hatchell, the children's English governess], aided by gestures and dictionaries; stories to tell the kids, not too gloomy in the evening to avoid nightmares, but lugubrious in the morning to stimulate their appetite.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Primers and pedagogy: Franklin Peterson's textbooks
    • Abstract: Crichton, Kieran
      As is well known, every girl in England must learn the pianoforte whether she has any aptitude for the study or not. If the parents grudge the expense or are unable to afford the fee to a trained teacher, or think that as their daughter is so young or so stupid a cheap teacher will do quite well to begin with, then comes the chance of the untrained, incompetent, so-called music teacher. These two evils feed each other, and injudicious parent and incompetent teacher will flourish side by side until the present wholesale system of teaching has given place to one more rational.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 34 - Tuvaluan 'faatele': A performative and historico-geographic
           context
    • Abstract: Beaulieu, Marc
      The faatele performance begins as a hushed, almost purposefully subdued event. The faatele ensemble, a flattened wooden box and a biscuit tin surrounded by several dozen seated singers and three lines of dancers, is silent, and performers have their heads to the ground. A single voice begins the first stanza, and others immediately join in. A verse is sung, abruptly stops, then the three lines of dancers stand up. Slowly and gracefully at first, the colourfully adorned dancers move their upper bodies in a mimetic fashion, elucidating the text of the song. Quietly, and almost as if humbly introducing themselves, a group of seated men strikes the box with their open palms. The single biscuit-tin player softly strikes his tin with two wooden sticks.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 16:05:44 GMT
       
 
 
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