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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Bioethics Research Notes
  [14 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1033-6206
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Bearing the burden of aging parents: The Christian
           response
    • Abstract: Ewing, Selena
      This paper is part of a larger body of research which was partly supported by a grant from the Mary Phillippa Brazill Foundation.

      PubDate: Mon, 15 Oct 2012 09:06:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Monkey on the back: The nature of addiction
    • Abstract: Pike, Gregory K
      Drug abuse has come into the public spotlight again as the Australia21 group recently released several documents arguing for an end to the prohibition of drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, ecstasy and amphetamine. The arguments are not new, and those who advance them probably think it is only a matter of time before they achieve their goal.

      PubDate: Mon, 15 Oct 2012 09:06:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Preimplantation genetic diagnosis: A perspective from
           human dignity`
    • Abstract: Giam, Patrick
      This article seeks to explore some further ethical and legal issues surrounding the practice of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) which was the subject of a 2009 article for BRN. After briefly reviewing the state of regulation of PGD in Australia, focusing mainly on the national Guidelines developed by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), I proceed to consider the ethical problems with PGD from the Catholic and natural law position that the embryo is a human person with inherent dignity and the right to life, which forms the basis for revisiting the conclusions reached in my previous article on the proper response to the regulation of such technology.

      PubDate: Mon, 15 Oct 2012 09:06:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - More than romance
    • Abstract: Tonti-Fillipini, Nicholas
      We all have friends or family who are gay or lesbians. These are people we know and love and are a part of our families. The Rudd government's removal of laws that discriminated against them was most significant in ending inequality in the law. Now though we face something very different: the redefinition of marriage to exclude the words "a man and a woman" from what marriage means.

      PubDate: Mon, 15 Oct 2012 09:06:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Abortion rates: Is a rough estimate better than no
           estimate at all'
    • Abstract: Alstin, Zac
      Conventional wisdom teaches that prohibition is counter-productive. We are all familiar with the idea that making something illegal - whether it be drug abuse, alcohol consumption, or abortion - merely 'drives it underground'. Abortion is indeed one of the most potent examples, with the spectre of 'backyard abortion' haunting any talk of restricting abortion access. On a global scale the term 'unsafe abortion' serves the same purpose - reinforcing the idea that unless abortion is made safe, legal, and easy to access, women will resort to abortion practices that are intrinsically unsafe.

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Jul 2012 12:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Exploiting infertility vs. Natural procreative
           medicine
    • Abstract: Pfeiffer, Kimberley
      We've heard it happening more than once. A couple uses IVF to fall pregnant then later down the track they conceive naturally. Confusing, right' Aren't they supposed to be infertile' Isn't that why people request this invasive and expensive procedure in the first place' Well, a recent study shows that more than 40% of women aged between 28 and 36 years that report having a history of infertility achieved subsequent births without using any form of reproductive assistance1. Which raises the question, what does it mean to be infertile'

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Jul 2012 12:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - The case against "same-sex marriage"
    • Abstract: Somerville, Margaret
      Same-sex marriage creates a clash between upholding the human rights of children with respect to their coming-into being and the family structure in which they will be reared, and the claims of homosexual adults who wish to marry a same-sex partner. It forces us, as a society, to choose whether to give priority to children's rights or to homosexual adults' claims. This problem does not arise with opposite-sex marriage, because children's rights and adult's claims with respect to marriage are consistent with each other.

      PubDate: Fri, 6 Jul 2012 12:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Bioethics in a secular world: The ethics and the
           application
    • Abstract: Tieu, Matthew
      As a contemporary academic discipline bioethics is a specialised though multidisciplinary field of study. It is the study of the ethical issues that arise from the biological and medical sciences, as well as clinical practice. It deals with important issues such as abortion, human embryonic stem cell research, euthanasia and reproductive technology, genetic modification, animal welfare, nanotechnology and neuroethics. The "Encyclopedia of Bioethics" defines bioethics as "the systematic study of the moral dimensions -including moral vision, decisions, conduct and policies -of the life sciences and health care, employing a variety of ethical methodologies in an interdisciplinary setting". Bioethics is a branch or sub-discipline of what is referred to as "applied ethics". As such, it also draws upon those disciplines that address the nature of ethics, i.e. philosophy, psychology and religion. Bioethics as an academic discipline therefore involves both the natural sciences and the humanities.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2012 13:08:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Where have all the moralists gone'
    • Abstract: Alstin, Zac
      Do you know the term realpolitik' It' German (of course) for realistic or practical politics, and implies a view of political life in which ideals and ethics are subordinate to practical goals. Readers may be surprised to learn that there was ever a time when politics was not self-evidently the pursuit of practical goals without regard to ideals or ethics. 'olitics'alone is now sufficient to invoke bastardry, deceit, and terrifying acts of pragmatism, in the minds of many.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2012 13:08:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Maternal serum testing: Is invasive testing a passing
           era
    • Abstract: Riordan, Marcia
      Recent advances in genetic technology may mean that the brave new world really is almost here. Non-invasive prenatal genetic diagnosis (NIPD) could finally allow hundreds of thousands of genetic traits to be determined with just one maternal blood test. This could bring genetic screening of the unborn child to a whole new level and mean that as a society we face a new set of challenges in areas such as disability rights, abortion and informed consent.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2012 13:08:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Double effect reasoning and cooperation
    • Abstract: Campbell, Ray
      This paper is an abbreviated version of a paper given at the National Colloquium for Catholic Bioethicists, Melbourne, 2012. That paper in turn was an abbreviated version of part of my doctoral thesis, The Human Act and Moral Responsibility, John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family, Melbourne, 2011. The larger works give more of the context for this discussion and more examples.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2012 13:08:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - John Damian O'Callaghan (1930-2011)
    • PubDate: Thu, 12 Jan 2012 09:02:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Unscathed': Abortion and mental health
    • Abstract: Pike, Gregory K
      In the year 2000, Canberra-based writer Melinda Tankard Reist placed notices and advertisements in various places about a project she was conducting on 'Abortion Grief'. Over 200 women responded, bravely prepared to tell their stories. The resulting book, Giving Sorrow Words: Women's stories of grief after abortion1 makes harrowing reading. Grief and pain followed these women down through the years and sometimes decades. Their accounts, as well as the numerous qualitative studies into women's experiences after Abortion, and the anecdotal observations coming from post-abortion care services5 are evidence that abortion leaves a significant mark on some women.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jan 2012 09:02:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - The irrationality of excess
    • Abstract: Tieu, Matthew
      When we speak of rationality we generally speak of logic and reason in an abstract sense. However, one can also think of rationality in a practical sense. Practical rationality is our capacity to use reason and logic to form beliefs, arrive at decisions, and act in accordance with those beliefs and decisions. If we believe that we ought to do X then, all things being equal, we will do X. If we believe that we ought to refrain from smoking, or drinking or having that extra serving of dessert, then all things being equal, the rational outcome from our subjective point of view is that we are moved to act in accordance with those beliefs. This is what defines humankind as rational agents.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jan 2012 09:02:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - 'Normalising' drug use': What does the 'pro-drug'
           lobby's law reform agenda affirm and reinforce in their current endeavours
           to 'normalise' drug use'
    • Abstract: Varcoe, Shane
      Until recently, there has been a largely unnoticed contingent of stakeholders who have not merely abandoned the ideal scenario of a drug free culture, but have quickly stepped through a phase of passive indifference, into what is a 'pro-drug' position in active pursuit of rights for individuals to be protected and supported in their consumption of currently illicit drugs. The players engaged in attempting to bring about this disturbing cultural shift are varied, but certainly these advocates are 'spinning' data and even engaging noble platforms such as 'human rights' to speciously gain leverage. A key strategy in what is now a further 'push' down the slippery slope of dysfunction is the notion of normalisation.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jan 2012 09:02:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Geron and the demise of embryonic stem cell science
    • Abstract: van Gend, David
      It was to be the "new dawn" of stem cell science, but it was a false dawn. Every year for a decade the press releases of Geron Corp, a stem cell company in the US, reassured investors that their world-first treatment using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in spinal injury was going to be approved "next year".1 And every year the regulating authority in the US, the FDA, failed to give approval, asking instead for further reassurance about the safety of the trial. Finally, coinciding with the election of President Obama and the prospect of a new, liberated era of embryonic research, the FDA overcame its qualms and gave the go-ahead.

      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jan 2012 09:02:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - Scholars turn their minds to marriage : The
           jurisprudence of marriage and other intimate relationships [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Somerville, Margaret
      Review(s) of: Scholars turn their minds to marriage : The jurisprudence of marriage and other intimate relationships, by Scott FitzGibbon, Lynn D. Wardle, and A. Scott Loveless (Eds.), Buffalo, NY: William S. Hein and Co., 2010.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Oct 2011 09:11:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - The natural law of moral decline
    • Abstract: Alstin, Zac
      The varied iterations of Natural Law theory draw - either explicitly or implicitly - upon a meta-physical account of human nature. They are firmly grounded in an objective description of human nature, and the goods which characterise and sustain it. Natural Law theory is primarily a work of discovery: we distinguish between good and evil in the first instance by observing and discovering the things that contribute to human flourishing.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Oct 2011 09:11:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - 'I don't want to be a burden'
    • Abstract: Ewing, Selena R
      Sometimes we find a question in bioethics that seems so mundane and common that nobody cares to consider it, and yet it has no easy answer. The question of my current research project is this. When an elderly person, perhaps your parent or your patient, says 'I don't want to be a burden,' what do they mean and how should we respond'

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Oct 2011 09:11:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - Environmental apocalypse and Christian hope
    • Abstract: White, Robert; Moo, Jonathan
      In an age when many have begun to consider widespread environmental collapse inevitable, the certain hope held out in the Christian gospel rules out both complacency and despair. Scripture's vision of a future for all of creation that is secure in Christ and given by God's grace challenges Christians to a radical environmental ethos that is marked by wisdom, self-sacrifice, perseverance, love and joy.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Oct 2011 09:11:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Conflicts of Conscience in Health Care: An
           Institutional Compromise [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pfeiffer, Kimberley
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jul 2011 09:41:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Euthanasia - Who Is in Control'
    • Abstract: Pike, Gregory K
      Organisations agitating for legal euthanasia often use the term 'dignity'. They have discovered that it is more effective to avoid the words euthanasia or suicide and instead try to get 'dignity' somewhere in their name. Thus we have Dying with Dignity Victoria, Death with Dignity Oregon, and the Dying with Dignity Bill in Tasmania.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jul 2011 09:41:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - All Drugs Should Not Be Legalised
    • Abstract: Pike, Gregory K
      On May the 10th this year, the Director of Southern Cross Bioethics Institute, Dr Greg Pike, was invited to participate in a public debate organised by the St James Ethics Centre in Sydney, as part of their IQ2 series of debates. The subject of this debate was "All drugs should be legalised", and Dr Pike spoke against the motion. The debate was aired on ABC radio national and televised on ABC2. The transcript of his address follows - the main talk was followed by a brief additional section titled "Drugs and Human Rights".

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jul 2011 09:41:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - The Great Australian Abortion Canard: Is Law Reform
           the End of the Issue'
    • Abstract: Alstin, Zac
      At a March lecture in Canberra, Australian ethicist and pro-abortion activist Dr Leslie Cannold, spoke about the 'unfinished business' of abortion law reform in Australia. A frustrated friend sent me the transcript of this lecture and asked me to write something in response. But given the context of Cannold's lecture: a pro-abortion speech to a pro-abortion audience about pro-abortion law reform, a direct response seems impertinent. Plus, as a rule of thumb, when you play 'Pin the Tail' on a live donkey you're liable to get a kick in the teeth. It makes more sense to take Cannold's speech at face value as evidence of an abortion activist's self-imposed mission in our society. To attack her for saying what she believes is perhaps in Cannold's own words "like blaming a leopard for having spots."

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jul 2011 09:41:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Surrogacy in Australia: New Legal Developments
    • Abstract: Klein, Renate
      The practice of surrogacy in Australia has been controversial since its beginning in the late 1980s. In 1988, the famous 'Kirkman case' in the state of Victoria put surrogacy on the national map. This was a two-sisters surrogacy - Linda and Maggie Kirkman and the resulting baby Alice - in which power differences between the two women were extraordinarily stark: Maggie was the glamorous and well spoken woman of the world; Linda who carried the baby, was the demure school teacher in child-like frocks and pig tails. Their IVF doctor applauded altruistic surrogacy. He called it 'gestational surrogacy' and proclaimed that if the so-called surrogate mother didn't use her own eggs, thus wasn't the baby's 'genetic' mother, no attachment would ensue! This statement is haunting us to this day. It is patently absurd: as a baby grows in a woman's body over the nine months of the pregnancy, it is hard to see why the 24/7 presence of the baby inside her body, its growth, its interaction with her (movements, the baby's kicking) would be any different whether s/he has the mother's genes!

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jul 2011 09:41:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - The Medically Supervised Injecting Centre - an
           Evidence Based Approach to Drug Policy'
    • Abstract: Tieu, Matthew
      The main results of the reports published on the efficacy and achievements of the Medically Supervised Injecting Centre (MSIC) in Kings Cross over the last decade of its operations are discussed. The reports do not provide any substantive evidence that the MSIC has achieved its objectives.

      PubDate: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 10:30:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Stem Cells and Utility: Shifting the Balance
    • Abstract: Pike, Gregory K
      The various levels at which misunderstanding exist with regards to stem cell research are discussed. The mismatch that exists between public perception and reality with regards to the same is highlighted.

      PubDate: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 10:30:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Locked-in Happiness
    • Abstract: Alstin, Zac
      Results of a Belgian study have revealed that a large number of people suffering from Locked-In Syndrome are happy. Disability is foremost a challenge to one's values, not to our happiness.

      PubDate: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 10:30:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Children's Human Rights to Natural Biological Origins
           and Family Structure
    • Abstract: Somerville, Margaret
      Over the millennia of human history, the idea that children - at least those born into a marriage - had rights with respect to their biological parents was taken for granted and reflected in law and public policy. But with same-sex marriage, which gives same-sex spouses the right to found a family, that is no longer the case. Likewise, children's rights with respect to their biological origins were not an issue when there was no technoscience that could be used to manipulate or change those origins: a baby could only be conceived in vivo through sexual reproduction. But with assisted human reproductive technologies (ARTs) and genetic technologies, that, too, is no longer the case. So, in light of these new realities, what are our obligations, as societies, to children with respect to their biological origins and biological families' What protections do children need and deserve' I propose that the most fundamental human right of all is a child's right to be born from natural human biological origins and that children also have human rights with respect to knowing who their biological parents and families are, and that these rights must be recognized. Children also have a right to be reared within their biological families and to have a mother and a father, unless an exception can be justified as being in the 'best interests' of a particular child. The connection among adoption, the use of new reproductive technologies, and same-sex marriage is that they all unlink child-parent biological bonds. Each context raises one or more of three important issues: children's right to know the identities of their biological parents; children's right to both a mother and a father, preferably their own biological parents; and children's right to come into being with genetic origins that have not been tampered with; that is, 'designing' our children should be prohibited. Such 'designing' would result in losses with implications far beyond those persons directly affected and far beyond the present time. It would undermine the rights to equality and freedom of future generations. Because the liberty and equality of all citizens is at the heart of democratic societal institutions and of the values that democratic societies promote, to create people who are neither free nor equal undermines those institutions and values. In short, not to prohibit 'designer children' would undermine the very foundations of our Western democratic societies.

      PubDate: Thu, 14 Apr 2011 10:30:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - What Did Sheen Know'
    • Abstract: Alstin, Zac
      While researching the possibility of a link between the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the rejection of traditional Western values, a quotation from Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen emerged in which he seemed to identify just such a connection. The argument in its bare essentials is that the affirmation of a gravely immoral act is implicit rejection of any moral theory which condemns such an act. Traditional Western ethics condemns the bombing of Hiroshima as gravely immoral. Therefore, affirmation of the bombing is implicit rejection of traditional Western ethics.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Dec 2010 09:24:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - Is the Child Damage'
    • Abstract: Pietsch, Chelsea
      In a claim of negligence, plaintiffs must be able to prove that they have suffered some sort of damage or loss. Proving damage is usually a straightforward task which involves making a comparison between the plaintiff's position before and after the alleged negligence. However, what damage has been done if a doctor's negligence results in the conception and subsequent birth of a child' Is it ever possible to conceive of life as damage' These questions must ultimately be addressed in wrongful birth claims where parents seek compensation for the conception and/or birth of a life that would not have existed but for the doctor's negligent advice or treatment. However, they are not as easy for judges to answer as you may think. Judges have a duty to resolve such matters - not with reference to vague notions of 'common sense' or 'community interests' - but in accordance with established law. However, what if there is no statute or precedent that speaks on the matter' How should judges resolve such 'novel' issues' Can judges rely on 'common sense' or arguments about 'community interests' in these limited circumstances' The question of whether or not a child may be categorised as damage for the purpose of satisfying a claim in negligence is such an issue. In this essay I acknowledge that, in the absence of guiding legal rules and principles, judges have no choice but to resolve novel questions on grounds of policy considerations. I suggest, however, that a distinction should be made between legal and public policy and that reliance on the former, not the latter, may be used to assert that children are blessings, not injuries. While it may be morally desirable for the issue to end there, this is not the case. Legal policy has also developed the notion of reproductive autonomy in such a way that suggests the opposite may also be true. In an attempt to resolve these conflicting values, I propose the damage in wrongful birth cases is not the conception and/or birth of a child but rather a doctor's infringement on their patient's reproductive autonomy, which warrants legal recognition in the form of compensation.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Dec 2010 09:24:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - What 'Really' Is Eugenics'
    • Abstract: Pike, Gregory K
      Eugenics is not usually a topic for polite conversation. The first thought that typically springs to mind is Hitler's euthanasia programme, the master race and the attempted extermination of the Jews. However, an examination of the social history of eugenics reveals that in practice it operated in many other contexts, and its conceptual meaning is much broader. And while that social history has usually been confined to the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the core ideas in eugenics have been part of dreams about the human condition for millennia. It is therefore not surprising to find various modern practices, some driven by new technology, subsumed under the rubric of eugenics. Eugenics as an idea is certainly resilient, even if at times it has been elusive. Indeed, perhaps it is resilient because it is elusive. In summary, eugenics is powerful yet poorly understood. Because it appeals to utopian dreams of a better future, where humans can be freed from their 'biological slavery', as Margaret Sanger put it, it remains pervasive even if cryptic. The new eugenics is sanitised, framed as autonomous choice, and unlike the ill-informed version of the 20s and 30s or the nasty Nazi variety. But it is nonetheless potent and its various manifestations are expressions of powerful ideas that remain firmly embedded in the collective human consciousness.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Dec 2010 09:24:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - The Inherent Instability of Euthanasia
    • Abstract: Alstin, Zac
      Euthanasia, which is defined as the intentional killing of another human being, is compared with the established categories of killing in self-defence or as a foreseeable consequence of medical treatment.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Oct 2010 14:08:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 3 - Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the
           Addiction Bureaucracy [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tieu, Matthew
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Oct 2010 13:47:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 3 - 'Apres Moi Le Deluge'
    • Abstract: Alstin, Zac
      The increasing support that euthanasia is gathering in South Australia with a new euthanasia bill about to be passed is discussed. Some of the implicit and explicit challenges and pressures that the introduction of such a bill will pose are highlighted.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Oct 2010 13:47:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 3 - Defending the Hippocratic Oath: The Importance of
           Conscience in Health Care
    • Abstract: Smith, Wesley J
      The growth in policies that force healthcare workers to participate in activities that are deemed both immoral and unprofessional as against the sanctity of human life has given rise to the need for bringing about conscience in health care. The need for fashioning proper conscience clauses and challenges faced in its implementation are highlighted.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Oct 2010 13:47:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 3 - Birth and Breeding Chapter 3, from 'Neither Beast nor
           God: The Dignity of the Human Person' 2009, Encounter Books
    • Abstract: Meilaender, Gilbert
      The concept and meaning of transhumanists, or people who look forward to a world in which aging has been overcome and our physical and intellectual powers have been enhanced is discussed. The excerpts from the book Birth and Breeding: Chapter 3, from 'Neither Beast nor God: the dignity of the human person' are highlighted.

      PubDate: Tue, 19 Oct 2010 13:47:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - Eating Disorders: The Ethics of Media Reporting
    • Abstract: Graham, Noelle
      Comparisons are drawn between media reporting of eating disorders and other.forms of self-harm. Proper understanding of these illnesses can protect sufferers from further harm caused by inaccurate and insensitive reporting.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - What Works in Sexuality Education
    • Abstract: Brick, Lisa
      Sexuality education should assist young people to develop their full potential. Its effectiveness depends on its being age and development appropriate, and involving teachers or educators who are well trained and living what they teach.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 2 - Fatal Licence: Commentary on the 'Consent to Medical
           
    • Abstract: Pollard, Brian
      The extreme difficulties in attempting to make safe euthanasia law, with an argument of treatment in case of patients who can ask for death to escape from pain and patients who are not in a position to ask, are documented. Published findings of five large inquiries into the issue show that it would not be possible to make such law without endangering the lives of some of those who did not want to die.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill
           in War and Society [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ewing, Harley; Ewing, Selena
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Understanding the Nature of Drug Addiction
    • Abstract: Tieu, Matthew
      The nature of drug addiction as well as the reasons as to why people become addicts and ways to treat them is discussed. The importance of the constituent elements of, and one's development within, one's social environment, is crucial for successful recovery from addiction and a return to 'good life'.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - What Is Mercy': Reflections on the True Nature of
           Mercy in the Context of Euthanasia
    • Abstract: Pietsch, Chelsea
      The definition and meaning of mercy from the point of view of life-ending decisions or euthanasia is discussed. The different ways in which mercy can be interpreted are highlighted.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 1 - Tired of Life'
    • Abstract: Pike, Gregory K
      The Dutch government is debating extending its euthanasia scheme to 70 year old who wish to receive a lethal injection at the hands of specially trained 'suicide assistants' who wish to end their lives as there is nothing left for them to do. The government has been forced to consider the concept following a signature campaign by over 100,000 individuals for the same.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
 
 
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