Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 387 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 387 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Narrative Therapy & Community Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Irrigation Australia: The Official J. of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
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Australian Universities' Review, The
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0818-8068
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Losing faith in the classification and evaluation of
           research: A meta-metrics approach to research on religion in Australia
    • Abstract: Possamai, Adam; Long, Gary
      This article uses a meta-metrics approach to research the research in Religion and Religious Studies (Field of Research (FoR) Code 2204) in Australia. Comparing and contrasting various results from the data provided by the Australian Research Council (ARC) on its Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) process, as well as global rankings data, the findings point to a reported drop of quality of research in this field. In this article we argue that this loss of quality could be due to the way this FoR Code is constructed and we call for its revision. This research also points to a considerable disparity between peer review disciplines such as FoR Code 2204 and citation disciplines.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Letter from the editor
    • Abstract: Dobson, Ian R
      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - What will follow the international student boom'
    • Abstract: Calderon, Angel
      This paper highlights some of the challenges being faced by Australian higher education which are likely to have an impact over the next ten years and beyond and opportunities to deal with them. In doing so, the policy settings from the Dawkins reforms in the late 1980s to the present which have shaped the higher education landscape are described, bringing into perspective the operating context for Australian universities. Two key themes are discussed: universities' reliance on international students, and demographic shifts. The discussion that follows is how these drivers are likely to shape demand for higher education and what impact these will have on universities over the next ten years.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Disciplines in their organisational context: Mapping
           Australian faculty structures to the ASCED and ANZSRC fields of education
           and research
    • Abstract: Hider, Philip; Coe, Mary
      In this study, we investigated the extent to which the national classifications of disciplines reflect the organisational structures of Australia's universities. The names of faculty units of ten universities were mapped onto the fields of education set out in the Australian Standard Classification of Education (ASCED) as well as the fields of research in the Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (ANZSRC). The results show a fair degree of alignment between the faculty structures and both classification schemes, but also reveal much variation in the degree of alignment amongst the universities sampled. Schools and other second-level units are slightly more aligned to ASCED than to ANZSRC. Several units covering more specific fields are not represented in the current ASCED and ANZSRC classifications, though most non-alignment is due to divergent ways of dividing and compounding broader disciplinary areas. The degree of alignment to the research classification has changed little, overall, since the time of ANZSRC's predecessor, the Australian Standard Research Classification.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Organisational Narratives vs The Lived Neoliberal
           Reality: Tales from a regional university
    • Abstract: Rogers, Marg; Sims, Margaret; Bird, Jo; Elliott, Sue
      Organisational narratives are foundational to inform the actions and directions of an organisation. Modern organisations often place great weight and invest significant time crafting their narratives that are communicated through mission statements, strategic plans, policies, directives and self-promotion. Sometimes these narratives align with the lived reality of the workers and those who deal with the organisation, but at other times there is a significant gap, or even chasm, between the portrayed ideal and the reality. This paper situates such narratives, and the lived experiences within critical organisational theory and a neoliberal framework. Utilising autoethnographic accounts of four academics within a higher education context, it highlights this gap and the need to voice concerns about this misalignment. The paper raises awareness of both organisations and workers to the importance of being true to narratives and ensuring they are an accurate representation of what happens. It offers ideas for resisting the disjunction between narrative and reality and a way of challenging neoliberalism within higher education.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - What ongoing staff can do to support precariously
           employed colleagues
    • Abstract: Ford, Jessica; Ison, Jess; McKenzie, Lara; Cannizzo, Fabian; Mayhew, Louise R; Osborne, Natalie; Cooke, Benjamin
      There is a growing divide between ongoing and precarious academics in Australia. Precarious academics are often exploited, underpaid, and have little hope of gaining permanency. In this article we offer suggestions to ongoing academics on how to improve the working lives and conditions of precarious colleagues. Our suggestions range from easy and straightforward to more challenging. We offer them to encourage discussion and action, and to inspire ongoing academics to consider how the circumstances of precarious academics today may differ from their own experiences as 'early career' academics.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Academic clickbait: The arcane art of research article
           titling
    • Abstract: Moore, Tim
      The research is complete, the article written, there's just one last job - think of a great title, one that not only elegantly summarises your research, but that is also going to grab the attention of a fickle and perpetually time-poor readership.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Watch out!: The great university implosion is on its
           way
    • Abstract: Hil, Richard
      With China supposedly undermining our national security and way of life, and causing ructions on university campuses, it's time to take stock of the threat before us. So serious has the situation become that some have called for the equivalent of a dad's army capable of protecting our shores from possible Chinese incursions. (Border security, you see, are still flat out trying to turn back the boats).

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - 'Amplifier' platforms and impact: Australian scholars'
           use of 'the conversation'
    • Abstract: Osman, Kim; Cunningham, Stuart
      Digital and social media have grown exponentially to become highly influential spheres of public communication - increasingly crowded, contested, and corrupted, and increasingly in need of scholarly engagement. Alternative metrics ('altmetrics') that are generated from social and digital media platforms have become more important as indicators of impact and engagement for scholars. In AUR 61/2, we reviewed the growth of amplifier platforms and the academic and contextual reasons for their growth. In this article, we investigate how scholars frame their practices of engagement and impact, how they use 'amplifier platforms', in particular The Conversation, and to what extent institutions are supporting their staff in these activities. We find that scholars frame engagement and impact as an ethical imperative and place importance on evidence-based messaging; that they are not only interested in seeing their own research amplified, but in amplifying other quality research; that this benefits their other academic activities; that open access models promote republication and increase reach and engagement; and that institutional support for engaging on amplifier platforms is uneven and underdeveloped.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Responsible academics [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Klikauer, Thomas
      Review(s) of: The responsibility of intellectuals: Reflections by Noam Chomsky and others after 50 years, by Nicholas Allott, Chris Knight and Neil Smith, ISBN 9781787355514, paperback, London, University College London Press (free PDF download from 144 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - All bull, no point [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Klikauer, Thomas
      Review(s) of: Bullshit jobs - the rise of pointless work, and what we can do about it, by David Graeber, ISBN 9780141983479, paperback London and New York, Penguin Books, 332 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Resistance is not futile [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Klikauer, Thomas
      Review(s) of: Resisting Neoliberalism in Education - Local, National and Transnational Perspectives, edited by Lyn Tett and Mary Hamilton, ISBN 978-1447350057, hardback, Bristol, Policy Press and Bristol University Press, xx+270 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - Brain, brain, go away; come again another day [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Onsman, Andrys
      Review(s) of: Why the Brain Matters. A teacher explores neuroscience, by John Tibke, ISBN 978-1-4739-9291-7 (pbk), Corwin, 204 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 62 Issue 1 - It's all about building a narrative
    • Abstract: O'Neill, Arthur
      Trevor Prout (known behind his back as 'Brussels' to friend and foe alike) had to deliver on a promise. Asked what his priority would be if appointed to the position of Vice-Chancellor, University of Central Tasmania (UCT), he espoused a bold vision: to institute a root-and-branch makeover of the university's image. Beleaguered by northern and southern competitors, the Selection Committee grasped at any straw that would rescue UCT from oblivion in the course of yet another widely-expected round of mergers. Geography counted against continued existence - the usual resort was to put universities together that preyed together; so, Trevor's scheme was to distinguish UCT in such a way as to avoid its capture by a neighbour.

      PubDate: Sat, 7 Mar 2020 00:44:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Letter from the editor
    • Abstract: Dobson, Ian R
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - 'My study is the purpose of continuing my life': The
           
    • Abstract: Hartley, Lisa; Baker, Sally; Fleay, Caroline; Burke, Rachel
      People seeking asylum in Australia face complex and significant barriers accessing higher education. Due to the temporary nature of their visa, their only pathway to university is being granted admission as an international student, which is financially prohibitive. This paper focuses on the lived experience of people seeking asylum with regard to accessing higher education, and identifies six major themes: the importance of accessing studies; the stress of struggling to meet living expenses while studying; mental health issues; support for people with disabilities, health challenges, and family responsibilities; the importance of language support and navigational brokers; and the role of higher education in the settlement of people seeking asylum. The research indicates that more university and community support is needed to foster access and participation, but the priority should be on addressing the Australian Federal Government policies that underpin the most significant barriers facing people seeking asylum in accessing higher education. This recommendation is most pressing in light of the re-election of the Coalition Government in May 2019, which has committed to continue these restrictive policies.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - W(h)ither the honours degree in Australian
           universities'
    • Abstract: Horstmanshof, Louise; Boyd, Bill
      Australian universities offer diverse approaches to bachelor's (honours) degrees as a means of dealing with a range of contemporary demands. These demands include responding to (i) the Bologna Declaration, (ii) tensions between the conventional role for honours as a PhD pathway and an emerging role for honours as professional development, and (iii) the rigid Commonwealth funding model for honours. Benchmarking of honours across the Australian higher education sector remains problematic, much as it did in the 2009 Australian Learning and Teaching Council review of Australian honours programs. Little research into honours degrees has been done since that review. Nevertheless, while honours degrees continue as a pathway to higher degree research, other modes of honours and other programs (e.g. master's) vie for equivalent status in the Australian higher education sector, each seeking to adapt to professional development and accreditation education demands. These shifts raise questions about the role of honours in Australian higher education, hence our question, 'W(h)ither the honours degree in Australian universities''

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Examiner feedback and Australian doctoral examination
           processes
    • Abstract: Dally, Kerry; Holbrook, Allyson; Lovat, Terence; Budd, Janene
      Doctoral thesis examination is the litmus test for doctoral quality. Of those candidates who reach examination, most are notified they have more work to do on their thesis. Receiving and responding to feedback are integral parts of a formal learning process that continues until the final thesis is submitted. However, little is known about what happens after examiner reports are received by an institution, how recommendations and feedback are filtered through institutional processes to influence thesis outcomes, or about the roles that candidates and supervisors play in determining and giving action to thesis revisions. This article reports the findings from a desktop review of institutional protocols and policies governing doctoral thesis examination in Australian universities. Given that the PhD Viva, or oral examination, is rare in Australian universities, the authors question whether current examination processes allow adequate opportunities for candidates to actively engage with examiner feedback and take advantage of this final opportunity to demonstrate, or further develop, authoritative judgement and research autonomy.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Academic administration and service workloads in
           Australian universities
    • Abstract: Kenny, John; Fluck, Andrew
      This paper addresses the important and linked questions of how to manage academic performance and workload effectively. It highlights the need in a modern, corporatised university to consider the nature of academic work and optimal ways to develop workload allocation and performance management processes. This paper complements two previous papers on time associated with teaching and research components of academic work by exploring service/administration workloads. Data were collected from 665 academics with recent administration experience through a nation-wide survey in 2016 and 2018. The data were analysed to understand the median annual work hours for a range of internal and external service activities, and for a range of formal administrative roles. The analysis showed a further categorisation of academic service into operational and strategic activities. Together, the three papers underpin holistic academic workload model development using empirical annual hour allocations from a large and representative national sample of academics. This article provides an essential basis for any future consideration of performance assessment based on output measures such as research expectations, impact or quality.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Engagement and impact through 'amplifier platforms'
    • Abstract: Osman, Kim; Cunningham, Stuart
      Digital and social media have grown exponentially to become highly influential spheres of public communication - increasingly crowded, contested, and corrupted, and increasingly in need of scholarly engagement. As public debate is conducted more through social and digital media, alternative metrics ('altmetrics') that are generated from social and digital media platforms become important as indicators of impact and engagement. We review the growth of amplifier platforms and the academic and contextual reasons for their growth. Amplifier platforms are defined to distinguish them from traditional media outlets (where the scholarly voice is mediated through and 'gatekept' by journalists, whose editors retain final control), personal blogs (very few of which can be maintained over time) and from social media platforms (where the scholarly voice is accorded no presumptive standing). A significant range of amplifier platforms is canvassed while acknowledging that in Australia, the amplifier platform 'The Conversation' plays a central role.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - More work for less reward: Academic perceptions of
           service teaching
    • Abstract: Clifton, Delma; McKillup, Steve
      Service teaching, through which core courses or modules are provided by a department other than the one administering the degree, occurs in universities worldwide, but there have been many reports of student dissatisfaction with their service-taught courses. The experiences of service teachers have received little attention and may help to suggest strategies for improvement, so we surveyed service and discipline teachers from the science departments/faculties at Australian universities for their perceptions of the difficulty, the effect on the likelihood of promotion, and qualifications needed, for each type of teaching. Both service and discipline teachers perceived service teaching to be significantly more difficult, yet significantly less valuable for promotion, than discipline teaching. More research is needed to investigate whether these perceptions reflect the realities of service teaching because, if they do, they will have implications for university policies and workload models.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Three cheers for the Ramsay centre
    • Abstract: Davies, Martin
      In 2018 Australia's leading national university, the ANU, decided to break off consultation with the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation over a generous bequest to fund a course on Western civilisation. It is not every day that a university decides to turn down a $3 billion bequest to fund a humanities program (Groch, 2018). In these straitened times this seems a very regrettable decision indeed.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - 'Continuous improvement' in higher education: Response
           to 'neoliberalism and new public management in an Australian university:
           The invisibility of our take-over' by Margaret Sims (2019)
    • Abstract: Mitchell, Cat
      It is difficult to overestimate the reach of neoliberalism across social, cultural and political life, including in higher education. Margaret Sims (2019) makes this apparent in her examination of the impacts of neoliberal rationalities on an Australian university based on her experience as a senior academic. Her account is a resonant one, with much in her text speaking directly to the higher education situation in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In this response, I seek to pick up one of the threads in Sim's article, specifically her comments about the demands on academic staff for continuous improvement. This is a discourse that is brought to bear in a complex matrix of measures to enable the audit, evaluation and close control of academic work in pursuance of the neoliberal focus on efficiency (Olssen and Peters, 2005).

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - The end of Endeavour: The short and tumultuous life of
           'Australia's fulbright', the Endeavour program
    • Abstract: Barker, Joanne
      In April 2019, the Australian Government's well-regarded Endeavour Leadership Program was quietly scuttled. Since 2003, the Endeavour program (previously known as the Endeavour Scholarships and Fellowships program) had supported Australian postgraduate students, researchers and career professionals to study overseas. It also brought talented international scholars and fellows to Australia from all over the world. On the data available for the past 12 years, about 2000 Australians and 4500 foreign nationals were the recipients of Endeavour awards.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - The Ramsay centre and 'western civilisation': An
           attempt at historical perspective: A reaction to Martin Davies' paper
           (this issue)
    • Abstract: Bonnell, Andrew G
      Martin Davies' paper seeks to vindicate the efforts of the Ramsay Centre to fund courses in 'Western Civilisation' at selected Australian universities. He begins by lamenting the rejection of vast amounts of philanthropic money for the humanities, and all too quickly dismisses the stated grounds for the Australian National University's decision to decline a deal with the Ramsay Centre: 'The issue of academic autonomy has been raised as a reason, but this is, at best, ostensible', Davies writes. He then goes on to defend the concept of courses in Western civilisation more generally.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Per aspera ad astra' [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Onsman, Andrys
      Review(s) of: High participation systems of higher education, by Brendan Cantwell, Simon Marginson and Anna Smolentseva (Eds), ISBN 978-0-19-882667-7 (hbk), Oxford University Press, 465 pp., 2018.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Knowledge: Tomato is a fruit. Wisdom: You don't put it
           in fruit salad [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mudford, Neil
      Review(s) of: Knowledge and global power - making new sciences in the South, by Fran Collyer, Raewyn Connell, Joao Maia and Robert Morrell, ISBN 97821925495768 (pb), Monash University Publishing, 217 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Dumb and dumber [Book Review]
    • Abstract: White, Kate
      Review(s) of: Why do so many incompetent men become leaders' (and how to fix it), by Thomas Chamorro- Premuzic, ISBN 10 1633696324; ISBN 13 978-1633696327, Harvard Business Review Press, Boston, 214 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - An insider's account of wages campaigns for women
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: White, Kate
      Review(s) of: Winning for women: A personal story, by Iola Mathews, ISBN (pb) 978-1-925835-15-1, Monash University Publishing, Clayton, 301 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Working people into misery [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Klikauer, Thomas
      Review(s) of: Lab rats - why modern work makes people miserable, by Dan Lyons, ISBN 978-1-78649-393-4 (pbk.), London Atlantic Books, 259 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - Back to basics [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Abrahams, Natasha
      Review(s) of: The good university: What universities actually do and why it's time for radical change, by Raewyn Connell, ISBN Paperback 9781786995407, London, UK, Zed Books, 240 pp., 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 2 - STEM - education for the global economy [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Klikauer, Thomas
      Review(s) of: Miseducating for the global economy: How corporate power damages education and subverts students' futures, by Gerald Coles, ISBN 978-1-58367-690-5, paperback, New York Monthly Review Press, 256 pp., 2018.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 19:25:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Letter from the editor
    • Abstract: Dobson, Ian R
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Economics, education and citizenship
    • Abstract: Obeng-Odoom, Franklin
      In the current political economic dispensation, it is important to revisit the opportunities for citizenship, cooperative, and public economics and the responsibility of economics teachers. In doing so, it is essential to analyse the nature of the dominant pedagogical philosophy of individualism, probe what alternatives could be embraced, investigate whether citizenship is a superior compass, and ascertain how students respond to alternatives. The case study reported in this paper demonstrates not only that individualism is problematic but also that citizenship, public and cooperative economics have much prospect of success. Students who are enrolled in economics subjects could show substantial awareness of social justice and, based on their own account, that awareness could be increased. Overall, students appreciate the opportunity to challenge the status quo. If so, citizenship and cooperative economics have a place in the study of economics - contrary to the widely held view that they are irrelevant. It is the responsibility of teachers to expose the ideology of this impossibility view, emphasise the possibilities for cooperative economics and citizenship, and empower students to question and become citizens.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Neoliberalism and new public management in an
           Australian university: The invisibility of our take-over
    • Abstract: Sims, Margaret
      The higher education sector in Australia is operating in an ideological context in which the ideas of managerialism and neoliberalism combine to create a discourse shaping the lives of both workers and students. The practices that emerge inside higher education organisations as a result combine to form an organisational neoliberal managerial culture that shapes practices, operating in a vicious cycle. In this vicious cycle, managers set the organisational culture through the roles they take on in this figured world, leading to particular ways of behaving and engaging in the practice of management. These experiences are received and internalised by their recipients who come to believe their reality reflects the only way things operate. In this paper I take an autoethnographic approach to reflect on my experiences of the practices emerging from this culture as I have experienced them within one higher education organisation in Australia. I argue that we are seeing the operationalisation of a discourse of managerial privilege that, in the long term, is not only detrimental to the functioning of higher educational organisations but puts at risk the wellbeing of the nation through its impact on both staff and students.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Doctoral supervisory quality from the perspective of
           senior academic managers
    • Abstract: Kiley, Margaret
      It has been suggested in the literature that the relationship with a doctoral supervisor is the predominant factor in student decisions to continue or withdraw from their candidatures. However, anecdotally it is not uncommon to hear heads of department, faculty deans and those in similar positions say that they know who the poorly-performing doctoral supervisors are, but often they are not sure what they, or others can do to remedy the situation. This study is based on interviews with 34 senior staff in order to understand how they identified supervisors who they generally considered less than ideal in the way they supervised doctoral candidates. This was followed by how they addressed, often, the multiple issues involved. The results provide helpful insights for staff in leadership positions as well as those whose role it is to support doctoral education, and particularly candidates and supervisors.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - The Kantian University: Worldwide Triumph and growing
           insecurity
    • Abstract: Marginson, Simon
      How might we think about that institution called 'the University', at home and across the world' Because something like the institution we know is now found in every part of the world, and there are identifiable commonalities everywhere. Are the small quiet foundations of the University in Europe still relevant' What kind of institution has the University become'

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Silencing behaviours in contested research and their
           implications for academic freedom
    • Abstract: Hoepner, Jacqui
      What do attacks on 'unpalatable' research reveal about academic freedom' When academic work is curtailed, this cherished yet misunderstood concept is undermined. Silencing based on moral objection - rather than wrongdoing - suggests academic freedom is more constrained than we believe. On paper, academic freedom is rule-bound, yet 'dangerous' ideas produce overwhelmingly visceral reactions. It was these emotional responses I examined to explore the difference between what we believe academic freedom to be, and how it manifests in contentious fields. I conducted qualitative interviews with 18 researchers whose work elicited condemnation or constraint beyond 'legitimate' scholarly critique. I used mixed-methods data analysis to determine shared themes and characteristics. While academic institutions uphold their commitment to unfettered enquiry, 'academic freedom' is highly contingent and subject to the values of players in a range of disciplinary and institutional fields that together yield a generalised field of 'academic research'. This research challenges assumptions about 'freedom' by identifying parameters that bound the notion. I argue the concept is indeed bounded, and that academics become aware of those bounds when they bump up - often unexpectedly - against them.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Whose future': Or why we need to think more
           expansively about the future of Australian higher education
    • Abstract: Hil, Richard
      Future gazing has become something of a hobby among higher education boffins. It's more head-scratching than staring into the tea leaves and crystal balls, but the thinking caps are definitely on - well; sort of.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Free speech on Australian campuses: Hidden barriers
    • Abstract: Martin, Brian
      Speech at Australian universities is restricted in various ways. A few of them, such as student protests against visiting speakers, receive lots of attention. Others seldom do, such as defamation threats and cyber harassment. Self-censorship may be more significant than overt censorship. Those who want to raise awareness of hidden limitations on speech can learn from the methods used to raise the alarm about student protests.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Publications, citations and impact factors: Myth and
           reality
    • Abstract: Nathan, Robert Jeyakumar; Shawkataly, Omar bin
      This article discusses the role of university academics as researchers. In present-day society which touts instant gratification, the primary role of a university is being undermined. In Malaysia, academics no longer teach and research as they please but are 'guided' by government agencies and influenced by the priorities of funding agencies. One of the components of academic freedom is the freedom to publish. Academics publish research that pushes the boundaries of knowledge. They choose journals in which their articles will be peer-reviewed, published and read by the communities of interest. However, lately many academics tend to publish in journals based on rankings, in journals reputed to have higher impact than others. Often young academics are puzzled whether they should publish where it matters or where it would quickly boost the key performance indicators (KPIs) set by the university. This article highlights some of these struggles in modern academia and exposes several examples of academic misconduct.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Accounting for the university of the future [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Moore, Tim; Taylor, Gordon
      Review(s) of: The university of the future: Can the universities of today lead the learning of tomorrow', by Ernst and Young, EYGM Limited, 34 pages, 2018; The big four: The curious past and perilous future of the global accounting monopoly, by Ian D. Gow and Stuart Kells, ISBN 9781863959964, Black Inc, 272 pages, 2018.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Managing bullshit [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Klikauer, Thomas; Tabassum, Reshman
      Review(s) of: Business bullshit, by Andre Spicer, ISBN 9781138911673 (pbk.), London, Routledge, xii+200 (index), 2018.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Us and them [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Klikauer, Thomas; Tabassum, Reshman
      Review(s) of: Business and society: A critical introduction, by Kean Birch, John Justin McMurtry, Darryl Reed, Caroline Hossein, Mark Peacock, Alberto Salazar, Sonya Scott, and Richard Wellen, ISBN 978-1-78360-448-7 (pbk.), London, Zed Books, ix+301 pages, 2017.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - I create, therefore I am [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Onsman, Andrys
      Review(s) of: Creativity crisis. Toward a post-constructivist educational future, by Robert Nelson, ISBN 9781925523270, Monash University Publishing, 264 pages, 2018.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - It's time! [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Rodan, Paul
      Review(s) of: Whitlam's children: Labor and the greens in Australia, by Shaun Crowe, ISBN 9780522874051 (paperback), Melbourne University Publishing, 265, pages, 2018.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 61 Issue 1 - Unveiling opportunities for hope: Is it too much to
           ask for a compassionate university'
    • Abstract: Boyd, Bill; Grant, Airdre
      A few years ago, one of us responded, in this journal, to an article by Australian academic Eva Peterson, who had set out to celebrate the joy of an academic career (Boyd and Horstmanshof, 2013). Peterson explored the narratives of the aspirations of research academics as they moved forward in the academy, only to find a tale of woe (Peterson, 2011). There was, found Peterson, a malaise in the university. Early career scholars were making choices and expressing aspirations in an atmosphere of, as they understood and experienced it, overwork and undervalue. Instead of exciting career path strategies, Peterson encountered coping strategies and exit strategies. She concluded that policy makers and university managers would do well to listen to the stories of these academics, their narratives, instead of continuing, as she claimed, to dismiss and denigrate them. A grim picture indeed: one that, although the word was not used, lacked compassion.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Mar 2019 21:34:10 GMT
       
 
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