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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australian Journalism Review
  [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0810-2686
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Way-finder on a contested journey [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Muller, Denis
      Review(s) of: Media innovation and disruption, by Dodd, A., and Sykes, H. (Eds.). (2016), Future Leaders, Melbourne, ISBN 9780994404435, pbk, 159pp, free.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Global view of political journalism [Book Review]
    • Abstract: McGuinness, Kieran
      Review(s) of: Comparing political journalism, by De Vreese, C., Esser, F., and Hopman, D. N. (Eds), (2017), Abingdon, Routledge, ISBN 978113865586, hbk, pbk, ebk, 200 pp, hbk 90 pounds, pbk 26.99 pounds, ebk $US36.22.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Prime Minister fisher and the press [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Putnis, Peter
      Review(s) of: Andrew fisher and the news media, by Sykes, J. (2015), Thirroul, NSW, Jolyon Sykes, ISBN 9780994279613, pbk, 24pp, $5.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Honouring genre with depth and pace [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Voumard, Sonya
      Review(s) of: Behind the text: Candid conversations with Australian creative nonfiction writers, by Joseph, S. (2016), Melbourne, Hybrid Publishers, ISBN 9781925272475 (pbk), pbk, ebk, 250pp, pbk $A29.95, ebk $US7.66.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Insightful but uneven [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Fuller, Glen
      Review(s) of: Social media: Communication, sharing and visibility, by New York and London, Routledge, ISBN 9780415712248, pbk, hbk, ebk, 170pp, 24.99 pounds pbk.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Contributor notes
    • PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Busting political exclusion myths [Book Review]
    • Abstract: O'Donnell, Penny
      Review(s) of: Journalism and political exclusion: Social conditions of news production and recep tion, by Clarke, D. M. (2014), Montreal, McGill-Queen's University Press, ISBN 9780773542822, pbk, hbk, ebk, 376pp, $34.95 pbk, $110 hbk.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - The disclosure disconnect: Ideals of transparency and
           editorial reality
    • Abstract: Fisher, Caroline
      Disclosure of a journalist's interests is one of a range of transparency measures being advocated to help lift levels of accountability and public trust in journalism. However, there is a lack of consensus about the efficacy of this type of personal disclosure and how it should be performed. This paper reports on inductive analysis of semi-structured interviews with 10 Australian news editors about managing the transition of former reporters from press secretary to political journalist. The data revealed disagreement about the need for former political staffers to declare their previous employment to the audience once they became political news reporters. However, all argued reporters should be judged on their journalism practice and not on their CV. This paper highlights the tension between the ideal of transparency and the ongoing reliance on the norm of objectivity in conceptions of journalistic professionalism.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Uncertainty framing and the IPCC 'Fifth assessment
           report'
    • Abstract: Miliauskas, Anna; Anderson, Heather
      The issue of climate change has been a major focus of reporting in the Western media for some years, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been at the centre of much of this coverage. But while reportage of the most recent report of the IPCC has been extensively monitored elsewhere, it has received less attention in Australia. This paper examines coverage by Australia's national newspaper, The Australian, of the Fifth assessment report (AR5) of the IPCC, released in 2013-14. The paper examines the key frames manifested in the newspaper's coverage of the AR5, and concludes that, overall, the report was principally mediated within an uncertainty frame.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Public mission as strategy for future Australian local
           government communication
    • Abstract: Simmons, Peter; Erskine, Victoria
      Most Australian local governments (LGOVs) employ at least one professional communicator, but there are few sector-wide professional principles to guide LGOV communication practice. This paper examines challenges for councils and ways that LGOV communication may be conceptualised in the future. Councils and their communicators find themselves between pressures to change for an uncertain future and pressures to protect a status quo that no longer exists. Communities and their communication technologies are trending towards more open communication: expecting more participatory interaction and organisational responsiveness. Digitised mediatisation is compelling LGOVs to expand a longstanding reliance on traditional media and broadcasting information to include more listening and interaction. The analysis here strongly supports the alignment of communication strategy with the public mission of local government. It recommends umbrella principles for LGOV communicators that include commitment to plurality in decision process contributions, outreach to interested and affected stakeholders and transparency in processes with accountability to stakeholders for awareness, timing and outcomes.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - The poverty of parochialism: Why journalism ethics
           should go global
    • Abstract: Ward, Stephen JA
      This article argues that journalism needs to move from a practice shaped by parochial values to a practice guided by global values. The article begins by explaining the distinction between being parochial and being global in one's values. The distinction is used to distinguish between parochial and global journalism, from an ethical perspective. The article's second half examines how the adoption of a global journalism ethic would change and improve journalism and its coverage of global issues. The article concludes by considering ways to realise a global ethic in journalism practice.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - 'It has a bleak future': The effects of job loss on
           regional and rural journalism in Australia
    • Abstract: Zion, Lawrie; Sherwood, Merryn; O'Donnell, Penny; Dodd, Andrew; Ricketson, Matthew; Marjoribanks, Timothy
      Severe contractions in the Australian media landscape have led to a loss of jobs in major metropolitan newsrooms. In 2015, those cuts spread significantly to regional and rural newsrooms. This paper explores the effects of job loss on rural and regional journalism through a survey of 31 journalists working at rural and regional media organisations whose positions were made redundant from 2012 to 2015. As well as providing accounts of their personal redundancy experiences, this paper explores the participants' opinions of regional and rural journalism. It concludes that those whose positions in local journalism have become redundant are concerned about the resources of local newsrooms and the quality of journalism these newsrooms can subsequently produce.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Digital media and local democracy: News media, local
           governments and civic action
    • Abstract: Freeman, Julie; Hutchins, Brett
      The study of digital media and political action must consider variations in media ecologies to account for the ways in which contextually specific circumstances influence the character of local democratic participation. This article argues for this need by synthesising the disconnected literatures on Australian communications infrastructures, municipal governments and local news media. It reveals uneven levels of connectivity, restricted digital government practices and a decreasing capacity of local newsrooms and journalists to cover local politics. These problems coalesce to create risks of ill-informed citizenries, illegitimate local decision making and minimally accountable local governments. This situation contributes to the democratic marginalisation of communities, with political power remaining embedded within the hierarchal decision making system of Australian local government.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Journalists versus public relations practitioners:
           Power and agency at a media conference
    • Abstract: Sissons, Helen
      This article investigates interactions between journalists and a local authority's public relations team captured on video during an organised visit to a waterfront development site in New Zealand. Three interactions, which are part of a larger ethnographic study, are examined from Goffman's dramaturgy perspective. The performance displayed by the public relations practitioners (PRPs) and its reception by journalists are analysed in detail from both a verbal and a non-verbal perspective. The article provides new evidence of how PRPs' efforts to manage interactions, by controlling access to a media conference as well as the sources of information, enabled them to manipulate the way the journalists covered the subsequent news stories.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Twitter feeders: An analysis of dominant 'voices' and
           patterns in a local government mosque controversy
    • Abstract: Waller, Lisa; Hess, Kristy; Demetrious, Kristin
      Intense mainstream news coverage, graphic media spectacle and national political attention dominated public discussion about a local planning proposal to build a $3 million mosque complex in the regional Victorian city of Bendigo in 2014-2016. This article focuses on a study of Twitter and its relationship to the public issue. It employs a "geo-social" framework to examine how the mosque controversy entered wider information flows and engaged political power beyond the local. It provides contextually specific evidence of mainstream media and elite level actors dominating Twitter during deliberations over a local government planning issue. The analysis reveals how Twitter use in this case was shaped around legacy media logics, such as "old" news values and traditional power structures, rather than generating wide participatory public discussion and engagement on the issue.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Local authority codes of conduct: Anti-conflict and
           anti-media?
    • Abstract: Strong, Catherine
      New Zealand may be a global beacon of media and political freedom, but journalists find it difficult to cover local authorities that want to conduct business outside the public glare. This is not a new problem, but this paper exposes how some local authorities have embedded codes of conduct that restrict elected members from criticising councils in the media. Although some councils defend the wording as ineffective and find that councillors still express robust critical views, journalists report the opposite. Journalists identify this wording as a dangerous form of sanitised democracy.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Roles, routines, and responsibilities: The 3Rs of
           educating journalists for local government reporting
    • Abstract: English, Peter; Fynes-Clinton, Jane; Barnes, Renee
      In this era of cutbacks and restructuring, journalism graduates covering local government rounds in the regions are thrown organisational, ethical and practical challenges once reserved for more senior reporters. The changing environment has forced educators to rethink ways students are taught to report in this vital area. A pilot study of 13 recent University of the Sunshine Coast journalism graduates employed in regional newsrooms found that while they felt prepared for practical and ethical challenges, almost all of them were unprepared for the workload. They also reported that increased pressures had led to a dilution of the watchdog role.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Rethinking news media and local government:
           Journalism, politics and symbolic power
    • Abstract: Hess, Kristy; Waller, Lisa
      This essay explores why the relationship between news media and local government has been of little interest in journalism studies, especially in the Australian context. We argue that the reasons are complex but can be traced to issues of symbolic recognition and legitimacy. An overview of local government and news media in Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand grounds the discussion in journalism and democratic theory. We draw on Bourdieu's tradition of field-based research and theories of media power to highlight the important role 19th-century newspapers played in the establishment of municipalities. We then argue that local government's omission from the Australian Constitution relates to issues of legitimacy and recognition that are reflected in the wider field of power and perpetuated within journalism practice and scholarship. Finally, practitioner perspectives and contemporary research underline the need for critical engagement and inquiry that recognise the fundamental importance of news and politics closest to the people.

      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Note from the editor
    • Abstract: Richards, Ian
      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:55:49 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Media guidelines for the responsible reporting of
           violence against women: A review of evidence and issues
    • Abstract: Sutherland, Georgina; McCormack, Angus; Easteal, Patricia; Holland, Kate; Pirkis, Jane
      Violence against women is a global public health problem. There is growing international interest in how to prevent this pervasive human rights violation. It is within this context that the media - a dominant force in shaping the discourse on matters of public importance - is seen to play a crucial role. This paper considers the expanding body of evidence concerning portrayals of violence against women in the news media. We then review the content of a selection of international media reporting guidelines developed to address such concerns. We demonstrate that despite similarities in content, much less is known about processes by which the guidelines have been developed and disseminated. There is only one study in the peer-reviewed literature examining the impact of media reporting guidelines on journalism practice. In the light of the dearth of research and evaluation activities, we consider issues around future efforts in this area.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Note from the editor
    • Abstract: Richards, Ian
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Closing the arm's-length gap: Critical reflexivity in
           student Indigenous affairs journalism
    • Abstract: Thomson, Chris; Mason, Bonita; Bennett, Dawn; Johnston, Michelle
      Arm's-length journalism's perpetuation of colonial discourse often prompts calls for positive stories about Indigenous people. But these overtures can beget stories that fail to critically engage with issues and hence to connect with an audience. Such stories do not embody what Bourdieu called the symbolic power of journalism, and thus do little to address negative stereotypes and misrepresentation. With 2016 being the 25th year since the Royal Commission into Deaths in Custody recommended establishing units of study dedicated to Aboriginal affairs reporting, we contemplate one of the very few such units now taught in Australia. In an attempt to close the gap between positive Indigenous affairs stories that often cannot, or will not, be told by arm's-length journalism, and the many negative stories that can, the unit enlists Bourdieu's critical reflexivity to guide student collaboration with Aboriginal sources. Despite this context, we identify a tendency of students new to such collaboration to produce draft stories high in promotional content. Rather than dismissing such drafts as counter-journalistic, we embrace them as a step toward critically reflexive journalism.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Suspect identified: Revisiting naming practices in
           crime coverage
    • Abstract: Lillebuen, Steve; Lidberg, Johan; Chubb, Philip
      This study examines the media's practice of revealing the names of criminal suspects, particularly before charges have been laid. The paper, which uses a content analysis of police stories in two major newspapers in the Australian state of Victoria, shows the practice is commonplace. But as media naming practices extend into online publishing, as observed in this study, unproven police suspicions are given global publicity, causing reputational damage. This paper argues that naming should be considered a significant ethical issue, and one with increasing relevance in the digital age.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Reporting the Gonski review of school funding
    • Abstract: Shine, Kathryn
      Issues relating to schools and schooling are regularly the subject of news reporting, yet research about news coverage of education is rare within journalism studies. This paper examines news coverage of a major educational issue in Australia: the 2012 Gonski Review of school funding. The content analysis of reporting over three years from ABC news online, The Age newspaper, The Daily Telegraph newspaper and The West Australian newspaper aimed to identify the focus of the reporting and the main sources quoted throughout. Overall, the coverage was highly political in nature. Politics was the main focus of the coverage, and federal and state politicians were the dominant sources. Principals and teachers were under-represented, and the perspectives of other key stakeholders were rarely included. These findings raise questions about the breadth of coverage of this significant public interest issue, and suggest that reporters of education are not engaging with the community they serve.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Journalistic boundary work at a time of professional
           crisis
    • Abstract: Kenix, Linda Jean
      This research explores how news bloggers and mainstream news journalists discursively constructed the doxa of journalism, as well as their own efforts to reinscribe their activities as being positioned inside or outside of journalistic boundaries, at a moment of crisis. The study found a recurrent reflexive protectionism displayed by journalists who actively reinscribed their work as journalistic, while bloggers readily explored the extent of journalism practice, albeit through a politicised lens. If the boundaries of journalism are measured, in part, by the ascribed doxic values on display, rather than the reinscribed performance of journalism values, then bloggers emerged from this controversy as participating within the journalistic field - admittedly quite complicated and politically influenced, but as journalists nonetheless.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Resistance and persuasion through participatory
           journalism business models
    • Abstract: Adams, Debra
      The pervasive use of the World Wide Web has transformed news media's approach to almost every aspect of journalism, with many organisations restructuring their philosophy and practice to include a variety of participatory spaces/forums where people are free to engage in deliberative dialogue about matters of public importance. This paper draws from an international collective case study that showcases various approaches to participatory online news journalism during the period 1997-2011 (Adams, 2013). The research finds differences in the ways in which public service, commercial and independent news media give voice to the public, and ultimately in their approach to journalism's role as the Fourth Estate - one of the key institutions of democracy. An examination of OhmyNews International, News Corp Australia (formerly News Limited), The Guardian and the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) highlights various approaches to participatory online journalism and how each provides different avenues for citizen engagement. Semi-structured interviews with key senior journalists and editors illustrate distinctive practices of each organisation.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - 'Charity begins at home': Public perceptions of the
           homestay initiative for asylum seekers in Australia
    • Abstract: Hebbani, Aparna; Angus, Daniel
      This study analysed public perceptions surrounding the announcement of the pioneering 2012 Community Placement Network initiative by the former Australian Labor Government, through which an asylum seeker could spend six weeks with an Australian family while their bridging visa application was being processed. Using a Leximancer-supported content analysis of 455 comments from six online Australian news sources, we found that 1) comments did not discuss the article content but discussed other issues related to asylum seekers; 2) in most cases, negative comments outnumbered positive comments; 3) two of six article headlines inaccurately referred to the asylum seekers as refugees; and 4) most comments were negative towards the then Labor Government, Labor politicians and improper expenditure of tax dollars. We conclude that the space available for comments was used as a vehicle to voice dissent towards the then government, its leaders and immigration policy instead of a space to engage with article content.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Information access evolution: Assessing freedom of
           information reforms in Australia
    • Abstract: Lidberg, Johan
      The past seven years have seen major reforms of half the Freedom of Information (FOI) laws in Australia. This is the third article in a series investigating the reforms. The first paper mapped the international evolution of FOI (Lidberg, 2013) and the second described a pilot study of Australian FOI reforms (Lidberg, 2015). The question posed in this article is "have the Australian FOI reforms made a difference in practice?" To answer this question, a participatory observation study was designed and information sought using Australian FOI systems, comparing the FOI 1.0 "pull" FOI jurisdictions with the reformed FOI 2.0 "push" systems. A diary method was employed, and the findings indicate that some new-generation FOI regimes deliver better and faster access to information, while some non-reformed systems perform on par with the updated ones. The results point to great discrepancies between agencies in how the information is made available. Accountability theory was used to analyse and discuss the findings.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Station break: A history of Australian regional
           commercial television ownership and control
    • Abstract: Thurlow, Michael; Griffen-Foley, Bridget
      On July 1, 2016, the Nine Network abandoned its long-term regional affiliation agreement with WIN Television in favour of a new five-year deal to supply programs to Southern Cross Austereo. This realignment of metropolitan and regional commercial television interests was the latest move in a game of regulatory, economic, corporate, political and technological brinkmanship that began more than 60 years ago, and which is likely to end in the demise of regional commercial television as an independent if not distinct entity in Australia.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Heart-wrenching and intimate insight [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Breen, Michelle Dunne
      Review(s) of: Heart-wrenching and intimate insight, by Grant, S. (2016). Talking to my country, Sydney HarperCollins, ISBN 9781460751978, 9781460706817, hbk, ebk, 230pp, $29.99 hbk, $11.99 ebk.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Contributor notes
    • PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Ground-breaking but little known [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Trembath, Richard
      Review(s) of: Ground-breaking but little known, by Baker, J. (2015), Australian women war reporters, Boer War to Vietnam, Sydney, NewSouth, ISBN 9781742234519, pbk, ebk, 259pp, $39.99.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Global perspectives on social media [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Fisher, Caroline
      Review(s) of: Global perspectives on social media, by Bruns, A., Enli, G., Skogerb , E., Larsson, A. L., and Christensen, C. (Eds.), (2016), The Routledge companion to social media and politics. New York: Routledge, ISBN 978-1138860766, hbk, 560pp, $298 (also available as ebk).

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Boundaries at the heart of struggle [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hess, Kristy
      Review(s) of: Boundaries at the heart of struggle, by Carlson, M., and Lewis, S. C. (Eds), (2015), Boundaries of journalism, professionalism, practices and participation, Routledge New York, ISBN 9781138020672, pbk, 233pp, $82.99.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Concise and effective introduction [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Picard, Robert G
      Review(s) of: Concise and effective introduction, by Cunningham, S., Flew, T., and Swift, A. (2015), Media economics, London, Palgrave, ISBN 978-0-230-29322-9, pbk, $49.95 (also available as ebk).

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:09:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Note from the editor
    • Abstract: Richards, Ian
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - JERAA@40: Towards a history of the professional
           association of Australian journalism academics
    • Abstract: O'Donnell, Penny; van Heekeren, Margaret
      The professional association representing Australian journalism educators was established in 1975. This article, on the occasion of the association's 40th anniversary, traces the history and evaluates the role of the Australian Association for Tertiary Education in Journalism (AATEJ) and its successors, the Journalism Education Association (JEA) and the Journalism Education and Research Association of Australia (JERAA). It finds collegiality and a desire to improve standards of journalism teaching have endured as key features of the group's ethos. More recently, the association has taken a leadership role in the contested area of research development and, less consistently, adhered to a founding objective to champion free expression. The authors conclude that this repositioning of the association beyond its capacity as a support group for journalism educators raises the question of whether the time has come to renew the traditional mission statement and rejuvenate JERAA's public profile to account for its newfound disciplinary leadership.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - The longer the better?: Calibrating truth claims
           in literary journalism
    • Abstract: Kremmer, Christopher
      The revival of long-form journalism has provoked considerable opti-mism in an otherwise uncertain climate of news media disruption and convergence. But, exciting as the latest boom in a much-loved sub-genre of non-fiction may be, the new wave confronts the same critical and ethical challenges as its earlier iterations. In recent years, claims of inaccuracy, misrepresentation, appropriation and bias have been levelled at authors of commercially successful narrative non-fiction books. In this article, the interplay of literary and journalistic elements and practices is examined in literary journalism, a hybrid form of narrative that uses literary techniques in an effort to convey "deeper perspectives" than is possible in news reports (Sims, 1995, p. 19). Three works of book-length narrative non-fiction by well-known Australian authors - Helen Garner's This house of grief: the story of a murder trial (2014a); Nine parts of desire: the hidden world of Islamic women (1994) by Geraldine Brooks; and Anna Funder's Stasiland (2003) - are assessed for their journalistic qualities with reference to criteria posited as defining by Lounsberry (1990), Kovach and Rosenstiel (2007), Kramer (1995) and Ricketson (2014). The effect of research methods and narration on the analytical aspects of the texts is then considered by comparing the author's aims with the outcomes and conclusions of their inquiries.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Creating history: Literary journalism and Ned Kelly's
           last stand
    • Abstract: McDonald, Willa; Davies, Kerrie
      Ned Kelly is iconic in Australian settler culture. The story of the Irish bushranger has inspired numerous books, movies, television series, comics and artwork. A notorious figure, he is most often remembered as the archetypal folk hero battling for survival under the harsh conditions imposed by the British establishment. But where did his story begin? In 1880, four Melbourne journalists travelled on the police train to Glenrowan to cover the intended capture of the Kelly gang that would later lead to Kelly's hanging. J. D. Melvin (Argus), Thomas Carrington (The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil), John McWhirter (The Age) and George Allen (Melbourne Daily Telegraph) went beyond the role of reporters and became participants in the action. The resulting articles recounted the famous siege in detail, relaying atmosphere, conversations and character in ways that would underpin the cultural myths of Kelly and his gang over the next 135 years. This paper analyses the narrative journalism from the siege at Glenrowan while investigating its role - particularly the evocative imagery of Carrington's literary journalism - in the construction of the cultural mythology surrounding Ned Kelly's "last stand".

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Guest editors
    • Abstract: Ricketson, Matthew; Joseph, Sue
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Forty years on: A personal reflection
    • Abstract: Patching, Roger
      It is a privilege to be asked to reflect on nearly 40 years of involvement with our professional association. Although I wasn't at the inaugural meeting in Bathurst in 1975, it has been my pleasure to play what I hope was an active role in the association for at least 36 years of those first four decades. It has been "quite a ride", from what started as a small group of like-minded journalists-turned-academics to what has become the multi-faceted organisation we see today.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Bad hair days and the good of Pamela Bone's literary
           journalism
    • Abstract: Rickett, Carolyn
      As a recipient of the United Nations media peace prize, Pamela Bone was noted for her fearless reporting on humanitarian, gender and social justice issues. While some of her columns invited controversy, "even when people disagreed with her, they respected and understood what she wrote came from her heart and mind and her great moral clarity" (Gawenda, quoted in Chandler, 2008, n.p.). Retiring from The Age newspaper at the end of 2005, Bone accepted an invitation from Melbourne University Press to write a memoir about her cancer experience. Her reluctance to write confessional columns was finally converted into a candid account of her terminal prognosis, using the form of literary journalism. This paper explores the therapeutic value of Bone's Bad hair days, and the wider contribution of her autobiographical voicing of illness.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Pioneers and millennials: Two moments in Portuguese
           literary journalism
    • Abstract: Soares, Isabel
      In the late 19th century, many Portuguese journalists used literary journalism to report on a number of issues that plagued modern societies: the plight of the urban poor, the evils of over-industrialisation and the rapacity of imperialism. The genre endured and is still a staple of Portuguese journalism, frequently known as reportagem, or long-form reporting. The human-interest factor continues to be a priority in contemporary Portuguese literary journalism, which has also adapted to the newer formats of photojournalism and television, as well as online. This paper unveils examples of literary journalism published in Portuguese by Portuguese journalists; it also aims to draw a comparison between the first generation of Portuguese literary journalists in the last quarter of the 19th century and those who bring it to light in the post-millennium years. What topics interest these two generations of literary journalists, and how Portuguese-written literary journalism is characterised in these two decisive periods, are the main questions addressed in this article.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Travel writing: An exploration of its place within
           journalism
    • Abstract: Stubbs, Ben
      Travel writing is a non-fiction form that draws on subjective, immersive and narrative-based techniques. It is often seen as a more creative and literary pursuit with less journalistic value, despite its strong record of influence on a plurality of forms such as history and ethnography, and its contribution to the understanding of global tourism. This paper explores the possibility that travel writing, when employing various devices such as a contract of truthfulness, evidence of a double story and an acceptance of rigorous subjectivism, might enrich modern journalism and be more readily recognised as a sub-genre of literary journalism. This will be demonstrated through an analysis of the work of three Australian travel writers: Christopher Kremmer, Nicolas Rothwell and Patrick Holland.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - David Marr's the prince: Faith, sex abuse and
           narrative authority in literary journalism
    • Abstract: O'Donnell, Marcus
      David Marr has worked as a journalist across television, radio, print and online media. Although this impressive body of work is necessarily varied, Marr has said his recent work was governed by three underlying purposes: "Making sense of complex events, turning evidence into narrative, tracking power in Australia" (Eisenhuth and McDonald, 2007, p. 35). This article looks at one of the recurring themes in Marr's work: the role of religion in Australia. It examines the way Marr tracks the complex relationships of religious power by turning evidence into narrative, and the complex strategies that he employs to ensure narrative authority in a complex and controversial area. It focuses on The prince (2014), a biographical investigation of Cardinal George Pell and the Catholic Church's sexual abuse crisis. As both a broadcaster and an author, Marr's work is performative and investigative. The paper argues that this strong performative voice in Marr's work is a critical part of its success and an intrinsic part of the way he turns evidence into narrative, and provides a case study for the way narrative authority is exercised in literary journalism.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - From journalism to literature: Borges, Critica and the
           'Universal history of infamy' as an experiment in democratic dialogue
    • Abstract: Calvi, Pablo
      Jorge Luis Borges' narrative works have gathered attention around the world. But Borges' early narrative exercises, which could be generally classified as non-fiction, have only recently started garnering critics' interest. Borges' Universal history of infamy (UHI), the writer's first narrative effort, is composed of a series of short stories the Argentine published in instalments in 1933-34 in Revista multicolor de los Sabados, a pullout section of Buenos Aires' evening newspaper Critica. The relevance of UHI to storytelling and journalism is multifaceted. On the one hand, the narrations show the formative exercises in prose of an author who would go on to become one of the most important fiction writers of the 20th century. On the other hand, UHI opens a window into Borges' approach to factuality, storytelling and the role of the mass press in a young, modern democracy. This paper considers UHI and, in particular, one of the most salient stories of the series, "Monk Eastman, purveyor of iniquities", in a new contextual light. UHI is read as a production of a daily tabloid, but also as intended Saturday entertainment for the lower-middle class readers who in the early 1930s followed Critica newspaper. It is also considered as part of a literary apparatus and, finally, as a bridging production, meant to establish a connection between readers and their world in the context of a new democratic society.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Chasing the future: Journalists writing political
           history
    • Abstract: Mullins, Patrick
      Journalists writing books of contemporary political history in Australia have generally drawn upon the model that was established by Warren Denning (1937), consolidated and popularised by Alan Reid (1969; 1971; 1976) and augmented by Paul Kelly (1976; 1984; 1992; 1995; 2009a; 2014). By some reckoning, this approach has reached its "zenith" (Bramston, 2014), with an inevitable question begging what should come next. This article studies the development of the genre and - using the work of Kelly as an exemplar of the traditional approach - explores how contemporary practitioners George Megalogenis and Annabel Crabb are finding new directions for its application.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Ideal companion to key debates [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Richards, Ian
      Review(s) of: The Routledge companion to alternative and community media, by Atton, C. (Ed.). (2015), Abingdon, Routledge, ISBN 9780415644044, hbk, $238 (also available as ebk).

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Well-researched exploration [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Josephi, Beate
      Review(s) of: Foreign correspondents and international newsgathering - the role of fixers, by Murrell, C. (2015), New York, Routledge, ISBN-13 9780415733359, Kindle, hbk, 176pp, $45.60 Kindle, $145 hbk.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Solid overview of FOI scholarship [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lidberg, Johan
      Review(s) of: FOI 10 years on: freedom fighting or lazy journalism?, by Felle, T., and Mair, J. (Eds.), (2015), Suffolk, Abramis, ISBN 9781845496463, pbk, 286pp, $45.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Developing skills in intercultural communication and
           international reporting through work integrated learning courses
    • Abstract: Woolley, Bruce
      This article examines a series of immersive intercultural learning experiences created for journalism students at the University of Queensland and conducted in Vietnam and Australia since 2012. The courses were designed as Work Integrated Learning projects - in short, learning by doing. They were also, as far as possible, meant to replicate "real-world" conditions of daily reporting in a foreign country. Computer-assisted content analysis and separate editorial coding based on the system developed for UNESCO's Global Media Project both reveal increased sophistication in the selection and treatment of stories from the first course to the most recent iteration. Reflections by the researcher and the students also indicate a rising level of editorial and technical capability as well as self-confidence over the duration of the courses. A longitudinal perspective is achieved through structured email interviews with several students from each of the courses, several months and in some cases several years after they took part. This investigation concludes that such courses serve a valuable role in the undergraduate journalism curriculum and can be provided cost-effectively for small groups of highly motivated students.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Who's in the news?: Sourcing priorities in
           regional newspapers
    • Abstract: Bowd, Kathryn
      Australia's regional newspapers are overwhelmingly local in their news focus, concentrating primarily or entirely on events, issues and people within the geographical borders of their print circulation area. In so doing, they position themselves as central to local communication networks, and as providers of a "voice" for their communities, both geographical and interest-based. For such publications, geographical location is a key definer of news, even though most also have a growing online and social media presence. This concentration on local content is one of the factors that suggests a closer link between newspapers and communities in regional areas than is typically the case in larger population centres. It also suggests a preference for local sources of news - and in particular local people as providers of information and opinion. This in turn raises questions about the extent to which regional newspapers follow Western journalism conventions that foreground the use of authoritative, or "official", sources. This paper reports on the findings of a study that examined sourcing, and particularly prioritisation of sources, at regional newspapers in four states of Australia over time. It found that, although the majority of the sources quoted on the front pages of these newspapers were local, the publications demonstrated a strong preference for authoritative sources.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Radio: A more equitable platform for female
           journalists?
    • Abstract: North, Louise
      Little scholarly attention has been paid to the characteristics and experiences of female journalists who work in Australian radio. This paper draws from the author's "Women in the Australian News Media" survey to provide a baseline profile and compare and contrast their newsroom experiences with those of female journalists in television and newspaper/online platforms. The survey finds some noteworthy differences: women in radio experience lower levels of sexual harassment; are more likely to have children than their colleagues in other platforms; and are the only cohort who say that men and women are equally represented in decision-making roles in their organisations. Nevertheless, they are more likely to be clustered in low to mid-range income brackets and, when it comes to story allocation, women across all platforms agree that there are still news areas that are traditionally allocated to male reporters. Overall, this paper argues that while women in radio experience gender discrimination at various levels, their responses in this survey indicate that it is less than that experienced by female journalists in other media platforms.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Afterword: Literary journalism - the personal and the
           political
    • Abstract: Keeble, Richard Lance
      I have always been fascinated by the journalism of George Orwell. While on sabbatical in 2000, I wrote my first academic paper looking at Orwell's work - his reporting from continental Europe of the final days of World War II. A few years later I wrote another paper on Orwell - this time examining the "As I please" columns he wrote for the leftist journal, Tribune, from 1943 to 1947. But I couldn't find a journal editor interested. So I decided to edit a book with a colleague from Gloucester University drawing together a number of essays on literary journalists, and slot my Orwell piece into it. At the time, I was mainly teaching human rights, investigative reporting and peace journalism and knew very little about literary journalism as a separate academic discipline. So, with the support of friends and colleagues, I quickly had to immerse myself in the literature!

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Contributor notes
    • PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Revisiting a challenged concept [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bowman, Leo
      Review(s) of: Gatekeeping in transition, by Vos, T. P., and Heinderyckx, F. (Eds), (2015), New York, Routledge, Print, ISBN 9780415731614, eBook ISBN 9781315849652, Adobe ISBN 9781317910527, hbk, ebk, 292pp; $132 hbk; $48.50 ebk.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2016 23:30:58 GMT
       
 
 
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