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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australian Journal of Social Issues
  [SJR: 0.178]   [H-I: 20]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0157-6321 - ISSN (Online) 0004-9557
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 52 Issue 1 - Social care and migration policy in Australia:
           Emerging intersections'
    • Abstract: Adamson, Elizabeth; Cortis, Natasha; Brennan, Deborah; Charlesworth, Sara
      Migrants are important both as providers and users of paid care services in Australia, yet migration has rarely featured in Australian strategies to grow and sustain the paid care workforce. Correspondingly, Australia is rarely mentioned in the international scholarship on care and migration that has burgeoned since the 1990s. This article shows the ways that service providers, consumer advocates, unions and scholars have begun to bring migration into debates about workforce growth in two of Australia's most significant areas of paid care: aged care and childcare. Drawing on submissions to national enquiries in both areas, we identify the actors who have sought to adjust Australia's migration settings to respond to growing demand for care, and explain the rationales - which differ between the sectors - underlying their advocacy for change.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 20:27:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 1 - Do peer effects mediate the association between family
           socio-economic status and educational achievement'
    • Abstract: Chesters, Jenny; Daly, Anne
      Differences in levels of academic achievement according to socio-economic status (SES), and parental education in particular, have been a persistent feature of Australian education systems. Young people with highly educated parents are more likely than their peers with low-educated parents to attain high levels of achievement at school. Students with low levels of achievement are less likely than their high achieving peers to complete Year 12 and are more likely to experience negative post-school outcomes. The SES of the neighbourhood, and in particular, the school attended, has also been found to have an effect on levels of both academic achievement and attainment. For this paper, we conduct analyses of National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy test scores for four cohorts of secondary school students attending government schools in the Australian Capital Territory to examine the associations between parental education, school attended and levels of educational achievement. Our findings show that students with university-educated parents achieve at much higher levels than their peers with low-educated parents and that attending a school with a higher proportion of students from educationally disadvantaged families has a negative effect on educational achievement.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 20:27:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 1 - Intergenerational care as a viable intervention
           strategy for children at risk of delinquency
    • Abstract: Whitten, Tyson; Vecchio, Nerina; Radford, Katrina; Fitzgerald, Janna A
      Literature has consistently cited early childhood interventions as an effective method for mitigating or preventing future delinquency in at-risk children. In this manuscript, we propose an adapted model of Intergenerational Care presenting as a possible intervention strategy for children at risk of delinquency. This model of care draws from programmes that provide formal care and support for older people and young children, with a primary focus on intergenerational interactions that focus on respite day care, community engagement, educational pedagogy across generations and evaluation. Using a specific model of Intergenerational Care, we incorporated three components of existing childhood intervention strategies: preparing for school readiness, promoting social skills with elders and peers, and managing behaviour. While no intervention strategy targeting children at risk of delinquency has made use of intergenerational interactions, the adapted Intergenerational Care model that we propose, with these three components supported by the existing literature, offers a unique and promising approach for preventing future delinquent behaviour in children. Recommendations for longitudinal research are also proposed.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 20:27:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 1 - Safe at home': Housing decisions for women leaving
           family violence
    • Abstract: Diemer, Kristin; Humphreys, Cathy; Crinall, Karen
      Internationally, domestic violence policy has shifted towards supporting women to stay at home with the perpetrator of violence excluded. However, the practical realities indicate that this is a complex arena in which the rhetoric of rights for "women and children to stay in their own home" needs to be underpinned by additional support to provide safety and protection for those choosing this option. The current study examines decision making about accommodation options and the role of civil protection orders among 138 women accessing domestic violence support services in Victoria Australia. It shines a light on the intersection between justice responses and the housing needs of women and their children leaving a violent relationship. Our findings reveal that for this sample of women, staying in their own home left them more open to breaches of intervention orders than those who re-located. In spite of the frequency of breaching, a majority of women believed that they were safer with the protective order in place. We conclude that supporting women to "stay at home" with the perpetrator removed may be a pathway to safety for only a minority of women particularly if support from police and courts is not proactive and reliable.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 20:27:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 1 - "Learning to become a better man": Insights from a
           fathering programme for incarcerated Indigenous men
    • Abstract: Rossiter, Chris; Power, Tamara; Fowler, Cathrine; Jackson, Debra; Roche, Michael; Dawson, Angela
      This paper reports a qualitative study of incarcerated Indigenous fathers in Australia, using a framework of generative fathering. Researchers interviewed 28 imprisoned Indigenous men about their experiences of parenting and their responses to a parenting programme. Participants identified how the programme supported their learning and their capacity to embrace the role of parenting the next generation. Responses indicate that the programme's format and content were relevant to their experience as Indigenous fathers, and enhanced by the skills of the facilitator, and provision of a safe learning environment. It facilitated their growth as individuals and as parents through acknowledging their cultural identity and roles.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 20:27:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 1 - Re-imagining public service
    • Abstract: Shergold, Peter
      We live at a time marked by growing distrust of democratic institutions and increasing threats to those Enlightenment values that afford the individual protection from the arbitrary exercise of authoritarian power. In the face of such challenges, we need to re-imagine more agile, adaptive and responsive forms of governance. This edited speech argues that with sufficient political authority, public services can facilitate the commissioning of programme delivery, cross-sectoral collaboration, new forms of social investment in public good and more opportunities for participatory engagement by citizens.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 20:27:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 2 - Return to work after workplace injury: Injured
           workers, insurers and employers
    • Abstract: Thornthwaite, Louise; Markey, Raymond
      Returning injured workers to work is a central object of contemporary workers' compensation systems. Injured workers' interactions with insurers and employers are critical to achievement of timely and sustainable return to work outcomes. This article explores the interactions of injured workers with insurers and employers through analysis of their perceptions and experiences. The focus is on experiences with the NSW Workers Compensation scheme since 2012. To frame this analysis, the article proposes a model mapping these interactions, the relationships involved, the health, social and vocational consequences, and the return to work outcomes. The research found not only that the NSW Workers' compensation system is failing to deliver a timely and durable return to work for many injured workers, but also that, for many, problematic and often pathogenic interactions with employers and insurers are resulting in exacerbated and secondary injuries and negative social and vocational consequences.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 19:21:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 2 - "Never enough hours in the day": Employed mothers'
           perceptions of time pressure
    • Abstract: Rose, Judy
      Finding sufficient time to meet work and family commitments poses immense challenges for employed mothers in 21st century contemporary life. Understanding how employed women with children manage their finite time resources requires deeper investigation of how time pressures accrue across work and home contexts. This study draws on data from in-depth interviews with 18 working mothers from diverse occupations (professional, sales, service, clerical, technical and trades) and across a range of employment hours (full and part-time). The findings from this study show that employed mothers endure high levels of time pressure related to time poverty (insufficient time for necessary or discretionary activities), time intensity (multitasking and merging work and home boundaries) and time density (familial emotion and organisation work). When women use strategies to increase time efficiency, it does not necessarily reduce their perceptions of time pressure. Juggling multiple tasks simultaneously distorts women's temporal experiences and diminishes the quality of time. Workplaces and policymakers need to find better ways to encourage employed fathers to share the responsibility for home- and family-related care and organisational work. Such measures may reduce the time stress and time inequity women endure, particularly in the time management control centre of the home.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 19:21:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 2 - Problematising Australia's Nanny Pilot Program as
           evidence-based policy: A reconstruction of the problem of childcare
    • Abstract: Fenech, Marianne; Sweller, Naomi
      In a notable departure from long-standing childcare policy in Australia, in January 2016 fee relief was extended to nannies providing in-home care in a 2-year pilot program. This policy is significant as fee relief is not tied to the meeting of regulatory requirements designed to ensure quality early learning and care for young children. Drawing on Carol Bacchi's approach to policy analysis, this paper extends previous problematising of evidence-based policy by highlighting the value of first considering how a policy 'problem' has been constructed. We propose that the nanny pilot is an ideologically driven policy that has emanated from a construction of childcare that is adult (parent)-centred and marginalises the needs and interests of young children. Accordingly, certain evidence is privileged while other evidence is ignored, with the ensuing policy focused on economic imperatives rather than quality early learning and care experiences for young children. We draw on an analysis of parent, peak body and researcher submissions to the Productivity Commission's 2013-2014 childcare inquiry, nanny-focused research, and data from three national surveys to explore the limitations of such a policy approach. The utility of problem reconstruction as a means of disrupting policy-informed evidence and the legitimisation of purported evidence-based policy is considered.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 19:21:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 2 - The economic consequences of divorce in six OECD
           countries
    • Abstract: de Vaus, David; Gray, Matthew; Qu, Lixia; Stanton, David
      This article uses longitudinal data to estimate the shortand medium-term economic effects of divorce in the USA, the UK, Switzerland, Korea, Germany and Australia during the first decade of the 21st century. Based on the data collected during the 2000s, in all of the countries studied, divorce had, on average, negative effects on the equivalised household incomes of women. However, the extent and duration of the negative effects of divorce differed markedly between countries. In all of the countries, the effects of divorce on the equivalised household income of men were smaller than for women. Although, using the available data, it is not possible to definitely explain the differences between countries, the analysis presented in this article has demonstrated that the average economic effects of divorce, particularly for women, are heavily influenced by the social security system, the labour market, family models and the family law system of each country. While the social security system and institutional arrangements such as child support and spousal maintenance do influence women's post-divorce economic outcomes, what is most important in explaining cross-country differences is women's labour market earnings and the extent to which re-partnering occurs.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 19:21:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 2 - "This rabid fight for survival": Small NGO manager's
           experiences of funding reform
    • Abstract: Clancey, Garner; Westcott, Harriet
      This article explores the experiences of small Non-Government Organisation (NGO) managers who are experiencing significant funding reforms. Drawing on a desk review of the literature, and semi-structured interviews with managers of small NGOs in a case study site of Glebe, New South Wales, we present some of the issues arising from these new modes of funding governance. Findings revealed that funding is increasingly complex, with variations in timeframe, funder and geographic boundaries. The shortterm nature of funding contributed to NGO managers stating that they have been operating in a "survival" mode characterised by a high-level uncertainty. Changes to funding regimes have led to a need to seek out future funding, engage in competitive tendering processes and comply with multiple and growing funding reporting requirements - tasks that are time-consuming and at times stressful. Overall, managers experienced overwhelming funding complexity, which impeded the NGO's ability to focus on the needs of clients - an outcome which is surely antithetical to the aims of the various reforms to funding governance.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 19:21:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 52 Issue 2 - "It was like leaving your family": Gentrification and
           the impacts of displacement on public housing tenants in inner-Sydney
    • Abstract: Morris, Alan
      In March 2014, the minister responsible announced that all of the approximately 600 public housing tenants of Millers Point and the Sirius Building in inner Sydney are to be moved and the properties sold. Millers Point is probably the oldest public housing area in Australia. The Sirius Building was purpose built for public housing tenants in the late 1970s. The article briefly examines the gentrification process in the Millers Point area. However, the main focus, drawing on six in-depth interviews with public housing tenants who are still residents in the area and 13 who have moved, is an examination of the impact of the government's removal announcement and the actual displacement of residents. What this article illustrates is that the place attachment of most of the interviewees was profound and the removal announcement and the actual move were devastating. Interviewees spoke of deep sadness and anxiety at the thought of leaving what they considered a unique and genuine community. Residents who had moved told of their isolation and melancholy at having lost their local social network. The research shows that the human cost of policies and not revenue should always be the central consideration.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 19:21:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - Introduction for special issue on income management
    • Abstract: Mendes, Philip; Marston, Greg; Katz, Ilan
      A number of governments around the globe have introduced conditional welfare programs tied to work and personal responsibility in an attempt to pressure the unemployed into labour market participation. This development is part of a broader move towards the reconceptualisation of the social contract from welfare being seen as a collective right towards welfare payments being used as a mechanism for changing the behaviour of disadvantaged sectors of the population (Deeming 2014; Dwyer and Bright 2016; Taylor, Gray and Stanton 2016; Social Policy Research Centre 2010; Standing 2014).

      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - Author guidelines
    • PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - About the authors
    • PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - Social Worker Assessed Vulnerable Income Management
    • Abstract: Bray, JRob; Gray, Mathew; Hand, Kelly; Katz, Ilan
      Despite the small size of the sub‑program, Social Worker Assessed Vulnerable Welfare Payment Recipients Income Management is often cited as a preferred approach to this type of initiative, being tightly targeted at a group of people with identified high needs, and demonstrated poor outcomes. Although the program was considered in the two recent major evaluations of income management, specific findings relating to it have tended to be overshadowed by the more general finding of an absence of positive outcomes, and indeed potentially negative effects, from compulsory income management. While the size of the sub‑program has made evaluation difficult, the two major evaluations of income management have nevertheless made specific findings which suggest that the program has had some positive outcomes for a highly marginal participant group. These findings, along with aspects of the operation of the program, including the role played by social workers, and a proposal to abolish the program, are discussed.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - Seven years of evaluating income management - what
           have we learnt?: Placing the findings of the New Income Management in the
           Northern Territory evaluation in context
    • Abstract: Bray, JRob
      Income management programs - which restrict how some recipients of government transfers can spend these funds - have operated in Australia since 2007. The nature of the programs implemented varies, especially in regard to the combination of voluntary and compulsory elements, and there are also differences in scope and targeting. A number of evaluations and other studies of these programs have been undertaken. These vary in rigour, methodology, and the set of programs considered. This has led to an apparent diversity of findings, which has been exaggerated by selective use in public debate. The largest and most in‑depth evaluation has been that of 'New Income Management' in the Northern Territory. This found that the program had not achieved its objectives and appears to have created dependence. The relative outcomes of the studies are considered.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - The normalisation of income management in Australia:
           Analysis of the parliamentary debates of 2007 and 2009-10
    • Abstract: Lovell, Melissa E
      Initially introduced as part of Australia's Northern Territory Intervention in 2007, Income Management (IM) explicitly targeted inhabitants of remote NT Indigenous communities. IM is a form of welfare conditionality that involves compulsorily 'quarantining' at least half of individuals' social security income. It has been heavily criticised for being racist, discriminatory, and a violation of individual rights. The introduction of New Income Management (NIM) in 2010 extended IM beyond Indigenous communities and introduced a new set of eligibility criteria that shifted the focus of IM from Indigenous people to working‑age recipients of social security income. This in‑depth study of the early parliamentary debates on the compulsory IM programs traces the patterns of political discourse that led to IM coming to be seen by many policy makers as a normal and legitimate technique within Australian social policy. Situating the IM programs within neoliberal concerns about welfare dependency and active citizenship, this article argues that the introduction of NIM heralded a shift from a conception of IM as part of a focused social experiment targeted at remote Indigenous communities to a potentially mainstream social policy option.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - Community worker perceptions of the Income Management
           regime in Shepparton
    • Abstract: Banks, Marcus; Tennant, David
      This paper focuses on how community workers in Shepparton viewed the impact of the Place Based Income Management (PBIM) trial on the lives of their clients, their clients' families, and the broader community. The paper responds to criticism that there has been a lack of community voices in the development of PBIM or of their inclusion in the formal evaluation framework, raised in Philip Mendes's 2013 study of this trial site. A key policy goal underlying Income Management is that the tool assists low‑income people to become better money managers. Our study found that Shepparton community workers also used the parlance of 'tool' to describe the programmatic value of the BasicsCard in their interactions with clients. However, the BasicsCard appeared marginal to their discussions. Three clear themes emerged from the interviews: Shepparton's focus on voluntary clients, and ascertaining why participation in the local trial had dropped; that support for IM centred on the voluntary measure and the extra resources available to assist clients; and pragmatically locating the program in the middle of a welfare continuum that stretched from the voluntary Centrepay at one end to the highly coercive and restrictive paternalism of State Trustees at the other.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - Tensions and contradictions in Australian social
           policy reform: Compulsory income management and the national disability
           insurance scheme
    • Abstract: Marston, Greg; Cowling, Sally; Bielefeld, Shelley
      This paper explores contemporary contradictions and tensions in Australian social policy principles and governmental practices that are being used to drive behavioural change, such as compulsory income management. By means of compulsory income management the Australian Government determines how certain categories of income support recipients can spend their payments through the practice of quarantining a proportion of that payment. In this process some groups in the community, particularly young unemployed people and Indigenous Australians, are being portrayed as requiring a paternalistic push in order to make responsible choices. The poverty experienced by some groups of income support recipients appears to be seen as a consequence of poor spending patterns rather than economic and social inequalities. By contrast, Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) has been constructed as a person‑centred system of support that recognises the importance of both human agency and structural investment to expand personal choices and control. Here we look at the rationale guiding these developments to explore the tensions and contradictions in social policy more broadly, identifying what would be required if governments sought to promote greater autonomy, dignity and respect for people receiving income support payments in Australia.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - Neoliberal subjectivities and the behavioural focus on
           income management
    • Abstract: Klein, Elise
      This paper specifically addresses the behavioural focus of the income management regime, arguing that through its use of market logic and the reduction of social and political complexity, the regime is a technology of neoliberal governmentality. This paper finds that income management, whether compulsory or voluntary, blanket or Community based, regards the individual as the site of dysfunction, depoliticising and dehumanising broader socio‑economic‑historical factors in the process. Further, the focus on behavioural change creates the illusion that the market logic of income management will produce responsible citizens, which in turn obscures the possibility of redressing poverty and inequality.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 4 - Blind-sided by basics: Three perspectives on income
           management in an Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory
    • Abstract: Altman, Jon
      Income management was introduced into the Northern Territory in 2007. Despite much rhetoric around evidence‑based policy making and constant reviewing of income management, there has been little grounded research about Aboriginal responses at the community level to this new institution. In this article I report on the operations of income management from a longer‑term perspective, working with Kuninjku people and retail outlets in the Maningrida region in Arnhem Land. My argument is that from a local perspective income management is just one of a suite of new measures that have been introduced to alter the norms and values of people to correlate more closely with Australian mainstream norms. This view is based on participant observation rather than direct questioning. Income management is a low priority issue for the Kuninjku people in the current policy maelstrom that seeks to shift policy from 'self‑determination' back to a form of assimilation now heavily influenced by a neoliberal ideological agenda. Local responses vary from indifferent acceptance to resistance. I ponder the crucial policy question, how can we allow substantial financial resources to be squandered in unhelpful income management when they could be deployed productively to enhance wellbeing for Indigenous Australians?

      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:32:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 3 - The experience of sole mothers balancing paid work
           with care for a child with a disability
    • Abstract: Cole, Lindsay; Crettenden, Angela; Roberts, Rachel; Wright, Annemarie
      There are increasing numbers of families in Australia headed by sole parents, but little is known about the experiences of those who also care for a child with a disability. Additional caring responsibilities have previously been shown to impact on the work participation of parents. This study involved qualitative analyses of interview data conducted with sole mothers with school‑aged children with disability (N = 11). Thematic analysis revealed four themes that enabled and supported participation in the workforce: social support; managing appointments; characteristics of the workplace; and the role of the school. Results suggest the importance of practical help from family and friends in facilitating participation in paid employment. Additionally, the importance of flexible appointment scheduling on the part of service providers was highlighted, as well as the importance of workplace flexibility and supportive workplace cultures. Such factors were important in supporting sole mothers to balance work with care, with important implications for personal and family wellbeing.

      PubDate: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 20:26:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 3 - The great (Australian) property crime decline
    • Abstract: Weatherburn, Don; Halstead, Imogen; Ramsey, Stephanie
      Between 1973/74 and 2000, rates of robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft and most other major forms of theft rose almost without interruption. Between 2000 and 2009, recorded rates of robbery in Australia fell by 63 per cent, recorded rates of burglary fell by 57 per cent, recorded rates of motor vehicle theft fell by 62 per cent, and recorded rates of all other forms of theft fell by 37 per cent. This article considers possible explanations for the fall in theft and robbery in light of the available evidence. It argues that a reduction in heroin dependence, improvements in economic outcomes, increases in the risk of arrest and imprisonment, and improved vehicle security are likely to have been significant contributors to the decline.

      PubDate: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 20:26:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 3 - A land of the 'fair go'?: Intergenerational
           earnings elasticity in Australia
    • Abstract: Huang, Yangtao; Perales, Francisco; Western, Mark
      This paper contributes to the existing literature on income mobility by developing and applying a two‑stage panel regression model and assessing the effects of using different levels of occupational (dis)aggregation and different earnings measures on the magnitude of father-son earnings elasticities in Australia. We find that the overall intergenerational earnings elasticity in Australia between 2001 and 2013 ranges from 0.11 to 0.30. Our preferred estimates lie between 0.24 and 0.28. Elasticity estimates vary depending on the level of occupational (dis)aggregation and earnings measure used: they are highest when two-digit level occupations and hourly earnings are used, and lowest when four‑digit level occupations and annual earnings are used. We read these findings as indicating that elasticity estimates are sensitive to the use of different data and methods, and researchers should be careful when undertaking cross‑study, cross‑temporal or cross‑national comparisons.

      PubDate: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 20:26:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 51 Issue 1 - 'Reasonable and necessary' care: The challenge of
           operationalising the NDIS policy principle in allocating disability care
           in Australia
    • Abstract: Foster, Michael; Henman, Paul; Tilse, Cheryl; Fleming, Jennifer; Allen, Shelley; Harrington, Rosamund
      Disability reform in Australia centres on a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), which aims to provide lifelong, individualised support based on the principle of 'reasonable and necessary' care. As a universal rights‑based scheme it represents a historical shift in allocation principles in Australia's disability policy. Nonetheless, attention will be on determining who receives what care given the diversity of personal and family contexts. The aim of this paper is to discuss the operational complexities of a principle of reasonable and necessary care with reference to the findings of a three‑year study on the experiences and perspectives of disability care of 25 adults with acquired disability, their 22 nominated family members and 18 service providers. Evidence from this study suggests enacting the principle of reasonable and necessary care and support will be problematic, in particular as it relates to personalising the level and scope of services, balancing formal and informal care, and principles of equity. The paper contributes to the literature about allocation principles in social policy and the challenges of implementation. Further, it provides an empirically informed discussion of some of the specific policy implementation challenges concerning the NDIS.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 May 2016 00:06:03 GMT
       
 
 
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