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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 402 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 402 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
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Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
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Journal Cover Australian Journal of Parapsychology
  [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1445-2308
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [402 journals]
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Advertisements
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Research grant: Cardigan fund
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsycho
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Editor's note
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Guidelines for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Lacan, Psi and the trickster: A psychoanalysis of
           parapsychology
    • Abstract: Glazier, Jacob W
      The privileging of physicalist ontologies and rigid experimentalism within parapsychology helps to expose a 'hole' in the praxis of the discipline proper; what psychoanalysis generally refers to as a "lack". Certain not to fill this hole, using the psychoanalytic approach pioneered by Jacques Lacan (i.e., Lacanian psychoanalysis), the following reading aims to develop theoretically a scene by which parapsychology can come, more self-reflectively, to better take in its scientific practice-the unconscious of its subject, how the discipline has chosen to carve itself out within, what Lacan calls the chaotic, polysemic pool of lalangue, that place where meaning slides around. Indeed, such a return to the unconscious actually opens up the field to more counter-hegemonic phenomena that are typically viewed as fringe. To illustrate this point, I deploy the Lacanian apr s-coup, otherwise known as retroaction (a causality not from the present time), in conjunction with extrasensory perception research to stage just such an encounter, between the subject of parapsychology and its lack. This not only thwarts the so-called 'source of psi' problem by showing how parapsychology is running from itself, but also reveals a homology between psi and the objet petit a-the little object of desire that must always be tamed. As such, the disciplinary contouring of parapsychological science evokes the wily qualities of the trickster. It follows that, in the future, a further psychoanalysis of parapsychology could work to develop the theoretical insights of this article with some of Lacan's other concepts, such as the jouissance of the body (i.e., the anxious pleasure that animates the subject), and the relationship between drive and desire.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 2 - Conformity and Reactance in the I Ching using a
           Q-sort/RNG-PK method: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      Conformity and Reactance iStorm and Rock (2014a) ran a synchronicity experiment in which a meaningful coincidence of 'inner' and 'outer' events was initiated by first asking participants to represent their inner mental states quantitatively on a Q-Sort Grid. Participants then created the outer event using a Random Number Generator (RNG) to generate an I Ching hexagram with an associated reading, hypothesized to match a high-ranking descriptor-pair. Significant effects include: a psi-hitting RNG-PK effect by psi believers (a.k.a. 'sheep'), and a psi-missing QSort effect by 'indecisives' who are mid-range-scorers on the Raschscaled Australian Sheep-Goat Scale (RASGS; a paranormal belief measure devised by Thalbourne, 1995). Storm and Rock (2014b) then reported the results of a reactance (Silvia, 2005) treatment, hypothesized to compromise the performance of nonbelievers in psi (i.e., 'goats') who try to disprove the psi hypothesis by performing poorly on psi tasks. Reactance effects approached significance. Indecisives produced the lowest scores on three psi measures (even lower than goats), yet mean scores on two related psi measures (RNG score and Yang lines) were higher (rather than lower) for reactant indecisives compared to control indecisives and reactant goats. In this pilot study, the effects of paranormal belief, conformity (Mehrabian, 2005), and trait reactance on psi performance were investigated, with special focus on indecisives. Using hierarchical multiple regression analysis, trait reactance significantly moderated the relationship between paranormal belief (RASGS) and psi. Conformity was a significant predictor of psi above and beyond the contribution made by the paranormal belief trait-reactance interaction term. However, this was only the case if RASGS scores were transformed (squared). The effects were not unique to indecisives. Results of this study suggest that there are instances in which the relationship between paranormal belief and psi are not necessarily linear.n the I Ching using a Q-Sort/RNG-PK Method: A Pilot Study

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - A case of ostensible poltergeist phenomena resulting
           in lingering haunt phenomena
    • Abstract: Dixon, John
      An ostensible poltergeist case was investigated after a series of unexplained disturbances, including object movements, was witnessed at a small bar. The initial disturbances ceased after a 13-month period, which coincided with the departure of a staff member who displayed traits similar to RSPK agents. The case was investigated by surveying the remaining staff to document the disturbances they had personally experienced. This survey focused upon quantitative data, while follow-up questions looked at qualitative aspects. Five criteria were created to help determine if the disturbances were due to poltergeist or haunt phenomena. The results of the survey and interviews supported the hypothesis that poltergeist phenomena were occurring at the bar. After another 13-month period a second survey was conducted in order to compare disturbances against the results of the initial survey. The results of the second survey showed that poltergeist disturbances had ceased, having been replaced by disturbances seen in haunt cases. After researching possible causes of RSPK, it was concluded that the suspected RSPK agent may have been experiencing Spiritual Emergency which manifested as poltergeist activity. This in turn could have attracted a discarnate entity/entities that remained on the premises after the suspected RSPK agent had ceased employment at the bar.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Editor's note
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Vice president's note
    • Abstract: Jinks, Tony
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Guidelines for contributors
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Advertisements
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsychology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Obituary
    • Abstract: Tilley, Robb
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Psychic phenomena and the brain: Exploring the
           Neuropsychology of Psi [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mossbridge, Julia
      Review(s) of: Psychic phenomena and the brain: Exploring the Neuropsychology of Psi, by Bryan J. Williams (2015), Sydney, NSW: AIPR, Inc. 147 pages, ISBN: 978-0-9870772-2-6, (pb). AUD$35.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Individual, perceptual and psychological differences
           between psi-tested self-claimed psychics and non-psychics
    • Abstract: Parra, Alejandro; Argibay, Juan Carlos
      The specific aim of the present study was to find psychological differences between psychic and non-psychics. Specifically, we hypothesized that the self-claimed psychics score higher than non-psychics on the following four dimensions: (1) Individual Differences (i.e., neuroticism, extroversion, psychoticism, cognitive and emotional empathy, and defense style); (2) Psychopathology (i.e., healthy and negative schizotypy, dissociation, hallucinations and abnormal perceptions, magical ideation and perceptual aberration); (3) Boundaries (i.e., transliminality and boundary 'thinness'); and (4) Perception (i.e., perceptual cognition and imagery, and sensationseeking). The database used in this paper was originally collected as part of a project that investigated the so-called token-object effect (Parra & Argibay, 2013a, 2013b). Two categorization procedures were performed in order to split the sample into (1) Psychic/high-psi-scorers (n = 48) and (2) Non-psychic/low-psi-scorers (n = 44). Psychic/high-psiscorers scored higher than non-psychic/low-psi-scorers on Extroversion, and they scored lower on Neuroticism and Psychoticism, which confirm previous findings. Other results showed that psychic/high-psi-scorers tended to have 'thinner' boundaries, and they reported more unusual/psychic experiences, than non-psychic/low-psiscorers. The two groups, however, did not differ on schizotypy or dissociation. Generally speaking, the typical psychic in our study (similar to the one described by Eysenck) is 'sanguine', tends to be lively, sociable, carefree, talkative, pleasure-seeking, optimistic, and leadership-oriented.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Believe it or not: III. Further analyses on predictors
           of paranormal belief
    • Abstract: Billows, Helen; Storm, Lance
      The aim of this study was to conduct two multiple regression analyses to determine possible underlying predictors of paranormal belief (PB), which was measured using Thalbourne's (1995) Raschscaled Australian Sheep-Goat Scale (RASGS), and the Basic Limiting Principles Questionnaire (BLPQ; Thalbourne, 2010) which was Raschscaled (i.e., RBLPQ) specifically for this study. In our first study (Billows and Storm, 2015a), mean scores on PB (both measures) were significantly higher for females compared to males; both measures correlated significantly and positively with conceivability (imagination), but not with depression or locus of control. In our second study (Billows & Storm, 2015b), PB (both measures) correlated positively and significantly with religiosity, and negatively with reasoning (not significantly) as hypothesized, but the non-significant correlation with reactance was positive, which was not in the hypothesized direction. PB varied significantly between religions, but not between income and education levels. In the present study, two multiple regression analyses (with RASGS and RBLPQ as criterion variables) revealed that religiosity was the strongest predictor of PB - the other predictors being conceivability, gender, religion, and income. Age was also a predictor, but only in the model with RASGS as the criterion variable. This research has made some new contributions to the literature on paranormal belief.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Research grant: Cardigan fund
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Paracoustics: Sound and the paranormal [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tilley, Robb
      Review(s) of: Paracoustics: Sound and the paranormal, edited by Steven T. Parsons and Callum E. Cooper (2015), USA and UK: White Crow Books, 309 pages, ISBN: 978-1-910121-53-5 (pb), GBP 12.99 pounds (AUD$24.84), Kindle GBP 12.99 pounds (AUD$13.37).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 16 Issue 1 - Research note: A Rasch scaling analysis of
           Thalbourne's (2010) basic limiting principles questionnaire
    • Abstract: Lange, Rense
      Rasch scaling has seen increasing use in the design and calibration of questionnaires aimed at assessing paranormal belief and related variables (Lange, Irwin, and Houran, 2000a; Lange, Thalbourne, Houran, and Storm, 2000b, Lange, Greyson, and Houran, 2004). The present research note describes the results of calibrating another such instrument, Thalbourne's (2010) Basic Limiting Principles Questionnaire (BLPQ). This 26-item questionnaire has been used in a series of studies by Billows and Storm (2015a, 20154b), and these data are used to calibrate the BLPQ.

      While past Rasch analyses (Lange et al., 2000, 2000, 2004) also aimed to test particular hypotheses, or to address content issues, due to small sample size, the present goal is more limited as it only looks at the basic psychometric properties of the BLPQ. Specifically, the main purpose is to determine whether the BLPQ items follow a probabilistic Rasch model acceptably well so that they define a linear scale where (person) scores are approximately at the interval level of measurement.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Advertisements [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: The survival hypothesis: Essays on mediumship, by Adam J. Rock, (2014). Jefferson, NC: McFarland, ISBN-10: 0786472200; ISBN-13: 978-0786472208. USD$47.45; Psychic phenomena and the brain: Exploring the neuropsychology of Psi, by Bryan J. Williams (2015), Sydney: AIPR, Inc. ISBN: 978-0-9870772-2-6 (pb). AUD$35.00; Education in parapsychology: Student and instructor perspectives, by Harvey J. Irwin (2013), Sydney, NSW: AIPR, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0-9870772-1-9 (pb). AUD$25.00; In search of Psi: Contemporary perspectives on extra-sensory perception, psychokinesis, and survival, by Adam J. Rock and Lance Storm (Eds.), (2014), Pari, Italy: Pari Publishing. 374 pages. ISBN-13: 978-88-95604-22-0 (pb). AUD$25.20; Synchronicity: Multiple perspectives on meaningful coincidence, by Lance Storm (Ed.), (2008), Pari, Italy: Pari Publishing, 352 pages. ISBN-13: 978-88-95604-02-2 (pb). AUD$17.59; Parapsychology in the twenty-first century: Essays on the future of psychical research, by Michael A. Thalbourne and Lance Storm (Eds.), (2005), Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company. 396 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0786419388 (pb). AUD$53.57; The survival of human consciousness: Essays on the possibility of life after death, by Lance Storm and Michael A. Thalbourne (Eds.), (2006), Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company. 319 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0786427727 (pb). AUD$53.57.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Research grant: Cardigan fund
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsychology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Correspondence
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Editor's note
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Guidelines for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Thinking style and the formation of paranormal belief
           and disbelief
    • Abstract: Irwin, Harvey J
      Past investigations of the relationship between paranormal beliefs and habitual thinking styles typically have two potentially serious shortcomings: they survey paranormal beliefs formed at some time in the past rather than at the time of their generation, and they treat paranormal belief and paranormal disbelief as polar anchors on a single dimension. An online survey of 129 Australian adults avoided these shortcomings by addressing participants' interpretation of a summary of research on dermo-optical perception and relating thinking styles to these beliefs and disbeliefs as evoked in real time. The combined data confirmed the conventionally observed relationships between belief and thinking style, but separate analyses for paranormal belief and paranormal disbelief suggested the relationships arose fundamentally from processes involved in the formation of disbelief.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Observer effect: The quantum mystery demystified [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Abreu, Nelson
      Review(s) of: Observer effect: The quantum mystery demystified, by Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2013), Italy: Adea Edizioni, 94 pages, ISBN 978-8897144397 (Kindle), AUD$13.83.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - The Guyra ghost: Original newspaper accounts of
           Australia's most prominent poltergeist case [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cooper, Callum E
      Review(s) of: The Guyra ghost: Original newspaper accounts of Australia's most prominent poltergeist case, edited and compiled by Patrick J. Gallagher (2015), Seattle, WA: CreateSpace. 128 pages, ISBN-10: 1511667761, AUD$12.28 (Kindle Edition: AUD$4.17).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - On the alleged scientific evidence for survival after
           bodily death
    • Abstract: Neppe, Vernon M
      Evidence for the survival of some component of human consciousness, individual or collective, after bodily death is discussed at three levels: (1) the physical (i.e., neurophysiological) level of the psychic sensitive; (2) the level of the manifestations of the psychic 'sensitives', including direct voice communication, out of body experience, recurrent spontaneous psychokinesis, automatic handwriting, ectoplasmic materializations, psychic healing, including psychic surgery, absence healing, paintings of the 'other side' done in trance, and psychometry; and (3) the level of content of communications, including the Rosemary Records, Cross Correspondences, and the musical compositions of Rosemary Brown. The following conclusions may be drawn from the data presented: (i) that death as an extinction is an illusory concept; (ii) that individual human entities survive physical death; (iii) that these individual human entities retain at least some knowledge of their physical experiences; (iv) that these individual human entities can continue to learn after physical death; (v) that laws are apparent which contradict, or which occur outside, the range of our physical laws of space, time, and even mass; (vi) that the 'dead' have communicated with the living; and (vii) if one further applies the premise that if the basic pattern of human fate is the same, and that if one person survives bodily death, everyone does, then some component of human consciousness survives bodily death. Two appendices outlining recent updated research, data and theoretical contributions are listed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 2 - Believe it or not: II. An exploratory study on
           possible predictors of paranormal belief
    • Abstract: Billows, Helen; Storm, Lance
      The main aim of this exploratory study was to determine new or not fully investigated correlates of paranormal belief as discerned in the following four hypotheses: (i) 'social marginality' hypothesis, (ii) 'worldview' hypothesis, (iii) 'cognitive deficits' hypothesis, and (iv) 'psychodynamic functions' hypothesis. Paranormal belief (PB) was measured using Thalbourne's (1995a) Rasch-scaled Australian Sheep- Goat Scale (RASGS) and the Basic Limiting Principles Questionnaire (BLPQ; Thalbourne, 2010). In our previous study (Billows and Storm, 2015), mean PB scores (both scales) were significantly higher for females compared to males. Both PB scales correlated significantly with conceivability (imagination), but not with depression or locus of control. In this second study, we hypothesized that PB correlates positively with religiosity (measured on Haraldsson's, 1981, Religiosity Scale; RS), and negatively with income, education, problem-solving (i.e., reasoning), and trait reactance (measured on Hong and Faedda's, 1996, Psychological Reactance Scale; HPRS). The same participants (N = 149) sampled in the Billows and Storm study provided demographic details, and completed the ASGS, BLPQ, the RS, the 16PF Factor B (Reasoning) scale, and the HPRS. PB correlated positively and significantly with religiosity, but not with income, education, reasoning, and reactance. PB varied significantly between religions, but not between levels of income and education. This research has made some new contributions to the literature on paranormal belief, but findings should be considered tentative pending replication.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Australian poltergeist: The stone-throwing spook of
           Humpty Doo and many other cases [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tilley, Robb
      Review(s) of: Australian poltergeist: The stone-throwing spook of Humpty Doo and many other cases, by Tony Healy and Paul Cropper (2014), Sydney, NSW: Strange Nation, 300 pages, ISBN-13: 978-1-921134-35-7 (digital), AUD$9.99; ISBN-13: 978-1-921134-34-0 (pb), AUD$29.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Anomalous cognition: Remote viewing research and
           theory [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mitchell, Colin; Storm, Lance
      Review(s) of: Anomalous cognition: Remote viewing research and theory, edited by Edwin C. May and Sonali Bhatt Marwaha (2014). Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Co. 444 pages. ISBN: 978-0-7864-9458-3 (pb). AUD$57.15.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Debunking an alleged feedback artifact in Thalbourne's
           RNG studies
    • Abstract: Thalbourne, Michael A; Storm, Lance
      Over a series of studies, M. A. Thalbourne tried to influence the digital output of a random number generator to demonstrate that psychokinesis (PK) can be influenced by 'Kundalini' (an alleged body-energy). The series did not indicate a consistent Kundalini-PK effect. It was later thought that a feedback artifact might explain some of the psi outcomes. In this paper, we show that there is no evidence supporting a feedback artifact. Inspection of past results does suggest a Kundalini- PK effect, but a more objective experimental procedure is advised.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Some difficulties in coincidence analysis
    • Abstract: Browne, Laurence
      A coincidence can be broadly defined as 'a notable cooccurrence of events' which may have causal or non-causal origins. Some coincidences have discernible causal connections, though these may be quite subtle and complex. Others are clearly attributable to the random play of chance or luck, while certain ostensibly random coincidences can be distinguished by the numinosity and meaning they hold for the individual involved. C. G. Jung (1991) coined the term synchronicity for such coincidences. There is, however, currently no generally accepted overarching theoretical framework that deals comprehensively and inclusively with the several disparate categories under which different sorts of coincidences might be appropriately classified. Just as planets and stars appear as points of light in the night sky and are indistinguishable to the untrained eye, so coincidences may seem on the surface to be all of one kind. Unfortunately, this has led to a tendency towards either/or explanations to account for them, a situation exacerbated by the ideological and metaphysical presumptions that have historically been equated with particular explanations. This state of affairs is not made any easier by the very real difficulties that occur both in terms of accurate gathering of information in regard to coincidences and with the analysis itself. Some of the pertinent issues involved will be explored in this article, with a particular focus on synchronicity; for it is with respect to this intriguing concept that much of the confusion lies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Seeing rare things with the mind's eye: Visual imagery
           vividness and paranormal/anomalous experiences
    • Abstract: Parra, Alejandro
      Mental imagery is a perception-like experience in the absence of the appropriate sensory input involving sight, sound, smell, taste, and tactile images. Some scientific research has been conducted to investigate the possible relationships between paranormal experiences and visual imagery. In the present study, paranormal/anomalous experience, and the capacity for visual imagery under open- and closed-eyes conditions, were assessed. It is hypothesized that visual imagery and paranormal/anomalous experiences are correlated. Participants were 348 well-educated believers in psi, interested in paranormal topics. They completed the 'Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire- Revised' (VVIQ-R) and a 10-item self-report inventory designed to collect information on spontaneous paranormal/anomalous experiences. The results showed that visual imagery and paranormal/anomalous experiences correlated significantly, especially for Aura, Remote Healing, and Apparitions, but only in the Open-Eyes condition, with the Closed-Eyes condition performing relatively poorly. These results and advantages of the VVIQ-R are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Believe it or not: A confirmatory study on predictors
           of paranormal belief, and a psi test
    • Abstract: Billows, Helen; Storm, Lance
      The major aim of this confirmatory study was to determine possible underlying causes of paranormal belief as discerned in the following four hypotheses: (i) 'social marginality' hypothesis, (ii) 'worldview' hypothesis, (iii) 'cognitive deficits' hypothesis, and (iv) 'psychodynamic functions' hypothesis. Paranormal belief was measured using Thalbourne's (1995) Rasch-scaled Australian Sheep- Goat Scale (ASGS), and Thalbourne's (2010) new measure, the Basic Limiting Principles Questionnaire (BLPQ). We hypothesized that paranormal belief (a) is higher in females compared to males, and (b) correlates positively with conceivability (imagination), locus of control (LOC), and depression. It was further hypothesised that a sheep-goat effect would be found in an online symbol-identification task, in which it was also hypothesised that a 'reactance' treatment (a threatening communication; Silvia, 2005) would negatively affect ESP performance. Participants (N = 149) completed the ASGS, BLPQ, Thalbourne's (1995) Conceivability Scale, Rotter's (1966) LOC Scale, and Beck's (Beck et al., 1996) Depression Inventory-II. The two belief scales correlated highly and significantly. On both paranormal belief measures, mean scores were significantly higher for females compared to males. Paranormal belief (both measures) correlated significantly with conceivability (imagination), but not with LOC and depression. In the psi task, neither a reactance main effect, nor a sheep-goat main effect was found, but the results were in the directions hypothesized. This research confirms two past findings, and has made some new contributions to the parapsychological literature.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Editor's note
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Vice President's note
    • Abstract: Jinks, Tony
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Guidelines for contributors
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Advertisements [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: The survival hypothesis: Essays on mediumship, Adam J. Rock (2014), Jefferson, NC: McFarland, ISBN-10: 0786472200; ISBN-13: 978-0786472208. USD$47.45; Shamanism and Psi: Imagery cultivation as an alternative to the ganzfeld protocol, by Lance Storm and Adam J. Rock (2011), Sydney: AIPR, Inc., ISBN-13: 978-0-9870772-0-2 (pb). AUD$25.00; Education in parapsychology: Student and instructor perspectives, by Harvey J. Irwin (2013), Sydney, NSW: AIPR, Inc.,ISBN-13: 978-0-9870772-1-9 (pb). AUD$25.00; In search of Psi: Contemporary perspectives on extra-sensory perception, psychokinesis, and survival, by Adam J. Rock and Lance Storm (Eds.), (2014), Pari, Italy: Pari Publishing, 374 pages, ISBN-13: 978-88-95604-22-0 (pb). AUD$25.20; Synchronicity: Multiple perspectives on meaningful coincidence, by Lance Storm (Ed.), (2008), Pari, Italy: Pari Publishing, 352 pages, ISBN-13: 978-88-95604-02-2 (pb), AUD$17.59; Parapsychology in the twenty-first century: Essays on the future of psychical research, by Michael A. Thalbourne and Lance Storm (Eds.), (2005), Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, 396 pages, ISBN-13: 978-0786419388 (pb). AUD$53.57; The survival of human consciousness: Essays on the possibility of life after death, by Lance Storm and Michael A. Thalbourne (Eds.), (2006), Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, 319 pages, ISBN-13: 978-0786427727 (pb). AUD$53.57.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Research grant: Cardigan fund
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsychology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 15 Issue 1 - Correspondence
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - The major problems faced by parapsychology today: A
           survey of members of the parapsychological association
    • Abstract: Irwin, Harvey J
      The academic discipline of parapsychology has faced major challenges throughout its history. An online survey of members of the Parapsychological Association (PA) was undertaken with the aim of identifying the range of significant problems held to confront parapsychology today. This paper presents a collation of the views of PA members. A sample of 114 people participated in the survey, 95 of whom revealed their perception of parapsychology's principal problems. Many such problems would appear to stem from being forced to work within a hostile academic zeitgeist. The lack of funding for research and teaching, lack of an adequate career path, and lack of ready access to mainstream journals were cited as hindering academics wanting to pursue parapsychological research. Associated issues such as the lack of a conclusive database (despite technological advances), the lack of a widely endorsed theory, and the failure to resolve the experimenter-psi effect also are deemed problematic. Some parapsychologists look to a solution in quantum physics, multidisciplinary research, or practical applications of psi research.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - A further study of psychopraxia using the 'I Ching'
    • Abstract: Thalbourne, Michael A; Storm, Lance
      This present study on the Chinese book of divination, the I Ching, is the fourth in a series of six studies using a particular standardized testing approach. Given that there are 64 readings in the book (corresponding to so-called 'hexagrams'), the participant is asked to select 16 hexagram descriptor-pairs that match the statement "Lately, or right now, I feel ..." The participant then throws three coins six times to produce an outcome hexagram which, if it matches one of the 16 pre-selections, is deemed a 'hit'. Previous I Ching studies (Storm, 2001b; Storm and Thalbourne, 1998-1999; 2001a,b) report significant hexagram hit-rates, but the samples were comprised mainly of university students and no previous tests had focussed on the general public. In this replication study (N = 200), to explore the generality of the findings, and for comparative purposes, 100 members of the general public and 100 students were tested. Both authors tested half of each sub-sample to see if there was an experimenter effect. To determine predictor variables, the 16PF (Russell and Karol, 1994), the Revised Transliminality Scale, two sheep-goat questions, two 'states-of-mind' questions, a pro attitude questionnaire, and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale were administered. The two sheep-goat questions correlated significantly with number of changing lines. Pro Attitude correlated significantly with second-hexagram hitting. Hexagram hit-rates were not significant. No experimenter effects were found. Some significant psychological correlates of transliminality were replicated. The cumulative record across four I Ching studies shows hexagram hitting to be a marginally significant effect.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Editor's note
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Guidelines for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - The Australian afterlife explorers conference
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Advertisements [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: The survival hypothesis: Essays on mediumship, by Adam J. Rock (2014). Jefferson, NC: McFarland. ISBN-10: 0786472200; ISBN-13: 978-0786472208. USD$47.45; Education in parapsychology: Student and instructor perspectives, by Harvey J. Irwin (2013), Sydney, NSW: AIPR, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0-9870772-1-9 (pb). AUD$25.00; Shamanism and Psi: Imagery cultivation as an alternative to the ganzfeld protocol, by Lance Storm and Adam J. Rock (2011), Sydney: AIPR, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0-9870772-0-2 (pb), AUD$25.00; Synchronicity: Multiple perspectives on meaningful coincidence, by Lance Storm (Ed.), (2008), Pari, Italy: Pari Publishing. 352 pages, ISBN-10: 8895604024; ISBN-13: 978-8895604022 (pb). AUD$17.59; Parapsychology in the twenty-first century: Essays on the future of psychical research, by Michael A. Thalbourne and Lance Storm (Eds.), (2005), Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company. 396 pages, ISBN-10: 0786419385;ISBN-13: 978-0786419388 (pb), AUD$53.57; The survival of human consciousness: Essays on the possibility of life after death, by Lance Storm and Michael A. Thalbourne (Eds.), (2006), Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, 319 pages, ISBN-10: 0786427728; ISBN-13: 978-0786427727 (pb). AUD$53.57.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsychology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Correspondence
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Haunted: The book of Australian ghosts [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cooper, Callum E
      Review(s) of: Haunted: The book of Australian ghosts, by John Pinkney (2005/2008), Victoria: The Five Mile Press. 333 pages, ISBN:9781741248630 (pb), Kindle: AUD$3.50 (Amazon second-hand: AUD$55.00).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - Conversations with ghosts [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tilley, Robb
      Review(s) of: Conversations with ghosts, by Alex Tanous with Callum E. Cooper (2013), Guildford, UK: White Crow Books, 138 pages. ISBN-13: 978-1-908733-55-9 (pb), AUD$15.35.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - First sight: ESP and parapsychology in everyday life
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      Review(s) of: First sight: ESP and parapsychology in everyday life, James C. Carpenter (2012). New York: Rowman and Littleman Publishers, 502 pages, ISBN: 978-1-4422-1390-6 (hb), AUD$55.90 (USD$46.55).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - The survival hypothesis: Essays on mediumship [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: De Foe, Alexander
      Review(s) of: The survival hypothesis: Essays on mediumship, by Adam J. Rock (2014). Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 320 pages, ISBN-10: 0786472200; ISBN-13: 978-0786472208 (pb)., AUD$58.28. (USD$47.45).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 2 - An investigation of the 'I Ching' using the Q-sort
           method and an RNG-PK design: II. the effect of reactance on psi
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance; Rock, Adam J
      In Part 1 of a two-part study, Storm and Rock (2014) emulated a synchronistic event in the laboratory by first instructing participants to construct a representation of their cognitive/emotional states using a Q-Sort Grid (64 I Ching descriptor-pairs were ranked from -7 to +7), followed by the creation of an outer event using a Random Number Generator (RNG) to generate an I Ching hexagram with an associated reading. Each participant generates (i) an RNG Score, (ii) Yang lines (whenever the RNG score is positive), and a QSort score, drawn from the Q-Sort Grid based on the hexagram that is generated. Q-Sort scores were positive for believers in psi (i.e., sheep), whose mean RNG score was also significantly above mean chance expectation (MCE). In the present study (Part 2), we report the results of a reactance treatment (Brehm and Brehm, 1981) which is hypothesized to compromise the performance of nonbelievers in psi (i.e., goats) who, through noncompliance, are predisposed to disproving the psi hypothesis. Participants were randomly assigned to a control condition (n = 58) or a treatment (reactance) condition (n = 62). Marginally significant reactance effects were found whereby the mean Q-Sort score was lower for (i) 'reactants' compared to 'controls', and (ii) reactant goats compared to control goats. So-called 'Indecisives' (mid-range scorers on the Rasch-scaled Australian Sheep-Goat Scale-Thalbourne, 1995; Lange and Thalbourne, 2002) produced the lowest scores on all three psi measures (even lower than goats), yet mean scores on two psi measures (RNG score and Yang lines) compared to their control cohorts, and compared to reactant goats, were higher rather than lower. It is suggested that more research on indecisives is warranted since their scoring patterns appear to be unpredictable, and may even contradict the conventional 'linear' understanding of the sheep-goat effect.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - President's note
    • Abstract: Rock, Adam J
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Guidelines for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Advertisements
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsychology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - The energy cure: Unravelling the mystery of hands-on
           healing [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tilley, Robb
      Review(s) of: The energy cure: Unravelling the mystery of hands-on healing, by William Bengston (2013). Boulder, CO: Sounds True. 289 pages. ISBN-13: 978-1-59179-911-5. (AUD$13.20).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - ESP of quarks and superstrings [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cowen, Ronald
      Review(s) of: ESP of quarks and superstrings, by Stephen M. Phillips (1999). New Delhi, India: New Age International. 248 pages. ISBN-10: 81-224-1209-2; ISBN-13: 978-81-224-1209-3. US$39.75 (AUD$44.40).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Australian ghosts: The most haunted locations of
           Australia [Kindle Edition] [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cooper, Callum E
      Review(s) of: Australian ghosts: The most haunted locations of Australia [Kindle Edition], by Jeffrey Fisher (2014). Seattle, WA: Amazon Digital Services, Inc. 29 pages (e-book). ASIN: B00IM80JXU. 1.85 pounds (USD$3.60).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Anomalistic psychology (Palgrave Insights in
           Psychology series) [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Jinks, Tony
      Review(s) of: Anomalistic psychology (Palgrave Insights in Psychology series), by Nicola Holt, Christine Simmonds-Moore, David Luke, and Christopher French (2012). Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. 252 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0-230-30150-4 (pb). USD$15.78 (AUD $17.00).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Aspects of consciousness: Essays on physics, death and
           the mind [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mitchell, Colin
      Review(s) of: Aspects of consciousness: Essays on physics, death and the mind, edited by Ingrid Fredriksson (2012). Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co. 225 pages. ISBN 978-0-7864-6495-1 (pb). USD$61.93 (AUD$66.80).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - An Investigation of the I Ching using the Q-sort
           method and an RNG-PK design: I. Four possible psi predictors
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance; Rock, Adam J
      An attempt was made to emulate a paranormal event (i.e., synchronicity) in the laboratory by instructing participants to construct a representation of their inner mental (cognitive/emotional) states using a Q-Sort Grid in which 64 I Ching descriptor-pairs were thoughtfully placed (i.e., ranked from -7 to +7), followed by the creation of an outer event using a Random Number Generator (RNG) to generate an I Ching hexagram with an associated reading that is rated for meaningfulness. There were four hypothesized psi-predictors: (i) 'pro attitude' measured on the Pro Attitude Scale (Thalbourne and Storm, in press); (ii) paranormal belief measured on the Australian Sheep-Goat Scale (Thalbourne, 1995), where 'sheep' are believers in psychic ability, and 'goats' are skeptics; (iii) trait reactance (i.e., resistance to compliance; hypothesized to be detrimental to psi) measured on the Hong Psychological Reactance Scale (Hong and Faedda, 1996); and (iv) Meaningfulness (of I Ching hexagram readings). The Q-Sort task did not yield any significant effects, although as expected Q-Sort scores were positive for sheep. There were a number of sheep-goat psi effects, including a significantly high mean RNG-PK score for sheep. Of the four psi predictors, Meaningfulness correlated marginally significantly with Direct-Hitting (scores of +7), and significantly with Binary-Hitting (scores of +6 and +7). Scores on the Rasch-scaled version of the ASGS (Lange and Thalbourne, 2002) correlated significantly with Pro Attitude and Meaningfulness. There was a 24% success rate at the .05 level, and a significant 72% of our tests were in the directions hypothesized. It is argued that the Q-Sort Grid may need simplification, and participants should give feedback on RNG-PK task complexity.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Paranormal beliefs, spoken and unspoken
    • Abstract: Irwin, Harvey J
      Recent social psychological research raises the possibility that some attitudes and beliefs may be implicit or inaccessible to articulation. In this study a measure of implicit paranormal beliefs was constructed and administered to a sample of 105 Australian adults as an online project. Significant relationships were found between implicit and explicit (self-reported) paranormal beliefs, offering support for the validity of the concept of implicit paranormal beliefs. While explicit beliefs were found to be correlated with thinking style, no such correlations were evident for implicit beliefs. Some speculations on the origins of implicit paranormal beliefs are offered.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Editor's note
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Counselling the discarnate and the methodological
           approach: Comment on Ferreira (2013)
    • Abstract: Cooper, Callum E
      I was surprised to read the paper by Ferreira (2013) regarding communication with the dead in a distressed state (post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) via the author's use of entering an out-of-body state. This paper was produced at the same time I was editing some of the unpublished work of the late Dr. Alex Tanous regarding his research on ghosts and hauntings through the American Society for Psychical Research (Tanous with Cooper, 2013). Both publications and purported psi abilities are linked very closely.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 14 Issue 1 - Are believers in the paranormal inclined to jump to
           conclusions'
    • Abstract: Irwin, Harvey J; Drinkwater, Kenneth; Dagnall, Neil
      An earlier study by Irwin, Dagnall, and Drinkwater (2012a) found a relationship between the intensity of paranormal beliefs and a self-reported proneness to jump to conclusions. This relationship was statistically significant for the factor of Traditional Paranormal Beliefs but was only of borderline significance for the other major factor of paranormal beliefs, New Age Philosophy. The project reported here aimed to replicate the relationship using an additional self-report measure of jumping to conclusions, plus a standard performance measure of this construct. A convenience sample of 124 people completed three measures of proneness to jump to conclusions and a questionnaire surveying paranormal beliefs. A relationship between intensity of paranormal beliefs and proneness to jump to conclusions was confirmed, but the pattern of findings across the various indices of jumping to conclusions raises several issues for further empirical clarification.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Book Reviews [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: Education in parapsychology: Student and instructor Perspectives, by Harvey J. Irwin (2013), Sydney, AIPR, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0-9870772-1-9 (pb), AUD$25.00; Shamanism and Psi: Imagery cultivation as an alternative to the ganzfeld protocol, by Lance Storm and Adam J. Rock (2011), Sydney, AIPR, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0-9870772-0-2 (pb), AUD$25.00; Synchronicity: Multiple perspectives on meaningful coincidence, by Lance Storm (Ed.), (2008), Pari, Italy, Pari Publishing, 352 pages, ISBN-10: 8895604024, ISBN-13: 978-8895604022 (pb), AUD$17.59; Parapsychology in the twenty-first century: Essays on the future of psychical research, by Michael A. Thalbourne and Lance Storm (Eds.), (2005), Jefferson, NC, McFarland and Company, 396 pages, ISBN-10: 0786419385, ISBN-13: 978-0786419388, (pb), AUD$53.57; The survival of human consciousness: Essays on the possibility of life after Death, by Lance Storm and Michael A. Thalbourne (Eds.), (2006), Jefferson, NC, McFarland and Company, 319 pages, ISBN-10: 0786427728, ISBN-13: 978-0786427727 (pb), AUD$53.57.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - AIPR awards
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsychology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Correspondence
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - A phenomenological examination of premonition
           experiences in dreams and waking states: A survey study
    • Abstract: Parra, Alejandro
      The main aim of the present study was to determine the proportion of people in Argentina who claim to have had various kinds of premonition experiences, and to discover correlations between these experiences and other variables, such as content, topics, symbols, clearness, vividness, emotional variables, and sensory modalities, and whether people could discern normal from paranormal explanations for their premonitions. The sample comprised 218 (50.8%) females and 211 (49.2%) males (Mean Age = 34 years; SD = 13 years), most of whom were students. The Premonition Experiences Questionnaire was used to collect information on spontaneous premonition experiences. The first part of the questionnaire covered 'Premonition in dreams', and the second part covered 'Premonition not related to dreams' (i.e., premonitions in waking states). The majority of premonitory dreamers reported that their premonitions were vivid, clear, and emotionally intense. Premonitory dreams were reported to be clearer than usual dreams. More than half the participants who reported premonitions during waking states, reported feeling anxious, but many expressed feelings of happiness and relief. The information obtained in the survey is of value to parapsychology both as a source of sociological information, and possible hypotheses about the nature of the experiences considered.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Anomalous experiences as Transliminal Drama: The case
           of Wasney De Almeida Ferreira
    • Abstract: Houran, James
      Social psychologist Wasney de Almeida Ferreira (Ferreira, 2013) recently reported an unusual set of anomalous experiences with the dead that he deliberately induced via an internal attention state. Only one such episode was detailed, and its content and thematic progression compared favourably to the progression of transliminal experiences as documented in the hierarchical (Rasch scale) content of the Revised Transliminality Scale (Lange, Thalbourne, Houran, and Storm, 2000). The findings suggest that Ferreira's psychical experiences may be dramatic examples of psychological content accessed and released through transliminal processes, a hypothesized mechanism inherent in anomalous experiences regardless of a psychological or parapsychological nature.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - The 'Survey of scientifically unaccepted beliefs': A
           new measure of paranormal and related beliefs
    • Abstract: Irwin, Harvey J; Marks, Anthony DG
      This paper reports the psychometric development of new measure of paranormal and related beliefs. Based on a constructive review of the limitations of current self-report questionnaires several criteria were formulated for development of the new measure. One of the key criteria was that items had to meet an explicit definition of scientifically unaccepted beliefs, thereby allowing inclusion in the new measure of a broad range of paranormal beliefs, traditional religious beliefs, urban myths, and similar beliefs currently not accepted by the scientific mainstream. An initial pool of 92 items was administered to 1,180 Australian adults to rate in terms of the level of endorsement. The data of 600 of these participants were analysed under Item Response Theory using the Rasch model and WINSTEPS software, yielding a 20- item questionnaire with two dimensions, New Age Beliefs and Traditional Religious Beliefs, that were free from differential item functioning for age and gender and which featured interval-level measurement. Data from the remaining 580 participants were used for the purpose of confirmatory factor analysis; this analysis confirmed the previously identified psychometric structure. A second study using 236 Australian adults demonstrated the new measure possessed generally satisfactory psychometric characteristics, although further investigation of the scale's discriminant validity and of the convergent validity of the Traditional Religious Beliefs subscale is warranted. The new Survey of Scientifically Unaccepted Beliefs is commended to researchers for its distinctive conceptual perspective, its elegant psychometric structure, and its sophisticated psychometric properties.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Paranormal effects and behavioural characteristics of
           participants in a forced-choice Psi Task: Ertel's Ball selection test
           under scrutiny
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance; Ertel, Suitbert; Rock, Adam J
      In a previous study (Storm, Ertel, and Rock, 2013), we demonstrated that Ertel's (2005b,c) Ball Selection Test (a.k.a. the Ball Test) can be used to test Reactance Theory (Brehm and Brehm, 1981), and the Sheep-Goat Effect (SGE; the tendency for believers ['sheep'] to psi-hit and non-believers ['goats'] to psi-miss). The Ball Test is a forced-choice psi task involving the blind selection of numbered pingpong balls after numbers are called by the participant (a hit is a match between a 'called' number and a 'selected' ball number). According to Reactance Theory, when an individual's freedom is threatened through some form of coercion, we may expect reactance, which is 'a motivational state aimed at restoring the threatened freedom' (Silvia, 2005, p. 277). Reactance may explain the SGE. In that study (N = 82), we found a significant forced-choice hit rate of 21.06% where PMCE = 20% (p = .002). Participants were randomly assigned to a control condition (n = 42) or treatment (n = 40) condition requiring them to read a statement that induced reactance. We found a significant reactance effect, and a significant SGE. In the present study, we sought answers to some crucial questions concerning the ball test's validity, including possible displacement effects, and possible biases in numbercalling and selection-behaviour. We found that participants did avoid calling numbers if they had just called them or just selected them from the bag. We found no evidence of hits being mere artifacts caused by sensory leakage or mnemonic aids.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Editor's note
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 2 - Guidelines for contributors
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - AIPR awards
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 13 Issue 1 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsychology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Donations to AIPR, Inc.
    • PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Research grant: Cardigan fund
    • PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Reply to Houran, Lynn and Lange (2017)
    • Abstract: Stokes, Douglas M
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Understanding the unknown: A thematic analysis of
           subjective paranormal experiences
    • Abstract: Drinkwater, Kenneth; Dagnall, Neil; Grogan, Sarah; Riley, Victoria
      This study investigated personal accounts of subjective paranormal experiences (SPEs). Ten UK-based participants took part in semi-structured interviews, where they discussed how alleged paranormal experiences made them feel, whether the narrated event(s) was unusual/strange, and what they believed caused the occurrence(s). Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis; a qualitative method that identifies patterns within data. Five central themes emerged (sensory experiences, you are not alone, distortion of reality, personal growth, and socio-cultural factors). Consideration of themes revealed an intricate, inextricable link between perception, interpretation and belief. Generally, SPEs were associated with the desire to comprehend the unknown and a reluctance to accept the uncertain. Findings provided important insights into the phenomenology of paranormal experience, suggested avenues for future research and were consistent with previous findings.

      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - White crows rising: Using spontaneous cases to
           establish psi
    • Abstract: Stokes, Douglas M
      Many, if not most, parapsychologists believe that the existence of psi phenomena cannot be proven through spontaneous case research. However they view the existing body of experimental evidence as sufficient to establish the existence of psi. Often they point to statistical meta-analyses to support this claim. However, Stokes (2015) has argued that the statistically significant, albeit small, effects found in typical meta-analyses may be the result of data selection and fraud, given the high levels of fraud and data selection that have been uncovered in the wider scientific community in both the medical sciences and psychology. In particular, tests of statistical significance in meta-analyses are based on the assumption that none of the experimenters represented in the database are fraudulent and that no data selection has occurred. In light of the high levels of experimenter malfeasance that have recently been uncovered in the wider scientific community, these assumptions are likely false. However, there are instances of striking psi effects in spontaneous psi cases research that defy normal explanations. Cases such as these may offer greater proof of the existence of psi than do psi experiments.

      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Commentary on Stokes's (2017) quest for "White crows"
           in spontaneous cases of psi
    • Abstract: Houran, James; Lynn, Steven Jay; Lange, Rense
      We critically evaluate Stokes's arguments that spontaneous cases are valuable for proving the ontological reality of paranormal phenomena. Currently, 'psi' and 'paranormal' have no explanatory value, but rather are rhetorical devices that merely rename "unexplained or anomalous" experiences or observations. Stokes's (2017) view of seeing two polarised agendas is misinformed, or at least anachronistic; added to that is his mistaken assumption that spontaneous case studies (which he sees as unambiguous) would be superior to conventional studies involving repetitious procedures (e.g., sampling, experimentation). However, we assert that both approaches are important, and any gaps can be bridged. In particular, a broad review of salient studies suggests that spontaneous cases of anomalous experience are reasonably common, structured and predictable in onset. Thus, they have the potential to inform and reinforce experiments and quantitative models, which collectively aim to build a true explanation for anomalous experiences and outcomes with the ultimate goal of achieving a cumulative theory of human consciousness. Lastly, several methodological or analytical approaches to spontaneous cases and qualitative data are proposed and discussed that can advance these goals.

      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Editor's note
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - An assessment of the worldview theory of belief in the
           paranormal
    • Abstract: Irwin, Harvey J
      An online survey was undertaken to examine the relationship between the intensity of beliefs in paranormal phenomena and one's worldview. A sample of 141 Australian university students participated in the survey. Statistical analysis showed that paranormal belief is significantly related to various worldviews when these are considered collectively, but no single worldview made an independently significant contribution to the relationship. The collective relationship also was not a strong one, casting doubt on the sufficiency of the worldview hypothesis of paranormal belief.

      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Parapsychology: A beginner's guide [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Morck, Nemo C
      Review(s) of: Parapsychology: A beginner's guide, by Caroline Watt (2016), London: Oneworld. 226 pages, ISBN: 978-1-78074-887-0 (pb), AUD $20.30 (USD $14.99).

      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - In memory of Suitbert Ertel who died February 25, 2017
    • Abstract: Storm, Lance; Irving, Kenneth; Bauer, Eberhard
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - AIPR courses: AIPR certificate in parapsychology and
           AIPR advanced certificate in parapsychology
    • PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Advertisements
    • PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - President's note
    • Abstract: Jinks, Tony
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Guidelines for contributors
    • PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:21:32 GMT
       
 
 
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