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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 400 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 400 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
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Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
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History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover Australian Journal of Music Therapy
  [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1036-9457
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [400 journals]
  • Volume 27 'Circuit breaking' the anxiety: Experiences of group music
           therapy during supported post-meal time for adults with anorexia nervosa
    • Abstract: Bibb, Jennifer; Castle, David; Newton, Richard
      Mealtimes are associated with feelings of anxiety and distress for people with anorexia nervosa. There is little research into specific therapeutic activities for reducing meal-related anxiety. The study reported here assessed the efficacy of post-meal music therapy in 18 adults with anorexia nervosa in hospital. We report here the qualitative data. Participants described music therapy as a way to take their mind off the meal they had eaten, get a break from anxiety and get to know other people. Music therapy offered an alternative distress tolerance technique during a time of heightened anxiety. This study provides support for the use of music therapy in managing post-meal related anxiety for consumers with anorexia nervosa.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 The lived experience of music therapy
    • Abstract: Shoemark, Helen
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Musical life stories: Narratives on health musicking [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Hedigan, JP
      Review(s) of: Musical life stories: Narratives on health musicking, by Ole Bonde, L., Ruud, E., Skanland, M.S. and Trondalen, G. (2013), Norwegian Academy of Music, Akademia Publishing, ISBN: 978-82-7853-081-8.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 'Mianzi' and other social influences on music therapy for older
           Chinese people in Australian aged care
    • Abstract: Lauw, Eta
      As the world becomes increasingly global, music therapists have to develop cultural competencies to work with clients of different cultural backgrounds with appropriate sensitivity to encourage therapeutic growth. Just as there are differences in Western and Eastern cultures, it is necessary to integrate Western and Eastern methods when working with Asian populations, especially with those who are older adults. This may be difficult, if one is not familiar with the "hidden rules" in the client's culture. This article shares one therapist's clinical reflections on experiences in developing a music therapy program in a Chinese residential aged care facility in the state of Victoria, Australia. Consideration is given to the socio-cultural concepts such as 'guanxi, mianzi' and linguistic diversity, and how these interact with Western therapeutic processes when working with Chinese clients.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 The influence of religion and spirituality on clinical practice
           amongst Registered Music Therapists in Australia
    • Abstract: Pek, Priscilla; Grocke, Denise
      Despite an increasing awareness of spirituality in healthcare, there is little known in regards to the spiritual or religious beliefs of music therapists and how these beliefs may impact clinical practice. Australian music therapists (n=73) responded to a web-based survey designed to address this gap in the literature. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The majority of Australian music therapists who responded to the survey identified themselves as currently affiliated with an organized religion or spiritual practice (67%). The religious or spiritual beliefs of music therapists were found to impact clinical practice in a variety of ways, with increased likelihood of a positive rather than negative influence. Participants described the complex and personal nature of the topic, and suggested the need for reflective practice. Recommendations are made for further research in this area.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Registered music therapists' motivations and perceptions of the
           impact of their practices on the well-being of clients and themselves
    • Abstract: Lee, Juyoung; Davidson, Jane; McFerran, Katrina
      This paper explores how and why music therapists invest significant personal human resources in their clinical practice to facilitate well-being processes for others. We use self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000) to understand the motivations of 15 Registered Music Therapists (RMTs) to practice, and analyse how their approaches vary in response to the different clinical contexts in which they work. Three focus group interviews were conducted and discussions were analysed thematically, the findings being compared across groups. The three groups comprised: four RMTs who worked with children who have various support needs; five RMTs who worked with adolescents and adults who have mental health issues; and six RMTs worked with adults who have a wide range of disabilities. The RMTs practiced in a variety of contexts such as medical, educational, and community-based settings. Analysis suggests that the RMTs were initially motivated by intrinsic factors such as personal belief in the power of music, but when working with clients who have particular needs, they integrated themselves into a newly identified role that could maximise therapeutic benefits. As might be predicted, differences were identified in music therapy facilitation styles, with variations in planning/focus of sessions and the use of music repertoire depending on the specific support needs of the particular groups of clients and their existing relationships with music. The findings report for the first time how perceived well-being benefits of the therapists' themselves continue to motivate their ongoing professional development and further investment in musical practices.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Giving and gaining: Experiences of three music facilitators
           working and musicking with asylum seekers in Australia
    • Abstract: Jin, Sil
      There is a significant body of multidisciplinary literature raising concerned voices about the violation of human rights and the deterioration of mental wellbeing of asylum seekers in Australia. However there is little research reporting how music therapists work with this population resulting in the limited generation of resources for music therapy practice. The current study investigated the experiences of three music facilitators (two music therapists and one volunteer musician) working and musicking with asylum seekers in Australia and sought to explicate their lived experience through a phenomenological perspective. Verbatim transcription of interview data was collected from semi-structured phenomenological interviews conducted on Skype which was used for the phenomenological microanalysis. Three global meaning units were identified: (1) gaining personal benefits from the experience, (2) giving agency and (3) building Bandship. The findings contribute an insight into the issues of cultural competency and sensitivity, impact of the work such as vicarious traumatisation and vicarious resilience and the role of music and performance.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Therapeutic songwriting: Developments in theory, methods, and
           practice [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Flynn, Libby
      Review(s) of: Therapeutic songwriting: Developments in theory, methods, and practice, by Baker, F. A. (2015), London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, AUS $49.95, 322 pages, ISBN: 978-1-137-49922-6.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 How music helps in music therapy and everyday life [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Rimmer, Jo
      Review(s) of: How music helps in music therapy and everyday life, by Ansdell, G. (2015), Surrey, UK: Ashgate, AUS $99.95, 351 pages, (hard copy), AUS $32.30 (eBook), ISBN: 1472458052.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Basic anatomy and physiology for the music therapist [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Tamplin, Jeanette
      Review(s) of: Basic anatomy and physiology for the music therapist, by Schneck, D. J. (2015), London, UK: Jessica Kingsley, AUS $39.95, 352 pages, ISBN: 978-1-84905-756-1 (paperback), ISBN: 978-0-85700-992-0 (e-book).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 International perspectives in music therapy education and
           training: Adapting to a changing world [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Kenner, Jason
      Review(s) of: International perspectives in music therapy education and training: Adapting to a changing world, by Goodman, K. D. (2015), Springfield, Illinois, USA: Charles C Thomas, AUS $69.95, 343 pages, ISBN: 978-0-398-08117-1 (hard copy) / 978-0-398-08619-7 (eBook).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Music therapy handbook [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bibb, Jennifer
      Review(s) of: Music therapy handbook, by Wheeler, B. L (2015), New York: Guildford Press, AUS $105, 510 pages, ISBN 1462518036.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 The intimate simplicity of group singing: A reflection of
           practice
    • Abstract: Delaney, Angela
      Reflexivity is an integral component of professional healthcare practice that stimulates questions, fosters professional growth, and promotes change. This article discusses a music therapist's reflexive processes in relation to a spontaneous group singing session for residents with dementia. The author used Shoemark's (2009) illustration of reflexive practice and research to guide the reflexivity. By defining the process and impacts of reflexivity, it is the author's objective to assist others to develop reflexive skills. This includes applying four lenses: self, theory, practice and evidence to further understand the clinical experience. Considerations and observations including the simplicity of singing together, the experience as a moment of shared humanity, the value of group singing and music therapy within the context of successful aging are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Therapists creating a cultural tapestry: Using the creative
           therapies across culture [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ip-Winfield, Vannie
      Review(s) of: Therapists creating a cultural tapestry: Using the creative therapies across culture, by Brooke, S.L., and Charles E. Myers, C.E. (2015), Illinois, USA: Charles C Thomas, AUS $62.95, 328 pages, ISBN: 978-0-398-08128-7 (hardback).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Editorial: Music therapy and ageing well
    • Abstract: Clark, Imogen
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 The use of extemporizing in music therapy to facilitate
           communication in a person with dementia: An explorative case study
    • Abstract: Ridder, Hanne Mette; Gummesen, Elisabeth
      A person who has dementia may also have aphasia and severe communicative disabilities with the risk of this leading to social isolation. This study explored the music therapeutic process with a person with dementia and aphasia in order to understand how music therapy may facilitate communication and dialogue. In an explorative hermeneutic case study, new understandings to the music therapy process were added and led to the identification of the improvisation method known as extemporizing described by Tony Wigram. In a subsequent literature review extemporization was explored and is suggested as a valuable method for providing a safe ground for the person with dementia. Extemporizing can thus facilitate engagement in communicative dialogues and thereby address psychosocial needs for people with dementia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 The evaluation of musical engagement in dementia: Implications
           for self-reported quality of life
    • Abstract: Lem, Alan
      Despite a well-established framework of practical applications, evidence of the efficacy of music therapy in dementia care is inconsistent. This project tested a new evaluation protocol to look at clients' participation in music therapy from the standpoint of engagement rather than cognitive abilities and behaviour. The first stage involved the development of a new scale of musical engagement to assess the clients' engagement as a function of creativity, duration, energy, and assertiveness. In the second stage 12 elderly clients with dementia participated in 20 weekly music therapy sessions to identify potential relationships between participants' level of musical engagement and their self-assessed quality of life. Results: While relationships between the variables were not statistically significant, there was an indication that increases in self-assessed quality of life may have been related to a decrease and/or stability in the level of musical engagement. Results also showed that the level of musical engagement in 70% of the evaluated group began to increase after the midpoint of the clinical program. Further analysis suggested that the more intuitive approach by the music therapists, more challenging music experiences, and less structure in the program might have been responsible for this increase. Regardless of limited statistical outcomes, the project offers a valuable insight into the techniques and assessment procedures for music therapy with elderly people who have dementia. In future, the scale of musical engagement could be applied to the investigation of moment-to-moment variations in musical engagement of people with dementia, which could lead to a better understanding of momentary changes in clients' quality of life.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 The acceptability and efficacy of using iPads in music therapy
           to support wellbeing with older adults: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Engelbrecht, Romy; Shoemark, Helen
      Portable technology has the potential to help support the wellbeing of older adults living in the community, particularly when targeting the health risk factors of social isolation and low self-esteem. This mixed-method feasibility study investigated the acceptability and efficacy of using iPads1 compared to traditional music instruments (TMI) with older adults living privately in the community. Five women, 71 - 96 years old, were recruited from a community-based day respite centre in Brisbane. Participants were randomly assigned to either the TMI or iPad group, and engaged in five sessions of activity-based music therapy. Participants completed journal entries following each session to detail their experiences, and were assessed for levels of perceived social isolation and global self-esteem pre- and post-intervention. Five themes were found for acceptability of iPads: learning was inherent to all sessions, differences in mood outcomes, differences in emotional communications, playing on an iPad resulted in greater creativity and freedom, and the importance of the environmental and structural considerations. There were no significant differences on scores of social isolation or self-esteem either between (TMI vs. iPad) or within (pre- vs. post-test) the treatment groups, however themes of developing social cohesion, group identity, and enhanced positive self-concepts suggest both iPads and TMIs contributed towards factors of wellbeing for the participants. Collectively, the encouraging findings present an entry point in illustrating that technology can be an acceptable and potentially successful tool for use in music therapy with older people living in the community.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Communication and professional relationships in healthcare
           practice [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Clark, Imogen
      Review(s) of: Communication and professional relationships in healthcare practice, by Candlin, S., and Roger, P. (2013), Sheffield: Equinox, 202 pages, ISBN:978-1-908049-97-1, Cost: $45.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 The re-entry experiences of international music therapy
           professionals from the Asia Pacific Rim area
    • Abstract: Leung, Hiu Ying Angel; Wilson, Brian L; Roth, Edward A; Smith, David S
      As music therapy is a relatively new healthcare profession in the Asia Pacific Rim area, students from the area may travel to countries with well-established music therapy programs, such as the United States and Australia, to receive formal music therapy education. Upon completion of their training, many of these international professionals choose to return to their home country. The purpose of this study was to (a) assess the existence and severity of reverse cultural shock in music therapy professionals from the Asia Pacific Rim area who relocated/established their professional practices at home after formal music therapy training in the United States, (b) understand their re-entry experience by exploring the relationships between reverse cultural shock and re-entry satisfaction, and (c) investigate the relationship between reverse cultural shock experienced and re-adaptation to home culture on a personal level. Forty-two music therapists accepted the invitation to participate in an on-line survey. Results revealed that most participants experienced low levels of reverse cultural shock during re-entry to their home country. The Pearson's Correlation Test found there was a medium-strong negative correlation between the severity of reverse cultural shock experienced and level of re-entry satisfaction, and weak negative correlation between re-adaptation to home culture on a personal level and severity of reverse cultural shock experienced. The transfer and application of music therapy knowledge and skills learned in the United States to the professional practice in participants' home cultural environment was also investigated. This study serves as the starting point for further investigation into the subject.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Cross-cultural perspective: A thematic analysis of a music
           therapist's experience providing treatment in a foreign country
    • Abstract: Gadberry, Anita L
      As more music therapists are travelling and moving to different countries and little has been written about cross-cultural treatment, the researcher sought to answer the following two questions: (a) What is the experience of a music therapist treating clients in a different culture' and (b) What issues arise in cross-cultural music therapy treatment'

      The research questions were explored using thematic analysis method. The experiences of a music therapist providing services in a different country were chronicled for one month. During the month of treatment, the participant wrote daily journal entries, processing her experience providing music therapy treatment in a foreign country and culture. Upon her return to the United States, the researcher interviewed the participant about her experience in Ecuador and her background prior to the trip. Data consisted of the therapist's journal entries, responses to interview questions posed by the researcher, and responses to questions that arose during the coding of the data. Four overarching themes emerged from the data: allowing the music to facilitate, prominent role of drums, impact of differing views on therapy, and the music therapist's uneasiness with the language barrier. Findings may assist other music therapists in their efforts to conduct cross-cultural treatment; results may also have implications for the training and education of music therapists.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 "Hidden rules": A duo-ethnographical approach to explore the
           impact of culture on clinical practice
    • Abstract: Thomas, Amy; Sham, Fiona Tsz Ying
      For clinicians in Australia "culture" is a broad topic. But what does culture mean from our individual perspectives, and how does our individual cultural background influence our clinical practice' These questions were raised between two Australian trained music therapy clinicians during clinical discussions. The primary author is an Australian senior clinician, and the second author is a Chinese clinician who works with the primary author in a sub-acute hospital setting. With the growth of qualitative research methods in music therapy, there are increasing opportunities to systematically explore topics such as culture in clinical practice. Duo-ethnography draws on processes from ethnography and narrative research to promote the understanding of a shared phenomenon. Using a duo-ethnographical approach, the authors of this article explore and reflect on their experiences of culture in clinical practice. The resulting narrative of their exploration of this topic is presented as a conversation to reflect the process undertaken, and aims to inform the dialogue about culture in clinical practice. Limitations of this approach and how this discussion can inform music therapy clinicians and other allied health professions are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Cross-cultural music therapy in community aged-care: A case
           vignette of a CALD elderly woman
    • Abstract: Chan, Grace
      This article explores cross-cultural music therapy for older people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds in regional North Queensland. In conjunction with the Functional Independence Model (FIM), music therapy is implemented to maximise their capacities to live independently and to promote their well-being. One-on-one music therapy programs create a platform for CALD older people to share their own culture, to strengthen self-identity, to optimise capabilities and to develop self-esteem. A case vignette discusses the role of a one-on-one program for a 92 year-old Austrian woman to address issues concerning social isolation and loss of capability in her life. Cross-cultural music therapy approaches including creating connections, developing cultural empathy, and maintaining an open-minded attitude, are also examined.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Song Preferences of Chinese Older Adults Living in Australia
    • Abstract: Yeung, Hilaria Cham-In; Baker, Felicity; Shoemark, Helen
      Music therapy research reports very limited repertoire resources for Chinese older adults who are a significant non-English speaking group in Australia. This small scale survey study established preferred songs in a group of Chinese older adults living in Australia, explored the relationship between demographic variables and the language of song preferences, and determined whether the most preferred songs were published in the participant's young adult years (20-30 years) as found in past studies. Twenty-nine Chinese older adults (aged 65-94) were recruited from a senior community gathering in Brisbane, Australia. The data of the survey generated a list of 49 individual song titles which were categorised into six music style categories (popular, patriotic, religious, folk, Chinese opera, and others). A significant relationship was found only between the Cantonese as the first language and preference for songs in Cantonese (p
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Home-based music therapy for the aged Chinese community in
           Melbourne: Challenges and outcomes
    • Abstract: Ip-Winfield, Vannie; Wen, Yun; Yuen, Caroline
      This paper concerns a pilot project: the Home-Based Preferred Music Listening program (HBPML) for older Chinese migrants (n=105) who live in the community and receive community care packages from the Chinese Community Social Services Centre Inc. (CCSSCI). The project aimed to educate and inform participants (elderly, family caregivers and aged home-care workers) on issues relevant to ageing and dementia and to empower the elderly to use basic music therapy techniques at home to improve their mood and to improve the job satisfaction of their carers.

      The project is still on going. This article describes and explains both its development and the music therapy models that inform practice. The outcomes from developing this pilot project include five important considerations for cross-cultural work. These were 'family-centred practice,' 'culturally sensitive practice,' 'the need for bilingual-bicultural therapists,' 'the use of culturally specific music' and 'therapists as consultants and resource persons.' It is hoped that this discussion will be useful to clinicians working with older Chinese migrants.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Cultural safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults
           within Australian music therapy practices
    • Abstract: Truasheim, Sian
      The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people is underrepresented within music therapy literature. An essential first step is to ensure that programs are culturally safe so that effective therapy services value the client's own cultural identity. Cultural safety is "the effective delivery of services to people from another culture, as determined by individuals and groups from that culture" (Saggers, Walter, and Gray, 2011, p. 18) and ensures appreciation and embracing of the client's culture.

      The aim of this article is to increase the consideration of cultural safety within music therapy programs accessed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and evaluate the potential for culturally safe music therapy programs by examining a pilot program that the author was a part of as a non-Indigenous music therapy student. Participants in the pilot program were 13 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander adults with a variety of chronic diseases. Findings of the study demonstrated that music therapy has the potential to be a culturally safe services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults when implemented with ongoing reflection and strategic development. Openness to diverging from western cultural norms, and creating partnerships with clients, community, and culturally safe organizations were central to ensuring culturally safe practice in this pilot program and are recommended for future programs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Contemporary cultures of service delivery to families:
           Implications for music therapy
    • Abstract: Williams, Kate E; Teggelove, Kate; Day, Toni
      Family-centred and early intervention and prevention programs are a strong focus of current policy objectives within Australia, and a significant area of practice within the music therapy community. Recent shifts in the culture of policy and practice increasingly reflect ecological understandings by focussing on integrated and place-based approaches to service delivery. Further, current funding opportunities are strongly concerned with the extent to which interventions are able to reach out to highly vulnerable families that typically do not engage with services easily. Music therapy holds unique promise within these cultural shifts and thus advocates must develop a solid understanding of the concepts and related language in order to confidently engage with both funding and service systems. This paper uses an integrative review to first define and summarise current knowledge in three key areas relevant to contemporary Australian policy and practice: hard-to-reach families, home visiting as assertive outreach, and integrated or place-based service delivery. Evidence for the effectiveness of music therapy in relation to these key themes is then presented. Finally, the paper discusses the implications for the future of music therapy within the current Australian early intervention and prevention policy context and makes recommendations for moving forward on both practice and research fronts. While there is growing evidence and theory to suggest that music therapy may be uniquely efficacious in this area, greater advocacy, documentation, research and adjustment of practices and language will further cement the position of the industry.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 The study of music therapy: Current issues and concepts [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: O'Callaghan, Clare
      Review(s) of: The study of music therapy: Current issues and concepts, by Aigen, K. S. (2014), Routledge: New York. 262 pages, ISBN-10: 0415626412, ISBN-13: 978-0415626415, Cost: US$48.95 (print) $38.49 (kindle).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Experiencing race as a music therapist: Personal narratives
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ip-Winfield, Vannie
      Review(s) of: Experiencing race as a music therapist: Personal narratives, by Hadley, S. (2013), Gilsum: Barcelona Publishers. 228 pages, Print ISBN: 978-937440-39-8, E ISBN: 978-1- 937440-40-4, Cost: $AUD28.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Assessment and outcomes in the arts therapies: A person-centred
           approach [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Stephensen, Claire
      Review(s) of: Assessment and outcomes in the arts therapies: A person-centred approach, by Miller, C. (2014), London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 256 pages, ISBN: 9781849054140, Cost: $AUD46.94.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Editorial: Regarding culture and music therapy
    • Abstract: Shoemark, Helen
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 From creative process to trans-cultural process: Integrating
           music therapy with arts media in Italian kindergartens: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Cominardi, Claudio
      The integration of immigrant children is a primary problem of the Italian education system. At the same time, the expressive communication of our multimedia and multicultural society is generating new opportunities for understanding between different cultures, which can influence the social lives of these children. This communication is strongly rooted in Western culture by the historical music and art avant-gardes of the 20th Century, which are based not only on common aesthetic patterns, but also on common sense-perceptual elements found innately in every person.

      The music therapy project described in this article explored how these music-art languages can become an open model for welcoming, integrating and sharing common languages with children coming from different cultures in public kindergartens, growing new channels of knowledge and communication among multicultural groups. The project also explored how the musical thinking of John Cage, if considered as a cultural bridge between differences, could be inspiring for intercultural music therapy projects.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Your song, my song, our song: Developing music therapy programs
           for a culturally diverse community in home-based paediatric palliative
           care
    • Abstract: Forrest, Lucy
      Working in home-based paediatric palliative care with children and families of diverse cultural background presents an array of considerations for the music therapist. Developing cultural awareness, sensitivity and responsiveness is paramount in the provision of culturally appropriate palliative care music therapy services. This paper presents a preliminary discussion of cultural considerations in providing paediatric palliative care music therapy services in home-based settings for children and families of diverse cultural background.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Understanding the benefits of an Asian music therapy student
           peer group
    • Abstract: Lin, Yi-Ying
      The purpose of this study was to understand the benefits of a self-regulated Asian music therapy student peer group on improving its members' learning experiences in academic, clinical, and personal domains. This group was formed spontaneously in September, 2011 by a group of music therapy students of Asian cultural orientation, all of whom studied at Montclair State University in the United States. A total of eleven students participated in this group, through August, 2013. Three group members, including myself, were selected as participants in the present qualitative research study. Narrative inquiry was used as the primary data collection and analysis method to allow the participants to express personal experiences as a coherent, contextualised whole. Themes identified around participants' challenges of studying music therapy in the United States included language barriers, feeling out of control, culturally-based needs for additional preparation time, discrepancies in mainstream social norm and one's original culture, and insufficient social support. Themes identified around how the group was helpful included providing additional opportunities for practicing music therapy techniques, gathering various information, using secondary language to share thoughts and feelings in a relaxing and secure environment, and increased connection with in-depth cultural understanding that greatly improved social bonding among members, and created a sense of belongingness which in turn helped strengthened the social support system in the group.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Improvising in styles: A workbook for music therapists,
           educators, and musicians [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Williams, Stephen
      Review(s) of: Improvising in styles: A workbook for music therapists, educators, and musicians, by Colin Lee and Marc Houde (2011), Gilsum, NH: Barcelona Publishers. ISBN 978-1-891278-58-7.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Music and mood regulation: A historical enquiry into individual
           differences and musical prescriptions through the ages
    • Abstract: Garrido, Sandra; Davidson, Jane; Odell-Miller, Helen
      In modern times, the use of music in the fields of health and mental health is becoming mainstream. Its application is of interest in both the treatment of mood disorders such as depression and in healthcare settings such as cancer wards or palliative care. However, this powerful effect is by no means a new concept, with music being used for mood regulation purposes since at least the time of the ancient Greeks. In fact, it was only during the 18th century with the dichotomy between the arts and sciences that occurred, that music became regarded as of less interest to health scientists. This paper investigates historical literature on the use of music in mood regulation from ancient times until today, drawing on a narrative synthesis of historical reports in order to demonstrate the various mechanisms and types of music that were believed to be involved in its power to influence moods. It is argued that while individual music therapists in clinical practice continually consider individual differences and the potential for music to have a negative impact on mood, these issues are rarely considered in empirical studies on music and mood.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 The impact of relaxing music on insomnia-related thoughts and
           behaviours
    • Abstract: Oxtoby, Jim; Sacre, Sandy; Lurie-Beck, Janine; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard
      Insomnia is a pervasive problem involving poor sleep quality and quantity. Previous research has suggested that music listening can help alleviate insomnia, but exactly how music helps sleep problems has not been determined. A greater understanding of these processes could help practitioners to design more effective music-based insomnia treatments. This randomised controlled trial was designed to assess the influences of nightly music listening on the sleep-related thoughts and behaviours described in Harvey's (2002) cognitive model of insomnia maintenance. University students, including a range of good and poor sleepers, were randomly assigned to a music listening group or a control group and were assessed before and after a two-week music listening intervention. Measures included a range of self-report scales, each assessing an element of Harvey's cognitive model. During the intervention, the music listening group was asked to listen to provided music for at least 20 minutes each night. The control group was asked to maintain their regular nightly routines. Results indicated that the music listening group significantly improved on most of the factors theorised to influence sleep quality, although their actual sleep quality did not significantly improve. The control group did not change significantly on any measures. The results of this study suggest that music listening can have positive impacts on a range of factors theorised to influence sleep quality. However, as the music was not shown to actually improve sleep quality, Harvey's cognitive model explanation of music's effect on sleep quality may require further investigation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Decision making in music therapy: The use of a decision tree
    • Abstract: Thompson, Stephanie; O'Callaghan, Clare
      The prescription of decision making within music therapy interventions is a key topic for both clinicians and researchers. Decision trees are graphical representations of problems and are commonly used in the healthcare setting to determine solutions to complex choices. They are efficient and easily interpreted, and assist with finding connections and ultimately potential outcomes to the decisions faced. They are straight-forward to replicate and therefore strengthen the validity of decision making in the therapy or research setting. This article will describe the development and application of a decision tree which was designed for a study of group music therapy for women with breast cancer. Additionally the decision tree provided a framework for determining applicable clinical interventions to meet the needs of participants. Case vignettes from clinical work with women with breast cancer will be used to illustrate the use of this tool.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Singing play songs and lullabies: Investigating the subjective
           contributions to maternal attachment constructs
    • Abstract: Creighton, Alison Liew; Atherton, Michael; Kitamura, Christine; Trondalen, Gro
      The aim of this study was to examine how the experience of singing play songs and lullabies contributes to early mother-infant attachment. A total of twenty-three healthy mother-infant dyads were recruited. Twelve were interviewed about their subjective experience of singing interactions. Eleven were interviewed about their subjective experience of non-singing play interactions. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using an adapted phenomenologically inspired analysis process (Grocke, 1999) then compared to Condon and Corkindale's (1998) four maternal attachment constructs or domains including: (1) pleasure in proximity, (2) tolerance/acceptance, (3) need gratification and protection, and (4) knowledge acquisition. The findings reveal that the mothers' experience of singing interactions primarily impacted the pleasure in proximity, need gratification and tolerance/acceptance constructs. The mothers' experience of non-singing interactions primarily impacted the pleasure in proximity, need gratification and knowledge acquisition constructs. The experience of singing was distinctly different from the experience of non-singing interactions in multiple ways. The findings reveal that singing facilitated a flow of interconnections between positive mental and emotional states. Furthermore, it appears that the therapeutic potential of singing to impact attachment lies within the positivity and flow of the mothers' intrinsic of how singing play songs and lullabies may contribute positively to maternal constructs of attachment in the first year of life.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Professor Denise Grocke's contribution to the establishment of
           the music therapy profession in Australia: A historical research study
    • Abstract: Bibb, Jennifer; Dileo, Cheryl
      Since its beginnings in the 1970s, the music therapy profession in Australia continues to grow and change. However, there is little literature about either the history or the continual growth of the profession in Australia. This study was the first historical research project which aimed to reflect on the growth of the music therapy profession in Australia over time. Qualitative data was obtained through interviews with three of Australia's most prominent figures in the field of music therapy. This article focuses on the establishment of the music therapy profession in Australia between 1970 and 1990 and Professor Denise Grocke's influence and contribution to the profession in these early years. The interview narrative provides invaluable insight into the establishment of the music therapy profession in Australia. This study brings to light the importance of developing the historical 'story' of the music therapy profession in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Editorial: Honouring the enormous contribution of Denise Grocke
    • Abstract: McFerran, Katrina Skewes
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Policy of the Australian Journal of Music Therapy
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 The psychology of music performance anxiety [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Osborne, Margaret
      Review(s) of: The psychology of music performance anxiety, by Kenny, Dianna T. (2011), Oxford: Oxford University Press. 365 pages. ISBN: 9780199586141.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Invitation to community music therapy [Book Review]
    • Abstract: O'Grady, Lucy
      Review(s) of: Invitation to community music therapy, by Stige, B. and Aaro, L.E. (2012), New York, NY: Routledge. 330 pages. ISBN: 9780415805544.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Therapeutic uses of rap and hiphop [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hart, Caroline
      Review(s) of: Therapeutic uses of rap and hiphop, by Hadley, S., and Yancy, G. (2012), (Eds.), New York: Routledge. 427 pages. ISBN: 978-0-415-88474-7.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Towards ethical research: A guide for music therapy and music
           and health practitioners, researchers and students [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Gleadhill, Libby
      Review(s) of: Towards ethical research: A guide for music therapy and music and health practitioners, researchers and students, by Farrant, C., Pavlicevic, M., and Tsiris, G. (2011), London, United Kingdom: Nordoff Robbins. 105 pages, ISBN: 978-0-9570739-0-6.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Voicework in music therapy: Research and practice [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Dearn, Trish
      Review(s) of: Voicework in music therapy: Research and practice, by Baker, F and Uhlig, S. (2011), London: Jessica Kingsley. 367 pages. ISBN: 9781849051651.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Music-in-action, selected essays in sonic ecology [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bolger, Lucy
      Review(s) of: Music-in-action, selected essays in sonic ecology, by De Nora, T. (2011), Surrey: Ashgate, 197 pages, ISBN:978-1-4094-1996-9.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Music therapy and parent-infant bonding [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Thompson, Grace
      Review(s) of: Music therapy and parent-infant bonding, by Edwards, J. (Ed.). (2011), Oxford: Oxford University Press, 212 pages, ISBN: 978-0-19-958051-4.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Predictable Factors in Sedative Music (PFSM): A tool to identify
           sedative music for receptive music therapy
    • Abstract: Hooper, Jeff
      This article introduces a tool developed to help clinicians and researchers choose appropriate sedative music for receptive music therapy when individuals attending treatment or participating in research cannot select their preferred stimulus. It outlines the three steps involved in developing the tool - finding out what has been already devised to categorise sedative music, choosing a suitable starting point for a new system, and using that starting point to draw up the new tool (Predictable Factors in Sedative Music (PFSM)). The PFSM quantifies sedative music by categorising six different musical factors as either predictable or unpredictable (one factor (melody) has five subsections). Finally, this article presents a study carried out to validate the PFSM. Twenty-five music therapists submitted sedative and stimulative music selections for blind PFSM evaluations. Although some discrepancies in scoring stimulative selections suggested that a separate tool was needed to identify stimulating music, the PFSM performed reliably scoring the participants' sedative selections and the study confirmed the intrinsic validity of the PFSM. The discussion suggests that the PFSM can ensure more effective music therapy practice not only by helping music therapists identify a sedative stimulus for receptive music therapy but also by helping music therapists who use improvisation to develop an understanding of how to manipulate separate musical factors.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Supervision for music therapists: An Australian cross-sectional
           survey regarding views and practices
    • Abstract: Kennelly, Jeanette D; Baker, Felicity A; Morgan, Kylie A; Daveson, Barbara A
      Background: Music therapy professional organisations regard supervision as important and therapists are often encouraged to use supervision. However, little is known about music therapists' views and practices of supervision. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the views and practices of Australian-based music therapists regarding supervision. Method: A cross-sectional on-line survey was conducted with registered music therapists (RMT) practising within Australia. Responses were analysed using descriptive analyses. Results: A response rate of 19.5% (71/360) was achieved. Overall completion rate was 16.3% (59/360). Four sets of respondents were identified, including those who received supervision from a music therapist; from a non-music therapist, from both music therapist and non-music therapist and a substantial proportion that did not receive supervision. No significant differences (p≤0.05) were found between the groups that did and did not access supervision, however differences in costs and location were identified. The majority of those that received supervision (57%) received it from a supervisor not qualified in music therapy. The top three factors used to select a music therapy qualified supervisor were trust and prior knowledge of the supervisor, workplace requirements, and the type of supervision needed. The two highest-ranking reasons for not using supervision were working in a setting where supervision was not needed, and working with a population where supervision was not required. Conclusions: Our findings highlight a gap between the importance placed on supervision by music therapy professional organisations and what this group of therapists report that they do. Based on our findings, professional guidelines urrounding the practice of professional supervision also need to be reviewed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Music therapy and international development in action and
           reflection: A case study of a women's music group in rural Bangladesh
    • Abstract: Bolger, Lucy
      This case study presents an example of music therapy practice in an international development context. The article draws on an example of music therapy work in a women and children's refuge in rural Bangladesh to propose considerations for music therapy practice when working crossculturally with a community in a fixed-term project. Reflecting first on the group experience and then the broader implications for music therapy, the author explores the potential role of music therapy as a psychosocial support tool in international development, the dimensions of cross-cultural collaboration, and the complex negotiation of role and power dynamics as a 'foreigner' in international development settings.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Connecting through music: A study of a spousal
           caregiver-directed music intervention designed to prolong fulfilling
           relationships in couples where one person has dementia
    • Abstract: Baker, Felicity A; Grocke, Denise; Pachana, Nancy A
      Maintaining meaningful relationships in ageing couples where one spouse has dementia may lead to improved wellbeing in the caregiving spouses and increase the probability that caregivers will be able to maintain the care of their partners. Our study piloted a home-based music intervention designed to stimulate meaningful interaction between the spouses and discover its value in affecting the quality of the spousal relationship, satisfaction with caregiving, and caregiver wellbeing. Five couples consented to participate in the study and were provided with an education and demonstration session designed to train the caregiving spouse to use music with their spouse. They were asked to selfdirect a program involving three sessions per week for six consecutive weeks. Measures of anxiety, depression, spousal relationship, and measures of caregiving experiences were administered pre-post program. Spousal caregivers completed a diary during the six weeks and participated in a postprogram interview. A thematic analysis of the data indicated that music-sharing experiences were beneficial to the spousal relationship, satisfaction with caregiving, and caregiver wellbeing, and enhanced the mood of both the caregiver and spouse with dementia. The sample size was too small to generate significant quantitative results and is used in this paper to support the qualitative data.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Editorial: The changing face of music therapy
    • Abstract: McFerran, Katrina Skewes
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Policy of the 'Australian journal of music therapy'
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Where music helps: Community music therapy in action and
           reflection [Book Review]
    • Abstract: O'Grady, Lucy
      Review(s) of: Where music helps: Community music therapy in action and reflection, by Stige, B., Ansdell, G., Elefant, C. and Pavlicevic, M. (2010), Surrey: Ashgate, 364 pages, ISBN: 9781409410102.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Adolescents, music and music therapy: Methods and techniques for
           clinicians, educators and students [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Baron, Annette
      Review(s) of: Adolescents, music and music therapy: Methods and techniques for clinicians, educators and students, by McFerran, K. (2010), London: Jessica Kingsley, 304 pages, ISBN: 9781849050197.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Group music therapy methods in cross-cultural aged care practice
           in Australia
    • Abstract: Ip-Winfield, Vannie; Grocke, Denise
      Australian Music therapists are being called upon to work with an elderly population that is increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD). This study addresses the shortage of research in the following areas: 1) cross-cultural music therapy methods; 2) aged CALD clients; and 3) group work. An online questionnaire was circulated to 88 practising music therapists working in aged care in Australia. Data were gathered regarding frequently used methods, music genre and styles, utilisation of culturally specific music idioms, and challenges and strategies in working with CALD clients. The results suggest that cross-cultural music therapy practice in aged care is influenced by the following: personal experience and professional training, and the client's background, abilities, level of acculturation and musical preference. The study concludes with recommendations for training music therapists in future.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Mother-infant musical interaction and emotional communication: A
           literature review
    • Abstract: Creighton, Alison
      Early experiences of emotional communication contribute to mother-infant attachment and impact upon an infant's neurological, social and emotional development. Understanding emotional communication is paramount to encourage, support and promote healthy mother-infant relationships and infant health. Across various fields of research there is extensive literature on mother-infant interactions, attachment, emotional regulation and infant health with varying degrees of relevancy to music therapy. This paper aims to integrate theories and concepts pertinent to music therapy in order to provide a cross-disciplinary theoretical framework for any therapist interested in early mother-infant relationships intervention. Gaps in the literature and potential areas for future research are also discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Reflections regarding Australian music therapy supervision:
           Guidance and recommendations for establishing internal and external
           supervisory arrangements aided by cross-national reflection
    • Abstract: Daveson, Barbara; Kennelly, Jeanette
      Although literature regarding student supervision is expanding, information about how to establish supervisory arrangements for clinicians remains scarce. According to results from a large-scale survey in America, not all music therapists participate in supervision. Also, those that do participate in supervision may receive it from someone who works alongside them in their own organisation. In this paper, the international music therapy supervision literature is reviewed, and research findings that have emerged from America are considered in relation to the development of supervision in Australia. Results from a large-scale survey in America indicated that the most common reason for not receiving supervision was "lack of access". In response, considerations and strategies for establishing internal and external supervisory arrangements are offered in this paper. The limitations involved in reflecting upon American findings in relation to the development of supervision in Australia are also noted. Cross-national reflections prompt questions regarding clinicians' access to and choices regarding supervision. A number of strategies for clinicians, supervisors and employers are outlined to aid the development of supervisory arrangements, and support the ongoing and important development of supervision for all music therapists.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 The Mexican 'corrido' and its use in a music therapy bereavement
           group
    • Abstract: Schwantes, Melody; Wigram, Tony; McKinney, Cathy; Lipscomb, Allison; Richards, Cathy
      The purpose of this article is to describe the use of song writing in a group process with Mexican migrant farmworkers who had been in a serious van accident resulting in the deaths of two of their coworkers. The Mexican song form often used for telling the stories of the deceased was used as the structure for the song writing intervention. This song form provided a unique and culturally appropriate format for song writing in this context. This clinical example demonstrates one model of working within a culture-centered music therapy approach. The result of this work was a process through which the migrant farmworkers grew closer as a group and made connections with their friends who died. Additionally, the process resulted in a product, a recording of their song that would allow the therapeutic process to continue long after song writing had been concluded. Based on this clinical example, it is recommended that music therapists use song writing with a culture-centered approach to meet the needs of clients from other cultures experiencing grief.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Policy of the 'Australian Journal of Music Therapy'
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Communicative Musicality: Exploring the Basis of Human
           Companionship [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hart, Carolyn
      Review for: Communicative Musicality: Exploring the Basis of Human Companionship, by Malloch, S., and Trevarthen, C. (2009). (Eds.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN: 978-0-19-856628-1. Includes photos.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Music Therapy in Progressive Neurological Disease from a
           Neuropalliative Rehabilitation Perspective: A Commentary on Mcnab's
           Article
    • Abstract: O'Kelly, Julian
      The review and analysis of McNab's article on music therapy in progressive neurological disease (PND) from a neuropalliative rehabilitation perspective is discussed. The paper highlights the vital role that can be played by music therapy and encourages those in the field of music therapy to help people with PND live a better quality life.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Music Therapy in Progressive Neurological Disease: A
           Neuropalliative Rehabilitation Perspective
    • Abstract: McNab, Eleanor
      The following paper describes the role of music therapy with patients with progressive neurological diseases (PND) within the context of neuropalliative rehabilitation. Neuropalliative rehabilitation is a construct which reflects the necessary interplay between neurology, rehabilitation and palliative care with long-term neurological conditions such as PND. The ultimate goal of care is best possible quality of life (QoL). Music therapy is highlighted as having a varied role in the treatment of people with PND, described by two case vignettes from the author's work. The impact of PND on the individual is described and discussed in relation to both rehabilitative and palliative aspects of care as well as QoL literature. The concept of 'centrality' is raised as a key component of QoL, particularly in adjusting to chronic illness. It is proposed that music therapy is able to enhance QoL through assisting clients to gain new perspectives and providing opportunities to build coping resources and strategies. The music therapy literature highlights the use of music therapy to address psychosocial concerns of PND, however restorative needs are rarely discussed. It is concluded that the concept of neuropalliative rehabilitation may be useful to the music therapist working with PND to assist with collaboration with other health care professionals and clinical decision making.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Music Therapy and Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Commentary
           on Gleadhill and Ferris' Article
    • Abstract: Hannibal, Niels
      The review and analysis of Gleadhill and Ferris' article on music therapy and dissociative identity disorder is discussed. The article is a good idea to build an argument connecting theoretical understanding of the dissociative disorder, the psychological treatment aims, and goals with music therapy theory and research.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 A Theoretical Music Therapy Framework for Working with People
           with Dissociative Identity Disorder
    • Abstract: Gleadhill, Libby; Ferris, Kylie
      Dissociative identity disorder (DID) is a debilitating disorder acquired due to severe ongoing neglect or abuse, characterised by the presence of two or more identities that frequently control the individual's behaviour (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000). Literature pertaining to the wider spectrum of trauma outlines the benefits of various therapeutic interventions, including music therapy. With limited research into the field of DID and music therapy, the current authors identified a need for a systematic approach to the treatment of clients in music therapy programs. Through the use of Lev-Weisel's (2008) suggested four therapeutic goals of treatment: symptom relief, de-stigmatisation, increase self-esteem, and prevention of future abuse; an accessible framework is provided for use with dissociative clients. With a session example of the use of song parody, a practical use of the four-goal framework is outlined. As there has been limited research in the field of DID and music therapy to date, along with the theoretical framework, the authors provide recommendations for future music therapy practice with DID clients.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Music for Anxiety in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis / Motor
           Neurone Disease: A Commentary on Horne-Thompson and Bolger's Article
    • Abstract: Lings, Jane
      The review and analysis of Horne-Thompson and Bolger's article on music for anxiety in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neurone disease is discussed. The paper highlights the need for further research with patients with the disease, and indicates that music therapy is not ineffective.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 An Investigation Comparing the Effectiveness of a Live Music
           Therapy Session and Recorded Music in Reducing Anxiety for Patients with
           Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis / Motor Neurone Disease
    • Abstract: Horne-Thompson, Anne; Bolger, Karen
      The aim of this research project was to compare the effectiveness of a live music therapy session, recorded music, and silence, in reducing anxiety for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) / motor neurone disease (MND). Twenty-one participants with ALS/MND were recruited from an inpatient hospice service. The study implemented a repeated measures design, with participants acting as their own controls. Participants experienced each of the three conditions mentioned above, over a period of one week. A pretest-posttest design was used and participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) (Zigmond and Snaith, 1983) and Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) (Bruera, Kuehn, Miller, Selmser and Macmillan, 1991) immediately before and after the intervention. Heart rate and oxygen saturation levels were also measured pre and post. Results of the study were not significant in either the music therapy or recorded music groups. The majority of participants (81%) reported little or no anxiety prior to the interventions, and therefore, little change was noted in any of the groups. Limitations of the study included patients' not experiencing significant anxiety, study design and difficulty with recruitment and attrition rates. The authors recommend further studies to determine the need for anxiety management and also surveying patients as to their needs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 The Future Use of Music Products in Palliative Care: A
           Commentary on Baxter and O'Callaghan's Article
    • Abstract: Aasgaard, Trygve
      The review and analysis of Baxter and O'Callaghan's article with regards to the future use of music products in palliative care is discussed. The audio/video examples will always be the most powerful tools in teaching, presenting and promoting music therapy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 21 Decisions about the Future Use of Music Therapy: Products
           Created by Palliative Care Patients
    • Abstract: Baxter, Cherie; O'Callaghan, Clare
      Music therapy sessions sometimes result in the creation of recordings, songs, or other art 'products'. In palliative care music therapy, the process of creating such products can further therapeutic goals for the patient and family until the patient's death, and for the family in bereavement. There is scant discussion, however, about whether and how patients are invited to consider the future 'life' of tangible products created in music therapy sessions, including beyond their deaths. This article discusses the efficacy and practicalities of therapists helping home-based palliative care patients to make decisions about the future use of such products. The work emerged from the first author's reflections about challenges arising from her work in community palliative care and the analysis of relevant literature. The article includes descriptions of how music therapy products can be used, contextual and legal issues, and suggestions for supporting patients making decisions about their products' future usages, when appropriate. This discussion should be useful for any music therapist wanting to ensure that products, created in their therapeutic relationships, are used appropriately beyond their sessions, if at all.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue Special Ed. 2009 - Funding and Employment Conditions:
           Critical Issues for Australian Music Therapy Beyond 2009
    • Abstract: Abad, Vicky; Williams, Kate
      As the Australian Journal of Music Therapy celebrates its 20th year of publication, it is evident that the profession of music therapy in Australia, has made substantial progress over these last 20 years. Jobs are regularly advertised on the website, there is a greater public awareness of what music therapy is, there are government recognised salary awards applicable in several states of the country, working conditions have generally improved, and many Australian music therapists are recognised on the international stage as leaders in their field of expertise. You can even go to a party and tell someone you are a music therapist and there is a good chance they will say 'oh yeah, I know someone who does that at the hospital / school / community centre / nursing home' instead of saying 'oh, so like, a what''. Despite the impressive leaps and bounds that have been made, and the success of many programs in Australia to date, there is still a great deal of room for improvement. What are the critical issues ahead for the development of music therapy in Australia' In particular, how do music therapists develop going forward and secure funding for clinical initiatives' In reflecting on this question, this article identifies two key areas, amongst the many, that can be addressed by music therapists over the next 20 years: funding and employment conditions. Examples from the national early intervention music therapy program 'Sing and Grow' are used to illustrate the potential impact of addressing these two issues on the positive development of the profession into the future.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue Special Ed. 2009 - The Link between Singing and
           Respiratory Health for People with Quadriplegia
    • Abstract: Tamplin, Jeanette
      This article presents rationale and methodology for current music therapy research in spinal cord injury (SCI). Respiratory complications are the leading cause of illness and death following SCI and may cause long term hardship for those living with quadriplegia (DeVivo, Krause, and Lammertse, 1999). Music therapy intervention involving singing training may facilitate increased respiratory muscle strength and control for people with chronic C4-C5 quadriplegia. This, in turn, has implications for long-term respiratory health and voice quality. The effect of SCI on respiratory function and voice is discussed, as is the effect of vocal training on respiratory function. The music therapy literature on respiratory rehabilitation is reviewed and used to strengthen the case for investigation into the effect of singing training on respiratory and voice function in SCI. Finally, the methodology for a rigorous research study on this topic is presented.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue Special Ed. 2009 - Music Therapy as an Exercise in
           Humanity
    • Abstract: Shoemark, Helen
      The pursuit of 'hard evidence' without consideration of theory or practice unnecessarily constricts the creation of useful evidence. Gold's pyramid of the theory, practice and evidence provides three lenses through which the clinician can become reflexive and progress to pertinent research. The author's journey through reflexive practice and research is illustrated through her work in neonatal music therapy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue Special Ed. 2009 - Practice Informed Research in Oncologic
           and Palliative Music Therapy: From Clinical Data-mining to RCT
    • Abstract: O'Callaghan, Clare
      Practice informed research described in this article is grounded in research questions arising from the author's work as an oncologic and palliative care music therapist for over 20 years. Constructivism offers an approach for examining varied perceptions that patients and caregivers, including the music therapist-researcher, have about music therapy phenomena. Data may be accessed through 'clinical data-mining' the metaphorical mine of information contained in therapists' routinely kept records (Epstein, 2001) and, it is suggested, prospective and retrospective clinical diaries, memories, and products (e.g., song lyrics). Mixed methods research, including a randomised controlled trial and subjective data collection, can offer varied perspectives of music therapy phenomena, meaningful to people with positivist and constructivist world views. Research projects encompassing varying models are described including, 'therapist as researcher', 'therapist-researcher partnership', 'reflexive group supervision,' and a multidisciplinary research team. Music therapy knowledge can be meaningfully extended through 'data-mining' the practice wisdom of experienced music therapists, and research projects focused on questions emergent from practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue Special Ed. 2009 - Music Therapy Research and the Mental
           Health-Well-being Continuum
    • Abstract: Grocke, Denise
      Research interests in the spectrum of mental illness through to well-being are explored across a 30-year trajectory. Case studies are shown to be fertile breeding grounds for more extensive research studies comprising quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research designs. As services for those with severe mental illness have moved into the community, changes in philosophy of treatment and therapy have been required and these are explained. As mental illness affects 20% of Australians, this area of music therapy practice remains of principal concern. In addition, the search for healing and enhanced meaning of life requires psychotherapeutic practices that allow for changes in intrapersonal and interpersonal growth, and receptive music therapy methods, specifically the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music, is shown to be one of the effective music psychotherapies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Issue Special Ed. 2009 - Research and Scholarship in Music
           Therapy: A Celebration of the 20-year History of the Australian Journal of
           Music Therapy
    • Abstract: Baker, Felicity
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Policy of the Australian Journal of Music Therapy
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Supervision of Music Therapy - a Theoretical and Practical
           Handbook [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Kennelly, Jeanette
      Includes references. Review(s) of: Supervision of Music Therapy - a Theoretical and Practical Handbook, by Odell-Miller, H. and Richards, E. (Eds), New York, NY: Routledge, 198 pages, ISBN 978-0-415-41126-4.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Music: Promoting Health and Creating Community in Healthcare
           Contexts [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Shoemark, Helen
      Review(s) of: Music: Promoting Health and Creating Community in Healthcare Contexts, by Edwards, J. (2007), Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 207 pages, ISBN (10): 1-84718-351-4 / ISBN (13): 97818147183514, Price UK 34.99, US$ 52.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Music Therapy with Children and Their Families [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Williams, Kate
      Review(s) of: Music Therapy with Children and Their Families, by Oldfield, A., and Flower, C. (2008), London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 208 pages, Cost: AUS $47.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Melody in Music Therapy: A Therapeutic Narrative Analysis [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: O'Callaghan, Clare
      Includes references. Review(s) of: Melody in Music Therapy: A Therapeutic Narrative Analysis, by Aldridge, G., and Aldridge, D. (2008), London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 342 pages, Cost: AUS $45.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Music Therapy Assessment as Evaluation and Validation:
           Commentary on Langan's Article 2009
    • Abstract: Jacobsen, Stine
      As Diane Langan states in her article, music therapists often develop their own assessment tools and strategies in relation to their own field of work and their own personal style. With this study, Langan has successfully incorporated relevant elements from the Board of Studies learning targets, indicators, and outcomes within special education into categories within a music therapy assessment tool. The model builds on the work of others and on the results of an international survey, and I would like to commend Langan in prioritizing the broader perspectives that include aspects of her own personal style, but offer a more generic level of assessment in music therapy for this population. She has provided a very useful tool for music therapy clinicians in special education that has two main purposes; evaluating music therapy process and validating music therapy within special education. The article does not appear to specify what type of evaluation the model produces and how the therapist does this. In particular, how can different kinds of development in activities, or combinations of activities be evaluated and how can one then evaluate and describe the process of the student'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 The Importance of Faith: a Commentary on Bower's and Shoemark's
           Article
    • Abstract: Aigen, Kenneth
      The review and analysis of Bower's and Shoemark's article is discussed. The vital role that faith plays in music as well as belief of parents in children and their capabilities is highlighted.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Evaluation of a Systematic Development Process: Relaxing Music
           for the Emergency Department
    • Abstract: Ahern, N; Short, A; Bonde, LO
      A process evaluation was applied to the development and implementation of a receptive music therapy tool, with a view to promoting evidence-based practice via clear linkage from theory to practice. This music tool was required for a research project in the noisy emergency department (ED) of a large urban hospital. The process evaluation focuses on questions about the suitability, planning, application, and effectiveness of this tool used within the research project protocol. The music tool intervention was applied to fifteen selected patients who received a choice of four genre-based relaxation playlists (GRP) over a two-hour period via headphones and MP3 players. The process evaluation method utilised data sources including key informant interactive interviews, observational data, reflective practices, patient feedback and an independent music review. Responses from patients (aged 23-91 years) indicated that most patients listened to multiple genres and most patients (n=14) indicated that the music made them feel better, thereby indicating suitability and effectiveness. Independent music reviewers confirmed that the music playlists contained relaxing musical elements, based on established music therapy criteria. This project was innovative in clearly documenting a music tool development process (GRP) and in turn applying a process evaluation to systematically review both the development and implementation of the tool. In doing so, linkage from theory to practice was established, contributing to understandings about music for relaxation in healthcare. (author abstract)

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 'And All the While, Messengers Are Running to and from My
           Childhood... Bringing Items and Memories, for Life to Continue'
    • Abstract: Yehuda, Nechama
      Focusing on senior citizens (whose numbers are constantly increasing in many parts in the world) and of the immigrants among them, is of utmost importance. I believe the information can be of great relevance to both clinicians and to academics interested in research. Immigration and acculturation are very often a source of psychological distress (Liebkind & Jasinskaja-Lahti, 2000) for the individual who has to deal with his culture of origin, as well as with the new culture (Berry, 1990, 1992). Examining immigration, researchers learnt that through music one can express both the conflicts of identity and their resolution (Zeira, 2002). For instance, one can actualize one's drive towards quick assimilation by erasing any or all distinctive ethnic markers, or one can express his reservations towards the new culture by sticking fanatically to "his own" musical world.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Challenges of Working with People Aged 60-75 years from
           Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Groups: Repertoire and Music Therapy
           Approaches Employed by Australian Music Therapists
    • Abstract: Yehuda, N; Grocke, D; Baker, F
      Meeting the musical and cultural needs of the increasing number of aging Australians of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups presents a significant challenge to music therapists. Music therapy clinicians working in aged care (N--24) were surveyed to identify the repertoire they use in their aged care work and to identify specific repertoire used with people from CALD groups. In addition, the clinicians were asked to comment on challenges associated with working with people from CALD groups. Repertoire identified included 142 different songs, 15 (11%) of these in languages other than English. Songs were classified into popular, patriotic, folk, musicals, and religious categories. Findings indicated that people with Italian, Greek, German, Yugoslav and Polish backgrounds were the most frequently seen groups. Repertoire for non-European groups was limited, indicating that music therapists need to expand their repertoire to meet the needs of all CALD groups. Challenges faced by clinicians included language barriers between client and clinician, and their lack of knowledge regarding the contexts where specific music selections may be used. Findings suggest that more emphasis be placed on understanding how to best work with CALD groups in music therapy training courses.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Playlists and Patients' Preferences: A Commentary on Short and
           Ahern's 2009 Article
    • Abstract: Bonde, Lars Ole
      The relationship between music medicine and music therapy is changing these years. And so is the role of the music therapist in music medicine. From a peripheral role in the administration of music in hospitals and other medical institutions music therapists are moving to leading roles in the selection of music suitable for music medicine interventions and for training nurses and other members of medical staff to administer music in hospital settings. Short and Ahern's article bears witness of this development; the music therapist is no longer an outsider but a central person in a holistic environment. From an international point of view I think this must be the way to proceed if we want music therapy to play a role in an integral agenda for the health services of the future. We cannot leave music medicine to the medical professionals! On the contrary, the situation calls for close collaboration. But how'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Music Therapy to Promote Interpersonal Interactions in Early
           Paediatric Neurorehabilitation
    • Abstract: Bower, J; Shoemark, Helen
      Interpersonal relationships are fundamental in successful neurorehabilitation (Gilbertson and Aldridge, 2008). However, an acquired brain injury has the potential to impact on an individual's ability to engage in interpersonal relationships, and subsequently, their potential to successfully participate in functional rehabilitation. This paper presents a clinical case study in which a paediatric patient with an acquired brain injury had the ability to talk but was unable to successfully interact with people. It is argued that the prosodic elements of music were successfully employed to initially engage the patient in musical interactions and subsequently combined music therapy/speech pathology interventions provided the patient with a non- verbal vehicle to rehearse interactive skills. This focus on increasing social capacity was fundamental in promoting engagement in functional speech rehabilitation for this patient. Literature from the clinical areas of paediatric and adult ABI, music neuropsychology and infant development are discussed as a theoretical basis for suggesting that music therapy can promote interpersonal relationships in early paediatric neurorehabilitation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 A Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Special Education:
           Incorporating Education Outcomes
    • Abstract: Jacobsen, S; Langan, D
      This study introduces a music therapy assessment tool designed for use in a special education context. Working with findings from a survey of music therapists practising in special education, measures were developed which incorporate New South Wales curriculum outcomes from the Music Education Life Skills, Personal Development, Health and Physical Education and Creative Arts (Dance) with music therapy outcomes. The survey included demographic and method questions and explored the extent to which music therapists engaged with music education outcomes. The assessment seeks to validate music therapy in the special education setting by providing a practical tool that is accessible to both educators and therapists. It includes the categories of. communication, initiation, response, movement, social interaction, emotional expression, listening and decision making. A main finding of the survey indicates that 90% of surveyed music therapists apply six or more of the ten Life Skills Music Education Outcomes (Board of Studies, 2003). The survey results were limited by a sample of 40 music therapists and also by self-reporting. Recommendations include further clinical application and refinement of the assessment tool.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 20 Celebrating Diversity in Music Therapy Practice and Research
    • Abstract: Baker, Felicity
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Policy of the Australian Journal of Music Therapy
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Music Therapy Groupwork with Special Needs Children: The
           Evolving Process [Book Review]
    • Abstract: McFerran, Katrina
      Review(s) of: Music Therapy Groupwork with Special Needs Children: The Evolving Process, by Goodman, Karen D. (2007), Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas. 318 pages. $69.95USD (Hardcopy) / $49.95USD (Paper) ISBN: 978-0-398-07739-6.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Interactive Music Therapy - A Positive Approach [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Fuller, Allison
      Review(s) of: Interactive Music Therapy - a Positive Approach, by Oldfield, A. (2006), London: Jessica Kingsley. AUS $49.95, 223 pages, ISBN 978-1-843-10309-7.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Clinical Training Guide for the Student Music Therapist [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Coull, Susan
      Review(s) of: Clinical Training Guide for the Student Music Therapist, by Wheeler, B.L., Shultis, C.L., and Polen, D.W. (2005), Gilsum NH: Barcelona Publishers. ISBN: 10891278-27-4. US$ 35.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Musicophilia [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bright, Ruth
      Review(s) of: Musicophilia, by Sacks, O. (2007), New Jersey: Picador, a Division of Random House, AUS $32.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Microanalysis in Music Therapy: Methods, Techniques and
           Applications for Clinicians, Researchers, Educators and Students [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Bellido, Gema
      Review(s) of: Microanalysis in Music Therapy: Methods, Techniques and Applications for Clinicians, Researchers, Educators and Students, by Wosch, T. and Wigram, T. (2007), London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, ISBN: 978-1-84310-469-8 AUS $58.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Evidence Missing, or Missing Evidence' The Role of the
           Literature in Defining Neuro-disability and Neurorehabilitation:
           Commentary on Daveson's 2008 Article
    • Abstract: Gilbertson, Simon
      Commentary on Daveson's article on neuro-rehabilitation. The role of literature in defining neuro-rehabilitation is discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 A Description of a Music Therapy Meta-model in Neuro-disability
           and Neuro-rehabilitation for Use with Children, Adolescents and Adults
    • Abstract: Daveson, Barbara A
      Changes to therapy services in healthcare are constantly shaped and driven by government and professional requirements. Recently, the need for adaptable models of music therapy within neuro-disability and neuro-rehabilitation, alongside the need to demonstrate outcomes has been identified within music therapy literature. Additionally, the Department of Health has emphasised the need for patient-led and patient-centred care. This paper presents a flexible, tri-pronged meta-approach to music therapy practice that promotes service-user involvement, and allows for the measurement of outcomes through the use of a particular approach to goal-setting. The three approaches of the meta-model (i.e., restorative, compensatory and psycho-social-emotional approaches) are described, and case vignettes of work with those with brain injury and neuro-degenerative disease are shared to illustrate how the model can be used to support these treatment approaches. An outline of the development of the model is provided, and comment about the potential challenges regarding the use of the model is included. This meta-model is applicable to practice in hospitals, residential and outpatient settings with children, adolescents and adults patients in neurology, neuro-disability and neuro-rehabilitation. Thus as a consequence, a response to the need for music therapy that is patient-centred, patient-led, able to be measured and adaptable is shared.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Music and Relaxation - More Topical than Never before': A
           Commentary on Smith's 2008 Article
    • Abstract: Erkkila, Jaakko
      Commentary is presented on the article Music and Relaxation. It also discussed the effect of music to minimise stress and anxiety.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:24 GMT
       
 
 
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