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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australian Journal of Language and Literacy, The
  [SJR: 0.399]   [H-I: 9]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1038-1562
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Being and becoming TESOL educators: Embodied learning
           via practicum
    • Abstract: Andrew, Martin; Razoumova, Oksana
      This paper reports on a qualitative study of the practicum learning experiences of thirty students of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) enrolled in a Masters of TESOL Education at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. Drawing on current thinking about the role of reflective practice in teacher education, the value of real world learning beyond the classroom and the pedagogical affordances of the practicum, the enquiry aims to identify the types of practitioner learning that occur during practicum placements in terms of enhancing learners' knowledge and skills, increasing their self-reliance and self-confidence and contributing to their growth as educators and individuals, their professional and social identities. Utilising reflective surveys from a portfolio of authentic practicum documents as data, the researchers create thematic narratives of 'being and becoming' which foreground the salient themes. Hence, we demonstrate how the practicum develops participant practice teachers' realisations of their emerging agency as practitioners, makes manifest their perceptions of their increased professional confidence and then serves to indicate the pedagogical value of applying theoretical learning from the classroom to their professional practice. These results suggest the importance of preparing teachers for discovery, both the usual and the unexpected, in the process of planning, implementing and evidencing practicum work, and emphasise the importance of being and becoming to the practicum's work of embodied learning.

      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:18:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - The complexity of teaching internet inquiry with iPads
           in the early years
    • Abstract: Lynch, Julianne
      Purposefully and effectively locating and reading information on the internet is a critically important aspect of contemporary information literacy. Increasingly younger children seek to develop skills in internet searching and reading to serve their needs and desires both in and out of school. This paper provides a close-up examination of one teacher's practices as she guides students who are in the second and third year of their schooling to undertake internet research. By providing an analysis of a selection of interactions taken from one classroom session, I illustrate the complexity of practices involved, practices that interweave traditional 'print' and new 'digital' materials and skills. The analysis highlights the interdependence of the traditional and the new as the teacher and her students strategically assembled diverse digital and 'non-digital' resources, modes and channels in mutually-supportive ways through the practice of fit-for-purpose inquiry, reading and composition. This practice is contextualised within the often contradictory popular and public discourses that surround early years literacy education and the place of new digital media - discourses that often fail to recognise and affirm teachers' expertise in these complex undertakings.

      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:18:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - A phenomenological perspective of children's writing
    • Abstract: Merga, Margaret Kristin
      Classroom teachers would recognise the struggle of engaging all students in producing quality writing assignments. This might be the view from the outside, but the world experienced by the child during the act of writing may be comprised of potentially rich and significant meaning that is waiting to be uncovered. This paper explores writing research from cognitive, affective, and social perspectives as the foundations for the major determinants on children's writing experience and engagement. In light of modern trends in technology and pedagogy, we argue for a shift in perspective that views these determinants as crucial factors constituting and shaping the lived experience of the act of writing. Drawing upon various disciplines, we suggest a new phenomenological orientation that positions writing as an experience of the self, the expression of ideas, and the existential phenomena of the lifeworld, to investigate this rarely addressed field of writing research. We offer an emergent preliminary working framework useful for informing pedagogical approach, and we highlight future phenomenological research needed in this area.

      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:18:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Learning through responsive and collaborative
           mediation in a tutoring context
    • Abstract: Jaeger, Elizabeth L
      Students are failing standardised assessments in large numbers. As a result, many of these students need the intensive support offered by one-to-one tutoring in order to be successful. In past studies, tutors selected the areas of focus, how instruction would proceed, and how progress would be measured. There is little in the research literature that describes in detail the characteristics of the child being tutored or the specific interactions occurring between tutor and child. This article describes a protocol in which the tutor responded to the particular challenges of the child - in this case comprehension monitoring difficulties - and the way she collaborated with the child to set goals, plan lessons, and celebrate gains. The study was framed by the concept of mediation, and examined the range of tools employed to facilitate literacy gains. These tools consisted of material/symbolic tools such as texts, symbolic tools such as context cues, and human/relational tools such as naming of intelligent behaviour. Data collected included both standards-based and informal measures of reading, audio-recordings of tutoring sessions, and interviews with the focal student. Findings demonstrated clear growth on all reading measures, and interviews tracked improvement in student engagement and confidence. There were also gains in the number, variety, and sophistication of mediating tools employed by the student.

      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:18:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Notes for authors
    • PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:18:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rennie, Jennifer
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:18:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Teaching Asia: English pedagogy and Asia literacy
           within the Australian curriculum
    • Abstract: Gauci, Regan; Curwood, Jen Scott
      The study was prompted by the introduction of three cross-curriculum priorities within the new Australian Curriculum, and the growing emphasis for students to become 'Asia literate'. It aimed to examine the attitudes that New South Wales English teachers currently hold towards addressing the cross-curriculum priority 'Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia' within 7-10 classrooms. Sociocultural theory and qualitative research were utilised as a means of exploring and accounting for the ways in which these attitudes have been shaped, and the implications this has on curriculum enactment. The study examines the influences that have shaped teacher attitudes towards addressing the cross-curriculum priority, the perceived evidence of political and economic motivations behind the inclusion of the priority, how English teachers define 'Asia' and the consistency of such definitions with those put forth by The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), and whether English teachers feel prepared to address this cross-curriculum priority in a way that enriches student learning and literacy. The research findings reflect that although English teachers believe that there is value in addressing the cross-curriculum priority, many feel ill-equipped or under-resourced to address it in a way that promotes deep learning and understanding for students.

      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2017 14:18:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Notes for authors
    • PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2017 14:47:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Teachers' selection of texts for Pasifika students in
           New Zealand primary schools
    • Abstract: Jesson, Rebecca; Parr, Judy
      In this article we explore teachers' beliefs regarding effective text for Pasifika students, a group at risk of underachieving nationally. We report the features of texts that teachers consider important when selecting texts for their Pasifika students. Primary school teachers (N = 11) were purposively selected for their demonstrated effectiveness in supporting Pasifika students' achievement in literacy. Teacher nominations and explanations of effective and less effective texts for Pasifika students were presented at small focus group discussions, and led to conversations about how teachers used those texts. Subsequently, a sample of text nominations was independently analysed and the results considered alongside reported beliefs. Findings suggest teachers draw on interactions between their knowledge of texts, their knowledge of students and curricular goals. Teachers' selections were largely instructional readers, most often narrative in structure. Teachers reported constraining the challenges of text for Pasifika students, to create controlled conditions for a focus on the learning of target skills. We explore the implications of teachers' choices of texts for literacy development, including the unintended risks of those instructional choices. The possibilities for learning and the constraints created through the selection of text for immediate short term goals are considered in terms of students' textual diet and their literacy development over time.

      PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2017 14:47:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - IRE and content area literacies: A critical analysis
           of classroom discourse
    • Abstract: Friend, Lesley
      This article draws on a research project undertaken in a state secondary school that explored ways of engaging students in the content area of science. The paper argues that high school teachers teaching in specialist areas can better cater for student needs through attention to a pedagogy that is literacy focused. This is particularly relevant in content area subjects in the secondary school where many teachers have not had access to pre-service literacy training and, traditionally, teaching approaches have been content focused. Moreover, contemporary schools are now places characterised by linguistic, cultural and social diversity and coupled with Australia's push for STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), it is helpful if science teaching incorporates productive (student engagement) and inclusive (student diversity) approaches. A discursive analysis of classroom talk excerpts from three science lessons is used to make comparisons: one from early in the project where the nature of science teaching was investigated and two as a result of findings from investigating the first. The talk was coded using an IRE (initiation-response-evaluation) structure to show how student activity and engagement increased as a result of a pedagogical change. The findings of this research have implications for the way content areas are taught in some secondary schools.

      PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2017 14:47:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Examining the examiners: The state of senior secondary
           English examinations in Australia
    • Abstract: Anson, Daniel WJ
      This paper investigates the language of examination reports for senior secondary English courses in New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. A combination of Legitimation Code Theory (LCT) and Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) is used to examine the types of knowledge and knower that are valued in examinations; and how language is used to describe successful and less successful writing, and the candidates who produce these texts. The analysis suggests that subject English values an elite code (at least, in examination settings), in which both an 'insightful' approach to texts and skilled writing justifying analysis is valued; and that students who are unable to take up these discursive practices are imagined as lazy and callow. The paper concludes with implications for teachers and examiners, arguing that teachers must make students aware of the 'dual-sided' nature of subject English, and that examiners should be cognisant of potential bias in their view of responses and their writers.

      PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2017 14:47:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - What motivates avid readers to maintain a regular
           reading habit in adulthood?
    • Abstract: Merga, Margaret Kristin
      Regular engagement in recreational book reading remains beneficial beyond early childhood. While most of the research in reading motivation focuses on the early schooling years, regular recreational book reading remains a highly beneficial practice beyond childhood, as it continues to enhance literacy skills and may help to maintain cognitive stamina and health into old age. Understanding why some individuals are avid readers in adulthood can offer insight into how to foster greater frequency of reading through both early and later interventions. This paper reports on data collected in the 2015 International Study of Avid Book Readers, which posed the question 'Why do you read books?' in order to capture self-reported motivations for reading from an adult sample. Qualitative data collected from 1,022 adult participants are analysed in order to explore the diverse and often interrelated motivations of adult avid book readers. Recurring motivations included perspective-taking; knowledge; personal development; mental stimulation; habit, entertainment and pleasure; escapism and mental health; books as friends; imagination and creative inspiration; and, writing, language and vocabulary. Findings offer a greater understanding of reading preferences and motivation of adult avid book readers, highlighting multiple potential points of engagement for fostering positive attitudes toward recreational book reading across the lifetime.

      PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2017 14:47:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rennie, Jennifer
      PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2017 14:47:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Indigenous children's multimodal communication of
           emotions through visual imagery
    • Abstract: Mills, Kathy A; Bellocchi, Alberto; Patulny, Roger; Dooley, Jane
      Billions of images are shared worldwide on the internet via social platforms like Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat and Twitter every few days. The social web and mobile devices make it quicker and easier than ever before for young people to communicate emotions through digital images. There is a need for greater knowledge of how to educate children and young people formally in the sophisticated, multimodal language of emotions. This includes semiotic choices in visual composition, such as gaze, facial expression, posture, framing, actor-goal relations, camera angles, backgrounds, props, lighting, shadows and colour. In particular, enabling Indigenous students to interpret and communicate emotions in contemporary ways is vital because multimodal language skills are central to academic, behavioural and social outcomes. This paper reports original research of urban, Indigenous, upper primary students' visual imagery at school. A series of full-day, digital imagery workshops were conducted over several weeks with 56 students. The photography workshops formed part of a three-year participatory community research project with an Indigenous school in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The archived student images were organised and analysed to identify attitudinal meanings from the appraisal framework, tracing types and subtypes of affect, and their positive and negative forms. The research has significant implications for teaching students how to design high-quality, visual and digital images to evoke a wide range of positive and negative emotions, with particular considerations for Australian Indigenous students.

      PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2017 14:47:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rennie, Jennifer
      PubDate: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 23:11:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Students' reading achievement during the transition
           from primary to secondary school
    • Abstract: Hopwood, Belinda; Hay, Ian; Dyment, Janet
      Adolescent literacy achievement has been, and continues to be, a hot topic in the educational community, with concerns about students' literacy capabilities consistently dominating the educational landscape, particularly in the area of reading. What is known from years of educational research, high stakes testing and teacher testimonials is that reading is an area of difficulty for many adolescent students. The focus of this research was to investigate adolescents' reading attainment at one of the most important times in a students' educational career; the transition from primary school (Year 6) to secondary school (Year 7). Seven co-educational government schools from the state of Tasmania, Australia, participated in the research, whereby a combination of primary and secondary schools from both rural and urban areas were included. Conducted over a two phase process, the research utilised the Progressive Achievement Test in Reading (PAT-R) to determine changes in students' reading ability. Methods of quantitative analysis were utilised; these employed a series of statistical tests. Results revealed that, for the overall cohort, students' PAT-R scores significantly declined from Year 6 to Year 7, indicating that the transition to secondary school can have serious negative effects on students' reading attainment as they transition into secondary education. The research findings raise attention to the impact that transition can have upon adolescent students' educational success and concludes with suggestions for how schools and educators can enhance the transition process and support students into effective secondary school literacy learning.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 23:11:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Testing spelling: How does a dictation method measure
           up to a proofreading and editing format?
    • Abstract: Daffern, Tessa; Mackenzie, Noella Maree; Hemmings, Brian
      In response to increasing data-based decision making in schools comes increased responsibility for educators to consider measures of academic achievement in terms of their reliability, validity and practical utility. The focus of this paper is on the assessment of spelling. Among the methods used to assess spelling competence, tasks that require the production of words from dictation, or the proofreading and editing of spelling errors are common. In this study, spelling achievement data from the National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) Language Conventions Test (a proofreading and editing based measure) and the Components of Spelling Test (CoST) (a dictation based measure) were examined. Results of a series of multiple regression analyses (MRAs) were based on a sample of low-achieving and high-achieving spellers from the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) in Year 3 (n=145), Year 4 (n=117), Year 5 (n=133) and Year 6 (n=117). Findings indicated significant relationships between scores in the spelling domain of the NAPLAN Language Conventions Test and the phonological, orthographic and morphological subscales scores of the CoST. Further, the orthographic subscale of the CoST was generally the main predictor of NAPLAN spelling across year level. Analysis also demonstrated that gender was not an influential factor. Implications for assessment and instruction in spelling are discussed in this paper, and the CoST is offered as a valid, reliable and informative measure of spelling performance for use in school contexts or future research projects.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 23:11:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - That's not a narrative; this is a narrative: NAPLAN
           and pedagogies of storytelling
    • Abstract: Caldwell, David; White, Peter RR
      For the past eight years, Australian school students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 have engaged in the National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) writing test, with a one-in-two chance they will be tasked with producing a 'narrative' genre. This paper examines the way in which the very notion of storytelling and narrative is conceptualised in the NAPLAN supporting documentation, and its potential negative consequences. The paper begins by providing a review of the literature on storytelling, paying particular attention to research which has established the 'Complication- Resolution' narrative as one type of storytelling. It then provides an account of how story and narrative are typically characterised and defined in the official NAPLAN documentation, that is, as the 'Complication-Resolution' narrative exclusively. The final section of the paper presents a genre analysis of eight student writing samples and the related comments and gradings from the NAPLAN narrative marking guide. The analysis found a number of student texts in the marking guide that were effectively structured stories, but which had been marked down for Text Structure because they did not comply with the specific structure of the 'Complication-Resolution' narrative. The analysis also found a number of texts that scored highly with respect to the Text Structure criterion, even though they were not instances of the Complication-Resolution narrative sub-type. Drawing on these findings, the paper argues that various inconsistencies and points of apparent confusion in these comments and gradings can be taken as evidence that other sub-types of storytelling are being inappropriately devalued, and that ultimately, there is a lack of understanding in the nature of storytelling in the NAPLAN documentation. By way of conclusion, the paper reflects on some of the negative consequences that may flow from storytelling being defined in this limited way, including the implications for how storytelling is taught by teachers and caregivers, the potential misdirection of students as to what constitutes a 'good' story, as well as the cultural implications of limiting stories to one specific type.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 23:11:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Constituting 'at risk' literacy and language learners
           in teacher talk: Exploring the discursive element of time
    • Abstract: Alford, Jennifer; Woods, Annette
      The student category of 'at risk' is often assigned to learners who are considered by teachers and school administrators to not meet specified curriculum and assessment requirements. It is a pervasive term that manages to go unquestioned. Being 'at risk' implies being out of alignment with opposite terms, that is terms such as stability, safety, not at risk. This way of thinking can lead to an assumption that there is a fixed, normal position for learners, and that being other than that involves becoming 'risky'. This paper questions the very idea that such a binary exists and explores the ways teachers talk about learners who are considered to be 'at risk' within the schooling system. We also argue that teachers' talk about such learners and their 'at riskness' can constitute learners in ways that are either more constraining or more enabling to their pathways through schooling. The paper draws on our experience of analysing teacher interview data collected across a variety of research projects with teachers in Australian schools. Employing discourse analysis focusing on the discursive element of time as we trace temporal markers in teacher interview talk, we provide specific analysis of one teacher's talk about her English language learners on their path to also becoming literate in English. Her talk demonstrates an optimistic and generative discursive position that challenges views of English language learners as 'wanting' and potentially as 'at risk'.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 23:11:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Notes for authors
    • PubDate: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 23:11:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Subject area literacy instruction in low SES secondary
           schools in New Zealand
    • Abstract: Wilson, Aaron; McNaughton, Stuart; Zhu, Tong
      This paper presents findings of a study into patterns of literacy achievement and teaching in Year 12 biology, English and mathematics classes from 22 low socio-economic status (SES) secondary schools in New Zealand (NZ). We hypothesised that patterns of literacy teaching in specialised subject areas might contribute to well-documented inequities in education achievement for Māori (indigenous), Pacific Islands and low-SES students in NZ. We analysed participation and pass rates for sets of achievement standards that contribute to the standards based National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA), the main national school qualification (http://www.nzqa. govt.nz/qualifications-standards/qualifications/ncea/). These analyses showed that the rates at which students in the low-SES schools in the study participated in, and attained, key high literacy achievement standards were markedly lower than for schools nationally. Literacy instruction data were derived from observations of 104 teachers working with Year 12 (approximately 17 years old) students comprising 28 biology, 39 English and 37 mathematics teachers. Results from the classroom observations indicated that students had comparatively few opportunities to read longer, more complex subject-area texts and that instructional approaches commonly cited in the literature as effective in raising students' subject area literacy, strategy instruction and extended discussion, were infrequently observed in this study. Infrequent too were teaching about language features (such as nominalisation) in mathematics or biology lessons and teaching to develop students' critical literacy.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 23:11:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - So how do you teach literacy in teacher education?:
           Literacy/English teacher educators' goals and pedagogies
    • Abstract: Kosnik, Clare; Menna, Lydia; Dharamshi, Pooja; Miyata, Cathy
      Given expanding concepts of literacy and evolving communication patterns literacy teacher educators face a daunting task - preparing student teachers for a world where literacy is very complicated and contested. This paper addresses two key questions: What are the elements of a pedagogy of literacy teacher education? What opportunities for learning do literacy/English teacher educators offer to help student teachers understand the changing conception of literacy? For this research 28 literacy/English teacher educators in four countries were interviewed three times. Two overall conclusions are: the need to anchor their course in the concept of literacy as expanding and evolving; and to approach literacy teacher education holistically. Three elements of a pedagogy of literacy teacher education are discussed in this paper; that there is a need to: value and respond to diversity; read, discuss, and analyse a range of texts and genres; create authentic reflection activities. These elements are relevant for our increasingly diverse student body and can work dialogically. This paper provides a broad road map for literacy teacher educators who are often faced with conflicting messages from governments and feel tremendous pressure to teach to the test.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Feb 2017 23:11:34 GMT
       
 
 
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