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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover
Australian Journal of Emergency Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.354
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1324-1540
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Foreword
    • Abstract: MacKenzie, Iain S
      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - 2017 Lessons management workshop
    • Abstract: Cuthbert, Mark
      In November 2017, 45 lessons practitioners from across the country spent the day analysing observations from their agencies to identify consistent and recurring issues across the sector.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case studies point to research use
    • Abstract: Leahy, Brenda
      How do emergency services in Australia and New Zealand use research to drive change and innovation' What works, what doesn't and what gets in the way'

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Learning for the future: The emotional cycle of bush
           fire
    • Abstract: Dwyer, Graham
      Learning from previous bushfires can be a painful experience but it can also lead to significant innovation.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Volunteers: The ageing and the millennials
    • Abstract: Moir, Jake
      The New South Wales Rural Fire Service (NSW RFS) has over 70,000 members and is rapidly approaching a demographic dilemma. As 'baby boomers' begin to retire, it's time to shift the focus of the NSW RFS to 'millennials' and get ready for the challenges that come with that generation.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Connecting communities through volunteering: Lessons
           learnt at NSW SES
    • Abstract: McCullough, Andrew
      When the NSW State Emergency Service (NSW SES) is not responding to severe weather events, it is building capability through training and preparing our communities for the unexpected.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Firebombing at night - why not!
    • Abstract: Adler, Richard
      Dropping fire suppressant and retardant from aircraft provides great support to firefighters on the ground at bushfires - during daylight. So why isn't standard practice to continue firebombing operations into the night'

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - A vital layer of safety for Australia's airports
    • Abstract: Wood, Glenn
      Air services Australia provides aviation rescue firefighting services at 26 of Australia's busiest airports to protect and ensure the safety of the travelling public. The principal objective is to save lives.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case study: Urban aircraft deployment in Victoria
    • Abstract: Anderson, Matthew
      This case study explores the management and the deployment of aircraft in Victoria to examine the overall awareness of command staff in responding to and managing aviation assets within the Melbourne metropolitan area.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case study: Lessons management capability in emergency
           management and beyond
    • Abstract: Stuart, Heather; Thomason, Mark
      Lessons management is a small but growing capability across the emergency management sector. This case study explores how a number of emergency services organisations have collaborated to grow this capability both internally and across the sector.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case study: The preparedness puzzle
    • Abstract: Smith, Tracy; Leclercq, Muriel; Chuter, Victoria
      This case study describes how the Western Australian Office of Emergency Management developed its emergency management assurance and lessons management frameworks. Their relationship with the Capability Framework underpins successful implementation.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case study: The victorian emergency management
           community resilience index
    • Abstract: Parsons, Melissa; Foster, Holly; Redlich, Sam
      This case study describes the experience of using and embedding components of the national-scale Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index into the state scale Victorian Emergency Management Community Resilience Index.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - We learn as one: Victoria's journey to collaborative
           lessons management
    • Abstract: Jackson, Lisa Marie; Shepherd, Adair Forbes
      In November 2015, Victoria's lessons management framework was released. The EM-LEARN framework established a model for lessons management, including a life cycle that defined cultural characteristics and lessons management process, based on research.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Aitape story: The great new Guinea tsunami of 1998
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Johnson, RWally
      Review(s) of: Aitape story: The great new Guinea tsunami of 1998, by Hugh Davies, Published by Halstead Press 2017, ISBN 9781925043273.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - How emergency services organisations can - and do -
           utilise research
    • Abstract: Owen, Christine
      In emergency management organisations, the drive to use research to inform practice has been growing for some time. This paper discusses findings from a survey used to investigate perceived effectiveness of a number of important processes in research utilisation. In 2016, a survey was completed by 266 respondents in 29 fire and emergency services agencies. Questions sought answers on perceived effectiveness in disseminating research within agencies, assessing and evaluating the impacts on agency practice of the research, implementing agency changes that may be needed, monitoring processes to track changes and communicate outcomes of changes made as a result of research. The study found that there were differences in levels of perceived effectiveness between those in senior management and front-line service positions. The differences suggest that front-line services personnel have lower levels of perceived effectiveness in how research is disseminated. The study also found agencies had different approaches to keep up-to-date with research advances. An examination of the activities identified four developmental levels of research utilisation maturity. The findings suggest more work is needed to better understand the enablers and constraints to utilising research to support development of evidence-informed practice. monitoring processes to track changes and communicate outcomes of changes made as a result of research. The study found that there were differences in levels of perceived effectiveness between those in senior management and front-line service positions. The differences suggest that front-line services personnel have lower levels of perceived effectiveness in how research is disseminated. The study also found agencies had different approaches to keep up-to-date with research advances. An examination of the activities identified four developmental levels of research utilisation maturity. The findings suggest more work is needed to better understand the enablers and constraints to utilising research to support development of evidence-informed practice.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Can major post-event inquiries and reviews contribute
           to lessons management'
    • Abstract: Lawson, Cole; Eburn, Michael; Dovers, Stephen; Gough, Martijn
      Significant disaster and emergency management events are invariably followed by formal post-event inquiries and reviews. Such reviews identify lessons to improve future capacities and set the agenda for policy and management reform for emergency management organisations. As a result, there is a substantial body of reflections and recommendations gathered across all hazard types and jurisdictions by formal, structured inquiry processes that contribute to lessons management for the emergency sector. However, whether there is any coherence or core lessons emerging for the Australian sector from the totality of post event inquiries is unknown. The work reported here identifies the recommendations from these inquiries. A meta-analysis of 1336 recommendations made of 1336 recommendations made in 55 Australian major post-event reviews and inquiries since 2009 revealed common themes. The recommendations were compiled into a comprehensive database and categorised into 32 themes. The analysis highlighted recurrent themes from recommendations spanning multiple jurisdictions. The study indicates the potential value for Australian and New Zealand emergency management agencies and jurisdictions of using the aggregate data organised as a resource for lessons management.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Updating the costs of disasters in Australia
    • Abstract: Handmer, John; Ladds, Monique; Magee, Liam
      The Bureau of Transport Economics (BTE) 2001 report, Economic Costs of Natural Disasters in Australia (BTE 2001), has been the only comprehensive, national assessment of the economic impacts of disasters in Australia. Statistics and economic impact assessment methodology presented in the report have been widely used for research and policy analysis, particularly for assessing the costs and benefits of disaster risk reduction and mitigation. This is the case even though the data and analysis are over one and a half decades old. It has needed updating in terms of the approach to analysis and the dataset to include the many relevant disasters triggered by natural phenomena from 1999 to 2013. This paper sets out the approach used to update the 2001 report through a National Emergency Management Projects grant, documents the major issues faced, including the need for a new dataset and presents some results. The main differences between the BTE 2001 report and the update concern increase losses from bushfires, the inclusion of heatwaves, with heatwaves responsible for half of all deaths, and changes in the pattern of loss at the state level.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - The total flood warning system: What have we learnt
           since 1990 and where are the gaps
    • Abstract: Cawood, Michael; Keys, Chas; Wright, Christopher
      April 1990 was a month of severe flooding in eastern Australia. Two months later, a national workshop was held in which a large number of flood management specialists sought to capture the lessons of the floods while they were still fresh. Many aspects of the management of the events were examined, with flood warning highlighted as a key function. A second meeting the following year resolved to produce a best-practice manual to help guide practitioners in the development of flood warning services. The term 'Total Flood Warning System' (TFWS) was adopted to describe the need to integrate the many elements of effective warning. The need to help those in the path of a flood to understand the warnings they received and take effective action was recognised as central.The manual was published in 1995 and revised and updated in 1999 and 2009. This paper asks what has changed and improved in the flood warning field since 1990 and what is needed in TFWS terms to further help communities and individuals manage their flood risk.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Understanding the role gender plays in survivor
           responses to disasters: Evaluating the lessons in disaster program
    • Abstract: Spencer, Caroline; Bailey, Naomi; Muir, Carlyn; Majeed, Saadia; McArdle, Dudley; Keech, Emma; Duncan, Alyssa; Parkinson, Debra
      This paper evaluates four pilot training sessions conducted in August 2015 by Women's Health Goulburn North East, Women's Health In the North and the Monash University Disaster Resilience Initiative as part of the Gender and Disaster Pod initiative. The Lessons in Disaster Program promotes the understanding of the role that gender plays in survivor responses to disasters. The program embeds these insights into emergency management practice through training delivered to emergency management practitioners. This papers describes an independent evaluation of the program and reveals positive outcomes for participants in the emergency management and community sectors as well as highlighting key areas for further improvements.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Animal emergency management in South Australia: A case
           study of the Sampson Flat bushfire
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Megan; Taylor, Melanie
      Incorporating animals into emergency management is complex and involves many stakeholders who may not be core members of the emergency management system. This presents challenges as individuals and groups with veterinary and animal rescue knowledge are called upon, or offer, their assistance during emergency events. This paper uses a case study of the animal emergency management response during bushfires at Sampson Flat in South Australia in January 2015. South Australia incorporates animal welfare into emergency management planning and response arrangements. This case study draws on in-depth interviews with people directly involved in animal care during the bushfire response and examines their contributions and the successes and challenges involved in the response. The interviews revealed that the overall response was considered a success, especially in the areas of cooperation and coordination among the groups involved and the positive outcomes for animal welfare. The challenges identified related to communication, engaging with volunteers and staffin the response. This paper offers an example of best practice for animal welfare in emergency management. The challenges, and the responses to them, show the importance of flexibility, cooperation and learning from experience.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Community empowerment and trust: Social media use
           during the Hazelwood mine fire
    • Abstract: Yell, Susan; Duffy, Michelle
      During and after a disaster, affected communities grapple with how to respond and make sense of the experience. The physical and mental health of individuals is often adversely affected, as is the well being of the community. In early 2014, a fire in the Morwell open cut coalmine adjacent to the Hazelwood power station in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria burned for approximately 45 days, shrouding surrounding communities in smoke. As authorities struggled to put out the fire, the nearby communities became increasingly concerned about the perceived health risks of exposure to the smoke, particulate matter and gas emissions from the burning coal. The Hazelwood mine fire, initially treated as a fire emergency, 'evolved into a chronic technological disaster and a significant and lengthy environmental and health crisis' (Government of Victoria 2014, p. 28). In response to the crisis, people turned to social media as an alternative space in which to share information, tell their stories and organise for the purpose of activism. This paper takes the Hazelwood mine fire as a case study to examine how a community used social media (specifically Facebook) during a complex technological crisis involving health effects. It examines the issues facing emergency organisations and communities in relation to information and trust, and identifies the strengths and pitfalls of social media use in relation to community empowerment and engagement.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Gordon, Rod
      Recovery is now integral to emergency management, although the concept is barely 30 years old; being introduced in the mid-1980s. It is now a priority alongside prevention, preparedness and response, but is not yet well understood, lacking consensus about the priorities and methods for effective recovery

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Evaluating disaster recovery programs
    • Abstract: Srivastava, Sunila
      In 2012, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) endorsed recommendations to improve the methods and the evaluation of payments made for disaster recovery efforts

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Can your community cope with rising tides'
    • Abstract:
      As Texas and the Caribbean recover from the North Atlantic hurricane season, it is time for coastal communities to reflect on what makes a resilient community in the face of more frequent storm events, rising sea levels and changing coastal flooding patterns. How would you be affected' Would we fare any better in Australia'

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Health and disaster risk reduction regarding the
           Sendai Framework
    • Abstract: Reifels, Lennart; Arbon, Paul; Capon, Anthony; Handmer, John; Humphrey, Alistair; Murray, Virginia; Spencer, Caroline
      An expert workshop was held at the University of Melbourne in July 2017 to consider disaster risk reduction for the health sector under the Sendai Framework. Outcomes were recommendations for alliances and partnerships to link researchers and government across disaster risk reduction and health to inform policy and practice

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - 'We needed help, but we weren't helpless': the
           community experience of community recovery after natural disaster in
           Australia
    • Abstract: Moreton, Margaret
      This article shares key findings from a study of community recovery in rural and regional communities affected by fire, flood or cyclone across eastern Australia

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Social recovery for the elderly: learnings from
           south-west Queensland
    • Abstract: Whitton, Shona
      Over past decades in Australia the occurrence of natural disasters has seen the development of sophisticated disaster management responses. We have seen the development of systems for immediate disaster response, the restoration of public assets, and for longer-term human and social recovery

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Community recovery: six ideas to close
           'intent-to-capability' gaps
    • Abstract:
      The information in this paper draws on the experiences in 2011 as Chief of Operations and Plans at the Queensland Reconstruction Authority and in 2017 as State Recovery Coordinator for the Queensland Government. Deployments to Malaysia, Syria, Lebanon, East Timor, Kuwait, Iraq, Solomon Islands and Afghanistan also inform the six ideas on community recovery from natural disasters presented

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Integrated emergency risk management: building
           resilience in NSW communities
    • Abstract: Thompson, Matthew; Meggos, Danielle
      NSW communities are exposed to natural and technological hazards that threaten the safety and wellbeing of residents and cause significant death, destruction and disruption. Natural disasters alone have killed 337 people in NSW between 1990 and 2015. Between the 1966-67 and 2013-14 financial years, natural disasters in NSW resulted in normalised insurances losses of $22.4 billion.1 While the direct economic cost of these events is unknown, it is likely to be two or three times this figure

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - The impact of the Lancefield-Cobaw fire on community
           recovery
    • Abstract: Brown, Nathalie
      In October 2015, a Department of Environment Land Water and Planning (DELWP) planned burn in the Cobaw Forest, north-west of Melbourne, breached containment lines and formed the Lancefield-Cobaw fire. The fire burnt 3000 hectares through public and private land, destroyed four houses and many outbuildings, affected 140 properties including 123 km of fences and caused significant disruption to Lancefield, Cobaw, Benloch and surrounding communities. A multi-agency recovery effort began before the fire was contained

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - A monitoring and evaluation framework for disaster
           recovery programs
    • Abstract: Verlin, Aaron
      In recent years, there has been substantial research into how we can plan for and more effectively recover from disasters. This national discussion on better recovery outcomes is particularly important given the increasing frequency, severity and cost of disasters

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Disaster resilience: from the global to the local
    • Abstract: Bhagani, Hansika
      On International Day for Disaster Reduction (IDDR) 13 October, the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC gathered nearly 50 emergency management practitioners and researchers in Sydney to reflect on how at-risk communities are reducing their exposure to disasters

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - 2017 Resilient Australia Awards
    • Abstract: Douglas, Jacqui
      The 2017 National Resilient Australia Awards were characterised by success built through collaboration. The City of Mandurah in Western Australia saw the regional reach in a project officer's vision to increase preparedness in a community of interest. Two time zones away, Sydney's St. Ives North Public School brought community, students and emergency services together to teach STEM through the lens of bushfire risk and management. In Airlie Beach, Queensland, an image of a family's perseverance and strength in the face of disaster became a symbol of community resilience

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Diversity in Disaster: Communities and emergency
           management building resilience
    • Abstract:
      Every year people and communities across Australia experience emergencies and natural disasters.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Beyond the 2009 Gippsland bushfires: Acknowledgment
           and young rural adults' recovery
    • Abstract: Victoria, Moe; Victoria, Churchill; Victoria, Melbourne
      In 2009, four major bushfires destroyed vast areas of Gippsland in eastern Victorian including the areas around Delburn, Bunyip, Churchill and Wilsons Promontory, and are collectively known as the 2009 Gippsland bushfires. This paper explores how young adults in the rural areas are recovering from these bushfires and what psychosocial supports they perceive assists their recovery. A diversity of recovery experiences and needs were expressed reflecting that young adults are not a homogenous group. However, there were commonalities in their stories and they described the bushfires as being the most defining moment of their lives. Participants also reported low engagement with recovery supports, being 'out of the loop' when recovery information and support was distributed. Because young adults are often in the process of moving to or from the area because of life transitions such as relationships, jobs, study, or travel, participants reported exclusion from 'placebased' recovery supports. They reported ongoing emotional and physical health issues and exacerbation of chronic illness that had not been sufficiently acknowledged. Despite challenges in accessing important recovery supports, young adults in this study are moving forward with hope and optimism

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Engaging vulnerable populations in preparedness and
           response: a local government context
    • Abstract:
      Engaging communities proactively in preparedness and response is key to building a cohesive and resilient community. In Australia, responsibility for community engagement often falls to local government. While community-level engagement in emergency and disaster management is necessary, two demographic groups: low socio-economic; and culturally and linguistically diverse populations (hereafter referred to as vulnerable population groups) are of particular interest from an emergency and disaster management planning perspective as they are often exposed to, and are least prepared for, emergency and disaster events. This is due to factors including a lack of housing affordability, low literacy levels and diversity in cultural backgrounds. A community survey was conducted in Logan, a city south of Brisbane, to better understand the challenges of engaging vulnerable population groups in preparedness and response. The survey identified a trend of passivity towards preparedness. It also found that information from traditional mass media and family members was preferred and trusted. Based on these findings, a two-pronged approach is recommended that combines the use of traditional mass media and digital media with proactive face-to-face engagement to improve outcomes

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Valuing recovery through risk ownership
    • Abstract:
      As the risks encountered by natural hazards change and become more dynamic, so too, does the task of recovering from them. To manage natural hazards, planners must plan for the unexpected; building resilience before, during and after events. Currently, recovery funding is limited to a two-year window. Devastated communities that do not recover during this time rely on ad hoc funding to support patchy recovery beyond this. Planning for long-term recovery needs to be embedded throughout the risk assessment process to be effective. This presents a number of challenges. By identifying the longer-term risks and their consequences in advance, sustained recovery can be planned for all social, environmental and economic values (assets). This will determine what recovery interventions may be needed and when they are likely be most effective.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - The Canterbury earthquakes and the effect on landlords
           and tenants with commercial leases
    • Abstract: Collins, Toni
      The Canterbury earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 had a significant impact on landlords and tenants of commercial buildings in the city of Christchurch. The devastation wrought on the city was so severe a cordon was erected around the central business district for two and a half years while buildings were demolished, repaired or rebuilt. This was an unprecedented response to a natural disaster in New Zealand. Nevertheless, despite the destruction not all buildings within the cordon were damaged; many were still capable of being occupied and used. The difficulty was that tenants could not access them. As time went on and it became clear the cordon would be in place for a significant period, tenants did not want to pay rent for buildings they could not use. They wanted to end their leases to set up business elsewhere. The problem was that landlords and tenants were unclear about their legal rights because the law was unclear; their leases did not cover an inaccessible building and neither did the legislation. This paper argues there is a possible solution: the application of the doctrine of frustration. This doctrine enables contracts to be terminated in situations where an extraordinary event has such an effect on a contract that it radically changed the parties' contractual obligations. It is argued the doctrine should apply to enable landlords and tenants with commercial leases of buildings affected by the Canterbury earthquakes to terminate them.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Disaster recovery towards resilience: contributions of
           an assets-based community development approach
    • Abstract: Victoria, Melbourne; Victoria, Gippsland
      As the likelihood of extreme weather events increases under a changing climate, organisations tasked with disaster risk reduction and emergency management are exploring new approaches to help communities recover from these events. Community-directed initiatives place control back with those who are most affected. However, implementing such initiatives can be challenging. Assets-based community development is one communitydirected approach that draws on existing social networks, organisations and community assets. This paper considers how an assets-based community development approach might inform community recovery programs so that recovery efforts support longer-term community resilience. Drawing on the evaluation of a modified assets-based community development approach that was implemented as a recovery and resilience-building program after a bushfire in East Gippsland, Victoria, this paper examines how the key elements of assetsbased community development can guide recovery programs. Findings indicate that an assetsbased community development approach has significant potential to guide communitydirected recovery programs that may contribute to longer-term resilience. This provides insights into disaster recovery practices that shift from responsive postdisaster actions to proactive resilience-building

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - How can governments enable and support community-led
           disaster recovery'
    • Abstract: Owen, Carole
      The national recovery principles state that disaster recovery should be community-led. However, reports from various recovery processes in Australia and overseas consistently identify that governments too often, in practice, do not support this. This research examines ways in which governments can enable communities to lead their recovery after emergency events. This is a preliminary report of a continuing study. To date, semi-structured interviews have been held with over 20 experienced individuals about their involvement in community recovery. Participants are community members from disaster-affected communities, government employees from all levels of government and across departments, and representatives from community sector organisations. These preliminary results show the complex interplay between communities, governments, and community sector organisations in disaster recovery, and the varying expectations and experiences of those involved. These initial findings show potential to influence policies, processes and systems across governments and communities, and better support communityled recovery

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
 
 
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