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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 398 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 398 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)

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Journal Cover
Australian Journal of Emergency Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.354
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1324-1540
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [398 journals]
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Cameron, Robert
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Unseen need in IFRC world disaster report 2018
    • Abstract: Beitz, Alana
      Millions of people across the globe are not receiving the humanitarian assistance they desperately need, despite various commitments from government and aid organisations to ensure the world's vulnerable people are not left behind.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Improving service through valuing inclusion
    • Abstract: Haritos, Costa
      Changes in social, environmental and economic conditions and the need to partner 'with' communities to build resilience, means people are the greatest resource for emergency services organisations.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Climate change challenges for Queensland's emergency
           management sector
    • Abstract: Thompson, Matthew
      The Emergency Management Sector Adaptation Plan (EM-SAP) is a direct response to observed and projected effects of climate change and helps the sector identify opportunities and meet the risks communities face.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - A groundswell of caring for country
    • Abstract: Douglas, Jacqui
      In the aftermath of devastating bushfires, the Dixons Creek Primary School community took up the challenge to think of and create ways to build resilience to future events by using local and traditional knowledge of the land.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Making my resilient community a reality
    • Abstract: Douglas, Jacqui
      If we are to build communities that thrive in the context of more frequent, severe disasters, we need to think holistically. That's the beauty of a word like 'resilience'; encompassing both preparedness and recovery; social networks and built environments; groups and individuals.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - 2018 Resilient Australia awards: Bringing everyone to
           the table
    • Abstract: Douglas, Jacqui
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Hazard-smart remote communities in northern Australia:
           Community-led preparedness
    • Abstract: Sithole, Bevyline; Campion, Otto Bulmaniya; Hunter-Xenie, Hmalan
      Critiques of current attempts to build resilience in remote communities in northern Australia have generally been criticised as top-down and failing to produce meaningful outcomes. A component of the project was scoping resilience in remote communities that highlighted the challenges with current government efforts to plan for rather than with communities. Living with hazards requires that government leave space for communities to define and articulate what it takes to build hazard-smart communities. What does it mean to be hazard-smart' Who should be responsible for building hazard-smart communities' Communities in central Arnhem Land are using participatory-action research tools to talk about what it would take to ensure the survival of people facing significant hazards. Based on experiences with Cyclone Lam, communities have identified and made suggestions for what an inclusive community-led process would look like as an emergency management framework. This paper identifies key elements providing direction on how communities and governments can work together.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Designing to heal [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Richardson, John
      Review(s) of: Designing to heal, by Jenny Donovan, Published by CSIRO Publishing, ISBN 9780643106475.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Answering the call: Mental health needs of police and
           emergency services personnel
    • Abstract: Harman, Georgie
      Landmark Australian research into the mental health, wellbeing and suicide risk of 21,014 police and emergency services personnel has established national baseline measures and given agencies and stakeholders clear evidence to underpin and drive action.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Tsunami in Australia: Challenging assumptions,
           building preparedness
    • Abstract: Lamont, Amanda; Sexton, Jane
      University of Newcastle researchers captured media attention in 2017 with the release of a study modelling tsunami risk for the city of Sydney. The study considered a range of scenarios from minor disruptions through to rare, one-in- 5000-year disasters.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Reflections from Sendai: Lessons for Australia
    • Abstract: Sexton, Jane
      It's hard to believe eight years has passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake occurred that devastated so much of Japan. In November, I was very fortunate to participate in a United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction meeting in Sendai, which included two days of site visits to areas hit by the tsunami.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - A new wave of tsunami hazard data
    • Abstract: Davies, Gareth
      In 2018, Geoscience Australia updated and released the Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment (PTHA), which outlines the tsunami hazard for all of Australia and its offshore territories.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Applying science to build resilience to tropical
           cyclones
    • Abstract: Arthur, Craig
      The first step in understanding risk is understanding the hazard. This means knowing the likelihood of the hazard event and its intensity. During 2018, Geoscience Australia updated the Tropical Cyclone Hazard Assessment (TCHA) to better calculate the likelihood of tropical cyclones in Australia.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - The emergency service volunteer management framework
    • Abstract: McGill, Courtenay; Pidgeon, Jennifer; Gagne, Marylene
      Current high turnover rates among emergency services volunteers are concerning given the pivotal role they play in emergency services organisations. Each 'lost' volunteer reflects a loss of valuable skills and experience on top of the financial loss associated with training.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Long-term consequences of flooding: A case study of
           the 2011 Queensland floods
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Gerry; Toloo, Ghasem; Baniahmadi, Sara; Crompton, David; Tong, Shilu
      Devastating floods in southeast Queensland in 2011 were the combination of flash flooding in the Lockyer Valley with riverine flooding in the Brisbane metropolitan area. While there is considerable information about the immediate impact on those affected, there is less understanding of the long-term health effects that follow such events. This study explored the perceptions of health effects and support received by people affected by the 2011 southeast Queensland flood six years after the event. A cross-sectional survey of 327 people was conducted in areas affected by the floods. The questionnaire sought information about the ongoing social, economic, demographic and self-declared physical and mental health effects. The data were analysed through comparison of those unaffected with those directly affected by the floods. Residents whose households were flooded were more likely to score their health negatively than non-affected residents and had higher reported rates of trauma, injury and mental illness. Twenty-six per cent of this group reported that they still experience some adverse health effects from the floods. Managing the long-term health implications of a flood-affected population is an important public policy task. Dissatisfaction with recovery operations and perceived injustices associated with insurance and compensation arrangements may aggravate health consequences. Early recognition and intervention may assist with reducing secondary effects.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - '(In)action': Rethinking traditional understandings of
           disaster risk reduction
    • Abstract: Cornes, Isabel Clare; Cook, Brian; Satizabal, Paula; de Lourdes Melo Zurita, Maria
      Little is known about the (in)actions of Australian householders in terms of their disaster risk reduction (DRR) practices. The degree to which top-down, educative methods are effective at prompting householder actions is questioned by practitioners and disputed within the academic literature. However, these methods remain the dominant forms of 'engagement' applied within the emergency services sector. This paper presents the initial findings of an alternative method for engaging householders, which builds relationships between emergency services organisations and the public. A total of 74 Community Engagement for Disaster Risk Reduction (CEDRR) door-knock surveys were conducted with householders in Victoria by volunteers from the Victoria State Emergency Services (VicSES) and Australian Red Cross in partnership with researchers from the University of Melbourne. These findings provide valuable insights into householder (in)action and show intentions and actions resulting from CEDRR engagements. The findings demonstrate there can be effectiveness when engagement is rooted in relationships. This paper offers an empirically supported method that challenges the prevailing educative methods.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Reconceptualising 'community' to identify place-based
           disaster management needs in Tasmania
    • Abstract: Astill, Sandra; Corney, Stuart; Carey, Rebecca; Auckland, Stuart; Cross, Merylin
      In Australia, the National Strategy for Disaster Resilience mandates that emergency management authorities use effective community engagement to develop trust and respect with community members to provide effective, inclusive disaster management practices. Using these principles, researchers from the University of Tasmania reconceptualised the term 'community' as a 'community of practice' and facilitated a multidisciplinary workshop giving authorities, managers, planners and responders a forum to meet and collaborate to identify strengths, collective capacities and needs. The workshop was attended by 48 stakeholders dealing with emergencies and identified more than 30 research and 20 training needs as well as potential funding opportunities. The workshop also identified a fertile area for research and training given the critical mass of interested academics with experience and expertise in natural hazards fields. Attendees identified the latent potential for interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral collaboration and tapped into potential resources that address disaster management needs. This process has the potential to produce similar results nationally by enabling place-based disaster research to be identified by those who need it most.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Underinsurance in cyclone and flood environments: A
           case study in Cairns, Queensland
    • Abstract: Osbaldison, Nick; McShane, Connar; Oleszek, Raechel
      This article examines findings from a 2018 project in Cairns, Far North Queensland, on insurance and risk perception. Using a mixed-methods approach, the study explored how people regard insurance, if at all, and how they use it to reduce their risk of financial loss following a disaster event. Results suggest that while most home owners hold insurance, renters are less likely to have contents insurance leaving them financially vulnerable if losing their property. Cost of insurance is considered one barrier to taking out insurance, however, other issues such as risk perception, self-efficacy and trust in insurers are issues for both home owners and renters. The paper furthers knowledge of underinsurance in disaster-prone areas and provides vital information for understanding motivation to withdraw from insurance.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Resilience in the Philippines through effective
           community engagement
    • Abstract: Baybay, Carla Selina; Hindmarsh, Richard
      This research is important to assist the Philippines develop more effective community engagement adaptation approaches and policies to better respond locally to climate change and disaster risk management. To explore this, a literature review was undertaken followed by interviews and focus group discussions with local experts and community representatives. Findings from the literature review were that strong (active and inclusive) community engagement approaches to climate change and disaster risk management were more effective than weak (passive and consultative) approaches. These results were compared to fieldwork interviews and focus group discussions in two typhoon-prone Philippine provinces. Findings revealed that while strong and weak community engagement approaches exist in the Philippines, respondents at provincial and local levels supported the development of strong community engagement that involved capacity building and open information and dialogue. Meaningful engagement with stakeholders and across sectors that embraced Filipino community engagement customs and characteristics were emphasised.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 1 - Disaster preparedness: Services for people
           experiencing homelessness and the pressure-cooker response
    • Abstract: Osborn, Elizabeth; Every, Danielle; Richardson, John
      Community service providers deliver vital services to vulnerable populations. In the wake of a disaster, community service providers go beyond their normal service offerings to meet the added needs of clients. Research to date indicates that 25 per cent of community service providers effected by a disaster would not be able to reopen after a disaster, reducing the access to vital services. This paper discusses the disaster impacts on service providers for people experiencing homelessness and the possible ways to mitigate severe effects. To investigate the effects of disasters and barriers to preparedness, a survey was conducted and completed by 161 homeless service providers in Australia. A further 45 interviews were conducted. The results indicated that these service providers experience greater client demand for services and are heavily burdened during stressful and traumatic times. An increase in client presentations puts financial pressure on these organisations as well as on staff workload and staffing demands. Identifying these stresses and limitations, homeless service providers identified five initiatives to be better prepared. Initiatives include increased funding; training for staff, volunteers and clients; funds for identified infrastructure recovery; material support for clients and good inter-agency collaboration.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Feb 2019 15:43:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Zillman, John W
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Prepare for extended severe weather seasons
    • Abstract: Bruce, David
      Australia needs to prepare itself for the threat of year-round natural hazards that in the past were associated only with the summer months.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Reflecting on Queensland's 2018 recovery
    • Abstract: Moon, Brendan
      In 2018, 48 of Queensland's 77 local government areas received natural disaster assistance following multiple flood events. The Queensland Reconstruction Authority, Australia's only permanent disaster recovery organisation, reflects on recovery successes and challenges from these events.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Disaster resilience indicators: The connectedness of
           communities
    • Abstract: Ingham, Valerie; Islam, Rabiul; Hicks, John; Burmeister, Oliver
      Can community organisational connectedness be a measure of community resilience' Our proposition is that the strength of a community's resilience is a function of the connectedness of local community organisations.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Project Firestorm: A student, teacher and NSWRFS
           collaboration
    • Abstract: Jarrett, Tony
      St Ives North Public School, Sydney, developed Project Firestorm with quality educational challenges and in collaboration with the local Rural Fire Brigade to increase resilience

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Learning to love where we live again:
           Strathewen-Arthurs Creek Bushfire education partnership
    • Abstract: Hayward, Jane
      The Strathewen-Arthurs Creek Bushfire Education Partnership came to life following devastating bushfires in February 2009.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Strengthening resilience of primary producers and
           farming communities
    • Abstract: Drew, Justine; Young, Mary-Anne; Tothill, Merri
      A community's capacity to lead its recovery depends on its collective resilience. How governments provide the right kind of support to primary producers to build that resilience is being assessed in South Australia.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Program evaluation, preparedness and resilience:
           Western Australia examples
    • Abstract: Armstrong, Rachel
      Community preparedness programs make an important contribution to disaster resilience, but their outcomes can be difficult to measure. Improved preparedness requires behaviour change, which can take a long time and multiple interventions.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Mental health interventions to build resilience
    • Abstract: Black, Linda; van Agteren, Joseph; Iasiello, Matthew; Carey, Marissa; Faggotter, Ronnie
      Natural disasters have severe and often traumatic implications for affected individuals and their communities. Evidence suggests that preventative mental health interventions, primarily designed to improve resilience and wellbeing, can provide individuals and communities with resources to 'bounce back' from adversity and decrease the risk of future psychological distress or mental illness.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Co-designing a disaster resilience strategy for South
           Australia
    • Abstract: Lumb, Miriam; Ritz, Monica
      In September 2016, a supercell thunderstorm and seven tornadoes with wind gusts of 260 km an hour destroyed major transmission lines across South Australia, triggering a state-wide blackout. Many households and businesses were unprepared for the loss of power, communications, fuel and food supplies.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Integrating animal welfare into emergency management
    • Abstract: Nardi-Wallace, Amanda
      Events requiring an emergency response such as fires, floods, cyclones and earthquakes have the potential to affect animals. Previous incidents have identified that a lack of adequate planning for animals and their welfare in emergencies can result in poor last-minute decisions and have resulted in dangerous and fatal consequences for both animals and their carers. In Western Australia (WA), fatalities occurred in the 2015 fires in Esperance while carers were attempting to move a horse. Post-incident reviews of this event and others identified a need to improve the management of animals and their welfare during emergency events.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Managing disaster risk to enhance preparedness
    • Abstract: Edwards, Jillian; Osuchowski, Monica
      Growing concern about the effects of a variable and rapidly changing climate combined with increasing potential for loss and harm are forcing us to question what can be done differently - before disaster strikes - so Australians can successfully live with intensifying natural hazards.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Engaging businesses in shared responsibility
    • Abstract: Hanvin, Renae
      As the south-east coast of America recovers from the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, there have been some great examples of how the private sector has contributed to community readiness, response and recovery.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Collective trauma events: Towards best practice
    • Abstract: Brady, Kate
      Emergency management organisations are increasingly responding to trauma events in Australia and internationally. Australian Red Cross has undertaken research to develop best-practice guidelines to help organisations support communities before, during and after these distressing events.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Lessons management forum
    • Abstract: Laurence, Nicola
      In August 2018, practitioners from Australia and New Zealand gathered in Melbourne for the third annual Lessons Management Forum, hosted by AFAC and the Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience. Building on the success of recent years, the program focused on effective coordination and evaluation of lessons management as areas for growth; from the grassroots level through to high-level policy.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Disclosing volunteers as 'human capital': Analysing
           annual reports of Australian emergency services organisations
    • Abstract: Berry, Yoke; Jones, Michael
      Annual reports of 11 volunteerbased emergency services organisations were analysed to determine how volunteers are valued in terms of human capital. A simple method was designed to enable comparison between agencies on nine categories of human capital being volunteer numbers, gender, age, length of service, diversity (three types), training and awards. The results were compared to the disclosure of the same categories pertaining to paid staff. Results showed that narratives of annual reports gave recognition and praise to volunteers but human resources sections reported primarily on paid staff. Data on volunteer numbers and diversity are poorly reported in many annual reports. It was found that human capital, if applied to both paid staff and volunteers, could be a suitable tool to validate volunteers in an annual report.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - When joining is not enough: Emergency services
           volunteers and the intention to remain
    • Abstract: Kragt, Darja; Dunlop, Patrick; Gagne, Marylene; Holtrop, Djurre; Luksyte, Aleksandra
      Volunteer turnover is a continuous concern for emergency services organisations. Using a psychological contract perspective, this paper examines how meeting the initial expectations of volunteers when they join an emergency service is related to the volunteer's intention to remain with that service. A survey was undertaken by 539 emergency services volunteers in Western Australia after volunteering for about a year. The survey included questions about reasons why volunteers joined the service, activities they expected to undertake as a volunteer, their evaluation of the volunteering experiences in the first year and their intent to stay. Using Latent Class Analysis of their expectations, three types of volunteers were identified. These were 'focused' volunteers (having well-defined expectations), 'lost' volunteers (lacking clear expectations except for serving the community) and 'overenthusiastic' volunteers (expecting status, reputation and career progression among other things). The results showed that the focused volunteers had participated in more activities and had a higher intent to remain a volunteer. Having too few or too many expectations seems to have negative consequences. Therefore, emergency services organisations could strive to understand and shape volunteer expectations to match a new volunteer's experience by using better aligned recruitment practices.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Usability of MyFireWatch for non-expert users measured
           by eyetracking
    • Abstract: Brady, Danielle; Ferguson, Neil; Adams, Matthew
      MyFireWatch is a public-access fire information system that shows the location of satellitederived hotspots on a map layer. Originally developed for expert users, MyFireWatch was created with a user-centred design methodology. This paper describes a study of the onscreen viewing behaviour of nonexpert users of MyFireWatch, using eye-tracking technology to observe their use of the system. Non-experts between 20 and 80 years of age were able to use the online system to locate current fires and burnt areas. This validated the design. The study showed that younger users appeared more familiar with interactive map conventions that allowed them to search more quickly than older users. However, older users were able to substitute their prior navigation knowledge for some features. Using aggregated eye-tracking data for different areas of interest on the MyFireWatch interface, maps and fire information functions were viewed by participants the most. Areas on the interface containing menu bars and logos were viewed the least. This paper considers the usability for nonexperts of an interactive map designed to visualise the location of remotely sensed fires.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Disaster management in Australia: Government
           coordination in a time of crisis [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pikusa, Ed
      Review(s) of: Disaster management in Australia: Government coordination in a time of crisis, Published by Routledge, Author: George Carayannopoulos, ISBN: 978-1-138-04912-3 (Hardback), 978-1-315-16977-4 (ebook).

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Emergency preparedness and planning for animals: A
           case study in the Blue Mountains, NSW
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Megan; Bigelow, Jenny; Taylor, Melanie
      Planning for animals in the response and recovery phases of disasters is crucial to mitigate the negative effects that the loss or separation of animals can have. The human-animal bond can influence people's decisions during emergencies including how they will respond and when or if they evacuate. This paper uses results of a survey of residents in the Blue Mountains, NSW, who own animals to identify their emergency preparedness and their intended actions in an emergency event. The survey revealed complex animal ownership patterns and respondents showed strong bonds with their pets and were motivated to protect their animals. There was a high level of self-reported general emergency preparedness and almost three-quarters of respondents said they included their animals in their emergency planning. However, more than half were unsure where they would take them and a third were unsure if they could take them. Findings suggest that preparedness information be locally specific and consider the complexities of animal ownership, including the need for species-specific resources and information about animals that cannot be evacuated. A case study is used to examine and understand the links between the human-animal bond, disaster preparedness and resilience and the recovery of individuals and communities.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - 'That psychological bulls**t': Surprising findings
           from community research are improving preparedness communication
    • Abstract: Every, Danielle; Reynolds, Amy; Keen-Dyer, Helen; Dyer, Matt; Miller-Rose, Peta; Trigg, Joshua
      Effective preparedness is often communicated as physical actions such as having a survival plan and an emergency kit or reinforcing, moving and clearing property. However, the physiological responses to an overwhelming threat can disrupt the best-laid preparations and plans. Psychological and emotional preparedness during the response phase of a disaster helps identify and manage fear to reduce the impacts on cognitive and behavioural functioning. Rates of psychological and emotional preparedness are generally lower than for physical preparedness. This presents particular challenges when communicating this type of risk. This paper reports on qualitative research with residents and agencies in south-east Queensland about what psychological and emotional preparedness means to them, what prevents people from engaging with this type of risk and how best to communicate it.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Homelessness and natural disasters: The role of
           community service organisations
    • Abstract: Brookfield, Samuel; Fitzgerald, Lisa
      Homelessness can decrease the disaster resilience of individuals and communities. This paper presents the findings of ten in-depth qualitative interviews conducted at a homelessness support service to explore homeless individual's experiences of natural hazards and how they access support during disasters. Thematic analysis identified three themes: disconnection (isolation causing a reliance on non-durable forms of support), service provider trust (participants accessed services they trusted) and personal disaster (homelessness increased vulnerability to relatively minor natural hazards). Findings were applied to the role of community service organisations (CSOs) using the Adaptive Cycle of Resilience as a framework. The results imply that CSOs could minimise structural pre-disaster vulnerability by engaging people who are homeless in disaster preparedness and response activities. Disaster plans need to be 'all-people' and provide tailored support for the needs of specific populations. These plans could include word-ofmouth information, emphasising the strengths of people who are homeless and anticipating their priorities during disaster. CSOs could also employ vulnerability mapping to prepare for the needs of homeless populations. The impacts of disasters should be assessed in the context of an individual's exposure and vulnerability to their effects. Disaster recovery provides opportunities to promote strengths and increase social integration for people who are homeless.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 4 - Prescribed burning on public land in Victoria:
           Redesigning team structures and tactical planning
    • Abstract: English, Anthony
      Designing and delivering a planned burning program involves reliance on complex planning and operational expertise. On public land, fire agencies dedicate significant resources to these programs, many of which have increased in scope as government and community expectations evolve. Since Black Saturday in 2009, Victoria's fire services have shifted significantly in their approach to identifying and managing bushfire risk. Most notably, 'risk landscape' planning and the development of high-level policy statements such as Safer Together (State Government of Victoria 2015), have moved conversations about bushfire risk to a 'cross tenure' or landscape context and a community-based setting.

      This paper argues that one element not yet greatly affected by these changes is the design of on-ground burn delivery teams. In Victoria, the Burn Officer in Charge (BOIC) has been a pivotal position in delivering prescribed burns. This role has many dimensions and, as policy and operational demands increase, the structure of operational burn teams and the associated role of BOICs needs reconsideration. Innovation in areas of weather services, community engagement and use of aerial resources has been driven by technological development and research over the last decade. Nevertheless, the way that burn teams are structured has not witnessed comparable change. This paper describes and recommends adoption of a revised burn team structure in pre-burn tactical planning and knowledge management. These changes offer significant outcomes for government and communities.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Nov 2018 17:44:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Health surge: thunderstorm asthma
    • Abstract: Morgans, Amee
      On 21 November 2016, the largest recorded global epidemic of thunderstorm asthma occurred in Victoria. Its scale was unprecedented with public calls for assistance well beyond normal volumes during high-demand events.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Oct 2018 11:45:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Slatyer, Judy
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Get Ready: A model for deaf community leadership and
           preparedness
    • Abstract: Roberts, Genevieve
      The Deaf Society Get Ready program began as a one-year project under the Natural Disaster Resilience Program. Get Ready is the implementation of recommended interventions arising from university research into disaster resilience in the deaf community.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Implementation of the Sendai framework for disaster
           risk reduction in Australia
    • Abstract: Merrin-Davies, Maddison
      Global momentum to reduce the impact disasters have on communities has gathered pace. In line with this momentum, Australia is taking meaningful steps to implement the 'Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030'.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Disaster recovery: Are we doomed to repeat the same
           mistakes'
    • Abstract: Brady, Kate
      There are significant barriers to lessons management in disaster recovery in Australia. The 2017 AFAC Lessons Management Forum looked at the challenges and why they exist.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Evolution of a community resilience strategic plan
    • Abstract: Moreland, Jayme
      Developing a community resilience plan entailed understanding what communities need and how emergency management services can build resilience. These needs don't always match.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Australian input into international security standards
    • Abstract: Dunkerley, Catherine
      With over 96 years of experience in developing Australian Standards and a longstanding commitment to and involvement in International Standards, Standards Australia continues to lead from the front.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Lessons learnt from innovation: Red cross volunteers
    • Abstract: Hay, Georgia
      Before Red Cross can foster disaster resilience in communities, its volunteers must be resilient.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - The review of the national principles for disaster
           recovery
    • Abstract: Mitchell, Louise; Moreton, Margaret; Stratton, Mark
      The National Principles for Disaster Recovery create a set of fundamental underlying truths that form the foundation of our knowledge and values and guide actions and practice. This article describes the process and outcomes of the 2017 review of the Principles.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Making crowded places safe and healthy
    • Abstract: Douglas, Jacqui
      A crowded place can be defined in simple terms: A number of people who intentionally, predictably or spontaneously find themselves gathered in a physical space. Small and large crowds are everywhere-in shopping centres and stadiums; around transport hubs and main thoroughfares; in pubs, clubs, and hotels; at sporting and cultural events and places of worship. The congregation of people in different public places is an important and positive aspect of many societies.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - How overseas fire agencies recruit for diversity
    • Abstract: Mackintosh, Bronnie
      The number of female firefighters in the urban sector in Australia is less than five per cent, despite good efforts to broaden the catchment for recruitment. How can this be improved using best-practice recruitment'

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Identity management in disaster response environments:
           A child exploitation mitigation perspective
    • Abstract: Allan, Kathryn; Lacey, David
      The immediate disaster response environment exposes people to a multitude of risks, including identity risks. Those working in disaster response environments use identity management systems to protect people, especially vulnerable people and children. This paper examines identity management systems and the way they address risks of child trafficking and exploitation. This research offers a unique perspective into the experiences of non-state actors and the role they play in identity management systems during disaster response. A case study of Tropical Cyclone Winston is used to explore views of identity management and how they reduce risks to children. The case study showed that the role of the community in identity management, verification and associated controls were geographically concentrated and not readily portable. This created risks to children of trafficking and exploitation, particularly where evacuation centres and shelters were geographically removed from the children's communities. An Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork method revealed that those working in the disaster response environment rely heavily on information from the community and government when identifying children. Where there are gaps in the information and social networks in the identity management process there are significant risks to children. These insights are relevant to disaster response planning.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Jurisdictional collaboration on emergency management
           capability development
    • Abstract: Zsombok, Jane
      An emergency management capability development network established in 2017 has already achieved beneficial outcomes for capability development.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Cumulative climate change influences and hazards
           affecting the Sunshine Coast
    • Abstract: Gallina, John; Sidle, Roy
      Climate change projections indicate that low-elevation areas along the Queensland coastline will experience increasing adverse effects of submergence, coastal flooding and coastal erosion due to sea-level rise. Current and future climate change scenarios pose significant risks to coastal populations, economies, communities and the natural environment. Without planned pathways and predetermined trigger points for adaptation, coastal environments will remain susceptible to geophysical, hydrological and meteorological hazards. This paper describes hazards (heatwaves, bushfire, floods, storm surges, cyclones and coastal erosion) that impact on lowland areas of the Sunshine Coast region. This assessment is done in the context of converging disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation strategies using a framework of Define-Analyze-Implement-Reassess.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Flood levee influences on community preparedness: A
           paradox'
    • Abstract: Gissing, Andrew; Van Leeuwen, Jonathan; Tofa, Matalena; Haynes, Katharine
      Flood levees are a commonly used method of flood protection. Previous research has proposed the concept of the 'levee paradox' to describe the situation whereby the construction of levees leads to a lowered community awareness of the risks of flooding and increased development in the 'protected' area. The consequences of this are the risks of larger losses in less frequent but deeper floods when levees overtop or fail. This paper uses the recent history of flooding and levee construction to investigate the 'levee paradox' through a study of flood preparedness and floodplain development in Lismore, NSW.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Vale John Gallina
    • PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Evidence to support incident management team
           capability
    • Abstract: Owen, Christine; Hayes, Peter; Brooks, Benjamin; Cameron, Scott; Conway, Geoff
      In 2015, the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council (AFAC) commissioned a review of the evidence base to establish the rationale for capabilities central to effective incident management. The review focused on the capabilities required for senior AIIMS Level 31 Incident Management Team roles. Results were used to inform standards for the AFAC Emergency Management Professionalisation Scheme. The review considered the human factors and emergency management literature as well as research conducted through the Bushfire CRC. Analysis and synthesis of the evidence identified three broad capabilities, each with three sub-capabilities important in incident management. The three categories were to model leadership and teamwork, to think and plan strategically and demonstrate self-awareness. This article outlines the evidence base and the capabilities developed through this review and contributes to the evidence base for incident management capability. Guidance on what will be needed in continuing professional development program is provided.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Victoria's gender and disaster taskforce: A
           retrospective analysis
    • Abstract: Parkinson, Debra; Duncan, Alyssa; Davie, Susan; Archer, Frank; Sutherland, Angela; O'Malley, Steve; Jeffrey, Judy; Pease, Bob; Wilson, Andrew AG; Gough, Martijn
      This paper outlines aspects of gender disparity in disasters and emergency management captured in Australian research and the resulting establishment of the Victorian Gender and Disaster (GAD) Taskforce. The achievements and learnings of the collective, collaborative and broad-based GAD Taskforce over its three-year tenure (2014-2016) are discussed. The primary aim of the GAD Taskforce was to reduce the compounding effects of gender on disaster impacts. Its success was due to initial high-level membership, inclusion of women's health and other broad-based organisations, regular well-attended meetings and willingness of members to present a gendered analysis of their organisation. Existence of the GAD Taskforce facilitated access to a critical mass of professionals with gender and disaster expertise. Limitations to achievements of the GAD Taskforce emerged from new members not having decision-making authority and notable gaps in representation from the senior management of emergency management organisations. This paper and other documents can be used by subsequent groups working on gender or diversity to build on the achievements of the Taskforce. It will be important for such new groups to consider the threat to gender equity that 'diversity and inclusion' intrinsically holds.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - Experiences of individuals with physical disabilities
           in natural disasters: An integrative review
    • Abstract: Quaill, Jennifer; Barker, Ruth; West, Caryn
      People with physical disabilities are highly vulnerable during natural disasters. The interaction of individual, societal and environmental factors impact on their ability to prepare, evacuate and recover from disaster events. This paper provides a review of the current body of knowledge on the lived experiences of adults with a physical disability in natural disasters. Fifty-seven articles were identified in the primary search, with seven studies selected for review. The small body of research to date indicates that natural disasters present challenges to people with physical disabilities, and have significant negative impacts on their lives. However, there are a number of factors that enhance the resilience of people with physical disabilities. The aim of this integrative review was to describe the current body of knowledge on the lived experiences of adults with a physical disability in natural disasters and to identify gaps in the literature to inform future research.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 3 - A formative evaluation of the triple zero kids
           challenge teacher's guide
    • Abstract: Towers, Briony; Whybro, Mark
      The Triple Zero Kids Challenge is an online, interactive safety game and a mobile application. It provides young children in Australia with essential information on how to identify and report legitimate emergencies by calling Triple Zero (000). As a companion resource, the Triple Kids' Challenge Teacher's Guide provides educators of lower-primary school students with a series of structured learning activities to consolidate and extend the key messages of the online game. To ensure that the learning activities in the guide are both feasible and appropriate for the target age group, a formative evaluation was conducted with lower-primary students and their teachers. This paper reports on the results of the evaluation and highlights the importance of formative evaluation to the development of safety education programs for children. While the evaluation indicated that the learning activities were feasible and appropriate for lower-primary school students, it also identified the need for numerous modifications and improvements that have been incorporated into a revised 2017 version of the guide.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Aug 2018 20:20:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Foreword
    • Abstract: MacKenzie, Iain S
      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - 2017 Lessons management workshop
    • Abstract: Cuthbert, Mark
      In November 2017, 45 lessons practitioners from across the country spent the day analysing observations from their agencies to identify consistent and recurring issues across the sector.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case studies point to research use
    • Abstract: Leahy, Brenda
      How do emergency services in Australia and New Zealand use research to drive change and innovation' What works, what doesn't and what gets in the way'

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Learning for the future: The emotional cycle of bush
           fire
    • Abstract: Dwyer, Graham
      Learning from previous bushfires can be a painful experience but it can also lead to significant innovation.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Volunteers: The ageing and the millennials
    • Abstract: Moir, Jake
      The New South Wales Rural Fire Service (NSW RFS) has over 70,000 members and is rapidly approaching a demographic dilemma. As 'baby boomers' begin to retire, it's time to shift the focus of the NSW RFS to 'millennials' and get ready for the challenges that come with that generation.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Connecting communities through volunteering: Lessons
           learnt at NSW SES
    • Abstract: McCullough, Andrew
      When the NSW State Emergency Service (NSW SES) is not responding to severe weather events, it is building capability through training and preparing our communities for the unexpected.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Firebombing at night - why not!
    • Abstract: Adler, Richard
      Dropping fire suppressant and retardant from aircraft provides great support to firefighters on the ground at bushfires - during daylight. So why isn't standard practice to continue firebombing operations into the night'

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - A vital layer of safety for Australia's airports
    • Abstract: Wood, Glenn
      Air services Australia provides aviation rescue firefighting services at 26 of Australia's busiest airports to protect and ensure the safety of the travelling public. The principal objective is to save lives.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case study: Urban aircraft deployment in Victoria
    • Abstract: Anderson, Matthew
      This case study explores the management and the deployment of aircraft in Victoria to examine the overall awareness of command staff in responding to and managing aviation assets within the Melbourne metropolitan area.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case study: Lessons management capability in emergency
           management and beyond
    • Abstract: Stuart, Heather; Thomason, Mark
      Lessons management is a small but growing capability across the emergency management sector. This case study explores how a number of emergency services organisations have collaborated to grow this capability both internally and across the sector.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case study: The preparedness puzzle
    • Abstract: Smith, Tracy; Leclercq, Muriel; Chuter, Victoria
      This case study describes how the Western Australian Office of Emergency Management developed its emergency management assurance and lessons management frameworks. Their relationship with the Capability Framework underpins successful implementation.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Case study: The victorian emergency management
           community resilience index
    • Abstract: Parsons, Melissa; Foster, Holly; Redlich, Sam
      This case study describes the experience of using and embedding components of the national-scale Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index into the state scale Victorian Emergency Management Community Resilience Index.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - We learn as one: Victoria's journey to collaborative
           lessons management
    • Abstract: Jackson, Lisa Marie; Shepherd, Adair Forbes
      In November 2015, Victoria's lessons management framework was released. The EM-LEARN framework established a model for lessons management, including a life cycle that defined cultural characteristics and lessons management process, based on research.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Aitape story: The great new Guinea tsunami of 1998
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Johnson, RWally
      Review(s) of: Aitape story: The great new Guinea tsunami of 1998, by Hugh Davies, Published by Halstead Press 2017, ISBN 9781925043273.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - How emergency services organisations can - and do -
           utilise research
    • Abstract: Owen, Christine
      In emergency management organisations, the drive to use research to inform practice has been growing for some time. This paper discusses findings from a survey used to investigate perceived effectiveness of a number of important processes in research utilisation. In 2016, a survey was completed by 266 respondents in 29 fire and emergency services agencies. Questions sought answers on perceived effectiveness in disseminating research within agencies, assessing and evaluating the impacts on agency practice of the research, implementing agency changes that may be needed, monitoring processes to track changes and communicate outcomes of changes made as a result of research. The study found that there were differences in levels of perceived effectiveness between those in senior management and front-line service positions. The differences suggest that front-line services personnel have lower levels of perceived effectiveness in how research is disseminated. The study also found agencies had different approaches to keep up-to-date with research advances. An examination of the activities identified four developmental levels of research utilisation maturity. The findings suggest more work is needed to better understand the enablers and constraints to utilising research to support development of evidence-informed practice. monitoring processes to track changes and communicate outcomes of changes made as a result of research. The study found that there were differences in levels of perceived effectiveness between those in senior management and front-line service positions. The differences suggest that front-line services personnel have lower levels of perceived effectiveness in how research is disseminated. The study also found agencies had different approaches to keep up-to-date with research advances. An examination of the activities identified four developmental levels of research utilisation maturity. The findings suggest more work is needed to better understand the enablers and constraints to utilising research to support development of evidence-informed practice.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Can major post-event inquiries and reviews contribute
           to lessons management'
    • Abstract: Lawson, Cole; Eburn, Michael; Dovers, Stephen; Gough, Martijn
      Significant disaster and emergency management events are invariably followed by formal post-event inquiries and reviews. Such reviews identify lessons to improve future capacities and set the agenda for policy and management reform for emergency management organisations. As a result, there is a substantial body of reflections and recommendations gathered across all hazard types and jurisdictions by formal, structured inquiry processes that contribute to lessons management for the emergency sector. However, whether there is any coherence or core lessons emerging for the Australian sector from the totality of post event inquiries is unknown. The work reported here identifies the recommendations from these inquiries. A meta-analysis of 1336 recommendations made of 1336 recommendations made in 55 Australian major post-event reviews and inquiries since 2009 revealed common themes. The recommendations were compiled into a comprehensive database and categorised into 32 themes. The analysis highlighted recurrent themes from recommendations spanning multiple jurisdictions. The study indicates the potential value for Australian and New Zealand emergency management agencies and jurisdictions of using the aggregate data organised as a resource for lessons management.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Updating the costs of disasters in Australia
    • Abstract: Handmer, John; Ladds, Monique; Magee, Liam
      The Bureau of Transport Economics (BTE) 2001 report, Economic Costs of Natural Disasters in Australia (BTE 2001), has been the only comprehensive, national assessment of the economic impacts of disasters in Australia. Statistics and economic impact assessment methodology presented in the report have been widely used for research and policy analysis, particularly for assessing the costs and benefits of disaster risk reduction and mitigation. This is the case even though the data and analysis are over one and a half decades old. It has needed updating in terms of the approach to analysis and the dataset to include the many relevant disasters triggered by natural phenomena from 1999 to 2013. This paper sets out the approach used to update the 2001 report through a National Emergency Management Projects grant, documents the major issues faced, including the need for a new dataset and presents some results. The main differences between the BTE 2001 report and the update concern increase losses from bushfires, the inclusion of heatwaves, with heatwaves responsible for half of all deaths, and changes in the pattern of loss at the state level.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - The total flood warning system: What have we learnt
           since 1990 and where are the gaps
    • Abstract: Cawood, Michael; Keys, Chas; Wright, Christopher
      April 1990 was a month of severe flooding in eastern Australia. Two months later, a national workshop was held in which a large number of flood management specialists sought to capture the lessons of the floods while they were still fresh. Many aspects of the management of the events were examined, with flood warning highlighted as a key function. A second meeting the following year resolved to produce a best-practice manual to help guide practitioners in the development of flood warning services. The term 'Total Flood Warning System' (TFWS) was adopted to describe the need to integrate the many elements of effective warning. The need to help those in the path of a flood to understand the warnings they received and take effective action was recognised as central.The manual was published in 1995 and revised and updated in 1999 and 2009. This paper asks what has changed and improved in the flood warning field since 1990 and what is needed in TFWS terms to further help communities and individuals manage their flood risk.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Understanding the role gender plays in survivor
           responses to disasters: Evaluating the lessons in disaster program
    • Abstract: Spencer, Caroline; Bailey, Naomi; Muir, Carlyn; Majeed, Saadia; McArdle, Dudley; Keech, Emma; Duncan, Alyssa; Parkinson, Debra
      This paper evaluates four pilot training sessions conducted in August 2015 by Women's Health Goulburn North East, Women's Health In the North and the Monash University Disaster Resilience Initiative as part of the Gender and Disaster Pod initiative. The Lessons in Disaster Program promotes the understanding of the role that gender plays in survivor responses to disasters. The program embeds these insights into emergency management practice through training delivered to emergency management practitioners. This papers describes an independent evaluation of the program and reveals positive outcomes for participants in the emergency management and community sectors as well as highlighting key areas for further improvements.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Animal emergency management in South Australia: A case
           study of the Sampson Flat bushfire
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Megan; Taylor, Melanie
      Incorporating animals into emergency management is complex and involves many stakeholders who may not be core members of the emergency management system. This presents challenges as individuals and groups with veterinary and animal rescue knowledge are called upon, or offer, their assistance during emergency events. This paper uses a case study of the animal emergency management response during bushfires at Sampson Flat in South Australia in January 2015. South Australia incorporates animal welfare into emergency management planning and response arrangements. This case study draws on in-depth interviews with people directly involved in animal care during the bushfire response and examines their contributions and the successes and challenges involved in the response. The interviews revealed that the overall response was considered a success, especially in the areas of cooperation and coordination among the groups involved and the positive outcomes for animal welfare. The challenges identified related to communication, engaging with volunteers and staffin the response. This paper offers an example of best practice for animal welfare in emergency management. The challenges, and the responses to them, show the importance of flexibility, cooperation and learning from experience.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 2 - Community empowerment and trust: Social media use
           during the Hazelwood mine fire
    • Abstract: Yell, Susan; Duffy, Michelle
      During and after a disaster, affected communities grapple with how to respond and make sense of the experience. The physical and mental health of individuals is often adversely affected, as is the well being of the community. In early 2014, a fire in the Morwell open cut coalmine adjacent to the Hazelwood power station in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria burned for approximately 45 days, shrouding surrounding communities in smoke. As authorities struggled to put out the fire, the nearby communities became increasingly concerned about the perceived health risks of exposure to the smoke, particulate matter and gas emissions from the burning coal. The Hazelwood mine fire, initially treated as a fire emergency, 'evolved into a chronic technological disaster and a significant and lengthy environmental and health crisis' (Government of Victoria 2014, p. 28). In response to the crisis, people turned to social media as an alternative space in which to share information, tell their stories and organise for the purpose of activism. This paper takes the Hazelwood mine fire as a case study to examine how a community used social media (specifically Facebook) during a complex technological crisis involving health effects. It examines the issues facing emergency organisations and communities in relation to information and trust, and identifies the strengths and pitfalls of social media use in relation to community empowerment and engagement.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 05:32:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Gordon, Rod
      Recovery is now integral to emergency management, although the concept is barely 30 years old; being introduced in the mid-1980s. It is now a priority alongside prevention, preparedness and response, but is not yet well understood, lacking consensus about the priorities and methods for effective recovery

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Evaluating disaster recovery programs
    • Abstract: Srivastava, Sunila
      In 2012, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) endorsed recommendations to improve the methods and the evaluation of payments made for disaster recovery efforts

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Can your community cope with rising tides'
    • Abstract:
      As Texas and the Caribbean recover from the North Atlantic hurricane season, it is time for coastal communities to reflect on what makes a resilient community in the face of more frequent storm events, rising sea levels and changing coastal flooding patterns. How would you be affected' Would we fare any better in Australia'

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Health and disaster risk reduction regarding the
           Sendai Framework
    • Abstract: Reifels, Lennart; Arbon, Paul; Capon, Anthony; Handmer, John; Humphrey, Alistair; Murray, Virginia; Spencer, Caroline
      An expert workshop was held at the University of Melbourne in July 2017 to consider disaster risk reduction for the health sector under the Sendai Framework. Outcomes were recommendations for alliances and partnerships to link researchers and government across disaster risk reduction and health to inform policy and practice

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - 'We needed help, but we weren't helpless': the
           community experience of community recovery after natural disaster in
           Australia
    • Abstract: Moreton, Margaret
      This article shares key findings from a study of community recovery in rural and regional communities affected by fire, flood or cyclone across eastern Australia

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Social recovery for the elderly: learnings from
           south-west Queensland
    • Abstract: Whitton, Shona
      Over past decades in Australia the occurrence of natural disasters has seen the development of sophisticated disaster management responses. We have seen the development of systems for immediate disaster response, the restoration of public assets, and for longer-term human and social recovery

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Community recovery: six ideas to close
           'intent-to-capability' gaps
    • Abstract:
      The information in this paper draws on the experiences in 2011 as Chief of Operations and Plans at the Queensland Reconstruction Authority and in 2017 as State Recovery Coordinator for the Queensland Government. Deployments to Malaysia, Syria, Lebanon, East Timor, Kuwait, Iraq, Solomon Islands and Afghanistan also inform the six ideas on community recovery from natural disasters presented

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Integrated emergency risk management: building
           resilience in NSW communities
    • Abstract: Thompson, Matthew; Meggos, Danielle
      NSW communities are exposed to natural and technological hazards that threaten the safety and wellbeing of residents and cause significant death, destruction and disruption. Natural disasters alone have killed 337 people in NSW between 1990 and 2015. Between the 1966-67 and 2013-14 financial years, natural disasters in NSW resulted in normalised insurances losses of $22.4 billion.1 While the direct economic cost of these events is unknown, it is likely to be two or three times this figure

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - The impact of the Lancefield-Cobaw fire on community
           recovery
    • Abstract: Brown, Nathalie
      In October 2015, a Department of Environment Land Water and Planning (DELWP) planned burn in the Cobaw Forest, north-west of Melbourne, breached containment lines and formed the Lancefield-Cobaw fire. The fire burnt 3000 hectares through public and private land, destroyed four houses and many outbuildings, affected 140 properties including 123 km of fences and caused significant disruption to Lancefield, Cobaw, Benloch and surrounding communities. A multi-agency recovery effort began before the fire was contained

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - A monitoring and evaluation framework for disaster
           recovery programs
    • Abstract: Verlin, Aaron
      In recent years, there has been substantial research into how we can plan for and more effectively recover from disasters. This national discussion on better recovery outcomes is particularly important given the increasing frequency, severity and cost of disasters

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Disaster resilience: from the global to the local
    • Abstract: Bhagani, Hansika
      On International Day for Disaster Reduction (IDDR) 13 October, the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC gathered nearly 50 emergency management practitioners and researchers in Sydney to reflect on how at-risk communities are reducing their exposure to disasters

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - 2017 Resilient Australia Awards
    • Abstract: Douglas, Jacqui
      The 2017 National Resilient Australia Awards were characterised by success built through collaboration. The City of Mandurah in Western Australia saw the regional reach in a project officer's vision to increase preparedness in a community of interest. Two time zones away, Sydney's St. Ives North Public School brought community, students and emergency services together to teach STEM through the lens of bushfire risk and management. In Airlie Beach, Queensland, an image of a family's perseverance and strength in the face of disaster became a symbol of community resilience

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Diversity in Disaster: Communities and emergency
           management building resilience
    • Abstract:
      Every year people and communities across Australia experience emergencies and natural disasters.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Beyond the 2009 Gippsland bushfires: Acknowledgment
           and young rural adults' recovery
    • Abstract: Victoria, Moe; Victoria, Churchill; Victoria, Melbourne
      In 2009, four major bushfires destroyed vast areas of Gippsland in eastern Victorian including the areas around Delburn, Bunyip, Churchill and Wilsons Promontory, and are collectively known as the 2009 Gippsland bushfires. This paper explores how young adults in the rural areas are recovering from these bushfires and what psychosocial supports they perceive assists their recovery. A diversity of recovery experiences and needs were expressed reflecting that young adults are not a homogenous group. However, there were commonalities in their stories and they described the bushfires as being the most defining moment of their lives. Participants also reported low engagement with recovery supports, being 'out of the loop' when recovery information and support was distributed. Because young adults are often in the process of moving to or from the area because of life transitions such as relationships, jobs, study, or travel, participants reported exclusion from 'placebased' recovery supports. They reported ongoing emotional and physical health issues and exacerbation of chronic illness that had not been sufficiently acknowledged. Despite challenges in accessing important recovery supports, young adults in this study are moving forward with hope and optimism

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Issue 1 - Engaging vulnerable populations in preparedness and
           response: a local government context
    • Abstract:
      Engaging communities proactively in preparedness and response is key to building a cohesive and resilient community. In Australia, responsibility for community engagement often falls to local government. While community-level engagement in emergency and disaster management is necessary, two demographic groups: low socio-economic; and culturally and linguistically diverse populations (hereafter referred to as vulnerable population groups) are of particular interest from an emergency and disaster management planning perspective as they are often exposed to, and are least prepared for, emergency and disaster events. This is due to factors including a lack of housing affordability, low literacy levels and diversity in cultural backgrounds. A community survey was conducted in Logan, a city south of Brisbane, to better understand the challenges of engaging vulnerable population groups in preparedness and response. The survey identified a trend of passivity towards preparedness. It also found that information from traditional mass media and family members was preferred and trusted. Based on these findings, a two-pronged approach is recommended that combines the use of traditional mass media and digital media with proactive face-to-face engagement to improve outcomes

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 11:19:57 GMT
       
 
 
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