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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 400 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 400 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription  
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover Australian Journal of Emergency Management
  [SJR: 0.401]   [H-I: 18]   [10 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1324-1540
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [400 journals]
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Buffone, Joe
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Warm and dry lead up to fire season
    • Abstract: Bruce, David
      Most of Australia experienced autumn and winter conditions drier and warmer than average this year. In southern Australia in particular, the four months from May to August 2017 saw record dry conditions.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Priorities to guide hazards research
    • Abstract: Bruce, David
      The most significant natural hazard emergency management issues Australia faces have been drawn up by leaders from the sector to guide research over the next decade.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Australian support for international disasters
    • Abstract: Goodwin, Alan
      In 2017, the province of British Columbia in Canada experienced its worst fire season in history. More than one million hectares were burnt, across hundreds of fires. The state of emergency originally declared on 7 July 2017 was extended three times.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - A conversation with Craig Fugate: The importance of
           asking the right questions
    • Abstract: Douglas, Jacqui
      Former US FEMA administrator Craig Fugate recently shared insights from his career with practitioners and policymakers in Brisbane, Canberra and Melbourne, hosted by AIDR. In sessions delivered with compelling narrative and passionate advocacy, the discussion repeatedly wound its way back to the point of 'so what': the need to work backwards from an outcome to ask the right questions, and prioritise information from 'noise.'

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - New approaches to response, recovery and resilience
    • Abstract: Fugate, Craig
      As emergency managers, we plan for the unexpected. That's what we do. But when we look at the world around us - no matter what country - we see that we are not making our lives any easier.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Exercise Exchange Student: Student skills on fire
    • Abstract: Davie, Susan; Morrison, Ian
      In July 2017, 25 Year 10 students from the Macedon Ranges in Victoria traded their school uniforms for State Control Centre tabards to put their emergency skills to the test.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Connecting cities: Sydney embraces 100 Resilient
           Cities
    • Abstract: Douglas, Jacqui
      100 Resilient Cities, pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation (100RC) is dedicated to helping cities around the world become more resilient to the physical, social and economic challenges that are a growing part of the 21st century.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - EMPA conferences Sydney and New Zealand 2017
    • Abstract: Bartholomew, Vanessa
      The power of story telling was a consistent thread throughout the Emergency Media and Public Affairs (EMPA) conferences, held in Sydney in June and in Wellington in August 2017.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Building an animal-ready community: A community-led
           initiative to improve preparedness, planning and safety for animals and
           their owners
    • Abstract: Bickerstaff, Fiona; McCarthy, Megan; Bigelow, Jenny
      In Australia, 62 per cent of households have pets, which presents opportunities for activities that incorporate planning and response for pets and animals during times of emergency and in the recovery stages that follow.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - New handbooks for the handbook collection
    • Abstract: Lamont, Amanda
      During an emergency, information can mean the difference between life and death. Emergency broadcasts that issue evacuation orders, warnings and information that help to prepare and protect the public have primacy in an unfolding situation.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - North Australia and Rangelands fire information
    • PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Understanding community-led resilience: The Jakarta
           floods experience
    • Abstract: Rahmayati, Yenny; Parnell, Matthew; Himmayani, Vivien
      Disasters contribute to the complexity of urban problems such as water and sanitation, waste management and infrastructure damage. For some countries illegal settlements, slum areas, urbanisation, internal migration and employment dislocation exacerbate these problems. A common urban disaster that occurs in many Asian and Pacific countries is flooding, especially during the rainy season. Floods in Jakarta affect vulnerable communities situated on the riverbank of the Ciliwung River. Temporary shelters have been used in response, but they have not answered the needs of these communities. While many studies argue that socio-economic factors are significant contributors to community resilience, this study found that cultural and historical connections, 'connecting to place', was a significant factor that helps people survive and adapt. As such, relocating communities to safer locations is not always the answer and may contribute to other problems. This study supports designs for temporary shelters and facilities following flood disasters through community-led design processes that meet the needs of communities without disconnection from place, temporarily or permanently.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Analysis of rapid damage assessment data following
           severe windstorm events
    • Abstract: Smith, Daniel J; Krupar, Richard J; Henderson, David J; Mason, Matthew S
      The Cyclone Testing Station (CTS) and partners have conducted forensic damage assessments in Australia following severe windstorm events for over four decades. The information collected is used for building science research that provides the evidence base needed for improvements to building codes and development of damage mitigation solutions. The Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) operate Rapid Damage Assessment (RDA) teams in the aftermath of major disasters (e.g. cyclone and bushfire) to collect and disseminate information on extent of damage to buildings in impacted communities. These data enables focused and coordinated response in the immediate aftermath of an event and better planning for event recovery. This paper explores the use of QFES RDA datasets in analysing the damaging effects of severe windstorm events. Two case studies are discussed: a supercell that hit Brisbane on 27 November 2014 and Tropical Cyclone Debbie that made landfall along the northern Queensland coastline in March 2017. Where possible, damage data are combined with hazard information (dual-Doppler radar horizontal wind fields) and their relationship is investigated. The analysis demonstrates that RDA data are not only useful in response and recovery phases, but also have value for research aiming to better understand building failures and reduce damage in future events.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Developing organisational resilience: Organisational
           mindfulness and mindful organising
    • Abstract: Klockner, Karen
      This paper discusses the latest model and theoretical understanding around the concept of organisational resilience as it relates to organisational readiness to handle and manage complex socio-technical system fluctuations. The five key principles of organisational mindfulness are discussed along with what is seen as a nexus between the five principles and modern era complex system leadership theory. Suggestions are offered on how to enhance the collective mindfulness principles through strategic leadership efforts across the workforce, with a view to enabling organisations to become more resilient.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - From research outcome to agency change: Mapping a
           learning trajectory of opportunities and challenges
    • Abstract: Owen, Christine; Krusel, Noreen; Bearman, Chris; Brooks, Benjamin
      A key theme within the Bushfire and Natural Hazard CRC Cognitive Tools and Decision Making project is to understand how practitioners learn from research outcomes and how they can use them. Translating research outcomes into practice is a complex process and can be beyond the control of the project team and end-user representatives. Using 'lessons' terminology, it is suggested that observations and insights can be identified from reviewing research outcomes. However, the lessons that are derived from insights are only 'learnt' when they instigate sustainable change (Commonwealth of Australia 2013). To create the best conditions for organisational learning a literature review of learning lessons in emergency management was conducted. Practitioners were also interviewed to understand the contexts and challenges faced in implementing research insights and in facilitating change. This paper presents two studies that examine aspects of organisational learning. In the first study, the challenges to learning from action and experience and from reflection and planning are examined. In the second study, the systems for learning used in emergency services organisations are considered and a preliminary theory of research utilisation maturity is proposed. The initiatives reported help to maximise the value of research and supports innovation through utilisation.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Narrowing the awareness-action gap: Cultivating
           fire-fitness as a social norm through public policy initiatives
    • Abstract: Westcott, Rachel
      This study proposes innovative ways for routine fire-fitness' to become a social norm to narrow the bushfire awareness-preparedness gap and thus save human lives. It identifies new, data-driven preparedness policies to help improve human safety in all-hazards emergencies. Public preparedness for natural hazard events requires continual improvement. Addressing this with innovative public health policy and practices aims to more effectively manage the impact of fire and worsening severe weather events on human populations.

      The Lower Eyre Peninsula in South Australia was selected as a research site for several reasons including its recent and severe fire history. Data were collected from stakeholders, namely emergency responders and animal owners, to explore, problem-solve and arrive at practical and achievable answers to cultivate a culture of preparedness as a routine activity. Data analysis generated three initiatives with the potential to achieve this, being a new type of workplace leave, financial incentives linked to municipal charges and reviewing management of firebreaks and crop placement in the modern environment of 'conservation farming'. These represent medium to long-term changes to public health and safety policy that can help to make 'fire-fitness' a social norm.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Integrating intangible values in economic analyses of
           flood mitigation: A case study of the Brown Hill and Keswick creeks
           catchment in Adelaide
    • Abstract: Florec, Veronique; Chalak, Morteza; Hailu, Atakelty
      This study undertakes an economic analysis of flood mitigation options for a high flood-risk catchment in Adelaide. To date, economic analyses have focused primarily on estimating the tangible (market) costs and benefits of mitigation strategies and have largely ignored the intangible (non-market) costs and benefits. This analysis improves upon previous studies by conducting a benefit-cost analysis that incorporates the intangible costs and benefits of mitigation. The benefit transfer method was used to include intangible values in the analysis. It was found that, for this particular case study, the inclusion of intangible values does not change the attractiveness of the mitigation options evaluated and the benefit-cost ratios remain below one.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Reviewing high-risk and high-consequence decisions:
           Finding a safer way
    • Abstract: Eburn, Michael; Dovers, Steve
      This paper critiques the adversarial processes used in inquiries following significant natural hazard events, in particular bushfires. Shortcomings identified with current practices suggest post-event inquiries should adopt restorative practices rather than traditional adversarial procedures. Restorative justice is a concept established in the area of criminal law. It is argued that the use of restorative practices could assist in formulating inquiries that would assist all parties to collectively resolve how to deal with a aftermath of the disaster and deal with its implications for the future. Restorative practices would enable a focus on both short- and long-term recovery.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Crisis Proofing: How to save your company from
           disaster [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bains, Amara
      Review(s) of: Crisis Proofing: how to save your company from disaster, by Tony Jaques, Published by Oxford University Press 2016, ISBN 9780190303365.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - AJEM peer review of research
    • PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Country fire authority establishes an evidence base to
           guide future leadership development
    • Abstract: Owen, Christine; Martin, Fiona
      The Country Fire Authority (Victoria) evidence-based foundation and framework for leadership targets leadership development needs and opportunities for personnel engaged in incident management and those engaged in business-as-usual activities.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Maintaining communication during relief and recovery
           efforts: The ADF public affairs capability
    • Abstract: Bickerstaff, Fiona
      During an emergency, information can mean the difference between life and death. Emergency broadcasts that issue evacuation orders, warnings and information that help to prepare and protect the public have primacy in an unfolding situation.

      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:50:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Defining success in bushfire management: Critical
           moments in the 2012-13 ACT bushfire season
    • Abstract: Leavesley, Adam J; Cooper, Neil; Kendall, Dylan; Corrigan, Tony; Gale, Malcolm; McNamara, Brett; Mallela, Jennie-Ann
      The 2012-13 Australian Capital Territory fire season saw no loss of life, no major property loss and minimal environmental damage. It was therefore successful according to the main aims of bushfire management. This outcome hinged on a few critical moments when, due to a combination of strategy and good fortune, things went right. This case study demonstrates how influential chance can be in determining the outcome of bushfires and this in turn begs the question: should agencies be held responsible for factors that are beyond human control' It is proposed that holding agencies responsible for outcomes that are not entirely within their control, acts to reduce community resilience because it implicitly removes the onus on individuals to take personal responsibility; a vital component for good outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Communicating bushfire risk in the Blue Mountains: A
           case study of the 'fire stories' film
    • Abstract: Chapple, Rosalie; Blignault, Ilse; Fitzgerald, Anne
      This article presents a case study of bushfire risk communication in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales, Australia is one of the most bushfire-prone areas in the world. A documentary film, 'Fire Stories - A Lesson in Time was locally produced to raise community awareness of the risk of fire. The film presented a devastating bushfire event for townships in the Blue Mountains in 1957. The film was released in 2013 just months before devastating fires again struck the region. The impact of viewing the film in relation to the 2013 fires was evaluated. The film was found to have contributed to community resilience in areas of fire preparedness and response. This evaluation highlights the need for alternative, community-based approaches to enhance the effectiveness of community bushfire safety endeavours.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Increasing hazard and risk awareness
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Blue green algae in the Murray Darling Basin: A case
           for Commonwealth leadership
    • Abstract: Clune, Tim; Eburn, Michael
      Climate change is a material threat to Australia's economic, social and environmental interests. Strong emergency management frameworks that enable agile responses to these threats are an important element to ensure a resilient economy. This paper considers recent blue green algae outbreaks in the Murray Darling Basin and considers some of the limitations to effective prevention, preparation, response and recovery. This paper proposes an alternative model that includes the responsibilities of the Commonwealth and the state and territory governments in the management of the basin's resources.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Non-tradtonal health threats: Redefining the emergency
           management landscape
    • Abstract: Cuthbertson, Joseph; Archer, Frank; Robertson, Andy; Rodruguez-Llanes, Jose M
      The study of disaster risk is primarily aimed at identifying who may be at risk (vulnerable populations) from specific events (causes) so as to prevent and/or facilitate timely responses to them. These causes are predominantly defined b historical data rather than from forecasting potential risks. Many of the threats to health and security today are transnational, whether it is the spread of an infectious disease, migration of displaced people, or the widespread impact of a weather event. There is a paucity of discussion and literature that attempts to describe new and emerging causes of disasters, or the potential impact of these events. Reasons for this may include perceptions of these causes as being non-traditional threats and, therefore, not readily interpreted as causes of disasters and thus not as disasters at all. They may include climate change, social disruptions such as terrorism, economic crisis, drug trafficking or increased drug usage. The risks and impacts are changing because of societal and social change, economic changes and rapidly changing technology and interconnectedness. Traditional views of disaster are limiting, as they do not include high-impact events that are not associated with emergency service responses. The health consequences of these events are complex to understand. Nevertheless, careful analysis of these events reveals alignment of their human impact against established criteria that define disasters. The aim of this paper is to examine emerging causes of disasters and non-traditional health threats, consider their relationship to contemporary emergency management risk assessment, and consider what is required for emergency management to adapt and confront this emerging reality.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Developing communicators will improve prevention,
           response and recovery
    • Abstract: Ryan, Barbara
      Communication glitches in disaster management stubbornly remain on 20 per cent of total operational problems in Australian emergency response. This made the communication teaching team at the University of Southern Queensland think that something needed to change.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Developing a support program for the bereaved:
           Personal reflections from the Christchurch earthquake experience
    • Abstract: Wills, Jolie
      This reflective article provides one practitioner's personal experiences and learnings gained from the process of designing and implementing a support program for those people bereaved by the 2011 Christchurch earthquake. It highlights some key principles and approaches underlying the program and some of the challenges and opportunities identified to help people after a disaster. While findings reflect the author's personal views, links are made to other research and guidance to reinforce key messages.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Lessons in providing psychosocial support: A review of
           three post-disaster programs
    • Abstract: Eyre, Anne
      Despite great advances in emergency management, we live in a world where the incidence of individual and collective loss, bereavement and trauma and the need for post-disaster support is as great as ever. The provision of formal and informal psychosocial support is not new. However, some interesting models of post-disaster support have emerged following recent disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis and deliberate acts of violence including terrorism. This paper highlights the implications for future psychosocial support provision as identified through a review of three post-disaster psychosocial support programs. Following a review of evidence- based principles, guidance on the organisation and delivery of support is contrasted with recent evidence. This suggests that bereaved people and survivors can fall through gaps in post-disaster support and struggle to access peer- support services. Those who have received support have provided feedback to benefit others. The aim of this review is to assist the sharing of lessons and implications identified b participants of an evaluation and review of three bespoke support programs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - The value of peer support groups following terrorism:
           Reflections following the September 11 and Paris attacks
    • Abstract: Watkins, Jelena
      This paper discusses the role of peer support groups for victims of terrorism and the implications for including this provision in disaster pschosocial planning and response. Peer support here is defined as mutual support b people who have been through the same or similar experience and can help each other through giving emotional and practical support and advocacy. Building on the evidence that social connectedness and peer support are important for trauma relief and recoveru, different types of peer support groups are described and are illustrated through two case studies. This paper reviews the creation, facilitation and contribution of two United Kingdom (UK) peer support groups initiated after the 11 September attacks in 2001 and the Paris attacks in 2015.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Routines are integral to stabilising emergency event
           disruption
    • Abstract: Younger, David
      Exposure to emergency events can have life-changing consequences. Although the majority of community members make a full recovery following an emergency, a common theme is of disruption to pre-existing routines. Various aspects of life can be affected as 'normal' routines are replaced with improvised crisis routines. Individuals are at risk of compromised health and wellbeing while community cohesion may be reduced. For those involved in providing psychosocial recovery services, it is important to assist affected community members to recognise, minimise and adapt to the effects of emergency event disruption. This article examines the role of routines in stabilising emergency disruption with reference to the epidemic thunderstorm asthma event that hit Melbourne in November 2016.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Lessons from Cyclone Debbie: How important is
           preparation'
    • Abstract: Cullinan, Susan
      What does being prepared for a disaster look like' Red Cross asked three people how they prepared for Cyclone Debbie and whether they would do anything different next time.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Call for papers: Disaster recovery
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Cascading and complex network failures
    • Abstract: Bates, John
      The extreme weather event that affected South Australia from 28 September to 5 October 2016 provided an opportunity to explore the impacts of the events themselves and more importantly, how the consequences of damage and disruption caused by the force of the storms (a combination of thunderstorms, destructive winds, large hailstones and heavy rain) impacted on the South Australian community. AIDR's Cascading and Complex Network Failures Forum explored the South Australian extreme weather event on 7 April 2017 through a range of guest speakers and panel sessions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Engagement matters
    • Abstract: Bhagani, Hansika
      In May the Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience co-hosted a two-day workshop focused on community engagement for disaster preparedness, response and recovery. Workshops were delivered by researchers and practitioners from a range of organisations including Tasmania Fire Service, QFES, RMIT University, Victoria SES, NSW Rural Fire Service and a keynote address from Tim Muirhead of CSD Network.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Teaching emergency and disaster management in
           Australia: Standards for higher education providers
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Gerry; Rego, Joanna; Ingham, Valerie; Brooks, Ben; Cottrell, Alison; Manock, Ian; Surjan, Akhilesh; Mayne, Lidia; Webb, Chris; Maguire, Brian; Crawley, Heather; Mooney, Jane; Toloo, Sam; Archer, Frank
      Over recent years there has been a strong public perception of the increased impact of disasters worldwide. This increase is compounded by the effects of climate change, population growth, the interconnectivity and complexity of modern societies, urbanisation and an increase in the proportion of vulnerable members of society.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction:
           Supporting international frameworks through science and technology
    • Abstract: Ronan, Kevin R; Tofa, Matalena; Petal, Marla
      The recent United Nations (UN) Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), held in Cancun, Mexico from 22-26 May 2017, is the fifth version of a biennial meeting of researchers, practitioners and policymakers. Starting in 2007, the meetings reflect UN-level efforts to reduce escalating hazards and disaster risks worldwide.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Sendai Framework: Demonstrating progress
    • Abstract: Bates, John
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - New natural hazards science for Australia
    • Abstract: Maddock, Nathan
      An exciting series of new research has begun at the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, with nine new projects now underway. Joining the existing platform of natural hazards science these new projects cover mental health and wellbeing, coastal management, emergency management capability, risk communication, land-use planning, sustainable volunteering and recovery post-disaster. Marking the next phase of national research into natural hazards, the projects will support fire, emergency services and land managers as they work to prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from natural disasters.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Reducing the impacts of cyclones through technology: A
           case study of Cyclone Debbie and the Sunshine Coast Disaster Hub
    • Abstract: Gallina, John
      Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie wreaked havoc on the Sunshine Coast in March 2017. On Wednesday 29 March, the heavy rains began and by the next morning, Sunshine Coast roads were going underwater. With that rainfall came strong destructive winds of up to 108km per hour. On Thursday 30 March, all schools in the region were closed, along with beaches, shopping centres, the suspension of train services and 40 road closures. The SES and Sunshine Coast Local Disaster Management group responded to 547 calls for help in the region. 32,000 homes and businesses across the Sunshine Coast lost power during the event. By Friday 31st March, conditions were easing and the long road to recovery began.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Update of national guidance on flood risk management:
           The Handbook 7 collection
    • Abstract: McLuckie, Duncan
      The recent devastating impacts of floods in different areas of Australia highlights the risks faced by communities when they interact with floods. It provides a demonstration that the occupation of floodplains, whether due to the legacy of former decisions or as a result of future decisions, comes with an inherent flood risk that needs to be managed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Bates, John
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Disaster risk management: Insights from the US
    • Abstract: Gissing, Andrew
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu: Learning from the low death
           toll
    • Abstract: Handmer, John; Iveson, Hannah
      Cyclone Pam was one of the strongest cyclones to hit the south-west Pacific. In 2015 it struck some of the most populated parts of Vanuatu, resulting in extensive damage. Remarkably, only 11 deaths related to the cyclone were recorded. There has been some media attention to this good news and the logical questions are: why was the death toll low, and are there lessons for other countries' This paper examines the cyclone effects and explores possible reasons for the relatively low loss of life. Considerations include effective warnings and the high degree of self-reliance within communities, as well as aspects of the cyclone, in particular, the absence of a storm surge and major flooding in the area.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Emergency preparedness through community sector
           engagement in the blue mountains
    • Abstract: Redshaw, Sarah; Ingham, Valerie; Hicks, John; Millynn, Jacquie
      There is an expectation that communities exposed to potential disaster events will make preparations for themselves (COAG 2011). However, communities are frequently underprepared for the onset and results of disaster and a default response is to rely on emergency services organisations. This reliance is exacerbated by the presence within communities of highly vulnerable individuals who, because of age, infirmity or isolation, require additional levels of assistance by responders. Partnerships between community organisations and emergency services organisations can build preparedness by using programs that increase emergency response awareness. This paper provides a study of two partnership programs established by the community and emergency services sectors in the Blue Mountains, New South Wales. These programs successfully raised the level of emergency preparedness and community resilience to disasters.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - A community-based disaster coordination framework for
           effective disaster preparedness and response
    • Abstract: Hashemipour, Mehdi; Stuban, Steven MF; Dever, Jason R
      A primary challenge during disaster response is allocating the right task forces to the right locations at the right time. The disaster field is a dynamic environment, and, ideally, search and rescue tasks should be completed as soon as possible. The disaster response team should take advantage of local volunteers who are willing to part in the disaster response.

      Most preparedness systems for disaster response and coordination are oriented toward a large-scale view of disaster events. Natural and man-made events have increased in number and severity and adding new tools, technologies and simulation models to existing national preparedness systems improves resource coordination at the community level. These methods help emergency managers effectively coordinate available community resources with the objective of minimising the number of casualties and reducing the operation-response completion time.

      This research describes a framework, the Disaster Multi-Agent Coordination Simulation System, which is a decision-support system. The system helps response managers in a community-based response operation who want to test and evaluate all possible team design configurations and select the highest-performing team in the pre-phase of disaster response.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Microtasking: Redefining crowdsourcing practices in
           emergency management
    • Abstract: Poblet, Marta; Fitzpatrick, Mari; Chhetri, Prem
      This paper examines the roles, types and forms of virtual microtasking for emergency information management in order to better understand collective intelligence mechanisms and the potential for logistics response. Using three case studies this paper reviews the emerging body of knowledge in microtasking practices in emergency management to demonstrate how crowd-sourced information is captured and processed during emergency events to provide critical intelligence throughout the emergency cycle. It also considers the impact of virtual information collection, collation and management on traditional humanitarian operations and relief efforts.

      Based on the case studies the emergent forms of microtasking for emergency information management were identified. Opportunities for continuities, adaptations and innovations are explained. The contribution of virtual microtasking extends to all supply chain strategic domains to help maximise resource use and optimise service delivery response.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Youth justice conferencing for youth misuse of fire: A
           child-centred disaster risk reduction mechanism
    • Abstract: Pooley, Kamarah
      Youth misuse of fire is a multifaceted, complex, and dangerous phenomenon. In response to this problem, Fire and Rescue NSW and Juvenile Justice NSW established a memorandum of understanding to facilitate firefighter involvement in the provision of fire safety education during Youth Justice Conferencing for young people who commit fire-related offences. Despite being used for over a decade, conferencing for youth misuse of fire is yet to attract theoretical analysis or empirical investigation. To partially fill this void, a theoretical analysis of Youth Justice Conferencing for youth misuse of fire was conducted. Comparative analysis revealed that child-centred disaster risk reduction offers a scaffold to explain and justify the mechanisms operating in Youth Justice Conferencing for youth misuse of fire. This theoretical alignment has implications for both Youth Justice Conferencing and child- centred disaster risk reduction.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Incident management in Australasia: Lessons learnt
           from emergency responses [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ingham, Valerie
      Review(s) of: Incident management in Australasia: Lessons learnt from emergency responses, Edited by Stuart Ellis and Kent MacCarter, CSIRO Publishing, Clayton, Victoria, 9781486306176.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Community participation in emergency pIanning: NSW
           state emergency service case study
    • Abstract: Webber, David; Gissing, Andrew; Dufty, Neil; Bird, Deanne
      There is growing recognition within the Australian emergency management sector of the need to engage communities core partners, where they are considered equals in risk-related decision-making processes that affect them (Attorney-General's Department 2013). There is, however, little guidance available to practitioners about how best to involve communities in risk reduction processes and little evidence on which to build approaches. To address these gaps, the New South Wales State Emergency Service (NSW SES) instigated a pilot program to investigate and evaluate methods to involve communities in flood emergency planning within three NSW communities. This paper outlines the pilot process, the design of programs and evaluation results.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Reflections on Tasmania's black Tuesday 1967
    • Abstract: Bhagani, Hansika
      ResilienceThe worst bushfires in Tasmania's history, the Black Tuesday bushfires of southern Tasmania, involved 110 separate fire fronts that tore through 2640 square kilometres of land across the region. Many small towns were burned to the ground. The fires claimed 62 lives in a single day with 900 injured and thousands of people left homeless. In terms of loss of property and loss of life, Black Tuesday is considered to be one of Australia's worst disasters.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Queensland IGEM: Results achieved so far
    • Abstract: Mackenzie, Iain
      The vision for the Queensland Office of the Inspector-General Emergency Management (IGEM) is to be a catalyst for excellence in emergency management. Central to achieving this is a genuine need for commitment to authentic and thorough engagement - from the ground up. This is essential for real change and enhanced confidence in Queensland's disaster management arrangements.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - The Australian natural disaster resilience index
    • Abstract: Parsons, Melissa; Morley, Philip
      Society has always been susceptible to natural hazards. While the occurrence of these events generally cannot be prevented, the risks can often be minimised and the impacts on people and property reduced.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Enhancing emergency warnings
    • Abstract: Maddock, Nathan
      With the multitude of warnings issued when an emergency hits, how can emergency services ensure their critical safety advice is received and acted upon, rather than dismissed as noise' Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC research undertaken through the Queensland University of Technology is helping emergency services warn communities when danger strikes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - 50 years of firebombing operations
    • Abstract: Kightly, James
      On 6 February 2017, a small ceremony at Benambra in Victoria marked the 50th anniversary of the first organised operational firebombing flights in Australia. Back in 1967, two Piper Pawnees airplanes contracted from Alpine Aviation made the first operational drops of fire retardant on a small fire caused by lightning-strike in north-eastern Victoria. It was what has become a classic application of firebombing.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Handmer, John
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Research helps fire protection in Bangladesh
    • Abstract: Bruce, Dylan
      BruceResearch into how Australian children are involved in bushfire preparations around the home is being applied to disaster preparedness in slum communities of Bangladesh.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Enriching leadership of volunteers in the emergency
           services
    • Abstract: Jones, Michael; Berry, Yoke
      While some of us spend lazy hot summer days in the pool, thousands of volunteer firefighters and support crews battle fires and floods across the country. And it's not just in summer. Emergency services volunteers are there for us rain, hail or shine; 365 days a year.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Building skills for psychological recovery after
           disaster
    • Abstract: Bhagani, Hansika
      ResilienceIn the aftermath of a disaster up to 20 per cent of people affected can suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While response times vary across countries and across disasters, the Psychological First Aid (PFA) model is well-known and well-used in emergencies. The need for mental health treatment for those who continue to suffer beyond the immediate aftermath of a disaster is also well recognised.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Virtual reality for a new climate: Red Cross
           innovations in risk management
    • Abstract: Suarez, Pablo
      How can we help people and organisations experience the humanitarian consequences of climate change and extreme events' The Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre has worked with partners to explore virtual reality (VR) to blend playful interactivity with innovative approaches to data visualisation for risk management.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Victoria's Survive and Thrive program
    • Abstract: Hayward, Jane
      In the eight years since the Black Saturday bushfires devastated our community, my staff and I have faced many challenges in our small school. Many of these were what we'd have expected to deal with post-disaster, but many were beyond what we'd ever considered. We managed all that came with being displaced and operating from our temporary setting, while dealing with the challenge of rebuilding our school.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Educate the child, educate the community
    • Abstract: Maddock, Nathan
      Primary schools students across NSW are now front and centre in state-wide bushfire plans, based on research that identified the importance of involving children in active bushfire preparations for the benefit of the whole community.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Bates, John
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Live to Tell: Surviving a natural disaster
    • Abstract: Jones, Freya
      What does it mean to survive a natural disaster' To mark International Day for Disaster Reduction on 13 October, the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC hosted a public event to garner perspectives on disaster risk reduction.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Legislative requirements and emergency management
           practitioner expectations of preparedness in New Zealand schools
    • Abstract: Tipler, Karlene; Tarrant, Ruth; Tuffin, Keith; Johnston, David
      School safety is a priority within international disaster risk reduction efforts. Providing a safe learning environment and continued access to education after an emergency can limit impacts on students, their families and the community. This study explores New Zealand legislative requirements and emergency management practitioners' expectations of school-based emergency management efforts to identify what preparedness activities schools are expected to undertake to ensure the physical and emotional safety of their students in emergencies. The study combines a review of New Zealand legislation, policy, guidelines and resources related to school safety and emergency management with interview data from three emergency management practitioners. The key finding was that legislation was mostly generic for New Zealand workplaces. It was broad and, at times ambiguous, and schools are not provided with clear disaster risk reduction guidance. The establishment of clear emergency preparedness benchmarks for schools would help address deficiencies and ambiguities identified within the existing legislation. In addition, the development of standard operating procedures for core emergency response actions, such as lockdowns, evacuations and family reunification could provide a consistent approach to school-based preparedness efforts, thereby ensuring student safety.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - The significance of communication in emergency
           management: What's changed since 2010'
    • Abstract: Ryan, Barbara
      In 2010, Ryan and Matheson (2010) compiled evidence to quantify the importance of communication activities to emergency management. The study involved a comprehensive content analysis of emergency incident and emergency exercise debriefing sessions and reports spanning 2003 to 2008. Six years on, this 2015 study replicates that work to determine the current significance of communication in emergency management. It also identifies trends in issues that occur during emergency events. This study considers recommendations and findings from 22 reviews of recent disaster events and training exercises from around Australia. Using content analysis, 20.4 per cent of the findings relate to issues with communicating with communities. This represents an increase of 1.3 per cent on the 2010 study. Resourcing, skills in social media, and community consultation and engagement feature in the study results.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - National gender and emergency management guidelines
    • Abstract: Parkinson, Debra; Duncan, Alyssa; Joyce, Kiri
      Men and women experience emergencies differently and the effects of disaster events on them are different. Issues related to gender are known to compound the already damaging effects of disasters. Emergency plans in Australian states and territories rarely reflect these differential impacts and emergency planning does not yet take a gendered approach. The Attorney-General's Department recognised this critical gap and funded a project to develop national guidelines for gender and emergency management.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Capability enhancement through disaster management
           training: The Queensland experience
    • Abstract: Zsombok, Jane
      Disaster management education and training is an essential component of capability enhancement. It is one of the activities undertaken to maintain and enhance Queensland disaster management arrangements. The Queensland Disaster Management Act 2003 provides the legislative requirement for those involved in disaster operations to be appropriately trained. To support these requirements, training for Queensland disaster management stakeholders is undertaken in accordance with the Queensland Disaster Management Training Framework.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Hunter and Central Coast community disaster resilience
           forums - June 2016
    • Abstract: Dufty, Neil
      Emergency events in the Hunter and Central Coast regions of NSW over 2015-2016 showed there was an immediate need to improve how communities plan for and recover from such events. Community service organisations, businesses and primary producers needed to fully understand the roles of emergency services and plan ahead to maintain continuity during disasters.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Science shows climate change impact in the Pacific
    • Abstract: Kelman, Ilan
      We often read in the media, and sometimes in scientific journals that Pacific islands are sinking and disappearing due to climate change; an immense threat to our security. Concerns and fear about 'climate change refugees' overwhelm us, as do visions of communities slipping below the waves. However, science provides a different picture and tackles the mantra of drowning islands from both physical science and social science perspectives.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Resilient Australia awards 2016
    • Abstract: Bhagani, Hansika
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Tools for monitoring teams in emergency management:
           EMBAM and TBM
    • Abstract: Bearman, Chris; Rainbird, Sophia; Brooks, Benjamin; Owen, Christine; Curnin, Steve
      Effective teamwork is an important component of emergency management. However, from time-to-time teamwork may break down, particularly in a complex system like emergency management. It is important that people who have operational oversight of teams are able to detect if a team has a problem and can help the team modify its functioning. A literature review identified methods of monitoring teams from the position of operational oversight. Based on this review two methods of team monitoring were chosen for further evaluation. A preliminary evaluation study of each tool during a simulated emergency exercise suggests they both have potential. This is the first stage of an ongoing research program where team monitoring tools will be further developed using iterative design cycles of development and evaluation. In this way methods of monitoring teams from the position of operational oversight that are effective in an emergency management context can be developed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Community understanding of tsunami risk and warnings
           in Australia
    • Abstract: Paton, Douglas; Johnston, David; Rossiter, Katelyn; Buergelt, Petra; Richards, Andrew; Anderson, Sarah
      The development of the Australian Tsunami Warning System (ATWS) was in recognition of the fact that the Australian coastline faces some 8000 km of active tectonic plate boundary capable of generating a tsunami that could reach Australia in two to four hours. The work reported in this paper complements an earlier questionnaire study (Paton, Frandsen & Johnston 2010) with detailed interview data to inform understanding of respondents' awareness of tsunami risk and their willingness (or lack of) to respond to a rare but possible natural hazard. A belief that no tsunami events had occurred in Australia (at least since colonial times) and that major causes (e.g. seismic and volcanic) were absent, supported the view of participants that tsunami is a non-existent or a very low-probability hazard for Australia. This view was reinforced by the lack of discussion of tsunami by government or in the media. The ensuing sense of 'risk rejection' resulted in respondents believing that no resources or effort should be directed to tsunami risk reduction. The data raises the possibility that the ATWS may not be fully effective unless action is taken to increase tsunami risk acceptance and readiness. Recommendations for doing so draw on participant discussions of how to localise risk reduction activities. Their suggestions for increasing tsunami readiness in coastal communities included integrating it with community-based, localised discussions around frequent flash floods, coastal storms, bushfires and climate change hazards. These concepts are discussed, as well as the use of local volunteer resources to develop preparedness activities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Heatwaves in Queensland
    • Abstract: Nairn, John; Fawcett, Robert
      The Bureau of Meteorology has used the excess heat factor (EHF) metric of heatwave intensity over three warm seasons (November to March in years 2013-16) for the preparation of its heatwave severity forecasts. The EHF is a relatively recent metric, derived from two excess heat indices (EHIs). The first EHI (significance) characterises whether the three-day period under consideration is hot with respect to the historical record. The second EHI (acclimatisation) characterises whether the three-day period is warm with respect to the immediate past, specifically the preceding 30 days. Both aspects contribute to heat-health impacts on the population.

      This paper describes the performance of the Bureau of Meteorology's heatwave forecasting service. A heatwave climatology for Queensland in terms of the EHF is presented across a 1958-2011 year-base period that was used in the construction of the EHF dataset. This climatology is compared with a recent period, 1986-2015, revealing higher rates of heatwave occurrence and severity in the later period.

      This shift in heatwave climatology correlates with an increase in demand for heatwave services over the last decade. This has culminated in the release of the Heatwave Response Plan by Queensland Health that uses the Bureau of Meteorology Heatwave Service.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - The Australian disaster resilience knowledge hub
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 1 - Activities in defendable space areas: Reflections on
           the Wye River-Separation Creek fire
    • Abstract: Kornakova, Maria; March, Alan
      In December 2015 bushfires devastated the coastal Victorian towns of Wye River and Separation Creek, challenging the provision of effective defendable space. This paper uses observations from two cases to describe and comment on the activities that can occur within defendable space areas established for bushfire risk reduction. It focuses on the activities taking place immediately before, during and after bushfire events. The paper commences with a general description of defendable space, its objectives, its terminology in the Australian context, and the mechanisms of its regulation. Examples from the Wye River and Separation Creek 2015 Christmas Day fire events are used to raise design-related challenges associated with effective defendable space provision. The paper particularly focuses on challenges in difficult or unusual contexts, such as settlements with unusual pre-existing lot and road patterns or steep slopes. It is argued that a clearer understanding of these challenges and activities will allow for effective and responsive design of defendable space by urban designers, urban planners, architects and landscape architects.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Disasters and social resilience: A bioecological
           approach [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tarrent, Michael
      Review(s) of: Disasters and social resilience: A bioecological approach, Published by Routledge Taylor and Francis Group Ltd 2016, ISBN 978-1-138-93312-5.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Rumsewicz, Michael
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - EMPA: Disaster communications conference, New Zealand
    • Abstract: Riggs, Rebecca
      The Emergency Media and Public Affairs (EMPA) 2016 New Zealand conference was held in Auckland 15-17 August and brought together emergency managers, researchers, editors and journalists and a wide range of communication practitioners including public information managers and social media, engagement and recovery communication specialists.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - AIDR adds to disaster resilience body of knowledge
    • Abstract: Lamont, Amanda
      The importance of working together, sharing collective knowledge and expertise and building capability in communities and emergency management agencies is central to building the nation's resilience. As disasters increase in occurrence and complexity in Australia and overseas the imperative to work together is more important than ever.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Teaching resilience
    • Abstract: Bhagani, Hansika
      In 2016, Tasmania experienced both bushfire and flood. According to the Tasmanian State Natural Disaster Risk Assessment, Tasmania is also not immune to severe storms, earthquakes and landslides.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Churchill Fellowship: Media images and imitative
           behaviour in disasters
    • Abstract: Campbell, Philip
      In 2015, a Churchill Fellowship was undertaken to investigate the media's use of images of people undertaking risky actions during natural disaster events. The research considered if people were repeatedly exposed to such images were they likely, when in a similar position, to copy the action and act in an unsafe fashion rather than follow safety advice.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Reducing future risk starts now: Integrated planning
           could hold the key to Australia's mitigation of disasters
    • Abstract: Maddock, Nathan
      With the cost of natural hazards forecast to rise dramatically over the next 30years, mitigation of these hazards has never been more important, especially once the fact that every dollar spent on mitigation can save four dollars in recovery costs is factored in. In an effort to counter this, Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC research is providing quantifiable evidence that will support mitigation options for a range of natural hazards, reducing the amount of money that government spends on emergency response and recovery.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Disaster risk management should be an integral part of
           economic planning
    • Abstract: Glasser, Robert
      Research carried out on behalf of the Australian Business Roundtable for Disaster Resilience earlier this year showed that over $450 million was spent annually by the Australian government on restoring essential public infrastructure following extreme weather events between 2002 and 2011. In other words, that is around 1.6 per cent of total spending on public infrastructure.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Owning the future: Risk ownership and strategic
           decision-making for natural hazards
    • Abstract: Young, Celeste; Jones, Roger N
      Four workshops held in 2O5 investigated values, risk and consequences, actions and ownership for strategic risk management linked to prevention, preparedness and recovery. Building on a foundation of values at risk - social, economic, environment and built infrastructure - ownership of these values was linked to ownership in designated areas of strategic risk management. For values at risk, patterns of ownership at the institutional scale showed relatively even balance, but when risks, consequences and actions were surveyed, they became skewed towards two areas of government: state and local. Further work is needed to determine how these patterns of ownership can be more evenly distributed to achieve more sustainable outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Emergency management liaison officer training
    • Abstract: Carlton, Ian
      Since 2013, the Barwon South West Regional Emergency Management Training and Exercising Committee have been conducting a one-day Emergency Management Liaison Officer Training (EMLO training) for agency staff and volunteers. To date, over 165 personnel from 30 different emergency management agencies have undertaken this vital training.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - AUSVETPLAN turns 25
    • Abstract: Geraghty-Dusan, Francette
      'World-class' and 'indispensable' were just some of the descriptions of the Australian Veterinary Emergency Plan (AUSVETPLAN) provided by past and present contributors at AUSVETPLAN's 25th birthday celebration in August2016.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - The Excess Heat Factor as a metric for heat-related
           fatalitis: Defining heatwave risk categories
    • Abstract: Loridan, Thomas; Coates, Lucinda; Argueso, Daniel; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah E; McAneney, John
      Heatwaves represent Australia's most significant natural disaster in terms of mortality. A unanimous definition of what constitutes a heatwave does not currently exist. However, recent work from the Bureau of Meteorology (Nairn and Fawcett 2013) has provided a metric designed to summarise their intensity. This metric, called the Excess Heat Factor, is being increasingly adopted b the research community as it is well-suited to characterise heatwave hazards. Yet the link between the Excess Heat Factor and the potential societal or economic impacts heatwaves can have is still not well understood. Using the PeriIAUS archive of heat-related fatalities in Australia, this paper proposes to develop a classification of heatwave events in terms of their risk potential for human loss of life. This paper also quantifies the likely death toll from populations exposed to each of these categories. The category scheme is used to analyse the risk gradient of the three most lethal events in south-east Australia since 1900. The scheme helps communicate about heatwave fatality risk in Australia and provides some insight into the location of the populations under greatest threat. This study also catalogued 466 events in south-east Australia using the Excess Heat Factor and the newly developed heatwave categories. Using principal component analysis to identify the key modes of variability, a synthetic catastrophic heatwave scenario is generated and analysed for projected fatalities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Building community cyclone resilience: Through
           academic and insurance industry partnership
    • Abstract: Harwood, Jon; Smith, Daniel J; Henderson, David
      This paper presents research from collaboration between the Cyclone Testing Station (CTS) at James Cook University and insurer Suncorp over the last two years. A key outcome of this work has been an insurance premium reduction program by Suncorp known as the 'Cyclone Resilience Benefit'. Background research conducted for the program b the CTS is discussed and its details are briefly reviewed. Insights from the program delivery to over 14 000 homeowners to date are discussed. Although still in preliminary stages, the development of this industry program based on academic research demonstrates the benefits of strategic partnerships in the field of natural disaster risk mitigation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - An assessment of the opportunities to improve
           strategic decision-making in emergency and disaster management
    • Abstract: Brooks, Benjamin; Curnin, Steve; Bearman, Chris; Owen, Christine; Rainbird, Sophia
      The management of major emergencies is strongly influenced b the decisions made during the event. Decisions guide the distribution and subsequent deployment of assets, the removal of people from harm's way, how objectives are established and a myriad of other actions. Decision-making is therefore an important skill for emergency managers that permeates every emergency event and every level of disaster management. The vast majority of decisions made during an incident are effective enough in both process and outcome, but the drive for continual improvement and the need to manage more extreme events requires decision-making to become sophisticated and to achieve even higher levels of reliability.

      So how well are emergency management organisations integrating acknowledged developments in the understanding of decision-making' Where are the opportunities for continual improvement' What are some of the challenges that the expert decision-maker is required to balance across an event'

      This paper examines key concepts that have progressed the understanding of decision-making. A review of preliminary interactions with end-users of the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC (CRC) research project 'Practical decision tools for improved decision-making in complex situations' considers how Australian and New Zealand are using this knowledge to make decisions. Opportunities for improvement and the approaches being taken to evaluate cognitive decision tools for end-users are identified.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Evaluating resilience in two remote indigenous
           Australian communities
    • Abstract: Morley, Philip; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Sangha, Kamaljit K; Sithole, Bev; Sutton, Stephen
      While the occurrence of extreme events generally cannot be prevented, their negative effects can be lessened b reducing risks and improving the capacity of people and communities to deal with them. Improving community resilience helps reduce the effects of natural hazards and is increasingly becoming a goal of communities, organisations and governments.

      To meaningfully determine, coordinate, plan and priorities the most effective measures to improve resilience, a baseline assessment of a community's strengths and weaknesses is required. This paper quantitatively assesses the status of community resilience in two remote indigenous communities, Ngukurr and Gunbalanya in the Northern Territory. A quantitative assessment is used to explore community perceptions of disaster resilience within the study areas as well as the methods of assessment and appropriateness of the assessment methodology.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Helping fire-impacted families in rebuilding: Toward
           enhanced community resilience outcomes
    • Abstract: Prelgauskas, Emilis
      The recovery phase following an emergency event develops capacity for post-traumatic growth in affected communities. This endeavour to build and embed resilience among communities gives impetus to successfully negotiate current and future natural hazard events. An important component in this process is providing effective external support, which assists the physical rebuilding of assets and underpins emotional wellbeing. This paper describes current in-field experience where independent building professionals have contributed to the recovery phase of recent South Australian emergency events: the Sampson Flat bushfires in January 2015 and the Pinery crop fires in November2015. Much has been learned about the needs of people experiencing such events with respect to their re-establishing of homes and built environment and navigating building regulations, planning applications and approvals.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Can agencies promote bushfire resilience using:
           Art-based community engagement'
    • Abstract: Phillips, Richard; Cook, Angela; Schauble, Holly; Walker, Matthew
      Emergency management agencies are confronted with problems when communicating preparedness information to communities. Levels of community preparedness remain low despite the availability of education materials and bushfire safety programs. To address these challenges innovative approaches to engage communities are needed. This paper presents evidence from an arts-based community engagement initiative that promoted disaster resilience in a regional Victorian town. This approach allowed staff of the Country Fire Authority (CFA) to initiate conversations with local community members about bushfire safety. Some challenges identified with this approach related to CFA staff skill levels, appropriate organisational support, and response capacities of the local volunteer brigade. The question this paper raises is whether agencies can engage communities effectively using innovative activities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 4 - Can place attachment mediate perceptions bushfire
           risk': A case study of the Blue Mountains, NSW
    • Abstract: Ratnam, Charishma; Drozdzewski, Danielle; Chapple, Rosalie
      Place attachment is conceptualised as the bonding people to a place that influences their perceptions of those places. This research focused on verbal and visual experiences of residents homes and surrounds to explore whether place attachment in a bushfire-prone community mediated perceptions of risk. The analysis draws from qualitative data that used a visual and mobile method called 'Photovoice', coupled with in-depth interviews, to investigate the relationship between place attachment and perceptions of bushfire risk in hazard-prone settings. Located in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney, New South Wales, this research established that place attachment, as mediated b longevity in place and familiarity to place, provided the context for certain perceptions and experiences of bushfire risk. The information garnered from this research can be important for more effective bushfire risk communications that are targeted and tailored to account for residents' attachments to home.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 3 - People in disasters conference
    • Abstract: Burns, Penelope
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 3 - Remote-sensing flood data is filling the gaps
    • Abstract: Jones, Freya
      Floods account for some of the worst natural disasters in Australia, costing millions of dollars in damage each year, and devastating communities. Research is testing a new approach to flood forecasting using satellite technology, which could help communities prepare for and deal with floods.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 3 - Foreword
    • Abstract: Johnston, David
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 3 - Developing 'emergency ready communities': A tale of
           two Victorian councils
    • Abstract: Mason, Andrew; Crofts, Eleanor; Steenkamp, Malinda; Ramsey, Imogen
      This paper describes the approach, findings and lessons learned from a collaborative resilience project between Melton City Council and Wyndham City Council in Victoria. The project sought to educate community leaders about disaster resilience through participation in an 'Emergency Ready Communities' forum. As part of the forum, members participated in a workshop to assess the resilience capacity of their communities using the Torrens Resilience Institute Community Disaster Resilience Scorecard. This was a valuable exercise in community engagement as well as in resilience. The exercise highlighted key areas for future improvement.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
 
 
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