Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 387 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 387 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Narrative Therapy & Community Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Irrigation Australia: The Official J. of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Australian Journal of Adult Learning
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.297
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1443-1394
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - 'Maestras': Exploring dialectical relationships in an
           Aboriginal literacy campaign
    • Abstract: Williamson, Frances; Durnan, Deborah; Edwards, Tannia; Waites, Mary
      Previous studies have documented the personal transformation that many low literate adults undergo when they engage in literacy campaigns. In particular, research has captured how improved literacy leads to a greater willingness and capacity to speak out, or what is often referred to as voice. This paper focusses on the impact of an adult Aboriginal literacy campaign on those responsible for implementing it. Through the words of these 'maestras', we reveal how the teachers and trainers of the campaign, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, experience a similar trajectory of transformation to the literacy students. This transformation, we argue, is the result of the pedagogic relationship between students, local campaign staff and national trainers. This dialectical relationship in which teacher is learner and learner teacher is at the heart of the literacy campaign model and is part of what Giroux (1988) characterises as a radical theory of literacy and voice. We further argue that the impacts of the literacy campaign at the individual and collective levels and crucially, the sustainability of these impacts depend largely on this pedagogic relationship and the new, shared understanding of the world which results.

      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - From the Editor's desk
    • Abstract: Ollis, Trace
      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - Post-qualitative research and innovative methodologies
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Malloch, Margaret
      Review(s) of: Post-qualitative research and innovative methodologies, by Matthew Krehl Edward Thomas and Robin Bellingham (Eds), Bloomsbury Academic, 2020, ISDN 9781350062061, 232 pp.

      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - Developing a case-based experiential learning model at
           a program level in a regional university: Reflections on the developmental
           process
    • Abstract: Patil, Tejaswini; Hunt, Michelle; Cooper, Kimberlea; Townsend, Rob
      This article reflects on the developmental process of a case-based experiential learning model: the Federation University model, in an undergraduate community and human services program at a regional university. There is abundant literature that addresses the use and need for introducing experiential learning at the subject/unit level in community and human services/social work content. However, despite the expansion of research on experiential learning, there is limited literature that bridges the gap between course/program level teaching philosophy and using experiential learning activities in individual subjects. The article will demonstrate how Kolb's four stage cycle (Kolb, 1984) and case-based experiential learning were integrated to develop curriculum at a program level. It will also demonstrate how a move to experiential learning facilitated better alignment with face-to-face and online learning. As a way of argument, we suggest that case-based experiential learning is very relevant and useful to human services/ social work education because of its emphasis on bridging the theory and praxis nexus and providing graduates with an opportunity to work effectively in a complex, fluid and ever-changing sector.

      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - Emerging adulthood and its effect on adult education
    • Abstract: Meier, David
      It is during their late teens and early twenties that most students attend a university or other institution of higher education. Biologically, these students are adults. However, studies show that there is a delay in maturing. Arnett (2000) introduced the term "emerging adulthood" in reference to the stage of life between adolescence and adulthood. Adolescent behaviour can be observed well into the twenties, as confirmed by this study. In total, 118 participants, aged 21 to 65, from a statistics course were asked about their need for adult learning methods. The results show that there is a strong positive correlation between age and the need for methods of adult education, and that students younger than 28 are not necessarily ready for adult education.

      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - Support matters: Predictors of intrinsic motivation in
           older learners in Taiwan
    • Abstract: Lin, Yi-Yin
      Previous research has made it clear that older learners are mainly learning for learning's sake. However, few studies have explored the intrinsic aspects of older learners' motivation in detail; also, the factors that influence their learning motivation remain under-researched and under-theorised. To address this gap, this survey-based quantitative study investigated the learning motivations of 816 older learners from an intrinsic-motivation viewpoint, and explored the predictors of these motivations, including institutional as well as personal factors. The results indicated that these older learners rated their intrinsic motivations highly (3.97/5 overall), and that such motivations could be differentiated into cognitive-oriented and social-oriented motivations. The most important predictors of intrinsic motivations for the respondents were institutional variables, especially teacher support and peer support. Importantly, institutional predictor variables were found to diminish the negative impacts of both self-reported poor health and age on these older adults' overall intrinsic motivation to learn. These findings imply that, in Taiwan, providing more teacher- and peer support is likely to increase the intrinsic motivation to learn for vulnerable older adults who are disadvantaged by health problems and old age.

      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - How positive is positive psychology in an enabling
           program': Investigating the transformative power of positive
           psychology for enabling students
    • Abstract: James, Trixie; Walters, Vikki
      Positive psychology is one of the newest branches of psychology to emerge, and there is a growing research base of scientific study to validate the significance of this psychological approach in people's lives. This research investigates a unit of study that was developed for students entering university through an enabling program in order to introduce them to proactive solutions and strategies to develop their strengths, capacity and virtues rather than focusing on past weaknesses. Currently, only anecdotal evidence exists indicating that this unit is having a positive impact on the students who have completed the unit. As this research wants to identify the effectiveness of this unit in facilitating change in a student's life, the core tenets of Appreciative Inquiry guided the overall process of formulating the research approach and designing the questions for the survey. Past students became the change actors and their voice and experiences became the data.

      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - Adult community education: Australian environmental
           scan
    • Abstract: Devlin, CatherineAdult Learning Australia
      Adult community Education (ACE) is a recognisable education sector that offers accessible lifelong learning opportunities that are learner-centred and needs based.

      The Australian ACE scan profiles the sector in terms of its programs, features and provider types. The scan outlines ACE program participants, outcomes and the policy areas they support. It also explores the challenges facing the sector in terms of sustainability. This scan builds on the work completed in Adult Learning Australia's previous ACE scans (2014; 2015; 2016a; 2017).

      Comprehensive analysis of ACE is impacted by the lack of complete data on all of the work that ACE does. However, this report provides a contemporary profile of the sector through desktop research and analysis of existing data.

      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 2 - Promoting quality learning and teaching pedagogy:
           Evaluating a targeted localised Academic Induction Program (AIP) for the
           impact on continuing professional development
    • Abstract: Weuffen, Sara; Andrews, Tulsa; Roberts, Kate
      Despite their position as providers of tertiary education, universities sit beyond normalised discourses of education where qualifications, registration, and continuing professional development are concerned. In this case study, we explore how participation in an academic induction program (AIP) builds foundational andragogy knowledge and skills and fosters individual commitment to continuing professional development (PD) for the critical engagement, maintenance, and enhancement of quality teaching practices. Through a poststructuralist lens, we gathered triangulated evidence via surveys (n=32) and attendance data (n=190). Our findings indicate a positive correlation between AIP attendance and initial PD engagement but identifies a 35% decline in PD uptake six-month post-AIP. Survey responses indicate that while an AIP is a valuable tool for prompting initial engagement in learning and teaching PD, the role and function of teaching within universities needs to be elevated in order to support a career-long commitment to academic enhancement.

      PubDate: Sat, 19 Sep 2020 00:09:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 1 - An age of endarkenment': Can adult education still
           make a difference'
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      Adult education has the power to change lives, and in Australia has always been made up of educators and providers capable of adapting to the changing environments around them. Today, however, there is declining support for adult education at a time when there is growing public disenchantment with the political system, an uncivil public discourse, technological disruption and well-grounded fear for our environmental sustainability. This makes the challenge for adult education to meet the varying needs of adult learners more difficult. How might we think of adult education and learning for today's challenging times'

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 18:35:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 1 - From the editor's desk
    • Abstract: Ollis, Trace
      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 18:35:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 1 - Opportunities for change: What factors influence
           non-traditional students to enrol in higher education'
    • Abstract: McCall, Deanna; Western, Deborah; Petrakis, Melissa
      In recent years, the Australian federal government has sought to increase the diversity of students attending higher education through supporting students that have traditionally been under represented. This is due to a perception that the attainment of a higher education can enhance a graduate's life as they have greater access to professional positions, which may also lead to higher wages and better career stability. Most of the existing research is focussed on the student's process of deciding to enrol, and how to support students to succeed once they are enrolled, but fails to explore in-depth narratives of students' stated reasons of why they enrol, and if they consider these preconceptions to have been met or challenged.

      The current research contributes knowledge by investigating factors that lead students to enrol in higher education. The study aimed to examine how the Australian federal government's 'Widening Participation' agenda has affected Australians' perception of higher education. It is important to examine how enrolment of non-traditional students has changed throughout the last fifty years, whether and how the Widening Participation agenda influenced enrolment of students and students' perceptions of the factors that led to their enrolment post completion of an enabling program. The research argues that the concept of a 'traditional' student enrolled in higher education is outdated and that 'non-traditional' students are now the majority.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 18:35:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 1 - Misconceptions in the knowledge of vocational fitness
           students and graduates
    • Abstract: Jolley, Daniel J; Davis, Melissa; Lavender, Andrew P
      The use of non-academic sources of health information is popular among both the public and exercise professionals. However, the quality of this information varies and without the application of critical thinking skills, may lead to misconceptions forming. This research aimed to compare the knowledge, presence of misconceptions, and critical thinking ability of vocational education and training (VET) fitness students at the beginning and end of their training, and qualified personal trainers (PTs). It also examines differences in the sources of information used by students and professionals. An Exercise Science Knowledge Survey was developed to assess knowledge and misconceptions about ten areas of exercise and nutrition. VET students were assessed at the beginning and end of a personal training qualification and PTs were surveyed once. Though VET students' knowledge improved and misconceptions decreased from pre- to post training, PTs did not differ from post-VET students in knowledge, misconceptions, or critical thinking ability. PTs reported using more varied sources of information and were more likely to trust reliable sources. Critical thinking ability correlated with higher knowledge scores and lower misconception scores. Instruction in critical thinking should be embedded at lower levels of VET, and exercise professionals should be encouraged to undertake higher levels of study.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 18:35:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 1 - Transformative learning through mindfulness: Exploring
           the mechanism of change
    • Abstract: Morris, Thomas Howard
      Making appropriate perspective transformations as we age is necessary to meet the demands of the rapidly changing conditions within our world. Accordingly, there has been a growing interest in the role of mindfulness in enabling transformations. Still, how mindfulness may facilitate perspective transformations is not well understood. The present paper draws from empirical evidence from psychology and cognitive science to discuss the theoretical possibility that mindfulness may facilitate perspective transformations. A theoretical model is presented that depicts an incremental transformative learning process that is facilitated through mindfulness. Mindfulness affords the adult enhanced attention to their thoughts, feelings, and sensations as they arise in the present moment experience. This metacognitive awareness may moderate the expression of motivational disposition for the present moment behaviour, enabling a more objective assessment of the conditions of the situation. Nonetheless, in accordance with transformative learning theory, an adult would have to become critically aware of and analyse the assumptions that underlie the reasons why they experience as they do in order to convert behaviour change to perspective transformation. Further empirical studies are necessary to test this assumption of the theoretical model presented in the present paper.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 18:35:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 1 - A vocational stream for social care workers: A case
           study
    • Abstract: Thompson, Sally
      This article is a case study of an attempt by a team of VET teachers, researchers and users of social services to develop a more effective, knowledge rich, vocational stream qualification in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry. Health Care and Social Assistance is one of the fastest growing industries in Australia, adding entry-level jobs at a time when other industries are shedding them. Entry to this industry requires a Certificate 3 qualification from the relevant national Training Package.

      Training Packages have been designed to facilitate flexible points of entry to an industry for early school leavers and other disadvantaged groups, and then pathways to further study and careers. However, a growing body of research has pointed to the weaknesses of the training package model and competency based training more generally, to achieve these aspirations. Vocational streams and enhanced attention to knowledge in VET have been suggested as alternative ways forward. This case study draws on this research, and on the voices of service users, to build a more effective program for entry-level learners, while still working within the Training Package system. It highlights the limitations of Training Package Qualifications to provide accessible points of engagement for disadvantaged learners and provide them with the skills and knowledge required to pursue further education and build meaningful careers.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 18:35:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 1 - Contemporary theories of learning: Learning
           theorists... in their own words [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ryan, Cheryl
      Review(s) of: Contemporary theories of learning: Learning theorists... in their own words, by Knud Illeris (ed.), Routledge, Abingdon, Oxon, 2012, ISBN 978-0415473446, 265 pp.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 18:35:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 60 Issue 1 - Making the intangible, tangible: Assessment design
           that fosters curiosity, confidence and collaboration during international
           short-term study tours for Australian students
    • Abstract: Pennings, Mark William; Cushing, Debra Flanders; Gomez, Rafael; Dyson, Clare
      A distinctive characteristic of study tours is their immersive nature, and the type of learning developed in such circumstances often relies on instinctive skills related to confidence, flexibility, curiosity, resilience and risk taking. To discover more about these learning experiences for adult undergraduate students studying varying disciplines in the creative industries at an Australian University, the researchers employed educational action research and developed assessment modules to foster student awareness of intangible skills and personal characteristics during short-term international study tours. On the completion of the tours, participating staff and students provided feedback, via a questionnaire and focus group discussions, that assessed the value of these modules in promoting learning and their contribution to personal growth and cultural sensitivity. Findings show that these modules were highly effective at enabling adult students to become aware of the skills they employed while being actively engaged in international study tours. This study highlights the potential significance of immersive assessment modules that provide specific ways for students to engage with their host country and the cultural differences to which they are exposed.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 18:35:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Here we stand: The pedagogy of occupy wall street
    • Abstract: Webb, Darren
      Social movement learning is now an established field of educational research. This paper contributes to the field by offering a critical case study of Occupy Wall Street (OWS). The paper surveys the claims made by the movement's supporters that transformed utopian subjectivities emerged in and through the process of participation, the prefigurative politics of the movement becoming an educative process of dialogic interaction and a moment of self-education through struggle. Drawing on the extensive range of first-hand accounts, and analysing the anarchist and autonomist ideas animating the movement's core activists, the paper highlights the pedagogical lacunae in OWS and reflects on what we as educators, working in and with social movements, might learn from these. What the experience of OWS points to, the paper argues, is the need to avoid romanticising the creation of alternative spaces of learning and overstating the pedagogical possibilities opened up when people gather together and occupy a space.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Learning by participating in social movements:
           Ethnographic research in Madrid (Spain)
    • Abstract: Melero, Hector S; Gil-Jaurena, Ines
      Learning in social movements has been studied using different approaches, such as critical pedagogy, public pedagogy and adult education (Ollis, and Hamel-Green, 2015). While in the field of formal education, the focus is usually on 'education for citizenship' or 'citizenship education' (Schugurensky, 2006, 2010; Schulz, Ainley, Fraillon, Losito, and Agrusti, 2016; Tawil, 2013), educational studies that focus on social movements can be classified into two large unrelated groups (Niesz, Korora, Walkuski, and Foot, 2018). One explores the influence of social movements in formal education, with diverse approaches and little connection among them. The other studies learning in social movements, mostly inserted in the field of adult education and that form a corpus of interrelated and expanding knowledge. However, there are still few works that arise from an idea of complementarity or that have a double focus on citizen education that leads to activism, and activism as an educational process (Davies, Evans, and Peterson, 2014). Our previous studies1 arose from the idea of complementarity and an understanding that in order to formulate proposals for citizenship education, the object of study must be how citizenship and participation learning happens. That is, trying to understand the learning experiences of activists and the learning that takes place in spaces of participation, such as social movements, to formulate educational proposals (Gil-Jaurena, Ballesteros, Mata and Sanchez-Melero, 2016; Melero, 2018).

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Close, yet so far apart: Bridging social movement
           theory with popular education
    • Abstract: Heidemann, Kai A
      This special issue of the Australian Journal of Adult Learning is a great opportunity to bridge two areas of scholarship that are in close proximity to one another, but have generally failed to establish systematic dialogues and exchanges. These domains, of course, are comprised of educational scholarship devoted to the study of 'adult' and 'popular' education on the one hand, and sociological scholarship on 'social movements' on the other. While the study of popular education1 has thematic proximity to the social movement literature, it is not a terrain of systematic research and theorising by social movement scholars. A recent search of the terms 'popular education', 'community education' and 'adult education' in both the titles and keywords of two leading social movement journals over the past two decades, for example, yielded zero hits2. On the other side of the equation, while scholars of popular education may frequently invoke terms such as 'social movement' and 'activism', the tools of social movement theory are rarely put to use within this literature (cf. Kilgore, 1999). That these two literatures are so close, but so far apart is rather astonishing given their overlapping concerns for issues of resistance, solidarity, democratisation and social transformation. In this essay, I briefly address the gap between social movement studies and popular education studies, and then proceed to engage in some initial bridge-building work by discussing the concept of 'free space' (Groch, 2001; Polletta, 1999; Polletta, and Kretschmer, 2013). In particular, I suggest that by theorising community-based sites of popular education as 'free spaces', scholars can better investigate the ways in which the participants within these sites engage in educational practices that actively promote the reproduction of movement-based strategies, tactics, meanings and identities. From such a conceptualisation, researchers can explore the question of how local-level sites of popular education bolster the broader-level influence of social movements in society, thus shedding important light on the socio-political outcomes of popular education programs.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Call for papers for a special issue on: Adult
           learning: Transforming individuals and communities over the decades
    • PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - From the guest editor's desk
    • Abstract: Earl, Cassie
      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Spaces of political pedagogy occupy!: And other
           radical experiments in adult learning [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Rawolle, Shaun
      Review(s) of: Spaces of political pedagogy occupy!: And other radical experiments in adult learning, by Cassie Earl, Routledge, Abington and New York, 2018, 195 pp.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Exploring the power of the media in promoting lifelong
           learning and popular mobilisation drive against 'Galamsey' in Ghana
    • Abstract: Biney, Isaac Kofi
      This paper explores the power of media in promoting lifelong learning in mobilising the citizenry against 'galamsey' activities in Ghana. 'Galamsey' connotes 'an illegal process of gathering mineral resources, especially gold, and selling them'. It is an activity engaged in by young adults resulting in destroying water bodies and posing water-related challenges to the citizenry. This qualitative study sought to ascertain what informed practitioners in the media space to mount a sustained lifelong learning drive against 'galamsey' in Ghana. The study used in-depth interview and focus group discussions to collect data from 15 participants purposively selected. Six male and female participants also shared their experiences on the 'galamsey' menace and the fight against it. Their thought, views and insightful ideas lie at the heart of this study. It emerged that the 'galamsey' activities were complex and engaged in by both Ghanaians and foreigners using heavy earth moving machines destroying forest vegetation cover and water bodies. The players involved bribe their way for protection. This paper recommends that the Government of Ghana and media houses involved in the fight against 'galamsey' sustain the lifelong learning drive to save water bodies, arable lands, and forest vegetation cover in Ghana.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Student voice and agency for Indigenous Maori students
           in higher education transitions
    • Abstract: Amundsen, Diana
      This article reveals the complexities of Indigenous students navigating the neoliberal model of education through an examination of Maori transitions into higher education contexts in Aotearoa New Zealand. In a recently completed doctoral study, the lived transition experiences of Indigenous Maori higher education students were critically investigated from a student voice perspective. Data were collected and analysed through repeated semi-structured interviews, focus groups and visual stories in a semi-longitudinal study with 20 Maori students enrolled in a wananga, a polytechnic and a university. Using a Bourdieuan theoretical framework for analysis, findings revealed that participants experienced their transition as a journey. Students perpetually evolved their identities and agency in relation to the tertiary education environments and social structures they encountered which supported or constrained transition experiences. Within wananga, participants felt their Maori cultural identity was highly valued; within polytechnics, there was a sense that Maori culture is included but more could be done; within universities, a need for more inclusive practices to support Maori learner requirements was identified. This empirical research outlines learning for Maori students in higher education, and is a timely addition to knowledge revealing the complexities of teaching in the neoliberal model of higher education with Indigenous people.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Reconceptualising activism for a pedagogy of struggle:
           Occupying education, the power of the empty signifier for the future of
           education
    • Abstract: Earl, Cassie
      The global Occupy! actions gave some pause for thought. At first, some thought that this was a global movement that could change the way politics was conducted and maybe see the end of capitalism as we knew it. The hopes for Occupy! were high, but the highest hopes for the movement were short lived. This paper examines Occupy!'s legacy; what potential remains and where educators might go with it. An argument is presented that Occupy! became an empty signifier: a 'bucket' of discontent into which thousands of disjointed, dissenting voices and discontents were poured, ranging from the original Wall Street encampment to the Umbrella revolution in Occupy Central. The paper looks at the power of the 'empty signifier' as a galvanising mechanism and explores what this could mean for education. The notion of occupying the curriculum in HE will be explored as a unifying mechanism for multidisciplinary teaching and learning.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 59 Issue 3 - Learning in social movements: Emotion, identity and
           Egyptian diaspora becoming 'logically and emotionally invested' in the
           continuing struggle
    • Abstract: Underhill, Helen
      This article explores the implications of learning in social movements on diaspora activists' engagement with struggle. Focussing on emotions within social movement learning and the connection to activists' multiple identities, the paper examines the complex terrain of learning as embodied and rooted in emotionally situated beliefs and values. The theoretical framework that informs this enquiry brings diaspora and identity into conversation with emotions in social movement learning and Boler's 'Pedagogy of discomfort'. Developing these connections contributes a new approach to understanding the emotional dynamics of activism and the implications of learning in this context on social movement participation. Based on qualitative research with diasporic accounts of participating in activism related to the continuing Egyptian revolution, the analysis contributes a deeper understanding of how learning in struggle shapes multiple forms of connectedness and the implications learning in this context can have for activists' engagement with struggle. The findings add to existing knowledge of learning in social movements through a framework where cognition and emotion are 'inextricably linked' (Boler, 1999, p. xix) and to diaspora studies by highlighting that engagement is underpinned by situated and embodied identities that shape possibilities for learning.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 02:47:10 GMT
       
 
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