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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 398 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 398 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)

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Journal Cover
Australian Journal of Adult Learning
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.297
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1443-1394
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [398 journals]
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - Special issue: Lifelong learning and sustainable
           development from the guest editors' desk
    • Abstract: Wilson, Bruce; Osborne, Mike; Guevara, Robbie
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - Lifelong learning: An organising principle for reform
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      Lifelong learning (LLL) is not a new concept. The idea of learning throughout life has been present in educational thinking since Plato. However, as a guiding principle for integrating educational efforts, it is a much more recent development.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - Call for papers for a special issue on: Adult
           learning, social movements, popular education and the power of knowledge
    • Abstract: Earl, Cassie; Heidemann, Kai; Kumar, Ravi
      In this special edition we seek contributions from scholars at any level of their career who are working on the interrelated topics of social movements and popular education. We are especially interested in work that speaks to the question of the power that knowledge can hold for social change in the current age.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - University engagement in achieving sustainable
           development goals: A synthesis of case studies from the SUEUAA study
    • Abstract: Neary, Joanne; Osborne, Michael
      While initial discussions of the third mission of universities focussed on market-orientated behaviours of universities, more recently it has been connected to activities that focus on social justice and promoting sustainability (Trencher, Bai, Evans, McCormick and Yarime, 2014; Appe and Barrag n, 2017). It has been suggested that the third mission of universities in the Global South may be particularly significant in addressing acutely felt issues of climate change, economic inequalities, food insecurity and urban sprawl. The current paper explores this and asks whether the quadruple helix (Carayannis and Campbell, 2010) is visible in their engagement activities.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - Achieving sustainable development goals through adult
           informal learning
    • Abstract: Akinsooto, Tajudeen Ade; Akpomuje, Paul Young
      This study identified informal economic activities in Hausa community in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. It examined how people acquire knowledge and skills about the identified informal economic activities and provided explanation on why people prefer informal economic activities to other types of economic activities to making a living in Hausa community in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. All these were with a view to providing information on how adult informal learning is being used as a means of achieving sustainable livelihood, and, consequently, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal of ending poverty in all its forms everywhere. The study concluded that despite the fact that majority of the respondents do not possess the competencies required to participate in today's knowledge and technological driven labour markets, they are still able to use the knowledge and skills they acquired through informal means to take care of themselves and their families. In this way, informal learning becomes a means of livelihood, thereby contributing to eradicating poverty, one of the seventeen United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - Literacy, lifelong learning and sustainable
           development
    • Abstract: McKay, Veronica
      Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 calls on countries to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. Sub-goal 4.6 aims to ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults of both genders achieve literacy and numeracy, with literacy being regarded indispensable not only for the achievement of SDG 4 but also for the other 16 SDGs, specifically those relating to health and wellbeing, gender equality, active citizenship, income generation and responsible consumption and production. However, the potential of achieving literacy can only be reached if it is approached from a lifelong learning perspective; therefore literacy learning activities should be offered as part of a lifelong learning framework.

      This article describes how the Kha Ri Gude Literacy Campaign in South Africa, conceptualised within a lifelong learning framework, extended its literacy curriculum to engender agency and empowerment among the national target of adult learners who, as a result of the legacy of apartheid in South Africa, had little or no education. It examines how, through conceptualising literacy curricula content around the (local, national and international) development goals, it is possible to use literacy instruction as a catalyst to effect transformation and social change.

      The article draws on the mixed methods approach followed by the research to show learners' perceptions of the social, economic and developmental opportunities afforded by literacy acquisition.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - The role of fairy tales in affective learning:
           Enhancing adult literacy and learning in FE and community settings
    • Abstract: Kole, Karly
      This paper explores the role of fairy tales in relation to literacy, affective learning, self-authoring and narrative quest. The study examines fairy tales in the context of the New Literacy Studies with regard to improving cognitive, linguistic and creative writing skills for adult literacy learners.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - Freire and education [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ryan, Cheryl
      Review(s) of: Freire and education, by Antonia Darder, New York, Routledge, 2015, ISBN 978-0-415-54830-4, 177 pp.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - Achieving LLL with the sustainable development goals:
           What is needed to get things done'
    • Abstract: Duke, Chris
      The need for individual, community and institutional lifelong learning grows and changes with turbulent social, political and economic change. The national adult education non-government organisation (NGO), Adult Learning Australia, can influence the course of policymaking and ultimately the national culture through diverse activities within or started through #YOLL2018.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - How a blended learning environment in adult education
           promotes sustainable development in China
    • Abstract: Yao, Chunlin
      The study adopts a semi-structured survey to examine the effects of a blended learning environment in adult education in promoting sustainable development. The study analyses the development of blended learning environments in China, and some challenges that China faces in sustainable development. Based on the analysis results, the study revealed that a blended learning environment could promote adult education development, reduce the development inequality between genders and geographically, as well as protect natural environments. A survey to adult learners verifies the aforementioned conclusion. Adult learners believe that a blended learning environment is an eco-friendly learning environment; it increases the opportunities for females and those living in rural areas to become educated and promotes their sustainable development. The research results may be beneficial for education policy makers and practitioners interested in sustainable development.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 3 - Learning across the lifespan: Lifelong learning in
           neighbourhood houses in Australia
    • Abstract: Ollis, Tracey; Starr, Karen; Ryan, Cheryl; Harrison, Ursula
      Neighbourhood Houses in Australia are spaces of education and learning that cater to and work with adult learners across a lifespan. They are known as fourth sector education providers in the Adult and Community Education (ACE) sector. With a history spanning nearly 45 years, Neighbourhood Houses provide vital education opportunities for adult learners. The research is set against the backdrop of the current project of lifelong learning, which has dominated adult education discourses for more than 30 years. Neighbourhood Houses are learning organisations and sites of social inclusion that embody adult learning practices. This empirical research of learners' experiences in Neighbourhood Houses reveals the complex and varying reasons for participating in ACE that are beyond the realms of formal adult education and include reasons such as decreasing social isolation, fostering friendships and new networks, increased wellbeing, raising income capacity and further learning to improve employment prospects. In doing this, we provide three case studies from the larger data sample of this study to give insight into the complexity of adult education and learners' experiences that occur in this dynamic space of learning. The outcomes for participants vary but include greater mastery of English language, improved foundational literacy, numeracy and computer skills, increased understanding of civics and citizenship and Australian history culture and society, while reconstructing previously held negative views of themselves as learners.

      PubDate: Mon, 31 Dec 2018 16:58:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - A reflection on continuing professional education
           research
    • Abstract: Brennan, Barrie
      This paper has arisen from my research on the first study of the story of Continuing Professional Education in Australia and the publication of my UNE PhD thesis by Springer, 'Continuing Professional Education in Australia. A Tale of Missed Opportunities'. I will continue to work with the professional associations on their profession's CPE and the development of CPD. However, this paper is focused on issues that have arisen from the introduction of Australia's national registration regime for select health-related professions.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - From formal to non-formal education, learning and
           knowledge [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Jenkins, Gayle
      Review(s) of: From formal to non-formal education, learning and knowledge, by Igor Z. Zagar and Polona Kelava (Editors) (2014).

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - Notes for intending contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - 'The trails to get there': Experiences of attaining
           higher education for Igorot Indigenous peoples in the Philippines
    • Abstract: Adonis, Digna; Couch, Jen
      The title of this paper alludes to the hours of walking on mountain paths, which one of the authors, growing up in an Igorot Indigenous community in post-colonial Philippines undertook to go to school. This is an apt symbol of the sheer effort it can take to overcome physical, social, cultural and psychological barriers to access, persevere with and complete, higher education. This article explores the hardships of attaining higher education and the effects of education on the Igorot community. The article shares the experiences of Igorot leaders and how they have used their higher education learning to work for the promotion of maintenance of their Igorot culture.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - Experiences of bridging program students at a regional
           satellite campus
    • Abstract: Elsom, Sandra; Greenaway, Ruth; Marshman, Margaret
      The benefits of higher education to individuals and to society are acknowledged both in Australia and internationally. Increased access to higher education means that greatly diverse students are beginning their tertiary learning journey. We investigate the experiences of a group of non-traditional students undertaking a tertiary preparation program at a regional university, based at a satellite campus in a low socio-economic area. Bourdieu's conceptual tools are used to frame the significance that symbolic capital has on the experience of students. Using phenomenography, the experiences of nine students were recorded and interpreted. Interviews were used to identify which aspects of the university experience they considered were the most important. Students' motivation, social networks, staff-student interactions and the various challenges were among the most important experiences mentioned. These combined to create three analogous categories, stairway, doorway and hallway (SDH). The students' experiences in the program may be likened to a stairway that must be climbed; a doorway that must be passed through; or a hallway that offers opportunities for exploration along the journey. The SDH model is a useful way to categorise students, to identify their experiences and develop strategies to support them.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - Adult offenders' perceptions of rehabilitation
           programs in Africa
    • Abstract: Ngozwana, Nomazulu
      This article reflects on adult offenders' perceptions of rehabilitation programs in Africa. It also evaluates whether offenders are consulted when planning rehabilitation programs. Adult education principles were used as a lens to understand offenders' perceptions of rehabilitation programs. Using an interpretive paradigm and qualitative approach, individual interviews, observations and focus group meetings were held with offenders and other participants who were chosen through purposive and snowball sampling. Qualitative data analysis was used to generate the themes from the data. The findings revealed that rehabilitation programs are ineffective and imposed on offenders. Furthermore the data revealed that offenders see themselves as hard-labour while participating in rehabilitation programs. This has an implication for offenders' rehabilitation and reintegration into their societies as transformed citizens.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - Gender differences in online participation: Examining
           a history and a mathematics open foundation online course
    • Abstract: Morante, Annette; Djenidi, Valerie; Clark, Helene; West, Susan
      With enrolment and completion rates in the University of Newcastle's online Open Foundation enabling program being considerably higher for women than for men, this case study investigates the engagement of male and female students in two different subject areas. History and Mathematics students' online behaviour is examined to identify whether they differ and if there is a correlation between time spent online and student results. Is low-level, or no online interaction a problem or does it differ for the two genders, and the two subjects' It is generally accepted that women engage more but does this lead to higher results for them' Students do not always appreciate how different the world of online learning is, and, in addition, some experience difficulties in understanding how to use Blackboard effectively. By examining students' online engagement we seek to identify the behaviours that lead to retention of students and ultimately to their successful completion of the program.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - Bringing together learning from two worlds: Lessons
           from a gender-inclusive community education approach with smallholder
           farmers in Papua New Guinea
    • Abstract: Pamphilon, Barbara; Mikhailovich, Katja
      Smallholder farmers are the backbone of food production in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Due to an increasing need to pay for schooling and health costs, many farming families are seeking ways to move from semi-subsistence farming to activities that generate more income. The long tradition of agricultural training in PNG to support the development of farmers has focused on technology transfer and on the production of cash crops. This form of farmer education has primarily benefited men, who typically control cash crop production. It has often excluded women, whose significant engagement in it is precluded by their low literacy, low education, family responsibilities and daily work on subsistence crops. This article examines the lessons learned from a project that facilitated village-level community education workshops that sought to bring male and female heads of families together in a culturally appropriate way in order to encourage more gender-equitable planning and farming practices. Through the development and capacity building of local training teams, the project developed a critical and place-based pedagogy underpinned by gender-inclusive and asset-based community development principles.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 2 - From the editor's desk
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Integrated non-formal education and training programs
           and centre linkages for adult employment in South Africa
    • Abstract: Mayombe, Celestin
      This article outlines the results of a qualitative study, which investigated the adult non-formal education and training (NFET) centre linkages with external role-players in providing post-training support for the employment of graduates. The concern that informed this article is that adults who face long-term unemployment remain unemployed after completing the NFET programs in South Africa. The article reports on an empirical study conducted to investigate what constitutes NFET enabling environments for employment. The findings reveal that managers did not create adequate linkages that could enable graduates to access needed post-training support, community resources, public goods and services. The author concludes that without linking the NFET programs to external stakeholders, graduates will continue to find it difficult to be employed or to start small businesses which perpetuates unemployment and chronic poverty in South Africa.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - On the borders of Pedagogy: Implementing a critical
           pedagogy for students on the Thai Burma border
    • Abstract: Couch, Jen
      This article uses an auto-ethnographic approach to explore the reflections and insights that occurred during my teaching of a subject in adolescent development on the Thai Burma border. This paper adopts a relatively descriptive style to a personal reflection of teaching on the border and how it transformed the way I teach and made me look at the pedagogy that underpins my teaching practice. I found a lack of congruence between the pedagogical theories that are espoused and how I could apply these to a border setting. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to explore some of the ways I began to develop a Thai Burma classroom praxis that drew on the theoretical underpinnings of a humanising critical pedagogy.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Analysis of an organisation: A University of the third
           age (U3A), Mornington, Victoria
    • Abstract: Small, Michael
      The purpose of this paper is two fold: to look at Mornington U3A in organisational terms and then look at U3AM as a loosely coupled system. One outcome of the study would be to undertake further analyses of U3As in Victoria to determine the levels of bureaucracy under which each operates. Questions to be asked: are U3As in Victoria operating as bureaucracies and so need to be loosened up' Or are they run as organisational anarchies and need to be tightened up'

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - These walls speak volumes: A history of mechanics'
           institutes in Victoria [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Townsend, Rob
      Review(s) of: These walls speak volumes: A history of mechanics' institutes in Victoria, by Pam Baragwanath and Ken James, Self-published, Ringwood North, Vic. 2015.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Notes for intending contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Just another student survey': - Point-of-contact
           survey feedback enhances the student experience and lets researchers
           gather data
    • Abstract: Lake, Warren; Boyd, William; Boyd, Wendy; Hellmundt, Suzi
      When student surveys are conducted within university environments, one outcome of feedback to the researcher is that it provides insight into the potential ways that curriculum can be modified and how content can be better delivered. However, the benefit to the current students undertaking the survey is not always evident. By modifying Biggs' revised two-factor study process questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F), we have provided students with immediate point-of-contact feedback that encourages students to consider their own cognitive processes. The main purpose of the modified tool is to provide immediate benefit to the student, whilst retaining the functionality of the survey for the researcher. Two versions of the survey were presented to students, a feedback version and non-feedback version, with results indicating that the participants of the feedback version had a significantly higher opinion that the survey helped them to be a better learner. In general, the importance students place on feedback, regardless of the version of the survey completed, was evident in the study. The point-of-contact survey model implemented in this study has successfully allowed a tool that was once exclusively researcher focused to be oriented towards current students, introducing an additional layer of feedback, which directly benefits the current student, whilst retaining its usefulness as a diagnostic research tool.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Second chance education: Barriers, supports and
           engagement strategies
    • Abstract: Savelsberg, Harry; Pignata, Silvia; Weckert, Pauline
      Second chance education programs are now a well-established presence in institutions seeking to provide access and equity pathways for socio-economically disadvantaged groups. This paper focusses on the strategies used to support positive engagement in second chance equity programs, drawing upon evaluation research data from four TAFE sponsored programs. Interviews were held with service providers involved in the programs' development and delivery, and focus groups were held to gather information from program participants. The findings highlight the complex and often multiple barriers facing participants and the importance of delivering programs with sustained and tailored approaches. While tangible educational and/or employment outcomes were delivered, it was the associated social and personal development that made these programs especially successful. Hence, there is a need for equity programs to be holistic, scaffolded, and tailored to practical and vocational pathways.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Insights into attrition from university-based enabling
           programs
    • Abstract: Bookallil, Cheryl; Harreveld, Bobby
      High attrition rates from university-based enabling programs continue to be the subject of much research and administrative effort. Understanding the factors behind decisions to withdraw from such programs is difficult since those who do not successfully complete an enabling program may not readily agree to participate in research into their motivations for enrolling, and reasons for withdrawal, leaving them silent in the literature. Students who are relatively successful with enabling study have 'insider' perceptions to share concerning the motivations of their fellow students, and the barriers some face. They can provide unique insights into factors behind the intractable problem of high attrition from enabling programs and the low rates of articulation into university study.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Call for expression of interest - editor of the
           Australian journal of adult earning
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Australian Council for adult literacy - 2017 National
           conference
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - Second chance learning in neighbourhood houses
    • Abstract: Ollis, Tracey; Starr, Karen; Ryan, Cheryl; Angwin, Jennifer; Harrison, Ursula
      Neighbourhood Houses in Victoria are significant sites of formal and informal education for adult learners. Intrinsically connected to local communities they play an important role in decreasing social isolation and building social inclusion. The focus of this research is on adult learners and adult learning that engages with 'second chance' learners who participate in adult learning programs in the Barwon and South West regions of Victoria. The greater Geelong region is characterised by declining car automotive and textile manufacturing industries and emerging new industries such as hospitality and tourism. The data from the research participants in the study include career changers, long term and recently unemployed, newly arrived and migrant communities, young people and older adults. This paper focuses on the learning practices of second chance learners who frequently have negative perceptions of themselves as unsuccessful learners, but are transformed through their learning experiences in Neighbourhood Houses. We argue the unique social space of the Neighbourhood House, the support and guidance offered by staff and teachers, the unique pedagogy and small group learning experiences, allows adult learners to reconstruct a new identity of themselves as successful learners.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 1 - From the Editor's desk
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - The meanings of learning as described by polish
           migrant bloggers
    • Abstract: Popow, Monika
      This paper addresses the meanings given to learning by Polish migrant bloggers. It presents the result of an analysis of ten blogs, written by Poles living abroad. The blogs under analysis were chosen on the basis of random sample. The analysed material was categorised by recurring themes, which included: learning in Poland, language acquisition, formal education, learning about the new culture, discovering the social norms of the host society and seeing immigration as an all-round learning experience. Four types of meanings given by authors were distinguished: migration as learning experience, learning as effort which deserves a reward, learning as a change, and learning as adapting to multiculturalism. The meanings were analysed according to the principles of critical discourse analysis. The paper discusses how the meanings given by authors are linked to a broad socio-cultural context. It analyses also the impact of learning into identity creation processes.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - A farmer becomes a social pedagogue: A psycho-societal
           approach
    • Abstract: Mellon, Karsten
      In Denmark various non-traditional students are mature-age students who already have some kind of a vocational background. When applying to do a professional degree, most of them fall outside the traditional admission requirements, which is why individual assessment of applicants is necessary for bachelor programmes. This article examines the case of a woman named Amy, a mature, non-traditional university college student who becomes a social pedagogue. Because of severe allergies, Amy had to quit her job as a farmer and began to study to become a social pedagogue. Becoming a social pedagogue is a tremendously complex process that involves taking on a new professional identity and acquiring new skills. In order to ascertain the extent of this complexity, this article uses a psycho-societal approach derived from a Danish/German life history research approach. This article offers a brief presentation of the theoretical and methodological framework applied before analysing the process Amy undergoes to become a social pedagogue. The analysis demonstrates that this type of significant career change is demanding and, for Amy, filled with feelings of ambivalence and defensiveness.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - Call for papers for AJAL special issue (November 2017)
           getting of Wisdom - learning in later life
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - AJAL reviewers in 2016
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - From the editor's desk
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - Group work oral participation: Examining Korean
           students' adjustment process in a US university
    • Abstract: Kim, Jung Yin
      This study examines, from a sociocultural perspective, the factors that explain why a group of seven Korean students attending an undergraduate business program in a US university are initially labelled as silent participants when first engaging in group work, and how these factors impacted the students' overall adjustment process. Data came from in-depth interviews and group work observations. 'Discourse system' is used to categorise how they adapt over the course of a semester, with changes in expressing ideas, holding ground, and self-autonomy. The study showed that while various factors, including the students' English language proficiency, differences in sociocultural values and educational practices, and group work environment were intertwined and informed their group work adjustment process, differences in sociocultural values and educational practices played the most important role in their adjustment process. Regardless of their length of stay in the US, gender, and individual differences, all of the students felt challenged in the initial stages of participation in group work. The findings suggest pedagogical implications for promoting oral participation of Asian international students, especially Korean students, when they first commence in group work.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - Contemporary constructivist practices in higher
           education settings and academic motivational factors
    • Abstract: Alt, Dorit
      This study was aimed at assessing the relationships between college students' pre-entry factors, self-efficacy and motivation for learning, and the perceived constructivist learning in traditional lecture-based courses and seminars (SM). The study included 411 undergraduate third-year college students. Several scales were administered to the participants: The Constructivist Learning in Higher Education Settings scale (CLHES) aimed at measuring students' perceptions of occurrences of contemporary constructivist practices in learning environments, along three dimensions: constructive activity, teacher-student interaction and social activity; the Academic Motivation Scale - College (CEGEP); and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Regression analysis main results showed that the constructive activity and teacher- student interaction factors were positively correlated. The teacher- student interaction variable was highly effective in enhancing intrinsic motivation for learning which in turn, contributed primarily to academic self-efficacy. The motivational factors were not solely affected by the learning environment perception but were also informed, to some extent, by several pre-entry factors.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - Emotional highs in adult experiential learning
    • Abstract: Zeivots, Sandris
      Despite knowing that positive emotional experiences tend to be beneficial for adult learning, our incomplete understanding of the emotional system rarely allows us to incorporate emotion adequately in real learning situations. The experience of emotional highs, as observed in adult experiential learning courses, has been selected as the phenomenon of the study. This paper is concerned with developing a more sophisticated understanding of the phenomenon by studying the lived experience of emotional highs. Hermeneutic phenomenology has been selected as a suitable approach. This approach examines the lived state of emotional highs as well as recognises how adult learners make sense of these experiences. The lived experiences of 15 Australian adult learners were examined. Learners participated in one of three 4-8 day adult experiential learning courses, including two Outward Bound courses. The courses were held half indoors and half outdoors. Learners reflected and made sense of their lived experience through surveys and semi-structured interviews. As a result, a sophisticated definition of emotional highs is proposed.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - Notes for intending contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - Beyond economic interests: Critical perspectives on
           adult literacy and numeracy in a globalised world [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Castleton, Geraldine
      Review(s) of: Beyond economic interests: Critical perspectives on adult literacy and numeracy in a globalised world, by Keiko Yasukawa and Stephen Black (eds.), Sense Publishers, The Netherlands, 2016, 237 pages.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - Is society capable of learning': Beyond a
           metaphysical foundation
    • Abstract: Su, Ya-hui
      There is an assumption that any contemporary society should become a learning society to maintain stability in the face of change. Although proponents and policymakers take for granted that a society has the ability to learn, can this idea be defended' There is a problem in determining exactly what is meant by a learning society that learns. One response concerning whether a society has the ability to learn is negative, arguing that society lacks agency. In this article, I argue that society has the ability to learn by demonstrating how the negative position is untenable; I also show how the positive position is possible when the idea that a society has the ability to learn assumes a new meaning based on the view that a society is composed of individuals. I present Habermas' view that society can be a learning mechanism on its own, yet I argue that social agency has a distinctive character on its own but not a distinctive character on its own behalf. We need not build a metaphysical foundation, which claims that society can be a learning mechanism on its own in a way that extends beyond the efforts of individuals to construct a self-image.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 3 - Reasons for the slow completion of Masters and
           Doctoral degrees by adult learners in a South African township
    • Abstract: Motseke, Masilonyana
      The aim of the study was to investigate the reasons why adult learners took longer than required to complete their Master's and Doctoral degrees. A questionnaire and focus group interviews were used to collect data. Twenty adult learners who registered for the Master's and Doctoral degrees at one township campus of a university were targeted, and 16 responded. All 16 participants lived in the townships, and obtained their primary, secondary and tertiary education from the township schools. It was found that the lack of computer skills, poor research skills, inadequate access to the internet, stress, supervision problems, as well as employer's workload contributed enormously to the adult learners' inability to complete their studies within the prescribed period. The study also highlighted the impact of apartheid education on adult learners at postgraduate level. The apartheid education system, which was characterised by poor education provision, played a major role in the slow completion of Masters and Doctoral degrees by the African adult learners. It is recommended that African adult learners who enroll for Masters or Doctoral degrees should do training in research approaches, computer skills, information search and stress management prior to their study. The study duration for both the Masters and Doctoral degrees also need to be reviewed, especially for adult learners or students who obtained their education from the township schools.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - Call for papers for AJAL special issue (November 2017)
           getting of Wisdom - learning in later life
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - From the Editor's Desk
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - University Transition Challenges for first year
           domestic CALD students from refugee backgrounds: A case study from an
           Australian Regional University
    • Abstract: Kong, Eric; Harmsworth, Sarah; Rajaeian, Mohammad Mehdi; Parkes, Geoffrey; Bishop, Sue; AlMansouri, Bassim; Lawrence, Jill
      Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) is used broadly and inclusively to describe communities with diverse language, ethnic background, nationality, dress, traditions, food, societal structures, art and religion characteristics. Domestic CALD people are either refugees or voluntary migrants and have obtained permanent residency or citizenship. This paper identifies the key issues, challenges and needs of first year domestic CALD students from refugee backgrounds at a multi-campus regional university in Queensland, Australia. The term refugee background is used in the paper as the students are no longer refugees having successfully transitioned from refugee status to being permanent residents. Qualitative data was collected through one-on-one semi-structured interviews and focus groups with domestic CALD students from refugee backgrounds, and from key informants including teaching, administrative, and senior management staff members. Other than language and differences in education styles, this cohort of students faced other challenges, particularly in a regional setting, including socio-cultural issues, technology issues, family and health challenges and limited staff awareness of refugee needs. The findings provide insights into how Australian regional university policy makers could develop effective strategies, practices, procedures and policies to support CALD students from refugee backgrounds and to improve their retention and progression.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - Opportunity through online learning: Experiences of
           first-in-family students in online open-entry higher education Cathy
           Stone, Sarah O'Shea, Josephine May, Janine Delahunty and Zoe Partington
    • Abstract: Stone, Cathy; O'Shea, Sarah; May, Josephine; Delahunty, Janine; Partington, Zoe
      Online learning has an important place in widening access and participation in higher education for diverse student cohorts. One cohort taking up online study in increasing numbers is that of mature-age, first-in-family students. First-in-family is defined as those who are the first in their immediate family, including parents, siblings, partners and children, to undertake university studies. This paper looks at the experience of 87 first-in-family students, for whom the opportunity to study open-entry, online undergraduate units through Open Universities Australia made it possible for them to embark on a university education. Using a qualitative methodology, in-depth interviews and surveys were conducted with these students as part of a wider study into first-in-family students (O'Shea, May and Stone, 2015). Findings include the important role that opportunity plays in providing the impetus for study, as well as the importance of support and encouragement from family, friends, colleagues and institutions in being able to continue the journey.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - Staying power: The effect of pathway into university
           on student achievement and attrition
    • Abstract: Chesters, Jenny; Watson, Louise
      The expansion of the higher education sector in Australia opened up new pathways into university increasing the diversity of the student population. For non-traditional students, those who did not successfully complete secondary school, barriers to gaining entry into university have been dismantled, however, previous research suggests that non-traditional students are more likely than traditional students to drop out of higher education. This paper analyses administrative data for a cohort of first year undergraduate students attending an Australian university to examine the association between pathway to university and student retention and academic progression. Our findings show that after controlling for grade point average, students who completed an enabling course on campus prior to commencing their undergraduate program were less likely than students admitted on the basis of completing secondary school to discontinue their university studies. This suggests that enabling programs provided on campus may assist students who do not meet the minimum requirements for university entrance to complete a university degree.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - 'OnTrack' to university: Understanding mechanisms of
           student retention in an Australian pre-university enabling program
    • Abstract: Lisciandro, Joanne G; Gibbs, Gael
      University-based enabling programs have become an important pathway to university for non-traditional students. There is increasing interest in understanding the mechanisms that facilitate retention and success of enabling pathway students, with the aim of developing effective strategies for maximising opportunities for university access and participation. The current study focuses on an Australian enabling program that has achieved and sustained high retention rates, with three-quarters of its 2115 students that enrolled during the last seven years (2008 - 2014) retained until the end of the program. Further, 90 per cent of retained students were successful in receiving an offer to university; and 94 per cent of students that received an offer subsequently enrolled in an undergraduate course. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that demographic and prior educational factors explained little about student retention in the program. The main reasons cited for withdrawal were medical or emotional issues, and family problems or responsibilities. Overall, this data suggests that-both pre-program conduct and in-program practices may enhance student retention outcomes. Specifically, practices that support the development of strong peer and tutor-student relationships, and that foster community connections, are thought to provide a significant and positive influence on student retention in enabling programs.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - Popular Culture as Pedagogy: Research in the field of
           adult education
    • Abstract: Speldewinde, Chris
      Popular Culture as Pedagogy: Research in the field of adult education, by Kaela Jubas, Nancy Taber and Tony Brown (Eds.) (2015) Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, ISBN978-94-6300-272-1 paperback, ($32.00), vii+160 pages, index.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - Transformative learning challenges in a context of
           trauma and fear: An educator's story
    • Abstract: John, Vaughn M
      After more than three decades of development, transformative learning theory is currently a major theory of adult learning. It has also attracted substantial critique, leading to further development, application and differentiation. Recent contributions to this vast scholarship show a quest for a more unified theory.

      This article examines transformative learning theory via a case study of an adult education project in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Drawing on life and pedagogical experiences of an educator, it focusses on aspects of the theory subjected to critique and raises questions about attempts to foster transformative learning in oppressive contexts involving trauma and fear. The article calls for greater attention to the life and experiences of the educator in the learning process while responding to calls for theoretical examination in more diverse contexts. It thus illustrates how more varied, situated accounts of transformative learning attempts may challenge and improve our understandings of adult learning encounters.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 2 - The juxtaposition of STEPS to the undergraduate arena:
           The lived experience of transitioning into undergraduate study
    • Abstract: James, Trixie
      Australia wide, universities are offering tertiary education to the broader socio-economic cohort; however, alongside this educational reform, there is a concern that students who have been away from the formal education context for many years may not cope with the rigors of university. Consequently, prior to and conditional to admission to undergraduate studies, many universities have placed a greater emphasis on pre-skilling such students through pre-university programs known interchangeably as Enabling, Preparatory, Transition or Access programs. The research findings reported on in this article explore the lived experiences of eight first year undergraduate students, who upon the completion of an Enabling program, successfully articulated into and completed the first year of their university degree. Using a theoretical framework of social-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) and the application of existential phenomenology, commonalities in these experiences of the participants emerged. Four key themes were: (i) a sense of preparedness, (ii) fear of the unknown, (iii) university as an anchor, and (iv) a sense of certainty and rightness. In combination, the degree of self-efficacy demonstrated by each of the eight students can be said to have contributed to the successful completion of their first year of undergraduate studies.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - From the editor's desk
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - Opening the learning process: The potential role of
           feature film in teaching employment relations
    • Abstract: Lafferty, George
      This paper explores the potential of feature film to encourage more inclusive, participatory and open learning in the area of employment relations. Evaluations of student responses in a single postgraduate course over a five-year period revealed how feature film could encourage participatory learning processes in which students re-examined their initial perspectives on a series of employment relations topics and debates. Over time, the course became increasingly characterised by a pluralism in which all participants became more open to a range of different views, including those of students from diverse political, cultural and religious backgrounds. Of particular note was how the fictional situations depicted in feature films could expand the opportunities for participation and more complex, multidimensional approaches to learning. Following on from a discussion of how more open learning processes require a reconfigured conceptual framework, the paper concludes with some open-ended questions on the use of film in learning processes.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - University-based enabling program outcomes: Comparing
           distance education and internal study
    • Abstract: Bookallil, Cheryl; Rolfe, John
      Enrolment in university enabling programs has expanded dramatically in the last decade as universities strive to increase enrolments, particularly of students from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Offering enabling study by distance education has been part of this expansion with the benefit of providing access to a wider enrolment base. The purpose of this study was to compare enabling program completions and articulations to undergraduate study as well as student academic performance between those students who undertook enabling by internal mode and those who opted for distance education. Archival data from the host university student records system was extracted covering the time period from 2001 to 2011. Statistical analysis found significant differences existed in both course completion and articulation for students enrolled in online learning versus face-to-face teaching. Analysis also revealed academic achievement in the enabling programs, as measured by Grade point Average (GPA), to be higher among internal students compared to distance students.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - Unlocking the potential within: A preliminary study of
           individual and community outcomes from a university enabling program in
           rural Australia
    • Abstract: Johns, Susan; Crawford, Nicole; Hawkins, Cherie; Jarvis, Lynn; Harris, Mike; McCormack, David
      Many rural communities have a pool of mature-aged local people seeking a career change or better lifestyle, which inevitably involves reskilling or upskilling. These people have strong local ties and are committed to their community. University enabling programs provide a bridge to higher education. This longitudinal study explores the impact on rural mature-aged people of participation in a university enabling program, in terms of further study and employment outcomes. The benefits of enabling programs extend beyond individuals, to family and friends, and beyond. These broader benefits include an enhanced local skills base in key industry areas, and an increased awareness of the value of higher education within the community. Enabling programs are a powerful but under-valued tool in helping to unlock and harness the potential within rural communities, both in the medium and longer term.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - Learning to swim using video modelling and video
           feedback within a self-management program
    • Abstract: Lao, So-An; Furlonger, Brett E; Moore, Dennis W; Busacca, Margherita
      Although many adults who cannot swim are primarily interested in learning by direct coaching there are options that have a focus on self-directed learning. As an alternative a self-management program combined with video modelling, video feedback and high quality and affordable video technology was used to assess its effectiveness to assisting an adult to develop and practice swimming skills. The participant was a 36 year-old non-swimmer who had previously attempted unsuccessfully to learn to swim on previous occasions. A single subject design with baseline, intervention and 12-month post-intervention phase were conducted. Dependent variables included a continuous 25-metre swimming distance goal using the freestyle stroke. After a 13-week intervention phase the continuous swimming distance had increased to 25 metres. For this adult participant, self-managed learning proved to be an effective way to learn to swim and greatly improved her confidence around deep water.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - A survey on the influence of titles on the visitor's
           interpretation and learning in art galleries: An Iranian context
    • Abstract: Samanian, Kouros
      As previous studies suggest, titles of works of art have generally proven to be influential elements in reading and interpretation of the artworks. In the exhibition context, titles can be considered as a physical component of the museum or art gallery's space. According to the relatively new approaches, learning, being a subcategory of interpretation, occurs as a result of the dialogue between the personal background of the visitor and the context of museums. The present study takes shape on the ground of general studies on titles to account for titling role in the interpretation, hence the learning process of visitors. It also attempts to show whether the artistic background of visitors would influence the role they assign to titles in the process of interpretation. The results of this study can inform art galleries of how visitors regard titles and how titling can be a potential learning element. It may also suggest designing titling manuals to inform the artists of how titles can act as a medium between the artwork and audience. By following a survey method, 243 questionnaires were obtained from visitors of five painting exhibitions in the art galleries of Tehran. The data was analysed using SSPS software. The results suggested that interaction of visitors with titles can be categorised by two indicators of importance and functionality, both of which received high value by visitors to art galleries in Tehran. The most significant function of title for visitors was communicative function. Also, there was a significant, inverted relationship between the amount of artistic background and considering function and importance for titles.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - Formative reflections of university recreation science
           students in South Africa as catalyst for an adapted service-learning
           program
    • Abstract: Goslin, Anneliese; van der Klashorst, Engela; Kluka, Darlene A; van Wyk, Johannes GU
      Community-university partnerships through service-learning have progressively developed as part of institutions of higher education's mission statements. This paper explores the qualitative reflections of 410 undergraduate students enrolled in an academic recreation science course on a first time service-learning experience in South Africa. The study asks the question: 'how can pre-service and formative reflections used in a social constructive approach impact on collaborative, in-depth learning'' Students were tasked to keep reflective journals to express concerns as pre-service-learning and formative reflections over a four week, twenty hour service-learning experience. The service-learning program aligned with the social constructivism principles of collaborative learning, which occurred under the guidance and supervision of a lecturer, was embedded in a realistic problem, required collaborative problem solving and collaboration with the community partner and involved self-direction and self-management of students. Both pre-service and formative reflection themes changed over the three year study period. Results suggested that the initial service-learning experience did not contribute to a positive attitude towards community engagement and did not contribute to skill development. Results of the study confirmed the value of reflection as a tool in service-learning and commensurate with the overall aim and purpose of service-learning in institutions of higher education.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - Notes for intending contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 56 Issue 1 - Teaching in the VET sector in Australia [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Stehlik, Tom
      Review(s) of: Teaching in the VET sector in Australia, by Ros Brennan Kemmis and Liz Atkins (eds.), David Barlow Publishing, Australia, 2014, 159 pages.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 3 - From the guest editors' desk
    • Abstract: Charman, Karen; Ryan, Maureen
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 3 - People who have reviewed for AJAL in 2015
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 3 - A space for memory
    • Abstract: Charman, Karen
      In this article I examine the possibilities of reparation in an era of privatisation and de-industrialisation. I examine the effect of a recent project Sunshine Memory Space, a space, designed to evoke memories of a de-industrialised urban Melbourne suburb Sunshine. This project offered the opportunity for the effects of industrial change to be publically represented, remembered and valued. I offer an analysis of the significance of relational localised curatorial work.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 55 Issue 3 - Reaching for the arts in unexpected places: Public
           pedagogy in the gardens
    • Abstract: Pelosi, Ligia
      What constitutes public pedagogy' The term is broad and can be applied in so many situations and settings to the learning that occurs outside of formal schooling. In this article, the author explores how a community event - a painting competition held in a Melbourne suburb's botanic gardens - constitutes public pedagogy. The event centres on appreciation of the gardens, and on fostering the arts in the community. Local schools and residents have shown their appreciation of the competition through increased participation over the past five years. However, there is much learning that is unexpected and far less tangible, which flourishes beneath the surface of the event. Capturing a collective memory of the suburb is one aspect of such learning that is historically significant. The author argues that the event can also be seen as activist in a political sense, through the way it has restored the arts to the community in a way that education in a neo-liberal climate is currently unable to do.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2018 15:10:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 2 - Women and/or immigrants: A feminist reading on the
           marginalised adult learners in Korean lifelong learning policy and
           practice
    • Abstract: Lee, Romee; Kim, Jinhee
      This paper aims to analyse the policy and practice of lifelong learning (LLL), particularly adult education and learning (ALE) for women, immigrants, and women/immigrants in South Korea. An international as well as national policy document analysis was conducted to explore the impact of Korea's policy and practice of LLL for these groups of learners. Findings reveal that they are situated in the middle of gendered and/or racialised trends in ALE within an intensifying neoliberal context where learning is mainly utilised as a tool for employment in contemporary Korean society. Possible implications from the analysis were addressed to suggest policy updates and better practices.

      PubDate: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 21:15:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 2 - Women, adult literacy education and transformative
           bonds of care
    • Abstract: Duckworth, Vicky; Smith, Rob
      Drawing on a research project: 'FE in England - Transforming lives and communities' (sponsored by the University and College Union) to explore the intersection between women, literacy and adult education, this paper argues for the place of research in affirming localised understandings of education that cut across the grain of contemporary educational reform. In the context of the increasing dominance of a 'skills' discourse in education in the UK and reductions in funding targeted at adult education, this research project exposed how further education can still challenge and address hurt and often spoiled learning identities and counteract the objectification of the skills discourse through creating catalysing bridging bonds of care. The research data illustrate that further education offers organic transformative tools for consciousness-raising (Freire, 1995) and a caring space where hope can act as a change agent that fuels women learners' lives and teachers' practice.

      PubDate: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 21:15:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 2 - From the editor's desk
    • Abstract: Ollis, Tracey
      PubDate: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 21:15:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 2 - Transitioning from VET to HE in hospitality and
           tourism studies: VET grades as an indicator of performance in HE
    • Abstract: Richards, James; Dolphin, Andrew
      After reviewing research concerning student transition from Vocational Education and Training (VET) to Higher Education (HE), which mostly focussed on enablers, this paper examined the role of graded assessment within a competency based training (CBT) framework and its relationship to subsequent performance in HE studies. From this background, the key question was derived; is there a relationship between grades awarded under CBT and HE academic performance' The academic results of 34 students were reviewed for both VET and HE studies, and correlations analysed using the Spearman Rho calculator. A Likert style survey was used to gauge student perceptions as to their investment in assessment activities and the extent to which VET studies prepared them for HE. Results indicated that a positive correlation existed between performance in VET studies and those in HE. This correlation was supported in that most students reported that they did attempt to achieve the highest grades possible across both sectors. It was concluded that using VET grades as predictors of success in HE was valid for this cohort and that students believed that VET assisted in preparing them for HE studies. The findings add to the argument calling for retention and indeed refinement of grading within the CBT system.

      PubDate: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 21:15:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 2 - A new education pathway for postgraduate psychology
           students: Challenges and opportunities
    • Abstract: Reupert, Andrea; Davis, Melissa; Stewart, Sandra; Bridgman, Heather
      In Australia, the limited number of psychology postgraduate places, coupled with a high demand for mental health and psychological services underscores the need for new, innovative models of psychology training. The objectives of this paper are to describe the 5 + 1 internship pathway; why it was developed; the pedagogy employed and to stimulate debate regarding training models for Australia's future psychology workforce. Information outlined in this paper is drawn from the public domain and our collective experiences as fifth year coordinators and/or stakeholders in developing Australia's psychology workforce. The content of the fifth year program is applied and practical. Content is generalist as opposed to specialist, while pedagogical approaches employed are predominately experiential. The fifth year program lends itself to integration with other training models. Perceptions that the training is inferior to specialist programs need to be challenged. Online offerings are a priority to ensure training is available for students in rural and remote areas or seeking flexible modes of delivery.

      PubDate: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 21:15:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 2 - Critical reflection in the workplace and management
           competencies: In service of transformation'
    • Abstract: de Souza, Ricardo; Brunstein, Janette
      Critical reflection is understood as a valuable exercise for the creation of new meanings and behaviours. This article argues that if the focus of critical reflection is too concentrated on performance, its strength in the work environment is weakened, in other words, its potential for creating changes diminishes. This is based on an interpretive qualitative study that aims to understand the meaning that critical reflection assumes in the work environment and how it relates to managerial competence regarding professional conduct. Using narratives from the managers of a financial organisation, events involving disorienting workday dilemmas are presented, revealing moments of reflection. The actions set in motion by these reflections, and when these actions became competencies for negotiating conflicts between individual desires and the transformation of their context, are then discussed. Finally, a warning is offered about the risk of weakening the concept of critical reflection in the workplace, as it is sometimes treated merely from the performance point of view in the literature.

      PubDate: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 21:15:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 2 - It pays to prepare: The value of low-stakes tutorial
           preparation exercises to student performance
    • Abstract: Pearce, Christopher
      Engaging students in university classes is becoming an increasingly difficult challenge. One tool that can be utilised to enhance participation and engagement are low-stakes, low value, tutorial pre-preparation exercises. This exercise was trialled in the University of Technology Sydney Faculty of Law subject, Real Property over the course of 2017. This paper examines the results of the introduction of the task, in particular focussing upon the Expectancy Value Theory, and the relationship between a student's expectancy for success on the preparation task and the value attributed to that task. I found a strong correlation between student performance in that exercise and their subsequent performance on higher stakes assessments. Feedback demonstrates that this exercise increased engagement and performance in a course that had been perceived by the student body as challenging.

      PubDate: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 21:15:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 2 - Experience and education [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Schulz, Christine
      Review(s) of: Experience and education, by John Dewey, New York, Macmillan Company, 1938, 0-684-83828-1, 91pp.

      PubDate: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 21:15:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - From the editor's desk
    • Abstract: Ollis, Tracey
      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - Enabling learners starts with knowing them: Student
           attitudes, aspiration and anxiety towards science and maths learning in an
           Australian pre-university enabling program
    • Abstract: Lisciandro, Joanne G; Jones, Angela; Geerlings, Peter
      Pre-university enabling programs provide an important pathway to university for under prepared and disadvantaged students. In order to adequately prepare students for their university journey, enabling educators need to understand and respond to the evolving needs of their learners; not only their academic disparity, but also their past learning experiences and perceptions towards particular subjects. In the current study, students entering an Australian enabling program, 'OnTrack', were surveyed on their attitudes, emotions and aspirations towards the study of science and mathematics. Responses were associated with student perceptions of their past science and maths learning experiences. There was incongruity between student expectations of what future study would entail and the realities of their degree choices and career aspirations. This study suggests the need for social and emotional learning and teacher training. Greater attention should be given to both student's affective needs and their understanding of future course content during their enabling education experience to redress negative emotional learning experiences and safeguard student expectations, satisfaction, and retention in the future.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - What should be considered when designing and
           developing a counselling course for adults from diverse professional and
           cultural backgrounds'
    • Abstract: Furlonger, Brett; Snell, Tristan; Di Mattia, Michael; Reupert, Andrea
      Increased demand for counselling services has escalated the need for quality counsellor education programs. Striving to achieve quality in course design is a process not often articulated publicly. To address this gap, the design and development of a counsellor education course is described and includes the sources of knowledge that influenced its design and the step-by-step development of the program. Challenges designers met are discussed, as well as the ways in which these challenges were met through collaborative problem solving.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - Informal workplace learning experiences of graduate
           student employees
    • Abstract: Unluhisarcikli, Ozlem
      Informal learning and how individuals learn in the workplace have gained increasing attention by researchers in recent years. In relation to other learning activities, informal learning constitutes a substantial part of an adult's life. This paper explores the informal workplace learning experiences of graduate student employees. Data was collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 14 PhD students who were employed at their universities. Thematic analysis was used to interpret the data. The findings revealed that graduate student employees learn at work by participating in various work practices, collaborating with colleagues and advisers, and meeting new challenges that provide learning opportunities. The challenges of a set task play a crucial role in learning and skill acquisition, and learning happens as a result of interaction between an individual, an activity and a context. The workplace also provides a social environment where people can grow in maturity and learn responsibility as well as skills. Learning is embodied in the everyday practices of work.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - Adult literacy and socio-cultural learning at Pina
           Pina Jarrinjaku (Yuendumu learning centre)
    • Abstract: Bauer, Ros
      The Whole of Community Engagement (WCE) initiative commenced in July 2014, led by the Office of Pro Vice Chancellor of Indigenous Leadership at Charles Darwin University (CDU). WCE aimed to build the aspiration, expectation and capacity of six remote and very remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory to participate and achieve in higher education. Using a place-based, Indigenous-led, community development approach, the initiative developed a model that could be applied by other Australian universities and agencies through engaging closely within Indigenous communities and promoting local level management, leadership, decision-making, research and action. The WCE included participatory action research and developmental evaluation approaches. Campus-based and remote Indigenous community-based staff worked together to identify educational needs, priorities and activities from the ground-up. Some of the main messages communities emphasised were that:

      - Aboriginal leadership and governance in remote education are essential

      - Education and higher education are a priority for many Indigenous people

      - Aboriginal cultural knowledge is foundational to other learning

      - Education should be 'both-ways'

      - Education was viewed holistically by Indigenous participants and includes wellbeing, spirituality and livelihood

      - English language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) is central to progress.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - Enhancing e-learning in old age
    • Abstract: Limone, Pierpaolo; Monacis, Lucia; Ceglie, Flavio; Sinatra, Maria; de Palo, Valeria
      The rapidly growing older population has led researchers to further investigate the cognitive domains of intelligence, learning, memory and attention, which normally change during ageing, and their implications for maintaining a good quality of life (Simpson, Camfield, Pipingas, Macpherson and Stough, 2012; Williams and Kemper, 2010). Universities of the Third Age offer education programs aimed at promoting psychological and social well being. There are a range of stereotypes about older people and their lifelong learning habits; for example, that they have low or no interest, experience anxiety or lack self-confidence (Chang, McAllister and McCaslin, 2014; Morrell, Mayhorn and Echt, 2004). These stereotypes are out of touch with reality. While there is general agreement in the literature that online educational programs can be effective interventions that foster intellectual stimulation and personal fulfilment (Gonzalez, Ram rez and Viadel, 2012, 2015; Goodwin, 2013; Wandke, Sengpiel and Sonksen, 2012). Older people take more time to learn; make more mistakes and need more support.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - Music learning for fun and well being at any age!
    • Abstract: Ellis, Bronwyn
      Music has long been shown to have diverse benefits for all age groups. Music therapy has been used in a variety of situations involving both physical and mental health issues. A report of a United Kingdom study on the benefits of older people's participation in community music activities prompted an investigation of the benefits of a new initiative in an Australian regional city - a ukulele group formed by members of the local branch of the University of the Third Age (U3A). Data gathering materials comprised a questionnaire completed by voluntary participants early in their involvement, a second questionnaire six weeks later, and a focus group near the end of the year, as well as participant observation. Both questionnaires incorporated Diener and Biswas-Diener's Flourishing Scale (Diener et al., 2009) and questions on the physical aspects of playing the ukulele. The first also sought details of demographics, motivation for learning, musical preferences and any previous experience in learning a musical instrument. The second asked for highlights and challenges and whether the experience could be recommended to others of their age. Responses indicate enjoyment in learning something new, despite some challenges, and in being part of the group. This is supported by the fact that most original members are still attending, and many new ones have joined them.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - Continuing professional education in Australia [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Jenkins, Gayle
      Review(s) of: Continuing professional education in Australia, by Barrie Brennan, Singapore, Springer Science+Business Media, 2016, ISBN 978-981-10-1830-5, ISBN: 978-981-10-1832-9, 257pp.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 58 Issue 1 - Call for papers for a special issue on: Lifelong
           learning and sustainable development
    • Abstract:
      Adult Learning Australia (ALA) has declared 2018 to be a Year of Lifelong Learning. This raises many questions about why lifelong learning should be a priority. How might policy to promote lifelong learning develop' Are there particular outcomes that should be anticipated from a year focussed on lifelong learning' How can we get the various stakeholders for formal, non-formal and informal learning across various age levels to work together to promote a more coherent and engaged framework for all people to see themselves on a lifelong learning journey'

      PubDate: Tue, 29 May 2018 07:18:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - People who have reviewed for AJAL in 2017
    • PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - From the guest editors' desk
    • Abstract: Krasovec, Sabina Jelenc; Golding, Barry; Findsen, Brian; Schmidt-Hertha, Bernhard
      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - How the Men's Shed idea travels to Scandinavia
    • Abstract: Ahl, Helene; Hedegaard, Joel; Golding, Barry
      Australia has around 1,000 Men's Sheds - informal communitybased workshops offering men beyond paid work somewhere to go, something to do and someone to talk to. They have proven to be of great benefit for older men's learning, health and wellbeing, social integration, and for developing a positive male identity focusing on community responsibility and care. A Men's Shed is typically selforganized and 'bottom-up', which is also a key success factor, since it provides participants with a sense of ownership and empowerment. Men's Sheds are now spreading rapidly internationally, but the uptake of the idea varies with the local and national context, and so too may the consequences. Our paper describes how the Men's Shed travelled to Denmark, a country with considerably more 'social engineering' than in Australia, where Sheds were opened in 2015, via a 'top-down' initiative sponsored by the Danish Ministry of Health. Using data from the study of the web pages of the Danish 'Shed' organizations, from interviews with the central organizer, and from visits and interviews with participants and local organizers at two Danish Men's sheds, we describe how the idea of the Men's Shed on the Australian model was interpreted and translated at central and local levels. Preliminary data indicate that similar positive benefits as exist in Australia may result, provided that local ownership is emphasized.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - The Paula principle: How and why women work below
           their level of competence [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Foley, Annette; Lavender, Peter
      Review(s) of: The Paula principle: How and why women work below their level of competence, by Tom Schuller (2017), London, Scribe 256pp, ISBN 9781911344018, e-book, ISBN 9781925548013.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Lifelong learning in policy and practice: The case of
           Sweden
    • Abstract: Bostrom, Ann-Kristin
      This paper describes the changes in lifelong learning policy that have taken place since the 1990s in Sweden. Policy documents regarding lifelong learning in Sweden have appeared since 1994. The first of these documents contains general recommendations with regard to lifelong learning, in both a lifelong and a lifewide perspective, concerning pre-school and compulsory school together with adult education and training. Much support for early stages in life can have a tendency to put adult education and learning in second place instead of the whole functioning well together. Regarding lifelong learning in practice, this paper will focus on popular education and study circles. The recently developed knitting caf s will also be accounted for. The paper also asks the question 'Who is getting education and learning in later life'' 'What are the criteria that will give individuals access to these possibilities' and 'What results can be expected'' The theoretical perspective taken in this paper is that social capital is a part of wellbeing, and the paper examines the extent to which this is connected to the social context.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - The engagement of universities in older adult
           education in Aotearoa New Zealand
    • Abstract: Findsen, Brian
      This article investigates the engagement of universities in older adult education in the specific context of Aotearoa New Zealand. Initially, the broader context of the tertiary education system and the place of universities within it are explained. Not unexpectedly adult education, and particularly older adult education, exists only on the margins of the system. Significant achievements in the past in regard to universities' contribution to older adult education are acknowledged before judging the effectiveness of current engagement, using Peterson's (1976) definition of educational gerontology as a benchmark. Globally, there are adventurous moves afoot to extend the vision and practices of universities to embrace elders as legitimate partners in learning. The article explores potential engagement by reviewing some global examples including an exemplary "traditional" programme, inter-generational learning/ education, an application of the Age Friendly University concept and two solid research studies of older adult education conducted in sites in Europe and Asia. The article concludes by reflecting on the possible application of these initiatives in the New Zealand context.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Opportunities for generativity in later life for older
           men
    • Abstract: Carragher, Lucia
      The changing social and economic landscape across European Member States and beyond has had a disproportionate effect on older adults. Nowhere is this more keenly felt than among the "buffer generation" of men caught between the silent, strong, austere masculinity of their forefathers and contemporary society - progressive, open and individualistic (Wyllie et al., 2012). In most countries, men have shorter life expectancies than women and higher mortality rates from most common causes of death. This imbalance arises from issues broader than disease related mortality, with post-industrial society seen to have reduced opportunities for men with regard to work and full time employment, further compounded by dispositional barriers to learning (European Commission, 2011). This paper presents findings from a mixed methods study of 297 older men participating in community-based Men's Sheds in Ireland and particularly explores the contributions generativity through Men's Sheds makes to the well-being of older men. The findings show men giving back to the community in different ways, including through the sharing of skills and experiences. It is argued that community-based Men's Sheds provide opportunities for generativity, with identifiable health benefits for older men, holding important lessons for policymakers to enable greater visibility of men's perspectives.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Fifty years of learning by older adults in Aotearoa
           New Zealand
    • Abstract: Tobias, Robert
      This paper reflects on the history of adult and community education (ACE) in Aotearoa New Zealand with special reference to older people's learning. The paper adopts a critical framework and draws on both primary and secondary sources. Key economic, political, social, demographic and cultural forces are discussed along with the huge growth in tertiary education, the increasing pressures on people to continue their education in later life, and the impact of social movements on this expansion. This growth in tertiary education has not been paralleled by a comparable growth of ACE, and I argue that the history of ACE is in fact more complex and subtle, with many different stories being told. I then discuss the history of older adults' learning and report briefly on some ACE programmes which have emerged over the years and some trends in government policy with special reference to the New Zealand Positive Ageing Strategy and its implications for older people's learning. In the light of the positive ageing rhetoric I also raise questions about the very limited government investment in ACE generally and in particular in older people's learning.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Ageing and learning experiences: The perspective of a
           Polish senior immigrant in Sweden
    • Abstract: Rawinski, Malgorzata Malec
      The general aim of this paper is to present some insights into Polish senior immigrants in Sweden. In particular, it seeks to identify and illustrate the important contribution of previous generations of Polish senior immigrants in building on the diverse culture, traditions and values of the Polish community (Polonia) in Sweden. The paper considers what it means to be an older (age 65+ year) Polish immigrant in Sweden. A biographical method was used in this research to gain these insights. The research evidence was largely collected by means of narrative interviews. Life history is one of the ways to gain insights into the experiences of individuals. A narrative output is never an isolated product. There is always a close link between narrative and other social, cultural and ideological contexts. This paper emphasizes that stories and participant experiences will make more sense if there is a good understanding of the broader contexts in which the individual's story and experiences are embedded. Because of its brevity, the focus of this paper is an in-depth rendition of one older woman's learning experiences in adjusting from war-torn Poland to Sweden.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Intergenerational exchange of knowledge, skills,
           values and practices between self-organized active citizens in Maribor,
           Slovenia
    • Abstract: Krasovec, Sabina Jelenc; Gregorcic, Marta
      Our paper deals with intergenerational informal learning developed by participatory democracy process in the Self-organized District Communities (SDC) in Maribor, the second largest city in Slovenia. It is based on the assumption that SDC assemblies, being safe and trustworthy, are very powerful spaces for behavioural and values exchange between generations and also for social and political engagement, having a capacity for critical, informed and caring citizenry of all ages (Pinnington and Schugurensky, 2009). Our case study is focused on the social dimensions of acquisition of skills, knowledge, attitudes and practices, as identified by Schugurensky (2006; 2013), and on features of social learning (Serrat et al., 2016). In an embedded single-case study design with multiple units (Yin, 2012) we conducted 12 interviews and a focus group. Among interviewees, six were retired, four were employed, one was a student and one was unemployed; they were members of first, second and the third generations. Results show that besides knowledge, skills and practices gained through intergenerational political and social actions in SDC assemblies, value and attitudinal changes (also regarding age) are among the most important outcomes of the democratic participatory process.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Constructing narratives in later life: Autoethnography
           beyond the academy
    • Abstract: Golding, Barry; Foley, Annette
      Learning through life experiences as distinct from learning through the academy and courses have become increasingly important themes in later life adult education research and practice. Whilst the dominant discourse for most younger people is still about education and training for students in standardised and accredited courses, there is increasing concern to find ways of giving voice to empower people otherwise excluded, disempowered or missing from mainstream education, learning, research and the community. This paper specifically explores and actively mirrors ways of using techniques developed through academic autoethnography to empower older people to share and make sense of the lives they have lived by exploring some of the unexamined assumptions that govern everyday life, behaviour and decision making including in the many, often very informal contexts well beyond educational institutions, the academy and paid work. In essence, like autoethnography, our paper seeks to identify, interrogate and celebrate ways of revealing and displaying multiple layers of consciousness connecting the personal to the cultural for sharing and celebrating diversity in later life.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Ma te ora ka mohio / 'Through life there is learning'
    • Abstract: Findsen, Brian; Golding, Barry; Krasovec, Sabina Jelenc; Schmidt-Hertha, Bernhard
      In our final paper we reflectively stand back and ask, 'What do we know and what have we learnt about lifelong learning in later life from the international Getting of Wisdom Exchange program and process, including the research papers in this volume' In critically addressing this question we draw not only on new insights from the papers in this themed volume and the wider literature of lifelong and later life learning, but also on insights from Indigenous knowledge(s). We sense an ideal opportunity to reflect on our insights into Indigenous learning and eldership in Australia and New Zealand to go beyond what research is actually included in this volume. In part, what we do is ask what voices, pedagogies and research tends not to be included here, that is also missing in most mainstream Western research, that typically seeks universal 'truths' about learning through peer reviewed scientific perspectives and methods. We certainly do not regard learning shaped and re-shaped by governments through neoliberal and conservative discourses as the only or last word. We have chosen the ancient te reo Māori words, Ma te ora ka mohio / 'Through life there is learning' as the title for our paper to emphasise that lifelong learning is an ancient and wise construct that regards life and learning as inseparable and mutually reinforcing.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Occupational and educational biographies of older
           workers and their participation in further education in Germany
    • Abstract: Schmidt-Hertha, Bernhard; Muller, Margaretha
      The adult cohort of the German National Educational Panel Study (NEPS) provides data from six sets of longitudinal data derived from 11,932 German adults. We used the NEPS data to look at the effects of formal education in adulthood and occupational changes on participation in further vocational education and training in order to gain a better understanding of learning activities of older workers. This data enables us to differentiate between upward mobility, downwards mobility and changes at the same level of occupation. In a multi-regression-analysis we control for well-documented predictors - such as level of schooling and vocational education, job status, gender and age as well as for company size. Descriptive results confirm the expected effects, but these effects disappear when the other variables are taken into account.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Learning to live with chronic illness in later life:
           Empowering myself
    • Abstract: Withnall, Alexandra
      Type 2 Diabetes is both an incurable illness and a hidden disability that has reached epidemic proportions on a global scale. It has obviously spawned a huge clinical literature, but no scholarly accounts of learning to live with the illness on a daily basis from a feminist perspective. As an older woman, I have made use of a somewhat controversial autoethnographical approach to explore how far I consider myself empowered to live with, and manage this condition for the rest of my life. Self-management is an idea that is central to both the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS) philosophy of supporting patient choice and within a feminist perspective on health care. Learning to identify, access and use the necessary resources to manage my condition suggests that there are regional differences within the UK as to how much practical care diabetes patients are offered or can access. The paternalistic nature of the health care team/patient relationship appears to militate against the concept of patient empowerment.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Learning for older adults in Portugal: Universities of
           the Third Age in a state of change
    • Abstract: Veloso, Esmeraldina Costa
      U3As have their origin in 1973 in Toulouse, France, with Professor Pierre Vellas. This French influence was also felt in Portugal and the first Portuguese U3A opened its doors also in the 1970's. However, from inception the Portuguese reality was very different from the French model, especially in regards to its promoters. However, both in France and Portugal, these original models have since undergone significant changes. Within this context, this study seeks to analyse this shift in the organisation of U3A, attempting to understand, amongst other factors, who are the social players behind the change, their goals, and how they are organised. To achieve these research goals, several data collection techniques were used such as document/text analysis of information on the different educational opportunities on offer to older adults, especially U3A, as well as conducting interviews with some leaders of U3A. Theoretically, the work of several authors who have analysed U3A such as Aline Chamain and Marvin Formosa are considered as well as authors who have researched third age policies, in particular Anne-Marie Guillemard. In conclusion, the present work shows U3As in Portugal present themselves in a different context in terms of their promoters - as either tertiary institutions or as private associations.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Notes for intending contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 57 Issue 3 - Distress in the city: Racism, fundamentalism and a
           democratic education [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Brown, Tony
      Review(s) of: Distress in the city: Racism, fundamentalism and a democratic education, Linden West, (2016), Trentham Books, UCL Institute of Education Press, London, 192pp., ISBN 978-1-85856-688-7, ISBN 978-1-85856-689-4 (e-book).

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 03:32:29 GMT
       
 
 
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