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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
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Journal Cover Australian Field Ornithology
  [SJR: 0.141]   [H-I: 6]   [3 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1448-0107
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 34 Identification of terrestrial predators at two little penguin
           colonies in South Australia
    • Abstract: Colombelli-Negrel, Diane; Tomo, Ikuko
      Identifying predators and determining their influence on bird population declines can be crucial in the implementation of appropriate conservation measures. In this study, we focus on the Little Penguin Eudyptula minor, a flightless seabird whose numbers have seriously declined in some populations across Australia and New Zealand, for a variety of reasons, some not fully understood. Using a combination of motion-camera monitoring at active burrows and postmortem examinations of carcasses, we present data on the identity, occurrence and impact of terrestrial predators at two colonies in South Australia: Granite Island and Emu Bay (Kangaroo Island). Terrestrial predation varied from 20% for carcasses found on Granite Island to 44% at Emu Bay. There was no evidence for predation at burrows on Granite Island but, at Emu Bay, we identified goannas (Heath Monitor Varanus rosenbergi) as predators of chicks (by using cameras), and Cats Felis catus as predators of chicks and juveniles (from postmortem examination of carcasses). In addition, 45% of the carcasses found at Emu Bay were categorised as chicks. We discuss potential biases in identifying causes of death from carcasses only and the importance of combining both direct and indirect evidence.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The avifauna of Cartier Island commonwealth marine reserve,
           north-western Australia
    • Abstract: Clarke, Rohan H; Swann, George; Carter, Michael J; Mott, Rowan M; Herrod, Ashley
      Cartier Island and the surrounding reef is an isolated Australian Territory situated in the Timor Sea. Little is known about the avifauna of the reef system and the adjacent waters. Here we summarise all known ornithological records from the Island and detail the results of twice-annual bird surveys conducted within the Cartier Island Commonwealth Marine Reserve between 2010 and 2014. By the conclusion of the surveys, a total of 34 bird species had been recorded within the Reserve. The Crested Tern 'Thalasseus bergii' was shown to breed on the Island in small numbers. Several additional species of seabird and small numbers of shorebirds are regular visitors. Most other species occur as occasional visitors or vagrants.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The range and habitat of the Kalkadoon Grasswren 'Amytornis
           ballarae'
    • Abstract: Harrington, Graham; McKeown, Adam; Venables, Brian
      In this paper we discuss the results of the first comprehensive survey of the range and habitat of the Kalkadoon Grasswren Amytornis ballarae. This grasswren is of particular interest because (1) It is not classed as a Restricted Range Species by BirdLife International although we show that it occupies < 50 000 km2; (2) This species lives in a fire-prone environment, and the habitat is unsuitable for at least 3 years after fire. The movement and fate of the birds in these circumstances is unknown; (3) It is sympatric with the Carpentarian Grasswren A. dorotheae over part of its range, raising questions about competition between the species; and (4) The spatial and behavioural separation from the closely related Dusky Grasswren A. purnelli is not well defined. In 2008 and 2009, we visited 195 locations in firescars of known age within the known range of the Kalkadoon Grasswren and played calls of Kalkadoon and Carpentarian Grasswrens at 6-10 sites in each, totalling 1491 survey sites. We encountered 81 groups of Kalkadoon Grasswrens. They showed a marked preference for metamorphosed sandstone and marble. They were almost always found on rocky hills, but if on flat areas they were within 300 m of hills. Spinifex Triodia spp. dominated the ground-layer at all the sites where Kalkadoon Grasswrens were located. Ground-cover by spinifex increased annually after fire and plateaued after 6 years. Kalkadoon Grasswrens had returned to 30% of 3- and 4-year-old firescars, but occurred in 90% of locations surveyed which had not been burnt for >=10 years. No grasswrens were encountered in surveys between the currently published ranges of the Dusky Grasswren in the Northern Territory and the Kalkadoon Grasswren in Queensland. This paper provides a distribution map, and defines the habitat variables for the Kalkadoon Grasswren. Our mapping shows that the range of the Kalkadoon Grasswren is 40 000 km2, which qualifies it as a BirdLife International Restricted Range Species. We argue that an Important Bird Area should be declared for conserving and monitoring this species alone, where it is not sympatric with the Carpentarian Grasswren.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 White-throated Treecreeper 'Cormobates leucophaea' feeding on
           bracket fungus
    • Abstract: Maurer, CN; Maurer, G; Reaney, LT
      White-throated Treecreepers Cormobates leucophaea are generally considered strict insectivores. This paper provides observational data of a female Treecreeper during winter feeding on a White Punk Laetiporus portentosus bracket fungus occurring in Victorian heathy dry forest.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 A prolonged agonistic interaction between two Papuan Frogmouths
           'Podargus papuensis'
    • Abstract: Zdenek, CN
      Papuan Frogmouths 'Podargus papuensis' are large nocturnal birds about which relatively little is known. A prolonged aggressive interaction between two Papuan Frogmouths that involved interlocking beaks was filmed in the Lockhart River region on Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, and is described here. Two additional Papuan Frogmouths were present during the event, one of which gave a call-type (OomWoom) previously unrecorded for this species. Difficulties associated with detecting such agonistic behaviour mean that the prevalence of these contests and their behavioural significance are currently unknown and require further research.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 First specimens of free-flying Canada Geese 'Branta canadensis'
           from Australia
    • Abstract: Boles, Walter E; Tsang, Leah R; Sladek, Jaynia
      The Canada Goose Branta canadensis occurs in a feral state in New Zealand and rarely strays to Australia. There are two mainland records for Australia. The second of these pertains to four birds that were first observed on the south coast of New South Wales (NSW) in late 2007 before eventually being culled at Killalea State Park, NSW, in early March 2008. These specimens, three females and a male, the first from Australia, were incorporated into the collection of the Australian Museum. They are considered to have been free-flying adults of the subspecies B. c. maxima, that which occurs in New Zealand, from where they are assumed to have originated. The destruction of these Geese was consistent with guidelines for dealing with any appearance of this invasive species in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 14:25:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Moorland Point: Decline of a traditional roost-site for Ruddy
           Turnstone 'Arenaria interpres', Pacific Golden Plover 'Pluvialis fulva'
           and other shorebirds in northern Tasmania
    • Abstract:
      The Moorland Point area has been an important high-tide roost for certain migratory shorebird species on the central-north coast of Tasmania, where shorebirds are generally scarce. Ruddy Turnstone Arenaria interpres and Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva roost on a small rocky headland and adjacent piles of seaweed along with up to three Grey-tailed Tattlers Tringa brevipes (all mainly in summer), and Double-banded Plover Charadrius bicinctus roost above the high-tide mark 250 m to the east (mainly February-early August). More than 300 counts of shorebirds have been made at this site from 1985 to 2014. All these species have declined in recent years. Ruddy Turnstone, Pacific Golden Plover and Grey-tailed Tattler may have been affected by factors elsewhere in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, but local disturbance is also implicated and needs further management in addition to the recent initiative to block vehicles from the beach. The situation highlights some of the problems in conserving shorebird species that favour scattered small sites and may escape the attention given to sites supporting large numbers of more social shorebirds.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 14:36:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Notes on the 'Zoothera' thrushes in the Tweed Range of
           northeastern New South Wales
    • Abstract: Leach, Elliot C
      The Zoothera thrush complex is represented on the Australian mainland by the Bassian Thrush Z. lunulata and the Russet-tailed Thrush Z. heinei. These species are sympatric at several locations on the eastern coast. Often, these populations occupy different elevations, with the Bassian Thrush preferring higher elevations, though reasons for this are poorly understood. I present data from automated acoustic recordings made of these species in the Border Ranges and Mebbin National Parks of north-eastern New South Wales between 300 m and 1100 m above sea-level over a 1-year period from June 2015 to May 2016. Bassian Thrushes were recorded most frequently in October, typically at or above 900 m. Russet-tailed Thrushes were recorded most frequently in August, at or below 700 m. Differences in elevational preference between the species may be driven by several factors including adaptation to cold, avoidance of interspecific competition and avoidance of hybridisation.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 14:35:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 A necrophilic copulation by a Bridled Tern 'Onychoprion
           anaethetus'
    • Abstract: Fulton, Graham R
      A Bridled Tern 'Onychoprion anaethetus' was observed copulating with a deceased conspecific on an offshore island, Penguin Island, in south-western Australia. The copulation lasted for c. 30 seconds, in contrast with the usually 3-10 seconds observed in this species. This unusual copulation may simply be the result of a strong breeding drive present in colonially nesting Bridled Terns.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:32:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Maxwell Noel Maddock, 28 September 1928 - 7 July 2016
    • Abstract: Newman, Mike; McDonald, Kevin
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:32:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Further observations on Black-breasted Buzzards 'Hamirostra
           melanosternon' breeding near Alice Springs, Northern Territory
    • Abstract: Watson, Christopher; Nunn, Peter J; Carter, Mark; Waring, Richard
      Parts of the breeding cycle of a pair of Black-breasted Buzzards Hamirostra melanosternon were observed near Alice Springs, Northern Territory, in 2014 and 2015, when the pair raised a single fledgling in each year. Supplementary information was obtained on pre-laying behaviour, vocalisations, nest defence and chick growth. Our study confirmed allopreening and use of the piping call in the pre-laying phase; male use of the wheezing call; and gender roles in defence at different stages; and highlighted further similarities with the Square-tailed Kite Lophoictinia isura.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:32:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 First breeding record of Sanford's Sea-Eagle 'Haliaeetus
           sanfordi', a Solomon Islands endemic
    • Abstract: Petersson, Lars
      An active Sanford's Sea-Eagle Haliaeetus sanfordi nest is described, including the first documented observation of a fledging date (mid July) for this taxon. From this observation, laying in March and hatching in April are inferred.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:32:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 New breeding, distribution and prey records for the Pygmy Eagle
           'Hieraeetus weiskei'
    • Abstract: Bishop, David; Diamond, Jared; Hornbuckle, Jonathan; Debus, Stephen
      An active nest of the Pygmy Eagle Hieraaetus weiskei is described, providing the first documented observation of a downy chick in late January and hence an indicative laying date of late November/early December. The first documented record of this species for Waigeo Island (West Papua Province) is presented. A prey item being carried by another Pygmy Eagle is identified as a probable Brown (Slender-billed) Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia amboinensis, and another Pygmy Eagle had fed upon a Mountain Fruit-Dove Ptilinopus bellus.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:32:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Identification of a nominate Intermediate Egret 'Ardea
           intermedia intermedia' in south-western Australia
    • Abstract: Cake, Martin A; Graff, John K; Mantle, Daniel
      An adult Intermediate Egret in breeding plumage (pre-alternate moult) observed at Lake Joondalup, Western Australia, in January 2016 was identified as a vagrant of the Asian nominate taxon Ardea intermedia intermedia. Subspecific identification was established from the extent of black on the bill (which increased during the bird's stay at the site, of at least 17 days), and was confirmed independently by its proportionally short and thickly tapering bill, which was found to lie outside the range of Australian A. i. plumifera from an image-based analysis of the bills of each taxon. This is the first documented record of this taxon for Australia.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:32:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Albatross [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hughes, Philip
      Review(s) of: Albatross by Graham Barwell, Reaktion Books Ltd, London, 2014. Paperback, 101 illustrations, 51 in colour, 208 pp. RRP AU$27.95.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:32:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The only known egg of the Night Parrot? A molecular and
           morphometric assessment of an alleged egg from the Tanami Desert
    • Abstract: Olsen, Penny; Austin, Jeremy; Murphy, Steve; Dally, Gavin
      The Night Parrot Pezoporus occidentalis is a much sought-after, recently 'rediscovered', endangered nocturnal parrot, endemic to arid Central Australia. Very little is known of its ecology, and its eggs have never been formally described. The literature on the eggs of the Night Parrot is collated here, and the provenance of an alleged Night Parrot egg found in the Tanami Desert, Northern Territory, in 1983 was assessed using DNA analysis and physical characteristics. Anecdotal reports from the late 19th-early 20th Century indicate that the Night Parrot lays a clutch of two to six roundish, white eggs. We suggest that its eggs are probably similar to and slightly larger than those of its congener, the Ground Parrot P. wallicus. The alleged Night Parrot egg was definitively identified by mitochondrial DNA analysis to be from the Brown Quail Synoicus ypsilophorus. This represents the first evidence of breeding by this species in the Tanami Desert, and lays to rest a long-standing misconception regarding the parrot.

      PubDate: Thu, 3 Nov 2016 15:36:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Partial loss of migratory behaviour by Torresian
           Imperial-Pigeons 'Ducula spilorrhoa' in Darwin, Northern Territory
    • Abstract: Noske, Richard A; Lilleyman, Amanda
      The Northern Territory population of the Torresian Imperial-Pigeon Ducula spilorrhoa was once considered to be completely migratory, departing for New Guinea in February and returning to breed in August. However, reporting rates from Darwin suggest that since at least the early 1990s a substantial proportion of birds 'over-winter' in the region. We monitored an evening roost-site each month from May 2011 to August 2014, counting birds in 5-minute intervals as they arrived. Mean numbers were highest during the late wet-early dry season transition months (March through May) and lowest during the late dry-early wet season transition period (September through November), although the maximum number (1325 birds) was counted in June 2011, following the wettest wet season on record. These observations confirm that many Torresian Imperial-Pigeons do not migrate to New Guinea after the breeding season, but it is not yet known if any individual birds are long-term residents. It is possible that residency in the early dry season has evolved because of year-round availability of food resources in the urban environment but we were unable to test this hypothesis.

      PubDate: Thu, 3 Nov 2016 15:36:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Winter avifauna of Wanjarri Nature Reserve and Lake Mason
           Conservation Park of the Eastern Goldfields, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Bell, David T; Bell, Roma C; Loneragan, William A
      Surveys of the avifauna of Wanjarri Nature Reserve and Lake Mason Conservation Park during late July 2015 recorded 100 species, with 68 at Wanjarri and 90 at Lake Mason. The greater number of species at Lake Mason Conservation Park was attributed to the presence of 19 species of waterbirds associated with the lake. Although nearly equal numbers of terrestrial species were found at both reserves, the frequency of occurrence records from Lake Mason showed significantly greater frequencies for several species, probably because of the greater availability of surface water there. The significantly higher frequencies of Horsfield's Bronze-Cuckoo Chalcites basalis and Pallid Cuckoo Cacomantis pallidus at Wanjarri Nature Reserve may have been related to the many hairy caterpillars available there as a food resource. Detrended Correspondence Analysis showed that the major assemblages of bird species were associated primarily with vegetation type and secondarily with the geographic separation of the two reserves. Species associated with Mulga Acacia aneura woodlands, spinifex Triodia grasslands and saltbush Atriplex habitats on Wanjarri and Lake Mason were similar to those recorded in other arid-zone habitats of Western Australia. Species associated with Mulga woodlands included Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes, Slaty-backed Acanthiza robustirostris, Chestnut-rumped A uropygialis and Inland Thornbills A. apicalis, Singing Lichenostomus virescens and Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters Acanthagenys rufogularis, Rufous Whistler Pachycephala rufiventris and Red-capped Robin Petroica goodenovii. Species associated more often with spinifex grasslands and saltbush habitats were White-winged Malurus leucopterus and Variegated Fairy-wrens M. lamberti, Australian Magpie Cracticus tibicen, Brown Songlark Cincloramphus cruralis, and several raptors. Inclusion of these two reserves in the conservation estate of Western Australia is important as they are at the margin of the distribution ranges for several species. Data from our surveys will facilitate future assessment of populations of birds and assist in management decisions regarding future protection of the avifauna in these reserves.

      PubDate: Thu, 3 Nov 2016 15:36:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Do Spotted Doves need to forage extensively in food-rich urban
           environments?
    • Abstract: Lill, Alan; Geraldene, Beth
      Many 'urban exploiter' birds have access to much more abundant food resources than their exurban counterparts and so potentially may not have to allocate much time to foraging. Exotic Spotted Doves 'Streptopelia chinensis' in Melbourne, Victoria, spent a mean of only 17% of 'off-nest' daytime in foraging. Factors emerging from this and previous studies that might permit this small proportional time allocation to foraging include: (1) a rapid rate of food acquisition (1 item per second of continuous feeding), (2) energetically inexpensive foraging behaviour, and (3) a negligible level of intra- and interspecific interference competition for food. To some extent, a foraging strategy comprising many, brief, highly productive foraging bouts, and consequently a small daily proportional time allocation to foraging, may also be dictated by Spotted Doves' digestive physiology.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Stranger in the valley: Expansion in the range of the
           Spinycheeked Honeyeater in central eastern New South Wales
    • Abstract: McAllan, Ian AW; Lindsay, Kurtis J
      Evidence is given for a relatively recent eastward movement in the distribution of the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater 'Acanthagenys rufogularis' into the Cudgegong and Hunter River Valleys of central New South Wales. Since the 1980s, this species has colonised 200 km to the east, crossing the Great Dividing Range in the process. It is speculated that this change in distribution may be related to increasing temperatures, particularly minimum temperatures in winter. There have been no adverse interactions noted with other bird species so far, though there is the potential for a negative impact on the Critically Endangered Regent Honeyeater 'Anthochaera phrygia'.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Grassfinch decline and local extinction of the Crimson Finch
           'Neochmia phaeton' in the Fitzroy River Basin, Queensland
    • Abstract: Houston, Wayne A; Black, Robert L
      Many granivorous birds of northern Australia, including several species of grassfinches (Estrildidae), have suffered substantial range contractions in the last 50-100 years, apparently as a result of changes in cattle grazing and fire-management regimes. The Crimson Finch Neochmia phaeton was once widespread in woodlands and savannas of north-eastern Australia, including the extensive Fitzroy River Basin, where it was recorded in all the major subcatchments until the middle of last century. However, surveys in 2006-2008 show that it is now confined to a relatively small area in the north-east of the Basin. A tall river grass, Chionachne Chionachne cyathopoda, is an important component - for food and cover - of its habitat. Complex braiding of river channels, as at the confluence of rivers, is typical of the area where the Finches have persisted, possibly because it increases the availability of water and food, and reduces pressure from cattle grazing during the wet season. A recent local loss of the species was noted in one area where landholders used riparian fencing to maintain greater grazing intensity throughout the year, leading to suppression of Chionachne seeding. Thus, although generally favourable for conservation management, riparian fencing can also be used detrimentally. The loss of one local subpopulation of Finches following changed management practices demonstrates that cattle grazing alone, in the absence of changed fire management, has the capacity to alter habitat suitability for granivorous species

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Intraspecific and interspecific aggression among Flame, Scarlet
           and Dusky Robins
    • Abstract: Hui, Tabitha C Y
      Flame 'Petroica phoenicea' and Scarlet Robins 'Petroica boodang' are interspecifically territorial wherever they meet. However, aggressive interactions between Dusky Robins 'Melanodryas vittata' and these two species are rare where they co-occur. Interspecific aggression among co-existing species may be due to competition for resources. In this study at Cloudy Bay, South Bruny Island, Tasmania, in August 2004-February 2005, I examined intraspecific and interspecific territoriality in Flame, Scarlet and Dusky Robins by observing displays of aggression within and between the three species. I also used song-playback experiments to test whether the robins could discriminate between conspecific and congeneric species. Flame and Scarlet Robins responded differentially to playback of each other's song, but did not respond to Dusky Robin calls. Aggression between Flame and Scarlet Robins may be because of competition for horizontal space or resources. Conversely, the lack of aggression between Dusky Robins and these two species may be because of their ability to exploit different resources even when they are in the same area.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The first specimen of a Malayan Night-Heron 'Gorsachius
           melanolophus' from Australia
    • Abstract: Boles, Walter E; Smith, Michael J; Tsang, Leah; Sladek, Jaynia
      An immature male Malayan Night-Heron Gorsachius melanolophus found as road-kill on Christmas Island in 2011 represents the first specimen of this species from Australian territory to be retained (although other individuals have been seen and one was trapped, measured and released). The specimen is now preserved in the bird collection of the Australian Museum.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The breeding cycle of a pair of Brahminy Kites 'Haliastur indus'
           in New South Wales
    • Abstract: Rourke, Jeremy; Debus, SJS
      The breeding cycle of a pair of Brahminy Kites 'Haliastur indus' was observed at Port Macquarie, northern coastal New South Wales, by keeping a diary of events from nest-building to independence of the juvenile, from late winter to summer 2012. Nest-building lasted a month, the incubation period 35 days, the nestling period 52 days, and the post-fledging dependence period 7 weeks. Adult behaviour, sex-roles, and growth and development of the juvenile are described. The observed breeding diet consisted mostly of fish, although freshwater turtle and crab remains were observed accumulated under the pair's feeding tree. Further breeding attempts by the pair in 2013 (one fledgling) and 2014 (two failures) resulted in 0.67 young per year and 0.5 young per attempt over 3 years.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Two records of an Australian Owlet-nightjar 'Aegotheles
           cristatus' roosting in forestry boom-gates in Tasmanian forests
    • Abstract: Wapstra, Mark
      Two observations are presented of the infrequently encountered Tasmanian subspecies of the Australian Owlet-nightjar 'Aegotheles cristatus tasmanicus' roosting in the horizontal tubular bar of forestry boom-gates in Tasmanian forests.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Observations on a breeding pair of Black Falcons 'Falco
           subniger' in southern Victoria
    • Abstract: Whelan, DJ; McRitchie, BW; Pickering, LJ; Debus, SJS
      Successful breeding activity is described for a pair of Black Falcons Falco subniger in southern Victoria (south of 37 degrees S) in 2014 and 2015 (brood of two fledglings in each year), among the few confirmed or recent such records for the region (agricultural land and remnant woodland west of Melbourne). Courtship (supplementary) feeding at the nest, male brooding of downy chicks, growth and development of chicks, and other novel aspects of breeding behaviour and vocalisations are described. One nestling period lasted 40 days, and the post-fledging period at least a month. Prey included birds and small mammals. The fledglings and adults appeared vulnerable to vehicle- and train-strike; a roadkilled specimen is described for the district. The breeding adults were cryptic, suggesting the need for further survey for nests in the region. They were also wary and susceptible to disturbance, indicating a need for caution when approaching and observing active nests at all stages of the breeding cycle.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Kleptoparasitism of Australian Magpie by Australian Ravens
    • Abstract: Krohn, Jack
      This note reports an observation of apparent kleptoparasitism by Australian Ravens 'Corvus coronoides'. Such behaviour has rarely been recorded for Australian Ravens or other Australian corvids.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Field techniques in the study of Australian pigeons and doves
    • Abstract: Peters, Andrew; Raidal, Shane R; Roshier, David A
      Pigeons and doves (Family Columbidae) represent a significant component of Australia's avifauna, possessing unusually diverse phenotypic and behavioural characteristics. The importance of many of them as ecosystem service providers and the emergence of new threats to them in Australia and the region warrant the development of standardised research methods such as effective and humane capture and collection of biological samples. We present here techniques, including novel mist-net set-ups that we trialled for the capture of Australian pigeons and doves. These were successful in 12 out of 14 species in which attempts were made, including the arboreal Brown Cuckoo-Dove 'Macropygia amboinensis', Rose-crowned Fruit-Dove 'Ptilinopus regina' and Torresian Imperial-Pigeon 'Ducula spilorrhoa', as well as both escarpment-dwelling rock-pigeons 'Petrophassa' spp. Methods for the collection of biological samples are also presented.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The significance of Nimalaica Wetland for Brown Honeyeaters in
           the Broome region, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Lewis, Jan
      Nimalaica Wetland, 22 km north of Broome, Western Australia, is listed as a Wetland of National Importance. This study documents the non-waterbird avian community of the Wetland, particularly with regard to seasonality of occurrence and dispersal of passerines from 2000 to 2010. Mist-netting was utilised. Fifty-two per cent of birds caught were Brown Honeyeaters 'Lichmera indistincta', with data strongly indicating that this species was visiting the Wetland between March and August to breed. The presence of a cryptic species - Little Grassbird 'Megalurus gramineus' - not previously recorded in the Broome area was also revealed.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Status of the Endangered Yellow Chat 'Epthianura crocea tunneyi'
           on the western South Alligator River floodplain, Kakadu National Park
    • Abstract: Kyne, Peter M; Jackson, Micha V
      The current status of the Endangered Yellow Chat Alligator Rivers subspecies 'Epthianura crocea tunneyi' is poorly known. A survey of Kakadu National Park floodplains, Northern Territory, in 2004 identified the western floodplain of the South Alligator River as a key population area. To provide preliminary information on the status of the subspecies in Kakadu National Park, this floodplain was intensively surveyed over a 4-day period in September 2014 and compared with the 2004 survey, which was undertaken at a similar time of year (late dry season: October-November). Despite covering considerable areas of floodplain habitat over nearly 40 hours of surveying, Yellow Chats were recorded in only one area in 2014; 27 Yellow Chats from nine observations were recorded over 2 days, with a minimum number of 17 individual birds (16 adult and 1 juvenile) observed. This compared with a total of 65 Yellow Chats from 2 days of surveying in 2004, clustered around five areas of the western floodplain of the South Alligator River. Habitat in 2014 comprised predominantly dry floodplain lagoon, consistent with previous surveys. Feral animals (in particular Feral Pigs Sus scrofa) were regularly observed throughout the surveys, as was significant feral-animal damage to wet floodplain areas. Although these results suggest a possible decline on the western South Alligator River floodplain over a 10-year period, a comprehensive survey is required of all floodplains within the subspecies' range to assess overall population status. This could inform the establishment of annual monitoring sites in order to evaluate long-term population trends, essential data for management of threatened species.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:53:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Fish-catching by a juvenile Powerful Owl 'Ninox strenua'
    • Abstract: Mo, Matthew; Hayler, Peter; Hayler, Antonia
      The Powerful Owl 'Ninox strenua' typically forages for arboreal prey; however, some authors have identified crustaceans in pellet material. This paper reports on an anecdotal observation of a juvenile Owl catching and consuming a fish. The observation was recorded at dusk in the upper reaches of tidal mangroves in one of the bushland remnants in Sydney, New South Wales, along the Georges River. The observation may constitute investigative 'play' behaviour by juvenile Owls.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:34:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Observations of the food brought to young at a nest of the
           Striated Pardalote 'Pardalotus striatus'
    • Abstract: Thurley, David S
      The habit of the Striated Pardalote Pardalotus striatus of often foraging high above the ground and its being small in size and difficult to detect mean that few detailed observations have been made of the diet of this species. Here I report observations of food items taken to a nest on the patio of a house. The observations show that the adults feed their chicks a diet rich in lerps soon after hatching but with increasing quantities of insects as the chicks develop.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:34:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Growth and development of Buff-banded Rail chicks
    • Abstract: Clark, Julie; Harris, John
      The Buff-banded Rail Gallirallus philippensis is not uncommon in favourable parts of its range but its elusive nature makes it difficult to study and, in particular, development of chicks to attainment of juvenile plumage and adult size is incompletely reported. In the northern suburbs of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, planned storm-water management has resulted in the formation of wetlands, watercourses and pools, an ideal environment for rails and crakes. Physical and behavioural development could therefore be followed from opportunistic observations and photography of three broods of chicks, from black downy hatchlings to fully fledged juveniles, at Forde Creek in 2014-2015. The first feathers were visible on the fourth day. All the down had been replaced with feathers by around the third week, by which time the juveniles were about half the size of the adults. The juvenile Rails took another 3 weeks to fully develop the distinctive juvenile plumage patterning, similar to but duller than in adults, and by this time they were the same size as the adults. Although the rate of plumage development is broadly consistent with the literature, the growth rate was slower than the widely quoted figure of adult size being reached in 3 weeks. Observations over 107 days in summer 2014-autumn 2015 provided an opportunity to observe the behaviour of dependent chicks and adults as the chicks developed into juveniles and gained independence.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:34:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Neville Glenn (Glenn) Holmes 21 September 1951 - 18 December
           2015
    • Abstract: Gosper, Dennis
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:34:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 J.N. Hobbs Medal 2016: Citation - A.B. (Tony) Rose
    • Abstract: Fitzsimons, James; Debus, Stephen; Olsen, Jerry
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:34:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Diet of one wild Western Ground Parrot 'Pezoporus flaviventris'
    • Abstract: Newbey, Brenda
      The aim of this study was to examine the diet of a wild Western Ground Parrot Pezoporus flaviventris, a cryptic and critically endangered species. There has been no previous systematic study of the diet for this species. A wild male Western Ground Parrot was filmed over several days in spring 2006, in the Fitzgerald River National Park, Western Australia. The bird was recorded feeding, sunbathing, preening and dozing in his natural habitat. Fifty 30-second samples of the video were used to obtain 555 feeding records. The bird's diet at that time was most dependent on flowers (38%), followed by sedge seeds (35%), and a further 20% was comprised of green fruit of dicotyledonous plants. At least 27 plant species were consumed by the individual in this study. The plant species eaten varied considerably within and among 30-second video samples, as well as varying between days. The daily diet is likely to vary to a similar degree to the overall pattern. Other observations, combined with the findings of this study, emphasise the diversity of plant species in the diet of the Western Ground Parrot.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:34:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Presence and breeding of the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater in central
           New South Wales
    • Abstract: Rawsthorne, John
      The seasonal presence and breeding of the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Acanthagenys rufogularis, a nomadic frugivorous bird distributed across inland Australia, are documented and contrasted for three nearby but floristically distinct sites in central New South Wales during the period January 1986-January 2015. Eucalypt blossom at two of the sites (Charcoal Tank and Holy Camp) provided an autumn resource to which the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater responded with influxes, but these sites supported limited breeding of this species, and only in higher-rainfall periods. In contrast, the high density of Grey Mistletoe Amyema quandang parasitising Weeping Myall Acacia pendula at the third study site (Battery Hill) provided a stable resource supporting breeding resident Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters in a lower-rainfall year.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:34:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Breeding behaviour in the Spangled Drongo 'Dicrurus bracteatus'
    • Abstract: Briggs, Alan
      Over a period of five breeding seasons (between November 2008 and January 2013) the breeding behaviour - including nest-site selection, nest building, incubation and care of nestlings and fledglings - of the Spangled Drongo Dicrurus bracteatus was observed at Coowonga on the central Queensland coast, and from this the breeding success was estimated. The breeding season was from November to January, with a consistent start date from year to year. The incubation and nestling periods were also consistent from year to year. A nest was generally positioned in a tree near a clearing and in the outer part of that tree. Several factors contributed to nest-site selection: nest-tree species, habit and height, diameter of the tree's outer branches, availability of dead branches, proximity of the nest-tree to a clearing and to water, and height of the nest above the ground. New findings were the frequent attachment of a nest to dead twigs and the consistent placement of a nest on the first branch below the spreading canopy of the tree. The occurrence of colonial breeding was more difficult to determine, with many features of this behaviour (such as group nesting and co-operative defence against predators) being evident, but nests were widely dispersed over a large area. Rotation of nest-sites may be used to minimise predation, with some Drongos using a nest-site one year, but not the next, and then returning to that nest-site the following year.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 16:35:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 New bird records from the Fortescue Marsh and nearby claypans,
           Pilbara bioregion, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Trainor, Colin R; Knuckey, Chris; Firth, Ronald S C
      The Fortescue Marsh in the Pilbara bioregion, Western Australia, is an extensive ephemeral wetland that fills episodically. It is considered as a potential Ramsar site and is recognised as a nationally important wetland and an Important Bird Area. We surveyed birds at 21 sites on the Fortescue Marsh and a further 23 sites (44 sites in total), including nearby claypans Coondiner Pool and Mungthannannie Pool, in the Fortescue Valley over 12 days in March-April and July 2012. A total of 100 bird species (34 waterbird and 66 landbird species) was recorded during the survey. A further 86 bird species (including 28 waterbird species and 58 landbird species) were recorded for this area from searches of databases and the literature (total of 187 species; 62 waterbirds). New and significant observations during the survey included the first breeding record of Australian Shelduck Tadorna tadornoides for the Pilbara, the first breeding records on the Marsh of Black-tailed Native-hen Tribonyx ventralis and Caspian Tern Hydroprogne caspia, and the first record of Australian Painted Snipe Rostratula australis for the Fortescue Valley. Despite this area's importance to breeding and visiting waterbirds, the birds of the Fortescue Marsh remain surprisingly under-studied. We highlight some significant but overlooked literature records of waterbirds on the Marsh. Further ground and aerial surveys, and ongoing monitoring of this region would be valuable.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 16:35:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Seen but not heard: Lillian Medland's Birds [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Herman, Kerryn
      Review(s) of: Seen But Not Heard: Lillian Medland's Birds, by Christobel Mattingley, The National Library of Australia, Canberra, 2014. Hardcover, colour plates, 207 pp. RRP AU$39.99.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 16:35:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 A record of the Siberian Blue Robin 'Larvivora cyane' at Ashmore
           Reef off north-western Australia, April 2012
    • Abstract: Clarke, Rohan H; Carter, Mike; Swann, George; Herrod, Ashley
      An immature male Siberian Blue Robin 'Larvivora cyane' was recorded on West Island, Ashmore Reef, off northwestern Australia, on 23-25 April 2012. This is the first record of this species anywhere in Australia or its territories.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 09:18:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Australian high country raptors [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cam, Graham R
      Review(s) of: Australian High Country Raptors by Jerry Olsen; CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, 2014. Softcover, 336 pp. (including 30 coloured images, 154 black-and-white images, 87 figures and tables).

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 09:18:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Skinks and burrowing crayfish as prey items of the Eastern
           Yellow Robin 'Eopsaltria australis' in south-eastern Australia
    • Abstract: La May, Valerie; O'Brien, Martin; Boekel, Con; Costello, Kathy; Park, Geoff; Ross, Sonja
      This note describes five observations during 2014 and 2015 of predation by Eastern Yellow Robins Eopsaltria australis, on a burrowing crayfish Engaeus sp. and small skinks. This species feeds predominantly on terrestrial invertebrates and insects but these recent observations suggest that it is an opportunistic feeder.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 09:18:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 White-bellied Sea-Eagle breeding in the Western Port area,
           Victoria
    • Abstract: O'Brien, Martin; Lacey, Geoff
      The number of known active breeding sites for White-bellied Sea-Eagles Haliaeetus leucogaster in the Western Port area of Victoria has increased from one in the early 1980s to either six or seven in 2014. Three sites are located on French Island, two on Phillip Island, one at Devilbend Natural Features Reserve, Mornington Peninsula, and possibly one on Quail Island. A key factor in the increase in population is the creation and expansion of habitat reserves, especially French Island National Park, and subsequent change in management. All but one of the nests were built in tall trees. Surrounding habitats include forest, woodland, pines, farm trees and a swamp. Nest-site fidelity at several sites was low, owing to nest abandonment and collapse, with rebuilding of nests usually occurring nearby. In addition to the breeding pairs on French Island, other unpaired adult and immature Sea-Eagles are regularly observed there.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 09:18:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 An unprecedented irruption and breeding of Flock Bronzewings
           'Phaps histrionica' in central South Australia
    • Abstract: Pedler, Reece D; Lynch, Catherine E
      The Flock Bronzewing Phaps histrionica has declined significantly and undergone a northward range contraction in inland Australia since European settlement. In the southern parts of its range, including central northern South Australia, it is uncommonly recorded during times of significant ephemeral vegetation response, triggered by sustained above-average rainfall. In late 2013, while core habitats in Queensland were in extended drought and much of arid South Australia received below-average rainfall, an area of 10 000 km2 between Roxby Downs and Lake Eyre South supported tens of thousands of Flock Bronzewings, with evidence of widespread successful breeding during September and October and contemporary range expansions of 150 km to the south and west. Through a network of local pastoralists, mining workers and biologists we collated ˃80 field observations from >40 observers across this region. Direct evidence of predation by Cats Felis catus was detected at a nest-site and in the stomach of a cat shot in the area. Seeds of annual shrubs Trichodesma and Phyllanthus species dominated the crop contents of two dead fledgling Bronzewings that were collected opportunistically. Although the Flock Bronzewing is well known for its irruptive nature, the magnitude and southerly extent of this sustained irruption are unprecedented in the literature and in the living memory of local observers. This event exemplifies the remarkable ability of arid-adapted birds to locate and exploit localised productive habitat within vast dynamic and stochastic landscapes, in this case recruiting new individuals to the population despite widespread unfavourable conditions within their core range.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 A case of total absence of yellow in the golden Whistler
           'Pachycephala pectoralis'
    • Abstract: Martinsson, Svante
      An aberrantly coloured male Golden Whistler Pachycephala pectoralis, lacking yellow pigment, is reported from the Bellarine Peninsula, Victoria. This could be the first documented case of this colour aberration in the species.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Notes on the Bassian Thrush 'Zoothera lunulata' in the Illawarra
           region, South-Eastern Australia
    • Abstract: Mo, Matthew; Waterhouse, David R
      Observations of the Bassian Thrush 'Zoothera lunulata', a poorly studied species, were recorded opportunistically in the Illawarra region, New South Wales, over a 5-year period between January 1988 and December 1992. At this location, this species mainly fed on earthworms, mostly foraging on cropped lawns and deposits of leaf-litter. Cup-shaped nests composed of moss were observed from September to December, and foraging Thrushes gathered up to eight worms at a time to feed nestlings. The Thrushes were seen mostly singly or in pairs, and some had apparently dispersed from the study sites during autumn and early winter.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Common Mynas attack common Brushtail Possums and nesting
           Southern Boobook, and diet of the nesting Boobooks
    • Abstract: Trost, Susan; Olsen, Jerry
      Over a 30-night period a Common Myna 'Acridotheres tristis' was observed attacking Common Brushtail Possums 'Trichosurus vulpecula' and harassing a female Southern Boobook 'Ninox boobook' near her nest. One night a Myna that had been attacking Possums was chased by the male Boobook, which appeared to be chasing it as prey. We did not observe further attacks by Mynas after this night. Common Mynas were found in the dietary analysis for this pair of Boobooks.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The Eastern Spinebill 'Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris' as a
           nest-predator
    • Abstract: Guppy, M; Guppy, S; Carlisle, N; Fullagar, P
      Here we document the removal of eggs from the nests of two passerine species - Brown Thornbill Acanthiza pusilla and Yellow-faced Honeyeater Caligavis chrysops - by Eastern Spinebills Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Purple Swamphens 'Porphyrio porphyrio' and Dusky Moorhens
           'Gallinula tenebrosa' climbing trees and feeding on lerps
    • Abstract: Seymour, John
      During an outbreak of the lerp-forming insect 'Glycaspis brimblecombei' (Hemiptera: Aphalaridae) on River Red Gums 'Eucalyptus camaldulensis' near Adelaide, South Australia, Purple Swamphens 'Porphyrio porphyrio' and Dusky Moorhens 'Gallinula tenebrosa' climbed trees to feed on lerps. The Swamphens climbed up to 8 m above ground- or water-level, the Moorhens up to 4 m. The Swamphens usually obtained lerps in situ by pecking or by drawing leaves through the bill. Sometimes an individual detached a branch and flew with it to the ground to feed there. The Moorhens took lerps only by pecking in situ.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 A second living 'Rawnsley's Bowerbird' - a wild adult male
           hybrid from a Regent Bowerbird 'Sericulus chrysocephalus' Satin Bowerbird
           'Ptilonorhynchus violaceus' cross
    • Abstract: Frith, Clifford B
      A second observation of a living 'Rawnsley's Bowerbird', the result of hybridisation between a Regent Bowerbird Sericulus chrysocephalus and a Satin Bowerbird Ptilonorhynchus violaceus, was made at Kalang, New South Wales, in October and November 2014. Photographs show an individual very similar to the original specimen collected in 1867 and to the living individual observed in 2003-2004.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 An eye for nature: The life and art of William T. Cooper [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: McCarthy, David J
      Review(s) of: An eye for nature: The life and art of William T. Cooper, by Penny Olsen, with a Foreword by David Attenborough, Australian National Library, Canberra, 2014, Hardback, 24 x 29 cm, 278 pp., RRP AU$49.99.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 A history of birdwatching in 100 objects [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Handreck, Paul
      Review(s) of: A history of birdwatching in 100 objects, by David Callahan, edited by Dominic Mitchell, Bloomsbury Publishing, London, 2014, Hardcover, colour photographs, 222 pp., RRP AU$39.99.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Climate change adaptation plan for Australian birds [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Debus, Stephen
      Review(s) of: Climate change adaptation plan for Australian birds, edited by Stephen T. Garnett and Donald C. Franklin, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, 2014, Softcover, tables, maps, 270 pp., RRP AU$70.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The world of birds [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Debus, Stephen
      Review(s) of: The world of birds, by Jonathan Elphick, The Natural History Museum, London (published in Australia by CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne), 2014, Hardcover, colour photographs, black-and-white diagrams, 608 pp., RRP AU$90.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Australian bird names: A complete guide [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Citroen, Lou
      Review(s) of: Australian bird names: A complete guide, by Ian Fraser and Jeannie Gray, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, 2013, Softcover, black-and-white drawings, 336 pp., RRP AU$49.95.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Grey Falcon 'Falco hypoleucos' taking a small mammal as prey
    • Abstract: Moore, Euan D
      This note details an observation of a Grey Falcon Falco hypoleucos taking a small, rodent-like mammal as prey by a drop-attack from a tree perch.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Do black-necked Storks breed in the Hunter Valley?: A comment on
           Clancy and Kingsford (2015)
    • Abstract: Stuart, Alan
      The claim of Clancy and Kingsford (2015) that a pair of Black-necked Storks Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus bred at Hexham Swamp, Hunter Valley, New South Wales, in 2014 may be incorrect. This species, which is classified as Endangered in NSW, has never been confirmed to breed anywhere in the Hunter Valley. However, in late 2015 a pair with two fledged young was recorded regularly. Possibly this constitutes the first breeding record for the Hunter Valley, although it is not known where the pair nested.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:58:55 GMT
       
 
 
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