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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 401 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 401 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover Australian Field Ornithology
  [SJR: 0.141]   [H-I: 6]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1448-0107
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [401 journals]
  • Volume 34 Observations of nesting in the Papuan Flyrobin and the Olive
           Flyrobin, and post-fledging care in the Torrent Flycatcher, all endemic to
           New Guinea
    • Abstract: Donaghey, Richard H
      The nesting season, nest materials and dimensions, nest-site, and incubation and anti-predator behaviour of the Papuan Flyrobin 'Devioeca papuana', and nest and egg of the Olive Flyrobin 'Kempiella flavovirescens', both species endemic to New Guinea, are described. An observation of cooperative post-fledging care of two juvenile Torrent Flycatchers 'Monachella muelleriana' is presented. Incubation feeding occurred in the Papuan Flyrobin and incubation constancy was 54%. Papuan Flyrobin incubation behaviour, such as nest-attentiveness, frequency of nest visits and duration of on- and off-bouts, and nest failure are discussed and compared with those of the Jacky Winter 'Microeca fascinans', Lemon-bellied Flycatcher 'M. flavigaster' and northern temperate passerines. Flyrobin nest failure and potential avian predators are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Parental care and breeding strategies of the Jacky Winter and
           its life-history traits compared with other Australasian robins, and
           northern temperate and tropical songbirds
    • Abstract: Donaghey, Richard H; Donaghey, Carolyn A
      We studied parental care in the Jacky Winter 'Microeca fascinans' at Gluepot Reserve, South Australia, for one breeding season from 16 August to 9 November 2001, supplemented by observations on breeding and social behaviour in September 2012. We monitored ten nests in 2001, nine of which were attended by pairs and one by three adults, and watched three nests for a total of c. 117 hours. Female incubation constancy was 69%, duration of incubation sessions averaged 4.58 minutes and absences from the nest 2.07 minutes. Mean number of nest visits per hour by two pairs during the incubation period was 10.6 and for a group of three adults (two males, one female) was 15.8. Female care included brooding, feeding of nestlings, and nest-hygiene. Male care included delivering food to the sitting female, feeding the nestlings, nest-hygiene, nest-defence, and territoriality. Mean female brooding constancy was 55%. Mean number of feeding trips per hour by male and female combined for the entire nestling period was 14.6. Older young, 12, 13 and 14 days of age, received 21, 20, and 29 feeds/h respectively or one feed about every 2 minutes. Mean number of visits per hour by male and female combined to a nest with two young was 16.5 for Days 1-10 and 20.4 for Days 11-18 of the nestling period. High nest-predation is discussed in relation to nest placement and concealment, high nest visitation during incubation and nestling stages, anti-predator behaviour, nest-defence and types of predators, and re-nesting capacity, and compared with other Australasian robins and northern temperate and tropical songbirds. The small nest, small clutch-size, high nest failure, and anti-predator posture and mottled plumage of nestlings suggest that nest-predation is a strong selective pressure in the Jacky Winter. However, the moderately long nestling period, brood-size reduction, high rates of feeding young and nest visits by both male and female, and short and frequent incubation and brooding bouts on and off the nest relative to other robins are not consistent with nest-predation theory, and suggest behavioural responses to food availability and an ultimate response to food limitation. Incubation behaviour on and off the nest, parental care of young, nest visitation and other life-history traits that influence reproductive effort are discussed to elucidate the breeding strategy compared with other Australasian robins.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 A novel observation of food dunking in the Australian Magpie
           'Gymnorhina tibicen'
    • Abstract: Drinkwater, E; Ryeland, J; Haff, T; Umbers, KD L
      We document putative food-dunking behaviour in the Australian Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen. While conducting an experiment on the Mountain Katydid Acripeza reticulata, we presented one to a wild adult Magpie, which appeared to conduct 'dunking behaviour' while processing the insect. The Magpie carried the katydid to a puddle of water, dunked the katydid, and then dropped it. A nearby juvenile Magpie then retrieved the katydid and performed the same dunking behaviour before eating the katydid. To our knowledge, this is the first reported instance of food dunking by Australian Magpies. We hope this observation will facilitate future investigations into behavioural adaptations to dietary choices of Magpies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 First nesting pair of Little Eagles 'Hieraaetus morphnoides'
           recorded in the Sydney region
    • Abstract: Walsh, J; Beranek, CT
      Although the Little Eagle 'Hieraaetus morphnoides' is broadly distributed across much of Australia, it appears to be declining in New South Wales. The key threatening process is the removal of habitat, leading to loss of suitable nesting and foraging sites and changes in prey abundance. Here we present the first report of successful nesting of the Little Eagle in greater Sydney (i.e. in the County of Cumberland), and recommend guidelines for management. The nest, discovered in a Smooth-barked Apple 'Angophora costata' in the suburb of Ingleside on 15 October 2016, was visited one to three times per week, and observations on behaviour, diet and habitat of the Eagles were noted. The most common prey species taken was the European Rabbit 'Oryctolagus cuniculus'. The chick fledged at c. 9 weeks old. The nest-site is at risk from a proposed development in the area and needs to be adaptively managed to ensure the continued presence and nesting of this species at this site.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Responses of brooding Australasian Grebes 'Tachybaptus
           novaehollandiae' to other waterbirds
    • Abstract: Mo, Matthew; Waterhouse, David R
      A breeding pair of Australasian Grebes 'Tachybaptus novaehollandiae' was monitored nearly daily between November 2010 and March 2011. This paper describes the responses of the adults to other waterbirds that came within 5 m of their brood, either provoked or unprovoked. Brood loss was rapid, with only one of five chicks surviving more than 3 weeks. Nine instances of brood-defence were recorded, mostly in the first 2 weeks after hatching, as well as one observation of a chick defending itself. The Dusky Moorhen 'Gallinula tenebrosa' was the main species that prompted reactions from the adult Grebes. A Moorhen was seen trying to prey on Grebe chicks on one or probably two occasions, the first time this has been reported. A Purple Swamphen 'Porphyrio porphyrio' was also attacked by the Grebes, and is a likely potential predator of grebe chicks. Ducks and cormorants were attacked or tolerated on different occasions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Observations of penguins and other pelagic bird
           species in the Balleny Islands, Antarctica
    • Abstract: Tidemann, Sonia C; Walleyn, Adam; Ryan, John F
      On 27-28 February 2014, at the Balleny Islands in Antarctica, penguins on two islands were observed by close approach via zodiac craft, and counts of all pelagic bird species were made from a passing ship. Most penguins on Sabrina Island and Chinstrap Islet were Adelie Penguins Pygoscelis adeliae. Percentage of Chinstrap Penguins P. antarcticus to Adelie Penguins was 7.3 on Sabrina Island and 10.7 on Chinstrap Islet. Four species - Campbell Albatross Thalassarche impavida, White-headed Petrel Pterodroma lessonii, Mottled Petrel P. inexpectata, and King Penguin Aptenodytes patagonicus - were recorded for the Balleny Islands for the first time.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - J. N. Hobbs Medal 2015: Citation - Lynn Pedler
    • Abstract: Paton, David; Copley, Peter; Garnett, Stephen; Joseph, Leo
      Few people alive have even one bird named after them. Lynn Pedler has two - the Flinders Ranges Chestnut-rumped Heathwren Calamanthus pyrrhopygia pedleri and the Gawler Ranges Short-tailed Grasswren Amytornis merrotsyi pedleri. The names recognise Lynn's extraordinary field skills in recognising their uniqueness.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Exploring possible functions of vocalisations in the
           Torresian Crow 'Corvus orru'
    • Abstract: McCaig, Timothy; Brown, Matthew; Jones, Darryl N
      The vocal behaviour of the Corvidae (crows and ravens) is known to be complex and extremely diverse, although detailed studies of vocalisations within the family have been limited to only a few species. This study describes a pilot investigation into the potential functions of the vocalisations of Torresian Crows 'Corvus orru' in suburban Brisbane, Queensland, using playback to experimentally assess whether the apparent function of four calls determined during an earlier study were appropriate. These calls had been given the generalised function of contact, mobbing alarm, flee, and juvenile begging. Ten trials (using different recordings of each call type) were broadcast to target groups of wild Crows and the proportion of Crows reacting as predicted was determined. We found that the purported function of three of the calls (contact, flee and begging calls) had been appropriately described, with a clear majority of the audience birds responding as predicted. Playback of the mobbing alarm call, however, resulted in no birds responding as predicted, indicating that the inferred function had been incorrectly attributed. The results gained from this study can be used to investigate further details of the possible function of vocalisations of the many other calls within the Torresian Crow communication system.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Male combat in the powerful Owl 'Ninox strenua'
    • Abstract: Mo, Matthew; Hayler, Peter; Hayler, Antonia
      This paper describes an account of combat between two Powerful Owls 'Ninox strenua' in the St George area, Sydney, NSW. The breeding pair of this territory had been followed as part of a monitoring program since July 2012. Daily photographic records from February to May 2014 provided recognition of individual birds by observing their distinctive chest patterns. Two possible interpretations of the incident were generated. Based on the identity of the aggressor and a male changeover in the territory, the combat incident was believed to be a contest between rival males.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Nankeen Kestrel preys upon Western Bearded Dragon
    • Abstract: Fulton, Graham R
      A Nankeen Kestrel Falco cenchroides was observed eating an apparently freshly killed Western Bearded Dragon Pogona minor at a beach in south-western Australia. The Kestrel twice flew low over the landscape for 25 m, carrying the slain dragon. The mass of the dragon (43 g) was calculated as 26% of the Kestrel's mass (164 g). Kestrels taking, and carrying, lizard prey of this size may be uncommon.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - First record of the Green Pygmy-goose 'Nettapus
           pulchellus' for Sumbawa, Lesser Sundas, Indonesia
    • Abstract: Amin, Saleh; Suana, IWayan; Iqbal, Muhammad
      The Green Pygmy-goose 'Nettapus pulchellus' is a rare visitor from Australia to eastern Indonesia. On 31 July 2014, a Green Pygmy-goose was recorded at Lake Taliwang, Sumbawa, Indonesia. This is the first record for Sumbawa, and possibly the westernmost record for this species.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Index of bird species: Scientific names
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Index of bird species: Common names
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Index of authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 4 - Index of articles
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Changes in the bird community in the Pilliga Forests,
           New South Wales, between 1918 and 2004
    • Abstract: Cleland, ED
      In October 2004, a traverse through the Pilliga State Forests (the Pilliga Scrub) was undertaken and sixteen 2-ha area searches for birds were conducted periodically along the approximate route traversed in October 1918 by Dr J.B. Cleland, who also recorded birds. The 2-ha survey bird lists were combined into one list, which is compared with the list and counts published by Dr Cleland. The two lists are snapshots of the Pilliga Scrub bird communities of their day; the species in each list are broadly similar, but with different relative abundances. The bird community has changed, reflecting changes in the vegetation as land use has changed from pastoral to less disruptive forestry and conservation. The 1918 bird community is similar in structure to those found in fragmented remnant woodland of the Southern Brigalow Belt today, and the 2004 bird community is similar to those of continuous, less disturbed Southern Brigalow Belt vegetation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Additional records of Christmas Frigatebird 'Fregata
           andrewsi' in the Northern Territory, Australia
    • Abstract: McMaster, Damien; Rayner, Thomas S; McMaster, Cassie A
      The Christmas Frigatebird 'Fregata andrewsi' is the rarest of five species in the family Fregatidae and is known to breed only on Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean. The number of breeding pairs has declined dramatically over the past 100 years and the species is considered Critically Endangered. Although non-breeding Christmas Frigatebirds range widely throughout south-eastern Asia and the Indian Ocean, there are only two previously confirmed records from mainland Australia. Here we document the occurrence of an adult female Christmas Frigatebird from the Darwin coastline, Northern Territory, on 6 February 2014. Additionally, we document the occurrence of a likely first-year Christmas Frigatebird along the same stretch of coastline on 15 March 2014. We suggest that cyclonic activity and a strong monsoonal trough may have resulted in the arrival of these individuals to mainland Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Thank you, Stephen Debus
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - D. L. Serventy Medal 2015: Citation - Stephen J. S.
           Debus
    • Abstract: Fitzsimons, James; Lill, Alan; Ford, Hugh
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Observations of the killing of large macropods by
           Wedge-tailed Eagles 'Aquila audax'
    • Abstract: Fuentes, Esteban; Olsen, Jerry
      During a long-term study on the breeding ecology of a raptor guild in the Australian Southern Tablelands of the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales, on two occasions we observed a pair of Wedge-tailed Eagles 'Aquila audax' killing male Eastern Grey Kangaroos 'Macropus giganteus'. We also observed two attacks on an adult female kangaroo: one inconclusive, and one that resulted in the Eagle killing a young kangaroo expelled from the female's pouch. These observations shed some light on the way that Eagles use this food resource.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Eastern Grass Owls roosting in a wheat crop in inland
           New South Wales
    • Abstract: Dahlem, Michael
      This note details two roosting Eastern Grass Owls 'Tyto longimembris' flushed from a wheat crop by a combine harvester near Bellata in the Brigalow Belt South bioregion (northern inland plains) of New South Wales, in October-November 2013. Despite the observer searching on foot in a remnant of unharvested crop 9 x 500 m, a Grass Owl, known to be within the crop, evaded detection by walking, until flushed by the harvester. The flushed Owls retreated to a nearby dry gully vegetated with tall ground-cover. No nest and no owlets were found in the crop. The farmer considered that Grass Owls have occurred in his corn, sorghum and wheat crops over decades, although they appear to be absent in winter, after crops have been harvested. Crops may provide food (rodents) and roost-sites for the Owls, and/or may substitute for lost natural wetland habitats in the region. Further investigation of the Grass Owl's occurence in the sheep-wheat belt is warranted.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Development of independence in Powerful Owl 'Ninox
           strenua' fledglings in suburban Sydney
    • Abstract: Mo, Matthew; Waterhouse, David R
      This paper extends previous observations of behavioural development in Powerful Owl 'Ninox strenua' fledglings. The study combines a near-daily visual monitoring program on a pair of owlets in Oatley, suburban Sydney, New South Wales, with corresponding pellet analysis. The fledglings were initially fed on possums, fruit-bats, birds and insects, and first demonstrated independence by disassembling carcasses by themselves. By October, they apparently mimicked the adults' strategy for capturing insects, and began to chase birds and bats. Behaviours thought to be part of honing their hunting skills - including tearing and ferrying strips of bark, foliage-snatching, and swooping at animals on the ground - were recorded. Such actions intensified during a period when the adults were mostly absent in November and December.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 3 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - A new look, new platform and new era for 'Australian
           Field Ornithology' from 2016
    • Abstract: Fitzsimons, James
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Ravens are a key threat to beach-nesting birds
    • Abstract: Rees, James D; Webb, Jonathan K; Crowther, Mathew S; Letnic, Mike
      Depredation of nests by native and introduced predators is contributing to the decline of beach-nesting shorebirds in many parts of Australia. Determining the relative importance of these predators is crucial for designing and implementing appropriate management strategies for shorebird conservation. We deployed and monitored 82 artificial Red-capped Plover 'Charadrius ruficapillus' nests, on six beaches within a 140-km stretch of the New South Wales Lower North Coast, to identify the main predators of beach-nesting shorebird nests and their relative importance. After 18 days, 53 (63%) artificial nests were depredated. Australian Ravens 'Corvus coronoides' and Forest Ravens 'C. tasmanicus' were the chief nest-predators, and were responsible for depredating 40 (49%) nests collectively. Comparatively few nests were depredated by European Red Foxes 'Vulpes vulpes', which depredated 8 (10%) nests. The rate of depredation (nests depredated/2 days) by ravens was greater than the rate of depredation by foxes (P
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - More on the Square-tailed Kite as Australia's
           honey-buzzard
    • Abstract: Optland, Wanda
      This note provides a further example, with photographic evidence, of a Square-tailed Kite 'Lophoictinia isura' taking the nest of paper-wasps 'Polistes' sp. and extracting and eating the larvae.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Incubation behaviour and parental care of a nestling
           in the Black Monarch 'Symposiarchus axillaris'
    • Abstract: Donaghey, Richard H
      The Black Monarch 'Symposiarchus axillaris', endemic to low montane forests in New Guinea, is socially monogamous and a territorial pair breeder. It builds a deep cup-shaped nest that is externally composed of moss. Watches at one nest with an egg confirmed that both male and female contribute equally in the later part of incubation. In the first 2 hours after hatching, both male and female contributed equally to brooding and feeding of the young, and in nest-defence. The combination of black skin and extensive long black down of the newly hatched Black Monarch appears to be unique amongst Australasian monarch flycatchers. The pattern of biparental care in the Black Monarch is compared with other Australian and New Guinea monarchs, particularly the Leaden Flycatcher 'Myiagra rubecula'. Equal investment in provisioning of offspring by the male and the female may indicate a low benefit from extra-pair copulations.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Issue 2 - Nest and egg of the Dimorphic Fantail 'Rhipidura
           brachyrhyncha' and a review of clutch-sizes in New Guinean passerines
    • Abstract: Donaghey, Richard H
      The fantail species of Australasia typically build a compact cup-shaped nest of vegetable fibre bound externally with spider web, with a 'tail' extending from the base. The discovery of an active Dimorphic Fantail 'Rhipidura brachyrhyncha' nest in montane Papua New Guinea revealed an atypical nest externally composed of moss, but without a 'tail'. The coloration and size of the egg were similar to those of other Australasian fantails. A clutch-size of one in montane fantail species and usually two in lowland species contributes toward an understanding that clutch-size decreases with altitude in many open-cup-nesting New Guinean fantails, monarchs, robins, honeyeaters and birds-of-paradise but not in bowerbirds, 'Myzomela' and 'Meliphaga' honeyeaters, berrypeckers, jewel-babblers, woodswallows and whistlers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:17 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 A successful long-distance aerial pursuit of an Australian Raven
           Corvus coronoides by a Brown Goshawk 'Accipiter fasciatus'
    • Abstract: Beranek, CT
      The Brown Goshawk Accipiter fasciatus has a variable diet comprising mainly avian prey and mammals, and most observations suggest that it employs a range of ambush tactics but rarely uses long-distance aerial pursuits. Here I document a rare instance of a successful long-distance aerial pursuit of an Australian Raven Corvus coronoides by a Brown Goshawk, on 29 March 2015, on Broughton Island, New South Wales. After multiple unsuccessful aerial attacks, the Goshawk eventually succeeded. Although corvids are abundant and widespread throughout Australia and are within the preferred avian prey size range, they are rarely observed in the Goshawk's diet. Two ecological factors probably contributed to this observation: (1) there is little woodland here and thus little concealment for ambush tactics and (2) prey availability on Broughton Island and the surrounding islands has been altered by programs to eradicate pest mammals, thereby limiting the prey available to this species in this area.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 11:39:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 J.N. Hobbs Medal 2017: Citation - Ken Gosbell
    • PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 11:39:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Observations and first photographs of the Guadalcanal Thrush
           'Zoothera turipavae' and Makira Thrush 'Z. margaretae' in the Solomon
           Islands
    • Abstract: Quelennec, Thierry; Quelennec, Marianne
      We describe observations and provide ecological notes on two poorly known endemic thrush species from the Solomon Islands, the Guadalcanal Thrush Zoothera turipavae and Makira Thrush Z. margaretae. We also present the first published photographs for these species and discuss the differences in coloration observed in the field in July 2016 compared with published illustrations.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 11:39:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 170 years of Latham's Snipe 'Gallinago hardwickii' arrivals in
           New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory show no change in
           arrival date
    • Abstract: Wilson, David; Hansen, Birgita; Honan, Jodie; Chamberlain, Richard
      An understanding of migration phenology is critical to the conservation of long-distance migrants. Latham's Snipe Gallinago hardwickii is a cryptic, dispersed migratory wader that breeds in northern Japan during the austral winter and migrates to Australia for the non-breeding period. Records of this species for New South Wales (NSW) and the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) were extracted from a range of data sources including hunting reports, the Atlas of Living Australia, eBird and citizen science records, generating a dataset of first-arrival dates for 170 years (1846-2016). The first record in each year, corresponding to the expected arrival period of Latham's Snipe on southward migration, was used to infer the date of first arrival. These dates were analysed using simple linear regression against Julian day to test the hypothesis that changes in climate (i.e. increasing mean annual temperature) might result in a corresponding shift in arrival dates. The mean Julian day of first arrivals in NSW and the ACT was 14 August +/- 9 days, with no significant change over the 170-year span of records. This suggests that migration phenology of Latham's Snipe has not been strongly influenced by changing large-scale climatic conditions at either the breeding or non-breeding grounds.

      PubDate: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 11:39:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Incubation behaviour and care of a nestling by a pair of Black
           Fantails 'Rhipidura atra'
    • Abstract: Donaghey, Richard H
      The Black Fantail 'Rhipidura atra', endemic to the lower montane forests of New Guinea, builds a typical fantail nest. Observations of a nest placed high up in an understorey tree in the Arfak Mountains in Indonesian New Guinea revealed that the male and female of a pair mostly alternated incubation bouts and contributed almost equally to incubation, care of the nestling and nest-defence. Incubation constancy was 80%. Observations of Black Fantails mobbing potential nest-predators are described.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 13:18:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Parasitism strategies of the Fan-tailed Cuckoo 'Cacomantis
           flabelliformis'
    • Abstract: Guppy, M; Guppy, S; Fullagar, P
      The Fan-tailed Cuckoo 'Cacomantis flabelliformis' inhabits thick forest, and nothing is known about how it finds the nests of its hosts, or whether it monitors the nests that it does find. We studied this cuckoo, and its hosts, for 8 breeding seasons between 2007 (August 2007-January 2008 inclusive) and 2014 (August 2014-January 2015 inclusive) on a 10-ha site in a coastal forest of south-eastern Australia, near Moruya, New South Wales. For three of these seasons, nests were monitored with cameras. The Cuckoo was recorded at the nests of only its four putative hosts at the site (White-browed Scrubwren 'Sericornis frontalis', Brown Thornbill 'Acanthiza pusilla', Superb Fairy-wren 'Malurus cyaneus' and Variegated Fairy-wren 'M. lamberti'). It parasitised only the nests of the White-browed Scrubwren and Brown Thornbill, but it removed either eggs or young from all other nests at which it was recorded. There was no correlation between any measure of nest activity for a host species, and parasitism of that species, and cameras at nests recorded no evidence of nest monitoring by the Cuckoo. We conclude that individual Cuckoos may be host-specific, and that the parasitism strategy is enigmatic, but is possibly haphazard and inefficient. As a result, the Fantailed Cuckoo finds most host nests too late for successful parasitism, it spoils them to re-instigate building, and is by default a major nest-predator.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 13:18:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Invasive Eurasian Tree Sparrows 'Passer montanus' on Troughton
           Island in the North Kimberley of Western Australia: A cyclone-induced
           colonisation attempt'
    • Abstract: Tucker, Anton D; Johnstone, Ron; Loyn, Richard; Vinnicombe, Tracey; Newman, Brad; Newman, Heather; Veal, Heather; Bentley, Blair; Williams, Desmond
      Four Eurasian Tree Sparrows 'Passer montanus' were recorded on Troughton Island, north-western Western Australia, on 6-8 August 2016. Reports indicate that these were the remaining birds (or progeny) from a group of 17 birds that arrived after a storm in c. 2011; the population then dwindled despite apparently breeding over the next 5 years. This represents the first documented colonisation by this species of a near-shore location in Australia with little or no likelihood of ship assistance.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 13:18:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Recent sightings of the Night Parrot 'Pezoporus occidentalis'
           from Matuwa (Lorna Glen) and Millrose Station in Western Australia
    • Abstract: Hamilton, Neil A; Onus, Mike; Withnell, Bruce; Withnell, Kay
      The elusive and rare Night Parrot 'Pezoporus occidentalis' is being continually searched for and sightings reported. It was thought possibly to be extinct until recent discoveries of two dead specimens in Queensland (1999, 2006), a confirmed sighting in the Pilbara in 2005, the first photograph of a live bird in Queensland in 2013, subsequent discoveries in western Queensland, and a photograph of a Night Parrot in flight from the interior of Western Australia in 2017. We describe our sightings of the Night Parrot from the arid region of Western Australia on 24 November and 5 December 2009. In addition, we briefly describe other possible sightings from the same location and adjoining Millrose pastoral station.

      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 13:18:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Killing of a mobbing Crested Pigeon 'Ocyphaps lophotes' by an
           Australian Raven 'Corvus coronoides'
    • Abstract: Mo, Matthew
      Mortality in birds engaged in mobbing potential predators is rare, especially while defending their progeny. This paper reports an incident of a nesting Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes being fatally attacked by an Australian Raven Corvus coronoides that it was mobbing. The Raven remained on the carcass for some time, but did not feed on it.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 11:13:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 A probable Australian White Ibis 'Threskiornis moluccus' x
           Straw-necked Ibis 'T. spinicollis' hybrid
    • Abstract: Callaghan, Corey T; Ryall, Sharon; Kingsford, Richard T
      We observed a probable juvenile Australian White Ibis 'Threskiornis moluccus' x Straw-necked Ibis 'T. spinicollis' hybrid on the Lachlan River catchment, New South Wales, in November 2016. Photographs, combined with observations, demonstrate phenotypic characteristics of both these ibis species. The bird had a pattern on the wing similar to the Australian White Ibis but coloration on the body similar to the Straw-necked Ibis. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of a probable hybrid between these two species in the wild, and the first report documented with photographs.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 11:13:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Development of a tag-attachment method to enable capture of
           fine- and landscape-scale movement in black-cockatoos
    • Abstract: Yeap, Lian; Shephard, Jill M; Bouten, Willem; Jackson, Bethany; Vaughan-Higgins, Rebecca; Warren, Kristin
      This study reports on a successful trial of a double-tag mounting protocol using both satellite and GPS tags on captive black-cockatoos (Forest Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus banksii naso, Baudin's Black-Cockatoo Zanda baudinii and Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo Z. latirostris). The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility and tolerance of a novel back-mount and a double-mount protocol combining a back- and tail-mount in black-cockatoos. We trialled solar 3D Global Positioning Systems (GPS) tags, standard solar and battery-operated GPS and Platform Terminal Transmitter (PTT) tags, and developed an attachment method to fit back-mounted solar-powered UvA-BiTS GPS tags to captive black-cockatoos. We investigated the effect of a variety of different types of tail-mounted satellite tags on the operational ability of the primary UvA-BiTS units and the feasibility of the double-mounted tag system with regard to tolerance by the birds. Our study determined that the combination of a 7.5-g UvA-BiTS GPS tag and 17-g Telonics TAV 2617 satellite tag was best tolerated by the birds and was the optimal tag system for use on birds to be released. This system enables capture of movement data to better understand the ecology of black-cockatoos, and identify critical feeding, roosting and breeding habitats, thereby informing conservation management initiatives to conserve these threatened species.

      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2017 11:13:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The Otway Forester 'Strepera graculina ashbyi': A neglected and
           misunderstood subspecies of the Pied Currawong from southern Victoria
    • Abstract: Menkhorst, Peter; Morley, Craig
      The most southerly of the six described subspecies of the Pied Currawong, Strepera graculina ashbyi, is perhaps the least known and most controversial. Because it has reduced areas of white at the bases of the primaries and at the bases of the rectrices, its appearance is superficially similar to the Grey Currawong S. versicolor, and this has caused confusion from the time of its first description to the present day. Subspecies ashbyi is considered to be extinct by some authorities, yet our observations indicate that birds showing the phenotypic characteristics of ashbyi are common breeding residents in the Otway Ranges of southern Victoria and in the regional city of Geelong and surrounding areas. Here we review the taxonomic history, morphological characteristics and current status of S. g. ashbyi. We identify errors of citation and misinterpretation of the literature which, combined with a lack of ground-truthing, have resulted in the classification of a seemingly common taxon as Extinct. We then present a re-assessment of the distribution and biogeography of S. g. ashbyi and discuss the suitability of the type specimen. The true taxonomic status of S. g. ashbyi can probably only be determined by studies of rates of genetic introgression amongst Pied Currawong populations across western Victoria, but in the meantime its conservation status should be revised to Least Concern.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 May 2017 15:13:35 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Finding food in a human-dominated environment: Exploring the
           foraging behaviour of urban Torresian Crows 'Corvus orru'
    • Abstract: Clifton, Briana; Jones, Darryl N
      Urbanisation provides both challenges and opportunities for wildlife living within these novel environments. Corvids (crows and ravens), although naturally wary and neophobic, have become among the most abundant urban bird groups throughout the world. Although such success has been attributed to their exploitation of human-derived food wastes, the foraging behaviour of urban corvids is poorly understood. We investigated foraging among Torresian Crows Corvus orru in suburban Brisbane, Queensland, by observing their behaviour at 15 parks and commercial sites in 2014-2015. The items consumed by foraging crows were identified specifically and with regard to origin during 5-minute focal observations. In addition, the reactions of birds to the presence of humans were noted. We found that the diet of the species was dominated by natural foods, especially insects, although around a third of items were of human origin. Crows selected a very wide range of food types and were more likely to consume natural foods during the morning but anthropogenic foods during the middle of the day. Crows were prone to flying away from a foraging site if people were close by. This study demonstrated that urban Torresian Crows rely primarily on natural foods, probably switching to scavenging only when nutritional needs have been met.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 May 2017 14:36:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Identification of terrestrial predators at two little penguin
           colonies in South Australia
    • Abstract: Colombelli-Negrel, Diane; Tomo, Ikuko
      Identifying predators and determining their influence on bird population declines can be crucial in the implementation of appropriate conservation measures. In this study, we focus on the Little Penguin Eudyptula minor, a flightless seabird whose numbers have seriously declined in some populations across Australia and New Zealand, for a variety of reasons, some not fully understood. Using a combination of motion-camera monitoring at active burrows and postmortem examinations of carcasses, we present data on the identity, occurrence and impact of terrestrial predators at two colonies in South Australia: Granite Island and Emu Bay (Kangaroo Island). Terrestrial predation varied from 20% for carcasses found on Granite Island to 44% at Emu Bay. There was no evidence for predation at burrows on Granite Island but, at Emu Bay, we identified goannas (Heath Monitor Varanus rosenbergi) as predators of chicks (by using cameras), and Cats Felis catus as predators of chicks and juveniles (from postmortem examination of carcasses). In addition, 45% of the carcasses found at Emu Bay were categorised as chicks. We discuss potential biases in identifying causes of death from carcasses only and the importance of combining both direct and indirect evidence.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The avifauna of Cartier Island commonwealth marine reserve,
           north-western Australia
    • Abstract: Clarke, Rohan H; Swann, George; Carter, Michael J; Mott, Rowan M; Herrod, Ashley
      Cartier Island and the surrounding reef is an isolated Australian Territory situated in the Timor Sea. Little is known about the avifauna of the reef system and the adjacent waters. Here we summarise all known ornithological records from the Island and detail the results of twice-annual bird surveys conducted within the Cartier Island Commonwealth Marine Reserve between 2010 and 2014. By the conclusion of the surveys, a total of 34 bird species had been recorded within the Reserve. The Crested Tern 'Thalasseus bergii' was shown to breed on the Island in small numbers. Several additional species of seabird and small numbers of shorebirds are regular visitors. Most other species occur as occasional visitors or vagrants.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The range and habitat of the Kalkadoon Grasswren 'Amytornis
           ballarae'
    • Abstract: Harrington, Graham; McKeown, Adam; Venables, Brian
      In this paper we discuss the results of the first comprehensive survey of the range and habitat of the Kalkadoon Grasswren Amytornis ballarae. This grasswren is of particular interest because (1) It is not classed as a Restricted Range Species by BirdLife International although we show that it occupies < 50 000 km2; (2) This species lives in a fire-prone environment, and the habitat is unsuitable for at least 3 years after fire. The movement and fate of the birds in these circumstances is unknown; (3) It is sympatric with the Carpentarian Grasswren A. dorotheae over part of its range, raising questions about competition between the species; and (4) The spatial and behavioural separation from the closely related Dusky Grasswren A. purnelli is not well defined. In 2008 and 2009, we visited 195 locations in firescars of known age within the known range of the Kalkadoon Grasswren and played calls of Kalkadoon and Carpentarian Grasswrens at 6-10 sites in each, totalling 1491 survey sites. We encountered 81 groups of Kalkadoon Grasswrens. They showed a marked preference for metamorphosed sandstone and marble. They were almost always found on rocky hills, but if on flat areas they were within 300 m of hills. Spinifex Triodia spp. dominated the ground-layer at all the sites where Kalkadoon Grasswrens were located. Ground-cover by spinifex increased annually after fire and plateaued after 6 years. Kalkadoon Grasswrens had returned to 30% of 3- and 4-year-old firescars, but occurred in 90% of locations surveyed which had not been burnt for >=10 years. No grasswrens were encountered in surveys between the currently published ranges of the Dusky Grasswren in the Northern Territory and the Kalkadoon Grasswren in Queensland. This paper provides a distribution map, and defines the habitat variables for the Kalkadoon Grasswren. Our mapping shows that the range of the Kalkadoon Grasswren is 40 000 km2, which qualifies it as a BirdLife International Restricted Range Species. We argue that an Important Bird Area should be declared for conserving and monitoring this species alone, where it is not sympatric with the Carpentarian Grasswren.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 White-throated Treecreeper 'Cormobates leucophaea' feeding on
           bracket fungus
    • Abstract: Maurer, CN; Maurer, G; Reaney, LT
      White-throated Treecreepers Cormobates leucophaea are generally considered strict insectivores. This paper provides observational data of a female Treecreeper during winter feeding on a White Punk Laetiporus portentosus bracket fungus occurring in Victorian heathy dry forest.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 A prolonged agonistic interaction between two Papuan Frogmouths
           'Podargus papuensis'
    • Abstract: Zdenek, CN
      Papuan Frogmouths 'Podargus papuensis' are large nocturnal birds about which relatively little is known. A prolonged aggressive interaction between two Papuan Frogmouths that involved interlocking beaks was filmed in the Lockhart River region on Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, and is described here. Two additional Papuan Frogmouths were present during the event, one of which gave a call-type (OomWoom) previously unrecorded for this species. Difficulties associated with detecting such agonistic behaviour mean that the prevalence of these contests and their behavioural significance are currently unknown and require further research.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 23:18:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 First specimens of free-flying Canada Geese 'Branta canadensis'
           from Australia
    • Abstract: Boles, Walter E; Tsang, Leah R; Sladek, Jaynia
      The Canada Goose Branta canadensis occurs in a feral state in New Zealand and rarely strays to Australia. There are two mainland records for Australia. The second of these pertains to four birds that were first observed on the south coast of New South Wales (NSW) in late 2007 before eventually being culled at Killalea State Park, NSW, in early March 2008. These specimens, three females and a male, the first from Australia, were incorporated into the collection of the Australian Museum. They are considered to have been free-flying adults of the subspecies B. c. maxima, that which occurs in New Zealand, from where they are assumed to have originated. The destruction of these Geese was consistent with guidelines for dealing with any appearance of this invasive species in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 14:25:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Moorland Point: Decline of a traditional roost-site for Ruddy
           Turnstone 'Arenaria interpres', Pacific Golden Plover 'Pluvialis fulva'
           and other shorebirds in northern Tasmania
    • Abstract:
      The Moorland Point area has been an important high-tide roost for certain migratory shorebird species on the central-north coast of Tasmania, where shorebirds are generally scarce. Ruddy Turnstone Arenaria interpres and Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva roost on a small rocky headland and adjacent piles of seaweed along with up to three Grey-tailed Tattlers Tringa brevipes (all mainly in summer), and Double-banded Plover Charadrius bicinctus roost above the high-tide mark 250 m to the east (mainly February-early August). More than 300 counts of shorebirds have been made at this site from 1985 to 2014. All these species have declined in recent years. Ruddy Turnstone, Pacific Golden Plover and Grey-tailed Tattler may have been affected by factors elsewhere in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, but local disturbance is also implicated and needs further management in addition to the recent initiative to block vehicles from the beach. The situation highlights some of the problems in conserving shorebird species that favour scattered small sites and may escape the attention given to sites supporting large numbers of more social shorebirds.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 14:36:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Notes on the 'Zoothera' thrushes in the Tweed Range of
           northeastern New South Wales
    • Abstract: Leach, Elliot C
      The Zoothera thrush complex is represented on the Australian mainland by the Bassian Thrush Z. lunulata and the Russet-tailed Thrush Z. heinei. These species are sympatric at several locations on the eastern coast. Often, these populations occupy different elevations, with the Bassian Thrush preferring higher elevations, though reasons for this are poorly understood. I present data from automated acoustic recordings made of these species in the Border Ranges and Mebbin National Parks of north-eastern New South Wales between 300 m and 1100 m above sea-level over a 1-year period from June 2015 to May 2016. Bassian Thrushes were recorded most frequently in October, typically at or above 900 m. Russet-tailed Thrushes were recorded most frequently in August, at or below 700 m. Differences in elevational preference between the species may be driven by several factors including adaptation to cold, avoidance of interspecific competition and avoidance of hybridisation.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 14:35:06 GMT
       
 
 
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