Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 387 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 387 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Narrative Therapy & Community Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Irrigation Australia: The Official J. of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Australian Art Education
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1032-1942
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin C
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Contributors' biographies
    • PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - From acculturation ... to empowerment ... to
           inclusion: How Asian students are expressing their ethnic and cultural
           identities through art education in secondary schools in New Zealand
    • Abstract: Smith, Jill
      This study explores the researcher's experience of witnessing a transition from acculturation... to empowerment... to inclusion for Asian students in art education in secondary schools in New Zealand. The study was prompted by research in 2011 with Asian pre-service art teachers which found that Asian art and culture were invisible during their secondary school experiences; that they were 'acculturated' into the dominant European culture. A consequent pedagogical approach aimed at 'empowering' Asian pre-service art teachers to promote a stronger Asian presence in schools was implemented in course work in 2014. In 2018, the rapidly increasing Asian population in New Zealand motivated the researcher to investigate how 20 of her former pre-service teachers, currently teaching art in secondary schools in Auckland, are supporting their Asian students in art education. In this qualitative interpretive study data were collected from questionnaires and interviews, supported with artworks by Asian students. This article focuses on how a sample of four of the Asian art teacher participants are enabling their Asian students to 'be themselves', express their identities, and tell their stories through art. The findings suggest that the art teachers' youthful experiences of 'acculturation', and subsequent 'empowerment' gained through pre-service teacher education, have led to them using culturally 'inclusive', student-centred pedagogies, underpinned by an overarching sense of care for their Asian students.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - The tenth muse: The art of visual film making
    • Abstract: Maddock, Daniel; Redulla, Monique
      Without question, literacy is a vital foundation for educational success. However, the term literacy refers, quite narrowly, to linguistic literacy; the process of meaning-making derived from written or oral human language. When non-literary forms of communication and expression are discussed academically and critically, it is often through the lens of a cultural studies analysis that focuses on narrative and ideology (Bender, 2012). Within cinema, this amounts to a study of the content in the screenplay, an approach which often disregards the form of the filmmaking; for example, mise-en-scene, editing, and sound design. Most educators would agree that literacy in the 21st Century has a wider scope. Some have suggested the extension of literacy to include a study of visual literacy, while others argue visual literacy and linguistic literacy should both be understood as elements of a whole literacy. This article investigates the differences and commonalities between visual and linguistic literacy claiming that the term literacy encompasses the reading of all forms of communication regardless of modality.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Artworks to see before you die
    • PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - 'It looks like a tornado, now it looks like a cowboy
           hat': Community arts and diverse learners
    • Abstract: Bowell, Ian
      This paper draws from theories of 'situated learning', 'collaborative teacher communities', and analysed data from six case studies, and discusses how engaging in community arts activities caters for the needs of diverse learners. Emerging themes from analysed data reveal parallels to Elwyn Richardson's observations published 56 years ago. He describes a pedagogical approach that is still able to inform teaching and learning in a contemporary setting. The findings and themes in this paper are particularly pertinent today as primary school teachers are confronted with decreased curriculum support and a recent emphasis on the national testing of numeracy and literacy standards.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Supporting visual art teaching in primary schools
    • Abstract: Bowell, Ian
      In New Zealand, a reduction of support for primary school teachers in arts education is threatening teacher confidence in teaching visual art. This article examines a two-year pilot project in New Zealand aiming to provide a community support network to newly qualified primary school teachers to develop their confidence in teaching visual art. Using expertise within the community, the project uses practical visual art workshops and mentoring to support newly qualified teachers. At the halfway point in the project data reveals an emerging picture of a group of newly qualified primary school teachers being supported by visual art education expertise as they develop confidence in teaching visual art.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Reconciling critical and creative thinking
           capabilities and critical practice in visual arts education: A work in
           progress
    • Abstract: Maras, Karen
      With increasing national and international attention on educating for 21st century competence, and general acceptance that learning in Visual Arts supports the development of critical and creative thinking (CCT) capabilities, there is a need to explore the terms on which CCT skills articulate with the practical and theoretical constraints on knowledge in the subject. Drawing on psychological and art educational research, the cognitive bases of critical and creative thinking, their relationship and articulation is examined. Some reflections on how CCT capabilities manifest within the domain-specific constraints on critical practice in Visual Arts and implications of this for teaching and research in art education concludes this investigation.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Ladder to the sky: Empowering creative expression and
           children's voice through art appreciation
    • Abstract: Beachum, Jenny; Gibson, Robyn
      It is well documented that art appreciation has numerous benefits and is particularly significant in the primary classroom. However, the importance of art in the lives of young children, specifically how interactions with art can empower creative and emotive expression, is generally under-investigated. This research project sought to identify how an intervention of six sessions of quality art appreciation and related art-making experiences with students in a Kindergarten classroom could unlock children's voice by accessing a channel of communication unique to interactions with art. Data collected from work samples, informal interviews, journal notes, group discussions, photographs, and an interview with the class teacher demonstrates how these experiences can be facilitated and what impact they may have on young children. The findings suggest that a carefully planned unit of work that explicitly teaches art appreciation skills in conjunction with art-making opportunities can make a difference to the manner in which children talk about art. Additionally, the study found that students were more confident and imaginative in responding to artworks following just six sessions. They made meaning from viewing artworks and were able to articulate these ideas and their associated feelings and then share them with the class. It is argued that art appreciation is not only useful in the primary classroom, but is a crucial experience in addressing the right of young learners to be heard, acknowledged, and valued. Ultimately, this research demonstrates how interactions with art in the primary context can empower creative expression, emotive response, and children's voice.

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - 'Let the work speak for itself': Augustine Dall'ava,
           Australian sculptor
    • Abstract: Baguley, Margaret; Kerby, Martin; Bywaters, Malcom
      Augustine (Gus) Dall'Ava is one of Australia's foremost contemporary sculptors. In a career spanning forty years he has enjoyed both critical and commercial success. In addition to over 20 individual shows, he has won a variety of commissions: Aspects of Time (1981)which is a steel and stone gateway at the University of New South Wales (Sydney, 1981), Ian Potter Sculpture (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1981), Melbourne International Airport (Melbourne, 1995), Australian National Korean War Memorial (Canberra, 1997-2000), Deakin University (Melbourne Campus, Victoria, 2000), Pacific Power (Sydney, 2000) and Queens Plaza (Brisbane, 2004). The article is both a biographical overview and a coverage of the creative output of an artist of the "first rank for whom compromise of any kind is out of the question".

      PubDate: Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:08:46 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Contributors' biographies
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin C
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Towards foundations for a socially critical art
           education (8th annual Leon Jackman memorial lecture)
    • Abstract: Duncum, Paul
      Significant recent developments in Australian art education have moved away from a consideration of the aesthetic value of fine art products to a broad sociological conception of the visual arts which includes folk and popular arts. Many art educators assume a socially functionalist approach which celebrates cultural diversity and attempts to describe the function of cultural artifacts, sometimes in terms of lived experience. While acknowledging the importance of these developments, the author adopts the view that cultural production is part of an unjust society in ferment and is a site for ideological struggle. The view advanced is that to be true to its subject, art education must adopt a socially critical position. Drawing upon the culturalist tendency within English Cultural Studies possible theoretical foundations for a socially critical art education are explored. These include: social structure is as important as lived experience; society is comprised of competing interests and is structured in dominance; cultural production is constitutive of social reality; basic to human action is agency, constraint and struggle; and explicitly engaged judgement is essential to the development of a more democratic society.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Responding 30 years later to the 8th annual leon
           Jackman memorial lecture
    • Abstract: Duncum, Paul
      I recall delivering this paper with the aid of an Overhead Projector that showed the headings and main points. There were no pictures. This was years before slide shows were replaced by PowerPoint, years before the Internet took hold, decades before Web 2.0 interconnectedness, and today's Big Data analytics that trawl and aggregate millions of images in seconds. Yet it is not only the technology that has changed. Rereading the paper after 30 years I was at first struck by how many of the various contexts informing the paper no longer apply.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Regional jewel: New England Regional Art Museum
           (NERAM) and the Howard Hinton collection
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin; Baguley, Margaret
      If Michaela Boland is correct in her assertion that "At their best, local art galleries reflect the region back to itself" (Boland, 2012), the New England Regional Art Museum (NERAM) in Armidale deserves to be ranked among the best in Australia. The recent opening of its new exhibition Hinton: Treasures of Australian art is the culmination of two decades of philanthropy on the part of the art patron Howard Hinton OBE (1867-1948). The artists Arthur Streeton (1867-1943) and Norman Lindsay (1879-1969) placed Hinton alongside Alfred Felton (1831-1904), David Scott Mitchell (1836-1907) and Sir Baldwin Spencer (1860-1929), as one of the greatest benefactors of the arts in Australian history (Elphick, 2018). At a broader level, however, the collection also symbolises the importance of art education, particularly in regional areas, through its connection with the Armidale Teachers' College (1928-1971), then the Armidale College of Advanced Education (ACAE) (1971-1989), which amalgamated with the University of New England (UNE) (1989-2008), and the city that was once touted as the capital of a possible Australian state of 'New England'.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Exploring the arts and literacy in curriculum: A
           cross-cultural comparison of Australia, Canada and France
    • Abstract: Barton, Georgina; Lemieux, Amelie; Chabanne, Jean-Charles
      This paper is a cross-cultural comparative study of how the arts and literacy are represented within school curricula in Australia, Canada and France. The relationship between the arts and literacy within these contexts is widely considered to be tenuous, a situation which will be explored by first investigating how literacy has impacted on the arts, and second, establishing a case for arts literacies to be considered unique. A content analysis of the arts and literacy in each of the national curricula and current educational policies is then conducted. Implications of these findings for classroom practice are then shared.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Boundary objects in the visual art-science learning
           space
    • Abstract: Grushka, Kathryn; Clement, Neville; Chand, Ari; Lawry, Miranda; Devine, Andy
      Innovation and trans-disciplinary knowledge is now coupled with creativity and linked directly to career futures that prioritise STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Science). Concurrently, educators are calling for a move beyond previously defined disciplinary or epistemic boundaries. As education must now embrace epistemological fluency (Markauskaite and Goodyear, 2017) the visual arts are well placed to contribute to this learning. This article explores the concept of the 'boundary object' and defines it within an art-science learning context. This context reveals how a creative and aesthetic semiotic interchange between visual art and science can be realised. It describes a research project that specifically explored visual cognition and learning in the visual art domain. The contribution of visual art learning to trans-disciplinary learning is examined through a case study that focuses on visual arts learning in the art-science space.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Mapping the nomadic journey of becoming in digital
           portfolios: Digital way finding in art education
    • Abstract: Coleman, Kate
      Reflective processes and practices within the curation of a digital portfolio create openings for developing as an artist through critical autoethnographic practice/s. This ongoing practice of digital autoethnographic research unlocks the space for connections to be drawn rhizomatically between artefacts, evidence of practice and the selves thereby bringing the artist and their material worlds closer. This paper explores my moments of becoming in a digital a/r/tographic digital portfolio submitted as thesis in my doctoral studies, and the implications for both artist-students and artist-teacher candidates. Working methodologically in digital portfolios through a/r/tography and critical autoethnography as method has opened my practices and pedagogies in initial teacher education through digital wayfinding.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Artist teacher cognition: Connecting 'self' with
           'other'
    • Abstract: Heaton, Rebecca
      In this visual essay I story a doctoral journey exploring cognitive conception in artist teacher practice. Underpinned by autoethnographic research, I communicate how an understanding of cognition can be understood and developed by an artist- teacher academic working with a cohort of pre-service artist teachers. The visuals embedded in this essay draw relationships between the cognitive conceptions of self and other to reveal i) the importance of cognition to art education ii) factors which influence cognitive conception and iii) the value of cognition as a transformational practice. The use of personal, cultural and theoretical lenses in this essay provide important insights to the finding that engagement with cognition in artist teacher practice can assist in ensuring art education remains valued, timely and progressive.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Instagram and art gallery visitors: Aesthetic
           experience, space, sharing and implications for educators
    • Abstract: Suess, Adam
      Instagram is one of the world's most popular social media applications. For art galleries it is an important tool for promotion, marketing, interaction, participation and the enhancing of the visitor experience. For arts educators it is an opportunity to broaden the participation of people wanting to learn through art, and to consider how Instagram may contribute to an art gallery based learning program. There is limited research about the use of Instagram by visitors to an art gallery and the role it plays in their experience. This article is drawn from a research study into the use of Instagram by visitors to the Gerhard Richter exhibition at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art (14 October 2017 - 4 February 2018). The research project, which was informed by spatial theory, found that the use of Instagram at the gallery engaged visitors in a manner that transcended the physical space and extended their aesthetic experience. This finding is significant for arts educators seeking to engage students through social media during visits to art exhibitions.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Arts belong in the classroom: Empowering teachers in
           arts-based learning
    • Abstract: Macdonald, Jacqueline; Tualaulelei, Eseta
      Learning in and through the arts is central to fostering young learners' creativity. This article explores the perceived barriers to quality arts-based learning for children and potential strategies for overcoming them. It describes an action research collaboration with two Queensland based early years educators, and explores how this collaboration facilitated changes to their arts based pedagogical approaches. We argue that with sufficient support, educators can act as change agents by leading arts-based learning in a manner that promotes creativity.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - A game approach to art appreciation for children:
           Encountering artworks with a spirited, plucky, brave and daring
           disposition
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Naomi
      This paper will investigate the relevance, value, and detail of a variety of pedagogic practices aimed at increasing learning for children engaged in art appreciation. Artworks provide us with the opportunity to explore the world through an intimate encounter with a sensibility, an intellect and a history other than our own. The richness of this encounter has the potential to foster our curiosity and deepen our understanding of the world and humanity's place within it. The foundational premise of this paper is that by empowering children through their early and sustained engagement with visual arts we are teaching towards a more connected and just society (UNESCO, 1999). The game approach is an attitude of 'gameness' that is characterised by an intention to eagerly and intrepidly explore an artwork. An adult, with this same gameness of approach, is an important partner in this endeavour, as artworks are complex and often include subjects and themes that need to be intelligently translated to bring them into the frame of reference of children's lived experiences.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Farewell to Saigon by Tranh Van Tuan
    • Abstract: O'Toole, John
      As a drama teacher, I often use visual artworks, especially paintings, to explore two of the key elements of drama - 'Time and Narrative'. So many paintings show a particular dramatic moment of a story, frozen in time, and still embodying the artist's emotions and point of view. So it is with Farewell to Saigon - and for me all the more so as I know the painter and his own quite extraordinary and moving back-story, that imbues the painting with so many of the emotions and quite a lot of the story.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - National Visual Arts Education Conference (NVAEC) - 21
           - 23 January, 2019
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Speed: Mobility and exchange
    • Abstract: Blewett, Danielle
      Review(s) of: Speed: Mobility and exchange - Academy Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania 13 January - 20 April, 2018.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Gladstone regional art gallery and museum
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Exhibition: Iconic Queensland: 2017 Queensland
           regional art awards
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Exhibition opening speech: Iconic Queensland: 2017
           Queensland regional art awards
    • Abstract: van Noordenburg, Henri
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Contributors' biographies
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin C
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Spirit of '76: November reflections from the first AEA
           President
    • Abstract: Paramanathan, Nathan Thambu
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - The paradox of Nathan Thambu Paramanathan
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin; Barton, Georgina
      This article is a short biographical treatment of the life of Nathan Thambu Paramanathan, the inaugural president of Art Education Australia (AEA). It offers the reader an insight into his formative experiences in pre-war Kuala Lumpur, including his early exposure to the work of Dutch artist Meindert Hobbema, and then through the Japanese occupation, war time deprivation, and a post-war confrontation with the White Australia policy that made international headlines. Paramanathan now lives in retirement in Melbourne after a long and decorated career as an arts educator and a practicing artist. Though biography is often denigrated as something akin to fiction, it is nevertheless a means by which a reader can discern something of the "rainbow like intangibility" of a person's inner life amidst the "granite like solidity of the facts".

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Drawing in art education research: A literature review
    • Abstract: Duncum, Paul
      Drawing remains a central part of many K-12 art curricula, both in Australia and overseas, and research continues on what children draw in their own time. This paper contextualizes current approaches to research on drawing as part of art education by examining the history of research on drawing. Five major theoretical approaches are examined, including their relationship to the concept of art and their primary methods. These five approaches are described according to their chronological appearance. The approaches are named as mental operations, aesthetic expression, mental and emotional health, procedural, and social practice.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Landscape and memory: An exhibition at the Toowoomba
           regional art gallery
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin; McDonald, Janet
      In early August 2018, the Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery (TRAG) in Queensland opened a group exhibition titled 'Landscape and Memory: Frank Hurley and a nation imagined'. Eight artists responded to official war photographer Frank Hurley's iconic images taken on the Western Front and in the Middle East in 1917 and 1918. Though the exhibition took its place amidst a plethora of First World War centenary commemorative activities, at a broader level it was in fact an exploration of the place of landscape in the Australian cultural imagination.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Uncomposed: Unconventional cinematographic composition
           in cinema and television
    • Abstract: Maddock, Daniel
      The rules of composition for cinematography are an entrenched system of mathematical frame division that have remained unquestioned since the advent of the cinema medium. The rules have become convention to a point that, when broken, the result appears radical and stark to both critics and viewers. This article explores several of the leading examples of unconventional composition in the contemporary cinema and television drama genre, including Tom Hooper's 'The King's Speech' (2010) and 'The Danish Girl' (2015), and, briefly, the television series Mr. Robot (Esmail, 2015). The author compares the use of composition in these media to the use of it by the painters Edward Hopper and Vilhelm Hammershoi to suggest that the industrialisation of cinema has restricted the ability of filmmakers to experiment with the form.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Creative leadership and the Hadley's Art Prize Hobart
           (HAPH)
    • Abstract: Baguley, Margaret; MacDonald, Abbey; Jackett, Amy
      This paper explores the characteristics of creative leadership inherent in developing a major art prize with a significant education component. The Hadley's Art Prize Hobart (HAPH) is the richest landscape art prize in the world. Since its inception it has included an education kit in order to engage teachers and students and enhance their understanding and enjoyment of the exhibition. The creative and collaborative process between the curator of the HAPH and the art education specialists who developed the 2018 education kit is explored in this paper using the methodology of narrative inquiry. The three commonplaces of temporality, sociality and place for each participant was explored. The research found that although there are a range of personal attributes and characteristics that are evident in participants of long term collaborations, it is also possible for these to occur in shorter term collaborations such as the HAPH Education Kit.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - How to make bricks light: Clowning in child protection
           practice
    • Abstract: Steggall, David
      Clowning has a cultural history in delivering social benefit, in schools, hospitals, aged care facilities and refugee camps. However, child protection and social work are terrains unexplored by the clown practitioner. This paper explores 'The Dreams of Bricks', a clown show created for primary aged children currently residing in foster care. The performance was an interactive experience of the child safety practice tool: The Three Houses. It applies clown-logic to the research and practice of hearing children's experience of being in foster care. Clowning offers an intentional way of defying discourse and re-authoring a response to child protection practice. This paper outlines the creative development of the theatre show, the dialogue between social work theory and clowning methods, which emphasises selfreflection, the subversion of social norms, tragedy and sadness, hopefulness, the illumination of possibility, boundary crossing and empathy.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Building quality production outcomes in undergraduate
           screen media group production courses: A case study
    • Abstract: Hetherington, John; Sutherland, Jesse; Knie, Amy
      Undergraduate university productions in screen media have consistently proved problematic in achieving quality production outcomes, particularly in group production courses. Historically most universities and film schools have long debated the question of what quality to expect from student productions and how to best assess their work at this level. This paper provides a case study account of the authors' efforts to improve the standard of third year student productions in the Bachelor of Creative Arts (BCA) at the University of Southern Queensland. During the creation of two films 'Emerge' (Hetherington, et al., 2016) and 'City Fragments' Toowoomba (Hetherington, et al., 2016) the authors focused on production quality, the student experience of industry practice, and working collaboratively. These efforts were underpinned by the belief that time management needed to reflect industry practice, rather than academic constraints and an un-interrogated valuing of collaboration. As well as providing creative skill development, this research found that improving time management strategies and working collaboratively provides for a more realistic experiential learning atmosphere.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - The Palgrave handbook of artistic and cultural
           responses to war since 1914: The British Isles, the United States and
           Australasia [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: The Palgrave handbook of artistic and cultural responses to war since 1914: The British Isles, the United States and Australasia, Edited by Martin Kerby, Margaret Baguley and Janet McDonald, Published: 4 January, 2019.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - A litany of vapours by Phillip Wolfhagen
    • Abstract: Carrig, Anna
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Gallery Spotlight/Events/Awards - Lake Macquarie city
           art gallery
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - National Visual Arts Education Conference (NVAEC) at
           the heart: Inspiration, bravery, compassion and connection - 21 - 23
           January, 2019
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Embodied, emboldened and recursive art appreciation -
           exploring identity through contemporary art
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Naomi Lee
      This instructional paper presents a series of multimodal art appreciation experiences designed to engage young people aged 12 - 18 years in dynamic, responsive dialogues that explore constructs of identity using contemporary art as the catalyst to discussion. The focus artists, drawn from diverse cultural backgrounds, were represented in the 2017 Summer Suite of exhibitions at Penrith Regional Gallery and The Lewers Bequest, which is operated by Penrith Performing and Visual Arts Limited. It included 'Tracey Moffatt: Up in the Sky, Landing Points: Race, Place and Identify' and 'From the Ground'.

      This article explores the complex artistry needed to facilitate quality art appreciation experiences that honour all points of view whilst increasing young people's engagement in the complex cultural dialectics of identity in a 21st century Australian context. The multi-modal experiences include dialogic and textual responses as well as setting up the conditions for embodied or body-centric encounters. The recursive nature of the experiences seek to return students to the focus artworks, moving through initial responses into more enlivened and surprising encounters which have greater potential to transform their understanding, create memorable experiences and inform further art encounters as they move towards independent, cultural agency.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Rediscovering Maija Liisa Vasenius: Ceramics in the
           classroom
    • Abstract: Heilpern, Louise
      In 1960, my mother bought a Maija Liisa Vasenius ceramic wall hanging from a shop in Double Bay, a harbourside suburb in Sydney, Australia. She had saved hard while working as a nurse at the Montrose Children's Home in Burwood in order to afford an original piece of art. Since then, it has remained one of her favourite possessions. Although Finnish in origin and certainly folksy in its appeal (it was inspired by a folk Christmas ornament of straw called 'Himmeli'), there is still much to admire about my mother's choice of artwork. It is comprised of textured, well-proportioned ceramic shapes that are connected with wire fittings. Small, house-like shapes hold heavier diamonds. Blue ceramic beads retain a delicacy within the overall design. With a length of over 150 cms, its size and weight make balancing it a challenge.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Landscape of the dragon: Art therapy and education
    • Abstract: Paramanathan, Nathan Thambu
      Though it seems a lifetime ago I was once employed by a large Queensland boarding college to run their library. As part of my duties I was required to establish a museum and archive, a role that required me to read hundreds of school annuals, newsletters, newspaper reports and memos. Each offered an often hilariously idiosyncratic take on events that, in retrospect, were probably trivial. A variety of patterns inevitably emerged in my reading, or I imposed patterns on random events, which is of course not the same thing. Yet one thing appeared with monotonous regularity. In times of plenty (and in enrolment brochures) the arts flourished. But when feast turned to famine and shortages beset the land, they were dropped like a bad habit. Unlike maths and science (and rugby!) their value was apparently not self-evident.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - What Matters': Talking value in Australian culture
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: What Matters': Talking value in Australian culture, by Julian Meyrick, Robert Phiddian and Tully Barnett, Published: 1st August, 2018, Monash University Publishing ISBN: 9781925523805, August, $24.95, paperback or pdf.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Steam education: Fostering creativity in and beyond
           secondary schools
    • Abstract: Harris, Anne; de Bruin, Leon
      Current educational policy is dominated by a discourse of transferability, scalability and innovation, within a climate politicised by 'creative industries' and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education in Australia. STEM has been promoted as an authentic and engaging approach to education, particularly as Australia tries to boost its performance in international testing. However, STEM has consistently been challenged by STEAM, where 'arts and design' represent the 'A'. STEAM advocates for creativity and expression to be included as a core part of any interdisciplinary approach. There is no defensible reason why the 'A' of arts should not be included in domain interconnectedness and the development of critical and creative thinking skills' preparation of students for the global economy. Assessing the 'state of play' involving STEM and STEAM in Australia, this paper considers the widespread adoption of STEM in education, and its missed opportunity for integrating arts skills and capacities into the creativity agenda. Harris (2016) has argued in favour of a more 'ecological' whole-school approach to fostering creativity that promotes not only creative approaches to STEM subjects, but importantly arts subjects as well, including environmental, partnership and professional development components. The Harris Creativity Index is reviewed, and salient creative skills and capacities posited which allows teachers to implement pedagogical procedures that can improve creativity within schools through more whole-school transdisciplinary STEAM approaches.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Visual art pedagogy and practice on the anangu
           pitjantjatjara yankunytjatjara (APY) lands
    • Abstract: MacGill, Belinda
      The focus of this paper is on teaching and learning within a Communities of Practice (CoP) model of art education in Early Childhood, Schools and Adult learning centres across the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands (APY Lands) located in the remote desert country on the border of Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory. The Anangu, Aboriginal people from the APY Lands, have an approach to pedagogy which is informed by Kulini, a deep listening, spiritual, embodied knowledge system (Osborne, 2014). Western teaching practices built on Socratic teaching methods culminating in Direct Instruction (DI) nevertheless ignore the value of this system. In contrast, Anangu pedagogy which weaves western knowledge through an Indigenous ethics of care offers considerable potential for the development of a culturally responsive pedagogy (SooHoo and Nevin, 2013). This pedagogy needs to be co-constructed by Anangu and Piranpa (Non-Aboriginal people), a collaborative approach which positions both groups as learners and teachers within a Communities of Practice (CoP) model (Lave and Wenger, 1991).

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Arts research: Innovative practices - a 'snapshot'
           from new Zealand
    • Abstract: Smith, Jill
      Arts Research: Innovative Practices, a postgraduate course introduced at The University of Auckland in 2012, is attractive to students from across the arts disciplines and educational sectors wishing to engage in arts-based educational research. The course entices students to critically explore emerging visions and theoretical concepts that broaden research practices in the arts through approaches such as narrative, autobiography, performative ethnography, reader's theatre, poetic inquiry, and a/r/tography. Emphasis is placed on the 'visual' as a powerful research tool. In this paper, an example of a Master of Education (MEd) thesis by Meng-Jiun Penny Lin (2015) offers a 'snapshot' of insights into how research in more than one arts discipline can be creatively conceptualised, conducted and reported in innovative ways. This cross-disciplinary postgraduate study provides an inventive model for others embarking on arts research.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin C
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Contributors' biographies
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - A war imagined: Gallipoli and the art of children's
           picture books
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin C; Baguley, Margaret; MacDonald, Abbey; Lynch, Zoe
      The artists and authors who produce children's picture books dealing with the First World War, and Gallipoli in particular, find themselves burdened by the expectation that they will balance a respect for this foundation myth with a 'pity of war' approach more in line with modern attitudes to conflict. Whatever their personal ideology, to meet these expectations many of them embrace the thematic imperatives of those who have already painted and written about Australians at war: the increasingly sentimentalised construct of the Australian soldier as a victim of trauma, the providing of a moral lesson with many of the characteristics of a displaced Christianity and the traditional use of Australian war literature as an exercise in nation building.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Fairweather: The man and his art
    • Abstract: Beattie, Debra
      This article is written as a reflection on the production of a number of narrative versions of the life and times of Ian Fairweather (1891-1974). These are primarily sourced from the ABC TV broadcast post-production script, which won the NSW Premier's Literary Award for Non-Fiction in 2010, and the database on the painter's life which was launched as a scholarly website titled The Ian Fairweather Project in 2007. Fairweather lived a long and remarkable life, filled with adventure, mystery and intrigue. In his last twenty years, living as an eccentric recluse he painted masterpieces in a handmade grass and bamboo hut on Bribie Island off the Queensland coast. His life's journey from Scotland, his significant artistic output which is represented in all state galleries in Australia in addition to overseas institutions such as the Tate Gallery in London, and his embrace of Eastern philosophy can all stir contemplations about values and attitudes to both life and to art.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Exploring pre-service teacher self-efficacy across
           three Australian universities
    • Abstract: Lemon, Narelle; Garvis, Susanne
      This paper shares a study exploring the connection between primary pre-service teachers' feelings of confidence, preparedness and self-efficacy to teach in the curriculum areas of Mathematics, English, Technology and the Arts (Dance, Drama, Media Arts, Music and Visual Arts). The data collected from 339 pre-service teachers located in three different Australian universities demonstrates the variance across different curriculum areas and how institutional focus can influence pre-service teacher self-efficacy and confidence levels. This in turn can impact future teachers' engagement with the Arts.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Art and learning at the imperial war museum (IWM),
           London
    • Abstract: Walton, Alexandra F
      This article argues that visual art has an integral role to play in the educational mission of war museums that goes beyond merely illustrating historical narratives. The significant fine art collection of the IWM (Imperial War Museums), which contains over 20,000 items, is explored with a specific focus on how art curators from IWM London engage with these works to inform the Museum's narratives. More than any other part of the IWM collection, art has the ability to address abstract concepts and analytical themes related to the history of war. The article draws on interviews with IWM art curators, and examines the often contested role that the art collection plays in the broader efforts of a museum currently celebrating its centenary year.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Re-enchanting education: Challenging the 'hidden'
           curriculum
    • Abstract: Russell, Ann; Batorowicz, Beata; Baguley, Margaret
      Employing the Grimm Brothers' Hansel and Gretel tale as a metaphorical device, this paper explores how arts education can disrupt the hidden curriculum in schools (Rosenberg and Thurber, 2007). This paper provides a symbolic representation of the education context by likening the secondary school art studio to the Gingerbread House, featured in the fairy tale story, and in turn the art teacher to a feminist re-envisioning of a witch. In this contemporary version, the 'art teacher-witch' creates recipes for challenging and confronting increasing government involvement in the education sector through contemporary art practice.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Studio models in a changing higher education landscape
    • Abstract: Wallis, Louise; Williams, Anthony; Ostwald, Michael J
      This paper explores the way in which different studio models have emerged in architectural education, as well as providing an overview of studio models in recent use (2007-2011), which is timely in a context that values 'efficiency dividends'. Four models are explored in order to represent the considerable diversity in how the studio is defined and understood in the Australian and New Zealand context. The paper highlights the significant influence and impact of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) policies and management have had on schools and their studio models.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Australian tertiary artists, we need to talk: The
           birth of nitro
    • Abstract: Wilson, Jenny
      In June 2016, the Australian Council of Deans and Directors of Creative Arts (DDCA) began NiTRO, an online publication designed as a platform for tertiary creative artists and educators to make connections across the visual and performing arts, and also in design and creative writing. In a broader sense it supports the DDCA's mission to advocate for the importance of the creative arts in tertiary education, research and society. Since its first edition, NiTRO has attracted a diverse and growing domestic and international readership both inside and outside academia. This article traces its creation, focus, outcomes and future direction as expressed through the voices of its contributors.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Wellbeing and arts education: Opportunities for
           increasing advocacy
    • Abstract: McDonald, Janet; Aprill, Arnold; Mills, Deborah
      The importance of wellbeing for social and community health is often predicated on a 'medical model'. This paper explores existing research which proposes a return to Aristotle's eudaimonic understanding of wellbeing. An Eudaimonic approach values pleasure, enjoyment and beauty. However, the absence of wellbeing from policy documents related to arts education is of concern, particularly as the arts have been shown to increase empathy, tolerance and imagination. This paper therefore advocates for the transformational quality of experimentation, evident in the arts, which increases the wellbeing of students in a range of ways including the ability to recognise and explore nuance.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Impact of the creative arts indigenous parental
           engagement (CAIPE) program
    • Abstract: Vaughan, Tanya; Caldwell, Brian J
      Creative Arts Indigenous Parental Engagement (CAIPE) was funded by the Commonwealth Department of Employment, Education and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) as a Parental and Community Engagement (PaCE) project. It is a community driven program for parents and carers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people up to the age of 19 years (Department of Education, 2013). It facilitated the production of culturally relevant visual arts (mural and artworks) and resources (books) which drew on the cultural capital of parents, students and community members. The impact of the CAIPE was measured in eight schools, with a total of over one thousand students, including 155 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students. The three program elements of CAIPE; In-School Workshop, Early Literacy Storytelling and Creative Community were implemented by The Song Room in urban, regional and remote schools in Queensland, Australia. A mixed methods approach using statistical analysis of data and case studies identified statistically significant increases at the regional schools in attendance, English grades and literacy outcomes as measured by the National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Semi-structured interviews with students, parents, teachers and school leaders identified key learnings in program design.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin C
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Contributors' biographies
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Light fuse and stand well back: A reflection on the
           role of the creative arts in the Australian academy
    • Abstract: Meyrick, Julian
      This article is drawn from a lecture recently presented at Griffith University which examines the Australian higher education sector and its rapid transition from a traditional view of education to one which is increasingly affected by government funding and subsequent intervention. The amalgamation of the creative arts from small conservatorium-style academies to the broader university system has not been met with a concomitant desire to fully appreciate and value their unique contribution to the academy. The author argues that creative arts research requires understanding and to date little consideration has been given as to how it can be accommodated within existing university structures. Universities therefore need to provide the creative arts time to resolve issues around their intellectual contribution and to value the meaning they ultimately give to our lives.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Developing creative ecologies in schools: Assessing
           creativity in schools
    • Abstract: de Bruin, Leon; Harris, Anne M
      Creativity has a significant role to play in how educational praxis evolves to meet the demands of future workforces and their lifelong learning. There now exists an abundance of discourse activity pertaining to creativity in education that stress nurturing it as an essential yet complex and multifaceted aspect of education. The need to recalibrate creativity in education beyond simplistic notions of accommodating creative industries and domain-centred thinking is stimulated by more holistic and ecologically responsible and responsive organisational and pedagogical practices. This article details findings from a three-year international study of creativity in Australian, Singaporean, American and Canadian secondary schools. A Whole School Creativity Audit that considers school policies, teacher pedagogies, the nurturing of student and teacher practices and processes for creativity, school environments and local/global creative partnerships is posited. Whole-school engagement in cultivating united, interconnected understandings and practicalities, and interdisciplinarity that fosters 'wise creativity' as a holistic ecological approach in schools is identified as a crucial component of a modern education.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - The museum diorama: Caught between art and history
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin; MacDonald, Abbey; McDonald, Janet; Baguley, Margaret
      Perhaps more than any other type of museum display, dioramas, particularly those in military museums, are expected to be all things to all people. To justify their role as an explanatory tool they must be 'accurate' representations of history, yet to survive in the modern museum environment they must also be artefacts or artworks in their own right, flexible enough to adjust to changing tastes and perceptions. Diorama artists are constrained, however, by three seemingly incompatible approaches: representing a single moment in a complex event, compressing timelines in order to show multiple 'moments', and the creation of a hypothetical, generic representation of 'battle'. The issue of scale is also problematic, for the more a diorama shows of a battle, the less it is able to communicate the individual human experience of conflict. To engage with individual trauma in this manner is nevertheless problematic given that the great battles of history are traditionally linked to national achievement, yet the modern conception of war is increasingly one that characterises it as a destroyer of civilisations rather than a stepping stone in the creation of the nation state. This article explores how The Royal Armouries (Leeds, UK), The Royal Green Jackets (Rifles) Museum (Winchester, UK) and the Australian War Memorial (Canberra, Australia), have grappled with these issues, ones which position dioramas uneasily between art and history.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Transforming maternal regionalism through the
           mother-artist model (MAM)
    • Abstract: Clark, Linda; Batorowicz, Beata; Baguley, Margaret
      As a regional contemporary artist, and also a mother, I have often had to subsume one role over the other depending on the context. My recent tertiary studies have allowed me to explore the critical synergies between the two roles and in the process to propose, develop and refine my Mother-Artist Model (MAM). By blurring art and life, the model draws on mothering attributes of adaptability and resilience and makes visible the complex stories of the mother-child relationship. This paper explores the development of this process and the potential within the MAM to be used as an adaptive creative practice strategy for other women artists to overcome the challenges of maternal periphery through collective sharing and dialogue.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Good teachers grow: Disrupting negative depictions of
           teachers through relational a/r/tographic inquiry
    • Abstract: MacDonald, Abbey; Cruickshank, Vaughan
      This article explores the potential impact of expressions of gratitude to and for our teachers on teacher retention and resilience. It is widely acknowledged in educational circles that upwards of forty percent of Australian teachers leave the profession within the first five years. With teachers struggling under the pressures of increased social and political scrutiny and associated increases in societal and workplace expectations, teacher burnout and attrition remains a substantial issue in Australia. Despite the scholarly research that has identified the high levels of teacher attrition, the difficulties of the teaching profession go largely unacknowledged by a public who see media commentary around teacher work and lives dominated by references to short hours and long holidays. In addition, this narrative is often dismissive of the positive influence of good teaching and dedicated teachers.

      Using the case study of a recently retired career teacher known to the researchers, this article identifies the potential impact on teacher resilience and retention of a disruption of the negative public discourses around the work and lives of teachers. In doing so, we illustrate the need to balance dominant negative discourses with ones that acknowledge and celebrate the positive impact of teachers in the lives of their colleagues, students and the wider community. The authors employ an a/r/tographic inquiry that uses relational art inquiry tools to highlight the attributes of resilient teachers, and how teacher resilience and in turn retention might be cultivated through expressions of community gratitude. In doing so, we argue that when teachers feel valued and are cognisant of the gratitude felt by students, staff and parents, their professional resilience is bolstered and the likelihood of attrition reduced.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Critical images, critical voices: The artwork of
           vernon ah kee
    • Abstract: Castro, Jason; Batorowicz, Beata
      This paper explores the 'critical image' in contemporary art and its role in Australian art education through the lens of two tertiary artists and arts educators. Critical images are contextualised as dialogically based, interrupting prevailing discourses which create opportunities for new dialogues located in social, historical or cultural debates (Castro, 2017). As these debates are evident in the work itself, this paper asserts that critical images provoke viewer autonomy in critical thinking, and therefore 'educate' audiences. The critical image is explored in this paper through the art of Australian artist Vernon Ah Kee.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - To tread lightly: Teaching aboriginal and torres
           strait islander art and representation in a regional university
    • Abstract: Heckenberg, Robyn
      My heritage is Wiradjuri, a Central New South Wales nation with a powerful connection to Lake Cargelligo and a number of inland rivers. Our old ties with the river have facilitated strong ties with tribes up and down the rivers which have extended as far as South Australia. In addition, Wiradjuri has strong familial associations with Yorta Yorta, Gamillaroi and historically significant ties to neighbouring nations, such as the Wonnarua with whom we collaborated during the 1826 uprising against the British (Miller, 1995). Our broad associations also included ceremonial and marriage arrangements with peoples much further afield, such as Aboriginal people who shared Mount Bogong in the Victorian Alps. Cultural ties and reciprocity arrangements extended as far as Southern Queensland and during the Bunya Pine ceremonial cycle, there were huge gatherings of people, including Wiradjuri, who travelled significant distances to share food. This is the present location of the College of Indigenous Studies, Education and Research (CISER) at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ). It is at this university that I now plan and implement innovative art theory that provides a narrative of Indigenous art in the contexts of human rights, land rights, intellectual property rights, politics and international networks. In this way cultural exchange continues between myself as Wiradjuri and Aboriginal communities in Southern Queensland in an unbroken chain which honours both past and present associations.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Generation art: An educational program to engage
           audiences with art
    • Abstract: Mitchell, Donna Mathewson
      This article outlines an innovative education program piloted at Bathurst Regional Art Gallery in 2016. Generation Art involved a series of after school workshops for Year 10 students focused on cultural engagement and learning in the art gallery. The program culminated in the creation of digital stories re-visioning the art gallery and its collection from a youth perspective. These resources have been shared publicly on the gallery website and in a public screening. Action research was undertaken to document and evaluate the program and the underpinning partnership model. In this article, the program and research is outlined to illustrate its significance in engaging youth audiences with art and art galleries.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - The parliament house embroidery: A creative
           collaboration
    • Abstract: Baguley, Margaret; Kerby, Martin C
      The Parliament House Embroidery (PHE) was the result of an eight year collaboration between the South Australian artist Kay Lawrence and each Australian state and territory embroidery guild. Conceived as an artistic commemoration of Australia's Bicentenary and the opening of the new Parliament House in Canberra on 9 May 1988, the PHE is notable as both a key commissioned work and the only gift accepted by the Parliament House Construction Authority's Art Advisory Committee. Drawing from a case study this paper explores issues related to interpretation, leadership, and authorship that arose during this extended collaboration. As the PHE celebrates its thirtieth anniversary in 2018, this is a timely investigation of the process that led to the creation of this artwork.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - John Dewey and Reggio Emilia: Worlds apart - one
           vision
    • Abstract: Lindsay, Gai
      The Reggio Emilia educational project is internationally renowned for an early childhood pedagogy that centralises visual arts as a graphic language within multi-disciplinary projects. Loris Malaguzzi, the first director of the Italian project, is credited for introducing ateliers (art studios), as well as an atelierista (visual arts specialist) within each preschool. This paper suggests that Malaguzzi's conception of the atelier as a place for art focused, hands-on collaborative research with children may have been inspired by John Dewey's (1900) discussions about art laboratories as a unifying force for democratic and transformative education. Contemporary educators are invited to reflect on their own visual arts practice in light of the shared vision of these two educational philosophers.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - From the classrooms of Stanford to the Alleys of
           Amsterdam: Elliot Eisner as pedagogue
    • Abstract: Barone, Tom
      This paper was originally published as the first chapter of 'Aesthetics, Politics, and Educational Inquiry: Essays and Examples' by Tom Barone (New York: Peter Lang) in 1996. This book remains a seminal text in the development and growth of arts-based research and art education, and this chapter is a delightful wander through the streets of Amsterdam with Elliot Eisner, Tom's one time mentor, lifelong friend and esteemed colleague. It tells of experience and introspection, of teaching and learning and of the personal and professional perspectives of two highly influential scholars. It is reprinted here with permission in its original form.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Beyond the school gate: A study of arts engagement and
           employment in post-secondary school years
    • Abstract: Alter, Frances
      Creative industries are key drivers of modern economies; however, analysis has traditionally advanced a market-failure model of arts and culture (Potts, 2012). A negative socio-economic paradigm can have an adverse effect on post-secondary school students' career choices and continued engagement in the arts. This article reports on the findings from the first stage of a longitudinal study that tracks the life trajectories of a group of young people who at some time in their school years were winners and finalists in a university funded art prize. The participants, now in the early stages of their tertiary studies and careers, were surveyed in order to learn whether they had continued to engage in visual arts practice, continued on to further training in the arts or work in creative occupations. Participants in this study offered insights into their motivations to pursue arts-based careers as well as their understanding of the challenges that face those who desire a career in the Arts.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Considering a methodology to provoke respectful
           conversations about creativity with arts educators
    • Abstract: Selkrig, Mark; Bottrell, Christine
      While the space remains fragile for arts learning in school settings, the need for creativity and creative learning is emphasised in curriculum documents. Alongside this tension, what creative learning and teaching means continues to be unclear for many educators. In this paper we report on an innovative methodology developed and implemented for a project to explore connected understandings of creativity and creative learning amongst arts educators. The methodology, while succinct and efficient, also provided abundant, meaningful data. It also offered various ways for participants to engage in collegial discussions that provoked deep questions and thoughtful conversations about creativity and arts learning.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Transformative learning: Ecologies of practice in art
           and design education
    • Abstract: Snepvangers, Kim; Bannon, Robyn
      This research paper focuses on the quality of engagement of Preservice Art and Design Educators (PADE) with knowledge and transformative learning in tertiary art and design curriculum and field-based experience. The research scaffolds participant knowledge as an oral narrative from research interview data supported by a strong practical focus on learning from experiences gained in the field. This research project aimed to come to an understanding of how the specific potential of professional industry experience in the final year worked to generate teacher case-based knowledge. Case studies were selected as an appropriate methodology to report on research interview data conducted with graduates given their recent experience with changing variables of being, firstly, a student and subsequent engagement with a profession. The case selected for analysis explored the teaching and learning practices undertaken during a professional experience semester-long internship in a western Sydney school. Through a close study and evaluation of a pre-service art and design teacher's experience of teaching a Stage 5 Visual Arts unit of work, the discussion reveals assumptions and perceptions about learning. This kind of evaluative and reflective practice-led research has the capacity to deepen understanding of personal teaching practices and inform tertiary teacher education. The importance of teachers' case-based wisdom of practice and interconnectedness of learning within localised, specialist contexts in visual arts is highlighted as a marker of quality engagement with knowledge. Ecology is applied as an organising construct for the research, emphasising a personal approach to interconnection for planning curriculum projects whilst learning in the domain of art and design. Publishing impact and quality data concerning the transformative potential of art and design education is significant within neo-liberal educational agendas in Australia.

      PubDate: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 11:34:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - National gallery: The beating heart of art education
    • Abstract: Carrig, Anna
      This article is an overview of the 2019 National Visual Art Education Conference (NVAEC) held at the National Gallery of Australia (NGA), Canberra between 21 - 23 2019. It is adapted from a blog written by Anna Carrig, Educator Coordinator at the NGA and published on their website on 12 March, 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Millais, John Everett
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Contributors' biographies
    • PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - My name's William and I'm a sculptor: William Eicholtz
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin
      William Eicholtz is one of Australia's leading figurative sculptors. His work is framed by his use of the imagery of Classical marble sculpture and his fascination with baroque art. He acknowledges the figure's place in the history of art while simultaneously translating it into a language infused with humour and theatricality. Eicholtz has taken on a range of private and public commissions, notably the Lady of Justice (Melbourne, 2002), The Gippsland Immigration Wall of Recognition (Gippsland, 2006), Towner's Call (Blackall, 2009), and Courage (Melbourne, 2014).

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - A reflection: 'We've got it backwards: It's too late
           by age 8'
    • Abstract: Wright, Susan
      Thirty years ago, I wrote a paper for Australian Art Education entitled 'We've got it backwards: it's too late by age 8'. A few years earlier I had the privilege of receiving the Australia Early Childhood Association scholarship in honour of Frances Derham, a well-known Australian artist, early childhood tertiary educator (Piscitelli, 1993) and author of Art for the Child Under Seven (1973). The scholarship supported my visits to several sites, including Harvard's Project Zero, to meet with Howard Gardner and his team of researchers. Few scholars during that period were focusing on the arts and human development. Gardner's book Artful Scribbles (1980), which was regarded as provocative, brilliant and significant, made a "substantial contribution to the still sparse but growing body of literature on children's graphic and artistic development" (Wilson and Wilson, 1981).

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - We've got it backwards: It's too late by age 8
    • Abstract: Wright, Susan
      There is an abundance of evidence showing that early childhood is the most formative period for growth and development in the social, physical, emotional, intellectual, artistic, and creativity domains. There is evidence, as well, that the quality of early experience can have a significant impact upon development later in life. This paper raises the question that despite knowledge of the developmental process why do educational practices fall short of supporting artistry in children' Pre-service training is identified as a crucial factor with an urgent need to review educational structures in order to give support to quality arts instruction, particularly at the early childhood level.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Rebel with a cause: An hour with ben quilty
    • Abstract: Quilty, Ben; Kerby, Martin; Baguley, Margaret
      This article is based on a one hour keynote address at the National Visual Art Education Conference (NVAEC) held at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra between 21- 23 January 2019. Ben Quilty, one of the featured keynote artists, explored his childhood engagement with art, his concern about the state of art education in Australian universities, his experience as an official war artist in Afghanistan, his work with Syrian refugees, and his touching friendship/mentorship with Myuran Sukumaran who was executed in Indonesia in 2015. The sections in italics are those drawn from his presentation, although they have been edited for fluency and clarity. The article expands on Quilty's presentation by drawing on his background and artistic and socio-political interests.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Converging discipline perspectives to inform the
           design and delivery of STEAM teacher professional learning
    • Abstract: MacDonald, Abbey; Wise, Kit; Riggall, James; Brown, Natalie
      STEAM education continues to build momentum across Australia, with education stakeholders making space for the contribution that expanded and non-hierarchical disciplinary perspectives are bringing to education at all levels. This article offers a discussion of the lived experiences of teacher professional learning collaborators in designing and delivering a multi-site, live streamed STEAM professional learning event. The authorship teams' individual and shared experiences of contributing to teacher professional learning that holds space for broad and deep disciplinary agendas to emerge are elicited. From this, implications of working with and from ways of being, doing and knowing inherent to individual disciplines are considered in relation to their wider disciplinary synergies. In mapping the synergies inherent to the authorship teams' experience of contributing to this event, this article illustrates how storying disciplinary perspectives can elicit meaningful thresholds for connection, convergence and collaboration.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Development and analysis of dialogue and questioning
           strategies with primary school students in learning about artworks
    • Abstract: Tam, Cheung-On
      There is a lack of empirical research into group dialogue and questioning - the most basic component of teaching in art lessons. This study investigated the dialogues conducted by primary school visual arts teachers with their students. Eight teacher participants were observed and their teaching was examined against a theoretical framework constructed from a spectrum of dialogue and questioning strategies proposed by various theorists. From the observed dialogues, it was found that most teachers focused primarily on the observation and visual analysis of artworks. They also introduced some essential contextual knowledge to their students. However, interpretations of artworks were rather limited. Lastly, the development of students' personal connections with and judgment of artworks were ignored by most of the teachers. The study is particularly meaningful given the increased emphasis on learning art criticism in the new visual arts curriculum and amidst the latest cultural developments in Hong Kong.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Shifting paradigms: Attributes of contemporary
           practice
    • Abstract: Chua, Flossie SG
      Young people's ability to survive and indeed thrive in the 21st century is contingent on their capacity to engage in the complexities of the world. The rise of social media as a news source, escalating migration and displacement, uneven social and economic realities, and pressing environmental crises have forced a challenging shift in the way we think about what matters most to learn. To effectively prepare young people for the contemporary world that they are going to live, work and play in, much emphasis has been placed on the importance of ensuring that students are able to think deeply and critically, collaborate broadly across cultural and language differences, and develop creative solutions to complex global problems.

      This study proposes the epistemic practice of contemporary artists as a promising pedagogical inspiration for educators because contemporary artists demonstrate the kinds of capacities and dispositions that will effectively prepare young people for the contemporary world that they are going to live, work and play in. Contemporary artists are highly intentional in the way they think about their work; bridging in drawing from different expertise, contexts and worldviews to deeply understand and more effectively express their artistic intentions; and refractive in consistently disrupting commonly-held assumptions in order to provoke viewers to imagine radical alternatives and possibilities.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Artistic courage: National visual art education
           conference 2019 opening address
    • Abstract: Mitzevich, Nick
      Good morning everybody and welcome to the National Gallery of Australia. It's such a great pleasure to have so many of you here. The National Gallery, like so many important institutions in Australia, needs to be a protector of our cultural heritage. It also needs to be more than just a protector; we need to be advancing our cultural agenda. We have an important role to play in leading social and cultural transformation because we're the custodians of history. We are also the custodians of the passion and the commitment of artists.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - The defence of Rorke's Drift 1879 (1880) [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Kerby, Martin
      Review(s) of: The defence of Rorke's Drift 1879 (1880), by Alphonse-Marie-Adolphe de Neuville.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Shifting Paradigms, thinking in and through
           contemporary art, a pedagogy of possibilities
    • Abstract: Smith, Anne
      The power of contemporary art as a platform for critical thinking, multimodal practice and inclusive dialogue continues to gain momentum across diverse disciplinary interests and education contexts. This paper will provide insights into how the Shifting Paradigms Framework developed by Dr Flossie Chua, Project Zero, Harvard University can be implemented through the Australian art education setting. Through selected examples from the Independent Schools Victoria Arts Learning Program, the author will explore how the dispositions can be witnessed as guiding principles in the creation of student artwork and interactive workshop programs as presented at the Arts Learning Festival.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Using student goal setting and feedback to encourage
           independent learning
    • Abstract: Carmody, Robyn
      Australian students starting secondary school in years 7 or 8 (middle school) arrive to the subject of visual arts with considerable differences in their experience and skill. Teachers are faced with the challenge of instilling in these students a confidence in their ability and a capacity to engage in independent learning. This paper explores a project involving year 7 and 8 students undertaken in eight-week blocks over an 18-month period which sought to improve their drawing skills over time through the use of evidence-based practices including weekly progressive learning goals combined with effective feedback, spaced practice and criterion-referenced frameworks for assessment. It outlines the research question, context and stakeholders for the intervention, justifies the reasoning for the evidence-based teaching practices chosen, and the initial plan for implementation. In addition, the paper will explore the challenges and modifications to the project's 18-month implementation with suggestions for future iterations.

      PubDate: Thu, 27 Feb 2020 19:16:25 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Dancing around drawn edges: Reimagining deficit
           storylines as sites for relational arts teacher professional learning
           collaboration
    • Abstract: MacDonald, Abbey; Hunter, Mary Ann; Ewing, Robyn; Polley, Jane
      This article offers an examination of three Arts teacher professional learning initiatives implemented in Australia. Through a process of developing storied vignettes for relational encounter and meaning making, the article identifies some key factors that operate across contexts to enable and/or inhibit Arts teachers to achieve and embody transformative outcomes for Arts learning and pedagogy. Adopting an iterative collaborative process individual storylines become an entwined meta-narrative in which vignettes of recent Arts teacher professional learning exemplars disrupt the deficit storylines of competition and conflict that have operated historically to marginalise the Arts in education contexts. We suggest that such deficit storylines can be reimagined as generative spaces for possibility. Subject or discipline borders in context can be viewed as thresholds to enliven rather than fragment the presence and purpose of future oriented agendas for Arts education.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Art educators on twitter: How can diffraction trouble
           and stimulate virtual intra-active process in art practice and
           education'
    • Abstract: Power, Kerry
      Virtual engagement and communication infiltrates perception and learning and has wide-ranging implications for educator use. This article introduces a study of art educator communication on the social media system Twitter to support thinking with virtuality in art practice and art education. Virtual, transmissive processes have been considered by creating artwork and analysing data using a diffractive lens. Diffraction is defined by referring to Barad's (2007) conceptual model of light penetrating, bouncing off, and illuminating matter. I explore my synergistic relationship with virtuality by thinking with, through and around data to challenge how art educators might make use of virtuality in art education.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - The Australian curriculum for the arts - five years
           old: Its conception, birth and first school report
    • Abstract: O'Toole, John
      Five years have passed since the Federal Government ratified the Australian Curriculum: Arts for (almost) Australia-wide implementation. That official baptism followed a gestation and delivery period almost as long - from 2009-2013 - and procreation efforts that had spanned twenty years and one miscarriage. After five years, most babies are ready to face school and its curriculum and their first report. How school-ready is this toddler' And come to that, how ready are the schools to accept and nurture this creative tot' A good time for the first school report, perhaps.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - After 'What Matters'': A reflection on the value
           of arts and culture and four 'lies' of data
    • Abstract: Meyrick, Julian; Barnett, Tully
      In this article, we consider some of the issues arising from the recent publication of our book 'What Matters' Talking Value in Australian Culture', co-authored with Robert Phiddian. We briefly describe the book's main arguments, especially the critical stance taken towards the use of metrics and numerical proxies in the evaluation of arts and culture. We reflect on its media reception, and its attempted intervening in an on-going debate about the role and meaning of cultural activities in Australian life today. We then identify four 'lies' of data - four disingenuous applications of quantitative method that substitute for the search for a more effective understanding of the problem of value as it appears in the cultural domain and related fields. The article concludes with consideration of an alternative approach to the evaluation of arts and culture that resuscitates the notion of their 'public good', following political historian Tony Judt's call for "a language of ends not means".

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Alvarez, Kerby C
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Contributors' biographies
    • PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Art as transformative education: Starting the
           conversation
    • Abstract: Cain, Melissa; Nislev, Eva
      This chapter documents the journey of the authors, two Australian artists and arts educators as they explore the current and entrenched rationales for art education. These popular and pervasive global narratives offer an often unchallenged justification for engaging in art in educational contexts. Delivered through an unusual yet progressive form of narrative inquiry, this article is framed by emails shared between the authors over a four year period. They serve as an archive of stories, thoughts, and ideas, one which facilitates frank discussion, interpretation, and reflection. The authors explore reasons for art education at a fundamental level; a critical reflection that evolves to become transformative, and which places the 'common good' of humanity at its centre. Using the popular rhetoric as a starting point for their investigation, the authors seek to contribute to a global conversation about a 'counter-curriculum' for teaching art. They invite others to provide their perspectives and ideas with a view to looking outwards to a potential infinity, and a transformed approach to learning in visual arts.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Sensorium #1
    • Abstract: Eggleton, Alison
      Review(s) of: Sensorium #1, by Sue Pavlovich, (March 24 - April 8, 2018).

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Untitled by Dr Thancoupie Gloria Fletcher (Thanakupi)
           by Brodie Taylor
    • Abstract: Taylor, Brodie
      As an artist who explores the interrelation of narrative and symbology, it is not surprising that storytelling drives my passion for art. The telling of stories is a feature of all cultures, guiding intellectual, moral and creative endeavours to extraordinary heights. It is this capacity that often draws me to an artwork in the course of my role as the Collections Coordinator at the University of Southern Queensland. I am regularly exposed to a wide range of artworks, though none have had an impact on me to equal to Dr Thancoupie Gloria Fletcher's AO (1937 - 2011) 'Untitled' ceramic vessel.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 17:50:54 GMT
       
 
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