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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services
  [38 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1030-5033
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Better, more accessible, libraries for all in
           Australia: Progress and potential
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      Australia has four major library sectors, public, academic, school and special. All of those sectors have major strengths and rate well by world standards. Many new and redeveloped buildings have been constructed in them. The academic libraries have been strongly focused on the information/learning commons concept, electronic resources and information literacy education. Public libraries are now available to everyone in Australia, and are receiving increasing attention and new buildings as multidimensional centres for community learning capacity growing. School libraries have many new buildings and a strong focus on information literary education but they often now have inadequate teacher librarian and library technician staff and resources. School library needs were reviewed during 2011 by a committee of inquiry of the Australian federal parliament. Special libraries have experienced cutbacks and institutional changes and mergers but the sector continues to innovate and grow in areas such as law libraries. Australia has the benefit of a strong multisectoral professional library association based in the national capital Canberra, and which is helping all sectors to address areas such as the ageing and education of the profession, library education, professional development, and advocacy. Australia also unusually has a national association for Friends of Australian Libraries to focus citizen advocacy for stronger investment in public libraries in particular. A challenge for the Australian library sectors is to become better informed about the issues and many users they have in common, and to collaborate in practice and in advocacy for better, more accessible, libraries for all. Revised version of a paper commissioned by the French 'Bulletin des Biblioteques de France' and published in its number 6, 2011 pp59-63.

      PubDate: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 09:19:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Well learned: The Colocation lessons of the Hobsons
           bay libraries, Victoria
    • Abstract: Gately, Suzanne
      Hobsons Bay Libraries in Melbourne has undertaken three major developments in the last five years and is in detailed design for another to commence in late 2012. Each features a joint use or collocated aspect to its operation. Altona Meadows was fully integrated with a neighbourhood house. Altona North is collocated with Bayside P-9 College. Williamstown Library is currently being linked physically and operationally to the Williamstown Town Hall, a premier arts and cultural venue. The Newport Hub will bring the library together with an existing youth facility, a seniors building, a maternal and child health centre and programmed activity groups centre. The governance challenges for each of these is unique. Outlined are the benefits of having a strong framework that has a clear, joint purpose; the experiences of the Hobsons Bay team; and what they have learned from their successes and failures. Edited version of a paper presented at 'Connection and convergence: second international conference on joint use libraries' Adelaide SA.

      PubDate: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 09:19:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Twelve years on: The evolution of the Berri public/
           
    • Abstract: Ison, Peter
      The Berri Library and Information Centre is a joint use library located in the Riverland area of country South Australia. The library was considered unusual when it was established in 1999 because it was a quite large three way joint use library, serving the needs of a local senior high school, a technical and further education college and the local community. Another unusual feature is that all staff at the library work under a sole employment model, which is still far from normal for joint use libraries. This paper revisits some of the factors in place when the library was first established and examines how things have changed 12 years later. Edited version of a paper presented at 'Connection and convergence: second international conference on joint use libraries' Adelaide SA.

      PubDate: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 09:19:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Marriage and divorce: The Hervey Bay university/public
           library, Queensland
    • Abstract: Parker, Jo; Strachan, Brenda
      The Hervey Bay Library opened in March 1998 as the first joint use university/public library in Australia. It is soon to be dissolved, despite the economic, community and cultural benefits which it has provided. The reasons for this dissolution are explored. Principal among them is that the new library's building was a compromised funding convenience for its partners, particularly the local authority, which did not provide a solid foundation for a productive lasting relationship. This emphasises that sharing the costs of construction to benefit the joint use library is only the beginning of a meaningful long term collaboration requiring a shared vision and philosophy, resilience, adaptability and cooperation. Edited version of a paper presented at 'Connection and convergence: second international conference on joint use libraries' Adelaide SA.

      PubDate: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 09:19:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Challenge and change: Three decades of joint use
           libraries in the city of Onkaparinga, South Australia
    • Abstract: Bergoc, Albert
      The city of Onkaparinga library network in South Australia consists of six libraries, three of which are joint use. The largest of the joint use libraries is Noarlunga (a Tafe/public library), followed by The Hub (a secondary school/public library) and Seaford (a 6-12 school/public library). Each of the joint use libraries represents a unique model of partnership with characteristics that have shaped and defined them, their operational success and their ability to achieve their goals. Involvement with these libraries (and other joint use library ventures outside this network) has given the opportunity to observe and assess the factors that have contributed to their success, or otherwise, and to identify those critical to them. The primary factor is the joint use agreement, complemented by the adeptness with which a library manager uses it. Edited version of a paper presented at 'Connection and convergence: second international conference on joint use libraries' Adelaide SA.

      PubDate: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 09:19:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - The best of both worlds: The first three years of the
           Wangaratta public/technical and further education library, Victoria
    • Abstract: Richmond, Elaine; Twyford, Loueen
      Opened in 2007 the Wangaratta Library is a large joint use library in Victoria involving Goulburn Ovens Institute of Tafe, the High Country Library Corporation and the city of Wangaratta. This paper provides an overview of the original vision, the methods of implementation, consolidation of services, community attitudes and a description of the value added services of the venture. An external review after three years of operation provided the future direction to ensure the partners do not become complacent and that the library remains highly successful. However in 2012 and future as a joint use library is challenged by a major reduction in funding by its Institute partner. Edited version of a paper presented at 'Connection and convergence: second international conference on joint use libraries' Adelaide SA.

      PubDate: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 09:19:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Grey matter: The ageing librarian workforce, with a
           
    • Abstract: Franks, Rachel
      The issue of the ageing workforce within the field of librarianship is one that is deceptively straightforward. The workforce is ageing and will soon need to be replaced by a younger cohort of information professionals. The issue, however, harbours a range of complexities such as managing workplace change; recruitment as well as training and retraining; discrimination based on age and gender; conflict within a workforce with shifting demographics; and the provision of flexible working practices, especially for those older workers who have responsibilities such as the need to care for elderly parents. Another aspect is retention - attrition is not the exclusive prerogative of the retiree and an intake of younger librarians does not guarantee the meeting of workforce needs within libraries. This article looks at these issues and provides an overview of the debate around how serious the issue of an ageing workforce really is for library leaders.

      PubDate: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 09:19:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - For what are public libraries, if not for
           learning'
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Sep 2012 09:19:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Frail, fatal, fundamental: The future of public
           libraries
    • Abstract: Norman, Mark
      Public libraries will survive and thrive by recognising their changing role. With the digital world of content, the role is shifting to that of content aggregators, access managers, and educators in digital literacy. Often pc skills workshops are filled with the same people who demonstrate digital dexterity in the knitting and quilting groups, but lack a new kind of digital dexterity in making a mouse or touch pad do what they want it to do. The questions public libraries have challenging them are 'what will be the future mix between digital and physical access to content and services', 'what service model will we adopt or adapt', and 'who has the skills to teach in the digital environment'' This paper is based on a presentation made to the city of Sydney's library staff development day 13 March 2012.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - The manly art of local studies blogging: A new
           approach to old stories
    • Abstract: MacRitchie, John
      Local studies librarians have been slow to embrace blogging. This paper describes the set up of a local studies blog, what sort of content to include, the benefits and drawbacks of blogging, and the unexpected delights. Examples from the Manly Library local studies blog and other good examples, are provided. If a local studies blog is being used, effectively the local studies collection is being used. Edited paper presented at the conference A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - From filing cabinet to cultural centre: Creating a
           community history centre in Wanneroo western Australia
    • Abstract: Leigh, Carol
      Wanneroo's Community History Centre opened in 2009 as part of the new Wanneroo Library and Cultural Centre, a hybrid library/museum/ archive/arts development, housing a library, museum, exhibition gallery and public venue spaces. It is an integral part of the Wanneroo Regional Museum and was started from scratch, which offered an opportunity to assess and adopt best practice standards for online photographs, the digitisation of oral histories, the preservation of newspapers and photographs and the arrangement of archival material. Edited paper presented at the conference A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Many interests, one group: Creating and celebrating
           history in a modern environment
    • Abstract: Peckham, Amanda
      The Hobsons Bay Libraries Family History Group draws together interested people on a monthly basis giving maximum returns for minimum outlay. By offering themes as diverse as its community and alternating between training in resources such as library ancestry and specialist guest speakers a broad, popular and responsive program is provided for the community. Each session includes afternoon tea, a forum for feedback and suggestions for future meetings. The added benefit to the library is the creation of a relevant and enthusiastic focus group giving members of the community the opportunity to build social networks around common interests. Edited paper presented at the conference A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Language play for infants: Man in the moon for male
           caregivers
    • Abstract: Thomas, James
      Infancy is the time to begin language and book awareness. Men are in a unique position to open the doors to early literacy for their little ones. All they need to know is how to accomplish this goal. 'Man in the moon for male caregivers' invites fathers to attend a 30 minute, age appropriate circle time. Here they learn songs, how to share books, sign language, and even ways to exercise with their infants to encourage language development.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Fostering family and local history in libraries: The
           Hawkesbury experience
    • Abstract: Nichols, Michelle
      There has never been a better time to be a researcher. So much material is being digitised, indexed and made easily accessible for research. Many researchers can work from the comfort of their own home, so how do we ensure that local studies collections remain appropriate and appealing' Over the years, Hawkesbury Library has encouraged interaction with researchers and as a result the local studies collection has gone from strength to strength. Other strategies to keep the collection relevant include promotion of collection strengths; educating the community about resources; assisting local and family historians to be better researchers and engaging the community with events and programs that have a history focus. Hawkesbury Library does not have all of the answers but has risen to the challenge facing all local studies collections. Edited paper presented at the conference A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Unlock the past: Promoting history, genealogy and
           heritage in Australia and New Zealand
    • Abstract: Hicks, Shauna
      Established in August 2009 Unlock The Past (UTP) is a collaborative venture involving authors, presenters, archives, libraries, historical societies, genealogy and family history societies and commercial companies and individuals in a broad range of activities which all revolve around history, genealogy and heritage in Australia and New Zealand. This paper outlines how UTP can assist archives and libraries with their own objectives in reaching out to stakeholders and client groups, especially genealogists and local and family historians. Edited paper presented at the conference A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Build it and they will come: Chatswood library on the
           concourse, NSW
    • Abstract: Davidson, Alison
      With an area of 5000 square metres and opened in September 2011 the Chatswood Library in NSW is one of Australia's recent large libraries. Planned for over 15 years, the response of the community to it exemplifies the very high return on investment for councils replacing old library facilities. With a 297% increase in library members, an average monthly increase of over 72% in visitor numbers and an average increase of 51% each month in loan and returns statistics, the high demands on library services have continued during the first months of operation.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - In Australia's first national year of reading, another
           reason why library fines are not so fine
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 09:52:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Read to succeed: Strategies to engage children and
           young people in reading for pleasure [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      Review(s) of: Read to succeed: Strategies to engage children and young people in reading for pleasure, by Joy Court (ed) London, Facet Publishing, 2011 273pp 44.95 ISBN 9781856047470.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - A virtual sense of place: Public libraries as creators
           of local studies indexes and online resources
    • Abstract: Inkster, Fran
      There is a pressing need for public libraries to create indexes and resources relating to their local area. They can no longer rely on historical societies or genealogy groups to produce pamphlets or local histories to be catalogued and put into their collections. They need to be proactive and instigate these projects, whether they do the work themselves or use volunteers. The resources produced then need to be accessible online via library websites, thus creating a virtual sense of place. Edited version of a paper presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Sustaining community archives
    • Abstract: Newman, Joanna
      Community archives play an important role in heritage and cultural wellbeing but the quality of care they receive and their accessibility vary greatly. This paper presents the results of research which investigated the factors required for maintenance of community archives and how well a selection of New Zealand archives exhibited them. The results showed that many of the factors required for maintenance are interrelated and interdependent but that some have a particularly strong impact on the maintenance of the archival records and the evidence they contain. Based on these results and factors, possible strategies for enhancing the future sustainability of community archives are proposed. Edited version of a paper presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Local studies in the Wentworth library NSW Our sense
           of place
    • Abstract: Watmuff, Leanne
      On most days in Wentworth Shire Library, 300 metres from the junction of the Murray-Darling rivers, you will find volunteers from the Wentworth Historical Society busy researching queries, accessioning donations and indexing records. Pastoral station, riverboat trade, local government, church, community and family history records are housed in archival conditions in the Jeff Whyte Local History Room, publicly accessible during library hours. The relationship between the library and historical society, integrating local history and community in a comfortable atmosphere, reflects our sense of place. Edited version of a paper presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Looking out and keeping the gate open: Wairarapa
           archive, New Zealand's greatest little archive
    • Abstract: Green, Sandy; Winter, Gareth
      Wairarapa Archive, established in 1989, is part of the Masterton Library business unit. It is a community archive focused on an active outreach program. Staff present to community groups and schools, write numerous newspaper and magazine articles and have overseen a publishing program of 17 titles in 12 years. A digital strategy community partnership project, Picture Wairarapa, was completed in July 2010 with 6000 images, of one million held. These are available with full metadata, and contributed to Matapihi and Digital New Zealand websites. Kete Masterton, administered by the library, and Picture Wairarapa are linked to provide additional information and teachers resources. All year 7 and 8 students undertake a local history project with the archivist presenting class preparation sessions and working with students through the process. About 2000 researchers a year sign in to use the archive, which also holds a large digital oral history repository. Edited version of a paper presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Working collaboratively in local studies in orange NSW
    • Abstract: Richards, Jan
      In July 2008 the Orange Family History Group entered into a partnership with Central West Libraries in NSW to merge its activities and resources into the library's infrastructure. This has been a win/win for both parties, and for family and local historians. The members still meet but now have time to focus on matters of interest, rather than administrative issues. Together, exciting projects have been developed which allow for rewarding volunteering and which deliver great benefits to clients. Most importantly, through the expertise and enthusiasm of the members, it has been possible to value add to the reference and research service. Edited version of a paper presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Innovation in local studies collections and programs:
           How Melbourne library service is fostering community pride
    • Abstract: Bateman, Shirley
      One of the best ways to engage the community is through the provision of high quality, innovative local history collections and programs. Some ways Melbourne Library Service does this are the Snapped: Melbourne past and present photography competition; a series of Melbourne focused events, mainly in partnership with Arcade Publications; a Melbourne collection - Melbourne stories and Melbourne's marvelous history; celebrating Melbourne's status as a Unesco City of Literature; partnerships with local historical societies; a local history staff training program; and local and family history web pages. Edited version of a paper presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Measuring their success: Colocated library and
           community services
    • Abstract: Sidorow, Kerri
      Point Cook Community Learning Centre (PCCLC) was the first colocated library and council facility model in Wyndham, Melbourne. This model was a major investment for its council and because of growth pressures is already being replicated. Many parties have been keen to understand how the model is working and the impact it has upon the community. Using quantitative measures such as numbers through the door and program participation, the PCCLC has been a very successful, but how are the less tangible outcomes such as sense of place to be measured' Discussed are how a three tiered evaluation approach, including independent social research techniques, are used to measure and better understand whether desired outcomes are being reached. Edited version of a paper presented at Connection and convergence: second international conference on joint use libraries Adelaide 3-4 November 2011.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - The prime minister and other leaders contribute to a
           great start to Australia's first national year of reading
    • Abstract: McKerracher, Sue; Ellard, Robyn
      On 14 February 2012 and throughout the week, there were celebrations all around Australia to welcome the start of the National Year of Reading (NYR) - an initiative first proposed at the April 2008 Auslib Reading critical: developing readers in Australia and New Zealand conference, in Melbourne and later adopted at the first Alia Public Libraries Summit in Canberra in July 2009.

      PubDate: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 16:57:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - ebooks and beyond: Update on a survey of library users
    • Abstract: Duncan, Ross
      In April 2010 a survey was sent electronically to 40,000 members of Sunshine Coast Libraries to ascertain their use of ebooks and eAudiobooks. This was followed in April 2011 by a survey to identify changes in the electronic behavior and expectations of library members. The results indicate a high level of interest in ebooks and eAudiobooks, and a strong interest in emerging technologies such as iPhones, iPads, and Kindle. These trends present public libraries with the challenge of advocating for and rapidly growing their virtual offerings, and becoming effective advisers to their users about such emerging technologies and their capabilities.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:43:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Strong foundations on shaky ground: The upper
           Riccarton school/public library, New Zealand
    • Abstract: Eskett, Paula
      The Upper Riccarton School and Community Library was purpose built by the Christchurch city council in partnership with Riccarton High School, to serve the local multicultural urban community of 30,000 and the 1100 school populations as an integrated learning, information and leisure facility. The partnership has created a library which gives the two communities access to a large selection of traditional library resources, modern learning spaces and expertise that support the needs of both groups while fostering and encouraging lifelong learning for all. Opened in 2006, it is New Zealand's largest joint use library. Explored are the planning and establishment of the library, consultation with stakeholders and day to day work that all contribute to the success of the partnership and the library it has created. The high impact on the library of the devastating 22 February 2011 earthquake in Christchurch is described. Edited version of a paper presented at Connection and convergence: second international conference on joint use libraries Adelaide 3-4 November 2011.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:43:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Practical partnership: Library, museum and family
           history society cooperation in Camden NSW
    • Abstract: Oliver, Jo
      Camden Council Library Service, Camden Museum operated by Camden Historical Society and Camden Area Family History Society are colocated in the centre of the historic town of Camden on the semirural fringe of Sydney. These three organisations work in partnership guided by a memorandum of understanding. The partnership includes joint contribution to and referral of information and research enquiries; quarterly meetings to discuss issues, projects and programs; the operation of an image database and website Camden images past and present; planning a program of events focused on a heritage festival in April and history week in September; jointly run school tours for school and adult interest groups; electronic links between collection catalogues. Paper presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:43:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Library and cultural service convergence: A case study
           of the city of Wanneroo, western Australia
    • Abstract:
      Library and cultural service convergence is an increasingly frequent response by local governments to external pressures, especially changes in technology, user expectations, and the availability of finance.1 Convergence is also a purposeful and visible way that a library becomes embedded in the community, and this strategic positioning ensures connection and continuity. In the 21st century, libraries are working with traditional and nontraditional partners. This paper explores Wanneroo's experience of convergence of a public library, museum, community history centre and exhibition gallery. Paper presented at Connection and convergence: second international conference on joint use libraries Adelaide 3-4 November 2011.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:43:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Connecting our past with our future: A new gateway to
           Maitland's history and heritage
    • Abstract: Collard, Keryl
      The Maitland local studies strategy was developed as a result of a city wide strategic review undertaken by Maitland City Library which highlighted the importance of fostering management of Maitland's local history and heritage resources. The strategy sustains recognition of Maitland's history and cultural heritage through promotion of networks, development of standards, support of local heritage organisations and promotion of heritage education. This paper provides an overview of strategy development and outcomes, with a focus on how public libraries can position themselves beyond the role of repository and into community leadership. Paper, excluding appendices, presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:43:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Nowhere to go and nothing to do: How public libraries
           mitigate the impacts of parental work and urban planning on young people
    • Abstract: Williams, Pip; Edwards, Jane
      This paper provides the findings of research in ten communities across four Australian states exploring how adults and adolescents experience work, home and community, and examines two best practice public libraries which have explicitly considered the needs of adolescents in their design and services. It is demonstrated that public libraries, by providing often displaced young people with legitimate space and resources, can uniquely sustain their psychosocial development and confer enduring benefits for them and their capacity for citizenship, for their families and the wider community. This is particularly significant for young people from a lower socioeconomic background.

      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:43:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Six reasons why public libraries should be the first
           stop on the Australian national broadband network's roll out
    • Abstract: Goodman, Jack
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:43:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Vending Machine Collection Dispensers in Libraries
    • Abstract: Monley, Bruce
      Several Australian local governments have expressed interest in using vending machines to extend access to library materials. There has been one successful Australian use of a vending machine, but their cost, usual dependence on RFID technology and the suspicion that the technology could be superseded by ebooks have contributed to a slow takeup both here and overseas. This paper provides an overview of vending machine collection dispensing applications in libraries and related service provision.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:25:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - AR U Feeling Appy': Augmented Reality, Apps and
           Mobile Access to Local Studies Information
    • Abstract: Forsyth, Ellen
      Apps, mobile access and augmented reality can present different ways for people to find out about local studies related information whether they are in the library, or at an historical site. This paper discusses what mobile discovery tools are available for local studies sites; how are they already being used; how could they be used in the future; how easy they are to implement. Paper presented at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:25:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Public Libraries Serving Multicultural Communities
           across Australia: Best Practice Examples
    • Abstract:
      Libraries across Australia have a long and excellent record of service to multicultural communities. This continues into the 21st century in meeting increasingly diverse community need and the demands of an evolving digital society. Showcased are best practice examples of multicultural public library service from every part of Australia. Whilst the focus is on service in a digital age some of the best examples successfully combine growing ICT considerations with those of traditional service models.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:25:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Mylanguage: State and Territory Public Libraries
           Collaborating for a Multicultural Australia in the Digital Age
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Brendan
      MyLanguage is a project of seven state and territory library services commenced in 2004. The consortium has a commitment to expanding the possibilities of electronic multicultural library services. An early focus for the project was aggregated nonEnglish language data through the MyLanguage portal. Changing demographics in Australia, combined with a growing emphasis on digital and ICT solutions, has seen a new set of challenges relating to developing and delivering multicultural library services. This is especially in relation to people coming to Australia through humanitarian immigration. Explored are how the MyLanguage project is assisting libraries and community organisations build ownership and capacity to access and develop content that meets the expressed needs of their culturally and linguistically diverse (Cald) communities.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:25:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Digital Technologies Can Unite but Also Divide: Cald
           Communities in the Digital Age
    • Abstract: Migliorino, Pino
      In the community there is a number of groups, including ageing Cald Australians, newly arrived refugees and skilled migrants with medium level English language literacy, all of which are at risk of being excluded by new technologies that require either, or both, high level English and digital literacy. Digital technologies should be used by libraries and others to facilitate inclusion and address barriers that create exclusion. Edited version of a speech at the My Language conference 11 August 2010, State Library of NSW.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:25:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Continuous Improvement: National Standards and
           Guidelines for Australia's Public Libraries
    • Abstract: Quinn, Sherrey; McCallum, Ian
      There has been significant progress by individual Australian states in developing criteria for the delivery and improvement of their public library services. Queensland has a suite of standards and guidelines, with a rolling cycle of updates. New South Wales takes an evidence based approach, using data from its annual survey of public library activities to set targets for a select group of measures (standards), supported by guidelines for service delivery in key areas. The Queensland and NSW guidelines are informed by the work of the other, and by work elsewhere. In Victoria a framework and toolkit for self assessment and peer review has been developed to assist public libraries in meeting their service obligations and objectives. The Australian Library and Information Association (Alia) and the public library associations have a simple set of national standards and guidelines based on prior work. 'Beyond a quality service: strengthening the social fabric; standards and guidelines for Australian public libraries' was launched in April 2011. This paper reviews the national standards initiative and explains how the standards and guidelines might be applied to evaluating and continuously improving library services. It also comments on the characteristics of the evidence base.

      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:25:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 3 - Essential Connections: Public Libraries and Schools
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:25:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Loc@l: Local Year One Children @ Your Library
    • Abstract: Campbell, Michelle
      A program aimed to engender interest by primary schools to improve public library awareness and membership. The successful outcome has had benefits when planning other activities with schools.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Refresh for Success: Moonee Valley Libraries Online
           Database Training Wiki
    • Abstract: Jones, Sally
      The failure to train and develop public library staff to utilise online information resources results in denial of lifelong learning opportunities to their communities. At Moonee Valley Libraries this prompted the development of a training wiki to ensure staff at all levels are as proficient in the awareness, use and promotion of online resources as possible.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Reading into Wellbeing: Bibliotherapy, Libraries,
           Health and Social Connection
    • Abstract: Bolitho, Jennie
      Bibliotherapy recognises the value of sharing good literature and its potential to improve wellbeing and social connection. The implementation and outcomes of a pilot therapeutic reading group at an aged care facility are described.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Partnerships at Many Levels: Libraries in Northern
           Arnhem Land, Northern Territory
    • Abstract: Shepherd, Shirley
      The East Arnhem Shire Council, Northern Territory Library and other providers have formed a partnership to deliver library services, promote reading and increase literacy and school readiness for indigenous people in Australia's Northern Territory remote areas of Northern Arnhem Land.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - The Victorian Book Well Program
    • Abstract: McLaine, Susan
      Inspired by the successful UK Get into reading campaign 20 Victorians, including representatives from public libraries and health, families and migrant support organisations, have been trained to establish reading groups in their communities. Short stories, novels, poetry and plays are read aloud by these facilitators with group members joining in and sharing their stories as their self confidence grows. The program aims to reduce social exclusion and improve the health and wellbeing of vulnerable people such as the homeless, unemployed, people in aged care facilities, new migrants and those with mental health issues.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - From Manuscripts to Metadata: The Changing Face of
           Local Studies Librarianship
    • Abstract: Dixon, Diana
      In a period of rapid change local studies librarians worldwide are facing new challenges of increased demand and limited financial resources. An overview of the development of British local studies libraries, with reference to local studies in other countries, and the role of the local studies librarian precedes a discussion of the impact of digitisation of materials and the use of social media. Paper given at A sense of place: local studies in Australia and New Zealand conference Sydney 5-6 May 2011.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Developing Good Hearts: The Disability Awareness
           Training Scheme for Geelong Regional Libraries Staff
    • Abstract: Henczel, Sue; O'Brien, Kristin
      The Geelong Regional Library Corporation in partnership with the city of Greater Geelong (CoGG) Aged and Disability Services, was selected for the State Library of Victoria's 2010 Pierre Gorman Award to develop a disability awareness training scheme for library staff (Dats). Dats aimed to increase the awareness of a broad range of disabilities which exist in communities and through that awareness and understanding improve the ability of staff to respond to library users with disabilities.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Community Welfare Contributions of Victorian Public
           Libraries: A Quantitative Assessment
    • Abstract: McDougall, Andrew; Saxena, Shishir; Tate, Madeleine
      This paper values the contributions Victorian public libraries make to the community by applying a formal cost benefit assessment framework - the preferred evaluation framework of economists - to articulate and quantify in dollar terms the benefits conferred by public libraries to library users and nonusers. The annual costs are contrasted with an assessment of annual benefits using three different valuation techniques: contingency valuation, travel costs and financial savings. The results identify that the benefits of public libraries significantly outweigh their costs.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 2 - Dollars, Sense and Public Libraries
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 09:10:43 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - From Lending to Learning: The Development and
           Extension of Public Libraries [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - What's the Story': A New Zealand Storytelling
           Festival for Young People
    • Abstract: Robertson, Mya
      This paper describes the evolution of the concept, delivery and results of a library storytelling festival designed for New Zealand young people from 12 to 18 The festival sought to develop a wider perception of story telling by highlighting many of the different media used to tell stones, especially those that appeal specifically to young people today such as texting, tattoos and graphic novels Traditional storytelling was also explored, hence the oral and visual components Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - The Twilight Zone: Bringing Youth into Libraries
    • Abstract: Shay, Cathy
      Swansea Library's first offer of programs for local teens was met with little enthusiasm So began an investigation into developing a youth program that would be attractive to them Library staff went back to basics and spent time surveying local youth The process was simple, but intensive in its collection, and the results gave staff great insight The programming that followed is based on these results and still in its infancy This paper covers the investigation, the methods, interaction with the teens, the survey results, planning and promotion, and outcomes Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - New Directions with Existing Resources: Australian and
           New Zealand Libraries as Career Development Hubs
    • Abstract: Goodman, Jack
      We have all experienced the challenges of finding a job For 12-24s this can be a particularly difficult and unfamiliar process Because libraries already provide safe and comfortable community learning spaces, there is huge potential to attract and retain 12-24 year old users and their parents by offering career education resources and job search skills North American and UK libraries already promote career search resources, offer job development skills, online resume and cover letter writing assistance, and encourage continued library use with workshops and upskilling support Australia and New Zealand's public libraries have the infrastructure and capacity to build on existing youth services, including homework support, to further position themselves as career development hubs Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Communication 101: We Have Made Contact with Teens
    • Abstract: Hannan, Adrienne
      Wellington City Libraries has used a variety of methods of initiating and maintaining contact with youth. 13 to 18 year olds are notorious for being a difficult user group especially in getting them engaged in libraries and convincing them how relevant today's libraries are for them. Over the last few years different methods of communication, engagement and entertainment to connect with Wellington's youth have been tried. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Creative Citizenship: Building Connection, Knowledge,
           Belonging and Leadership in Young People
    • Abstract: Burnett, Lisa; Spelman, Anne
      For the last three years Moreton Bay Region Libraries has hosted Transit Lounge Caboolture (TLC), a developmental program for creative young people. Although not an obvious pairing, it has been successful, with the hosting arrangement on the verge of transforming into a true partnership. Between them, they offer a suite of services and programs that support the developmental needs of creative young people from pathfinders through to aspiring artists, emerging artists and professional artists. Programs such as Mash It Up short film festival and Band Camp, services like the e-newsletter and project mentoring provide opportunities for skills development, networking, showcasing and resourcing that would not otherwise exist. Through this unique partnership, a continuum of support has been offered that connects young people to each other, to community resources and to professional artists and artsworkers - connection, knowledge, belonging - developing a generation of young citizens who have a stake in their community and the skills and networks to create and lead arts and cultural activity. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Youth: An Exchange of Ideas for Public Libraries
    • Abstract: Macchion, Felicity; Savic, Natasha
      Discussed are the authors' experiences of libraries and youth during a job exchange with Columbus Library Service in Ohio USA. Programs for its youth clientele include job help centres, homework help centres, gaming events, volunteens and 'Lock in' libraries. Discussed are the teen events and spaces implemented within Yarra Plenty Library and the ways in which the exchange helped identify the needs of young people within the Yarra Plenty community. Also visited were library services in Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - On the Outside Looking In: Public Libraries Serving
           Young People with Disabilities
    • Abstract: Barker, Denise
      Social inclusion is very important to young people, particularly those who are disadvantaged due to a physical or intellectual disability. Public libraries already provide equity of access through disability access and inclusion plans but does this ensure social inclusion' Explored are what is an accessible community from the point of view of someone with a disability, and how libraries can ensure an inclusive environment with no nonphysical barriers which may deter those with disabilities. Highlighted are links made with young people with disabilities by public libraries and strategies which can create a more welcoming and inclusive library service for them. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Geeking Out: Quick and Easy Oral History
    • Abstract: Blackburn, Fiona
      Alice Springs Public Library and ABC Radio Alice Springs, both serving a community of nearly 30,000 people in Central Australia, are collecting oral histories together. The products will be short, focused, multiformat, and available on the web as well as for loan from the library. They will address a common theme and will not be the extended interviews which normally constitute oral history. The process is organic and serendipitous, avoiding problems of previous projects. The library will gain resources suited to our time; the ABC will increase its audience; and the community's sense of place will be enhanced by insight into lives lived out of the limelight.

      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 1 - Needed - Better, More Accessible, Libraries for All.
           But Who Should Pay'
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 09:48:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Fish Farms, Restaurants, Hotels and Libraries
    • Abstract: Duncan, Ross
      Pubs and restaurants in Hong Kong, wine import businesses in China, hotels in Dubai, fish farms and music studios in the UK - what do these businesses have in common in their pursuit of success' Regardless of the industry, the competition and the market, three things are critical to creating successful, sustainable business: getting more customers; getting existing customers to visit more often, or purchase more on each visit; increasing efficiencies and stripping away barriers to improvements. The same principles can be applied to public libraries if they think differently about what it is they do.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Customer Centric Community Languages Purchasing for
           Public Libraries in South Australia
    • Abstract: Strempel, Geoff
      An overview of a shift from bulk ordering of community languages resources to a customer centric approach for South Australian public libraries. Edited version of a paper presented at Alia Access conference Brisbane 1-3 September 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Gaming for Reading
    • Abstract: Clarke, Genevieve; Treagust, Michelle
      The edited executive summary and first chapter of a 2010 feasibility study on the use of video games to engage adults with low literacy in reading for pleasure. Reproduced with the permission of The Reading Agency.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Pleased: Victorian Public Libraries Enhancing Access
    • Abstract: Knox, Katrina
      In 2007 the 'More than just equipment' report was released. This identified issues for people with a disability in accessing their public library resources and services via the internet. Library representatives worked through the report and established priority areas to address the issues. One of these was the development of an online resource/directory to provide all Victorian library staff with the tools and information to enable their library service to support the independent use of public libraries by community members with disabilities, along with their families and carers. The result was the Pleased (Public Libraries Enabling Accessible Services Encompassing Disability) website, launched in October 2009. It is a high quality accessible web portal and is a first for public libraries in Australia demonstrating the innovative use of web technology to assist library staff in providing services to users with a disability. Edited version of a paper presented at the Alia Access conference Brisbane 1-3 September 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Read like a Demon: Football Heroes Promoting Reading
           to Primary School Students
    • Abstract: Fulco, Cenza; Lee, Debbie
      Read Like a Demon is a literacy program which offers primary school students an opportunity to participate in reading and writing workshops with Melbourne Football Club (The Demons) players, and a number of best selling children's authors. This is a partnership between the Melbourne Football Club and Casey-Cardinia Library Corporation, supported by Hardie Grant Egmont Publishers. It involves 160 students from 10 primary schools in the city of Casey. Introduced as a pilot in 2009 the program aims to celebrate children's connections with literacy, and to encourage them to read more. In 2010 the program has been extended to offer creative writing workshops. Sport and reading create a great mix - supporting such positive literacy values with sporting role models provide children with confidence and inspire a love of reading. Edited version of a paper presented at the Alia Access conference Brisbane 1-3 September 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - ABC 30 and 3: Creating an Interest in Reading in Homes
           Where There Is No Reading Culture
    • Abstract: McSwain, Bernice
      In 2003 the Salisbury Library Service in South Australia developed an extensive program aimed at encouraging all age groups in the community to read. Under the banner Salisbury Reads the program aims to develop a culture where the importance of reading is valued and acknowledged and to develop the foundation skills of language, literacy and numeracy. Components are changed as different needs are identified, and the component of the program called ABC 30and3 commenced in early 2009. Edited version of a paper presented at the Alia Access conference Brisbane 1-3 September 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Healing for the Soul: The Book Well Program
    • Abstract: McLaine, Susan
      The Book Well program is a collaborative initiative of the State Library of Victoria, the Public Libraries Victoria Network and VicHealth. Employing read aloud reading groups, the program focuses on the power of literature to improve the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities. It particularly targets people who are vulnerable due to their situations, such as the homeless, the long term unemployed, new arrivals in Australia, residents in aged care facilities and those experiencing mental health problems. The Victorian program was inspired by the UK's Get Into Reading program. In March 2010, 20 Victorians were trained over five days to deliver the Book Well program. This paper discusses the focus, merits and implementation of the Victorian program, provides an evaluation of the program to date, and comments on future directions. Edited version of a paper presented at the Alia Access conference Brisbane 1-3 September 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Putting Readers First: 'Frontline' Training in
           Victoria
    • Abstract: Downes, Anne; Bateman, Shirley; McLaine, Susan
      Frontline is an online course developed in the UK in the theory and practice of reader centred work in the public lending library. It is designed to challenge library staff to rethink their jobs and change the way that they work by putting readers first rather than books. Following a successful pilot and rollout in Melbourne Library Service, a three year program of the course across the state of Victoria began in October 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 4 - Public Libraries and Social Justice
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 15:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - Library Services for Older People - Good Practice
           Guide [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Joseph, Mylee
      PubDate: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 11:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - Emerging Themes for Public Libraries Looking Forward
    • Abstract: Mackenzie, Christine
      This paper draws out the themes, discussions and learnings from the 2009 Ifla Metropolitan Libraries Section mid term meeting in Brisbane. Papers at the meeting emphasised the use of buildings, staff development and workforce planning and the use of research to inform decision making and implement evidence based practice. Also described is the evidence based 'Being the best we can' self evaluation process for public libraries developed in Victoria in 2009.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 11:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - Working with Older Volunteers: Opportunities and
           Potential
    • Abstract: Bourke, Carolyn
      Volunteers form a significant part of the contribution libraries make to their communities. This paper considers the way libraries recruit, train and retain volunteers so that the process can be an enriching and rewarding one for all concerned. In particular, public libraries need to be reconsidering their attitudes to volunteers in the context of the potential capabilities of the baby boomers.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 11:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - What Talking Books Have to Say: Issues and Options for
           Public Libraries
    • Abstract: Hoy, Susan
      A main element of public library service has always been user expectation and reliance on the provision of new collection resources and formats in addition to traditional services. Today this translates to an emphasis on internet services and online provision of information and collections. The focus of this paper is on spoken word material and audio download services, giving an overview of available audio formats and device features. It covers general issues to consider when making decisions on audio collections and the strengths and weaknesses of the formats under consideration. Examined are the evolution of audiobooks, emerging technology, and playback devices; service and collection issues; format strengths and weaknesses.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 11:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - Public Library Resources and Programs for
           Mediterranean Languages Groups in Australia
    • Abstract: Hall, Anne
      Australia has welcomed migrants and refugees from many countries in the Mediterranean region over many years - Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Greek, Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian, Maltese, Turkish and French to the most recent arrivals speaking Arabic and its many dialects. Examples of best practice services in NSW public libraries demonstrate how public libraries support these culturally and linguistically diverse communities and how libraries and museums are preserving the cultural heritage and memories of communities. Their current challenges include providing resources for the ageing populations of some of the language groups and sourcing resources for the newest arrivals.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 11:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - Smarketing: Smarter Marketing for Libraries
    • Abstract: Duncan, Ross
      Smarketing (Smarter marketing) while not necessarily limited to electronic means, requires libraries and their management teams to rethink and reinvent marketing and promotional strategies. In an operating environment where library budgets are under pressure, and there are increasing demands on the times of both users and nonusers messages must be targeted, easily accessible and the results monitored closely to ensure continued relevance. Described is how the Learning Communities Branch of the new Sunshine Coast Regional Council in Queensland approaches and analyses marketing and promotion through an electronic newsletter to library members.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 11:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - Changing the Face of Public Libraries in New Zealand:
           Elgar's Smarter Systems Project
    • Abstract: Fletcher, Beverly
      eLGAR's (eLibraries for a Greater Auckland Region) multi award winning Smarter Systems project was the joint procurement, purchasing, implementation and operation of library management software involving 55 libraries and over 1400 staff. It changed the landscape of public library services in New Zealand and is one of the most successful, and one of the largest, shared service projects in the country. Described is the project from idea to going live with the new software. A followup article in Aplis will describe life post go live.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 11:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 4 - A Better, More Accessible, Public Library System for
           All in Australia: Whose Responsibility'
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 11:39:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - From Assassins Creed 2 to the Five Greatest Warriors:
           Games and Reading
    • Abstract: Forsyth, Ellen
      This paper examines whether the same appeal characteristics work for reading and for games. Explored are the use of readers advisory skills in working with young people to investigate how to suggest titles gamers might like to read, and games readers might like to play. Public libraries should talk with their readers and those who play games, and also find out if they have staff with specialist knowledge of games. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - Manix: A Teen Reading Odyssey
    • Abstract: Gayton, Jody
      Manix is an incentive and event based teen reading program run by Manukau Libraries. It has proven successful in attracting teens into Manukau Libraries while promoting literacy amongst this target group, by encouraging reading for recreation and pleasure. Developed out of the Odyssey program (the 2002 finalist in the 3M Award for Innovation in Libraries and adopted by several other New Zealand library systems) the Manix program continues to be offered annually since its inception in 2007. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - An Exquisite Paradox: Making Teens and Young Adults
           Welcome in Public Libraries
    • Abstract: Joseph, Mylee
      Public libraries have staff for young people's services, build collections, conduct programs and market services for teenagers and young adults. They are an important client group. Yet many library staff feel awkward or threatened when dealing with them. They can seem alien and intimidating and conflicts can easily arise. The Youth Action and Policy Association (Yapa) in NSW, in cooperation with the public library network and the State Library of NSW, has developed training resources to build the knowledge, skills and confidence of library staff in working with teenagers and young adults. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - Finding My Place: A Western Australian Public Library
           Program with National Potential for at Risk Youth
    • Abstract: Griggs, Natasha
      Finding MY Place (FMP) is a well established low cost initiative delivered through metropolitan and regional public libraries in Western Australia. This motivational program was designed for young people assessed as at high risk of leaving school prematurely. It aims to connect young people with the public library to ensure they have access to learning opportunities after their formal education. Through motivational and informative workshops, students develop a greater sense of what they want in life after their schooling ends. Workshops by guest presenters provide guidance, motivation and 'outside of the box' career options. It has been adopted in other states, and has potential as a national program in both Australia and New Zealand. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - Library Youth Spaces vs Youth Friendly Libraries: How
           to Make the Most of What You Have
    • Abstract: Bourke, Carolyn
      Regardless of the adequacies of budgets, library usage continues to rise. Libraries may not be able to have a dedicated youth space but still need to cater effectively to the 12-24 demographic. This paper looks at ways to maximise the resources already available to provide a youth friendly environment. It also considers the challenge to find out what 12 -24s think about libraries. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - The Public Library as Urban Youth Space: Redefining
           Public Libraries through Services and Space for Young People for an Uber
           Experience
    • Abstract: Derr, Leonee; Rhodes, Aimee
      Engaging urban youth presents many challenges to public libraries. This requires libraries to develop proactive collections and services which anticipate their literacy, spatial, technological and recreational needs, particularly in light of the independence, opportunities and advanced technological understanding they enjoy, and the other services and opportunities outside of the library. Examined, with reference to Melbourne Library Service's initiatives, are the opportunities and methods for public libraries to create a special place for themselves in the lives of young people. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - The Role of Libraries in Helping Adolescents and Their
           Families Juggle the Demands of Work and Life
    • Abstract: Edwards, Jane; Williams, Pip
      Libraries help young people accommodate the work-life commitments of their families by providing them with a safe, supervised environment when home and school are unavailable. This also helps build community by encouraging interaction between adolescents and adults and among young people themselves. Libraries are important sites of young people's experience of citizenship. Reported are the ways in which socioeconomic status shapes families' experience of work-life commitments and how this shapes experiences of libraries by young people. Also considered are the resources needed by libraries and librarians to effectively respond to young people. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 3 - Public Libraries and Young People - Progress and
           Potential
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:52 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Moving Library Collections: A Management Handbook
           Second [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Urban Teens in the Library: Research and Practice
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Growing a Young Adult Librarian: Recruitment,
           Selection and Retention of an Important Asset for Your Community
    • Abstract: Redrup-May, Margaret
      Staffing is the largest cost in an organisation but the investment can go wrong at so many stages. From job description design to recruitment, from induction to professional training, there is a need to plan, to communicate, to support and protect to ensure that the young adult librarian is given the opportunity to develop into a mission critical asset for a library service and the community served. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Beenleigh Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Public Libraries Giving High School Students a Break
    • Abstract: McMorland, Louise; Tolnay, Megan; Vick, Rebeccah
      The Inside Break project is a partnership between the metropolitan Sydney public libraries of Manly, Warringah and Pittwater. It aims to deliver information resources for senior high school students in innovative and engaging ways. The very popular insidebreak.org.au website utilizes Web 2.0 tools favoured by young people, including YouTube, blogs, Twitter, LibraryThing and podcasts. Building on its success, the website is extending partnerships to NSW public libraries. This is a unique example of libraries using new technologies to meet the needs of a target young adult client group. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Beenleigh Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Our Library Their Space: The Dunedin City Library Teen
           Space
    • Abstract: Ikin, Su
      In May 2008 Dunedin Public Libraries opened its new Teen Space in the city library. This paper examines the design process from initial concept to completed space, including consultation with the wider youth community and the crucial role they played in the process. Discussed are the way the space is used, who uses it, the flexibility of the space incuding as a performance space and as an exhibition space for artwork. The external relationships, what has worked, what has not worked and what is next are also assessed. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Beenleigh Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Developing a Youth Services Strategy Framework for
           Public Libraries
    • Abstract: Kelly, Paula; Joseph, Mylee
      The youth services strategy framework was developed by a brains trust of youth services librarians in Victoria, in consultation with Paula Kelly (State Library of Victoria) and Mylee Joseph (State Library of NSW). The framework is designed to highlight the objectives of library services to youth holistically, guide planning and to be scaleable to meet local needs. It supports public library staff in developing youth strategies and planning services and is available freely online. The framework considers the vision, mission and values underpinning the delivery of library services to young people and specifically addresses planning, collections, spaces, staff and training, technology and access, programs and services and communication. Edited version of a paper presented at '12 to 24s @ your public library in Australia and New Zealand conference' Beenleigh Qld 11-12 June 2010.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - Ebooks and Beyond: The Challenge for Public Libraries
    • Abstract: Duncan, Ross
      A survey of Sunshine Coast library users indicates that there is a high level of interest in ebooks and e-audiobooks and also that there is strong demand for technologies such as the iPhone, iPad and Amazon's Kindle. These local trends, mirrored internationally, present public libraries with a challenge to dramatically improve their virtual offerings, or lose relevance in this emerging high growth area. They also have a responsibility to play a leadership educational role in informing their communities about e-readers, content and associated trends.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 2 - The National Year of Reading 2012 - Will Your Library
           Be Ready'
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Innovation at DOK: Holland's Library Concept Centre
           and Home of the Shanachies
    • Abstract: Boekesteijn, Erik; Geer, Jaap van der
      A description of one of the world's most innovative libraries, which aims to be the most advanced public library in the world using creativity, technical innovation and scientific understanding. The library also has a commitment to sharing ideas within a global library network and the importance of public libraries and that network for democracy.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Making a Difference: The Western Australian 'Better
           Beginnings' Family Literacy Program
    • Abstract: Allen, Nola
      'Better Beginnings' commenced in Western Australia as an integrated program of early literacy support for parents involving early years, community, health and library services. Its success and the longitudinal study of it indicate that it should be considered as a national program. This article is based on a paper presented at the Australian Public Libraries Summit 26 March 2009 by Margaret Allen CEO and state librarian, State Library of WA and was first published in the 'Australian library journal' Nov 2009.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Where Angels Fear to Tread: A Nonlibrarian's View of
           the Sustainability of Rural Libraries
    • Abstract: Amberg, Penny
      Small rural libraries face an increasing range of challenges with often fixed or even reducing resources. Being sustainable might mean just surviving - let alone adopting new technologies, attracting more resources, forging community partnerships, garnering political support, and promoting children's and youth activities. Discussed is why cultural sustainability is also important to small rural libraries and their communities, and the need for them to focus on their communities, marketing and partnerships.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Public Libraries and Change: A Perspective from
           Victoria
    • Abstract: Schwirtlich, Anne-Marie
      A review of technological and social trends in Victoria and the implications for public libraries; the vision of the Ministerial Advisory Council on Public Libraries and how it seeks to cope with these technological and social trends; the thinking of the Public Libraries Victoria Network in its draft strategic plan for 2009-13; three strategic projects on which the Library Board of Victoria and the Public Libraries Victoria Network are collaborating and how they help to respond to the changing environment. Reflected on are how these will position public libraries in Victoria for the next few years.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - As the Book Changes Form the Library Must Champion Its
           Own Power Base: Readers
    • Abstract: Peters, Tom
      Reports of the death of reading are premature because readers are resilient and innovative. Librarians must therefore encourage experimentation in reading. They need to cleave to the needs and wants of readers and continue to study their reading habits, and design their content collections, systems, and services to help them improve and maximize their reading experiences.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Best Sellers: Readers Advisory at the Core of Public
           Libraries and 'First to the Fringe'
    • Abstract: Brown, Paul
      Since 2008 Manukau Libraries readers advisory training program has been intrinsic to enabling frontline staff to rethink and improve services. However far from representing a simplistic model of operational instruction Best Sellers is predicated upon key sociopolitical considerations. While advancing readers advisory work, it has challenged librarians to review organisational pedagogies and behaviours which have been allowed to act as delimiters in the repositioning of readers advisory services as the core business of public libraries.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Is This the Best Smaller City Public Library in the
           World'
    • Abstract: Bundy, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 12:02:30 GMT
       
  • Volume 22 Issue 3 - Readers Advisory Services for Older Adults
    • Abstract: Forsyth, Ellen
      This paper examines the range of readers advisory services being provided for leading edge baby boomers over 55, the well aged and the frail aged. Currently there is little targeting of readers advisory to specific age groups or agilities. Readers advisory services for older adults require experimentation, a willingness to make mistakes, and learning from those mistakes to provide more imaginative and better services.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
 
 
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