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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australasian Policing
  [5 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1837-7009
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Critical incidents and potential impact upon race hate
           crime reporting
    • Abstract: Cuerden, Gareth; Rogers, Colin
      In recent times, many countries have suffered terrorist and ether terror attacks, and have also suffered from the economic downturn due to austerity etc. In many instances, countries have seen a retreat to so called 'core values: and a swing towards a more right wing type of political consensus appears evident. The recent decision by the electorate in the United Kingdom referendum to leave the European United for example, has impacted upon the social and political thought in the country. Economically, ties with Europe will of course hopefully remain, as well as ether aspects of the former union, particularly when it comes to policing for local, national and international arrangements. During the so called Brexit debates, however, there were claims and counterclaims regarding the topic of immigration. This political issue appears to have been a major contributing factor in the decision to leave the ED, but it may also have encouraged some individuals to engage in open hostility towards immigrants across the country. For example, incidents have been reported in the media of racial abuse being hurled at minority ethnic individuals in places such as Manchester, Basingstoke, and Cardiff amongst many other places, as well as online race hate abuse towards individuals. Given that most countries have diverse populations which include minority ethnic communities and individuals, the question arises as to whether or not crimes and other incidents of a race hate nature are more prevalent during these types of incidents.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 19:46:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - The Russell Street Bombing 30 years on
    • Abstract: Roberts, Brendan
      At 1.01 pm on March 27, 1986, the heart of policing in Victoria was pierced, when a stolen car full of explosives was detonated outside the Entrance to Melbourne's Russell Street police headquarters. The blast claimed the life of 21-year-old Constable Angela Taylor and injured dozens more. On the 30th anniversary of the Russell Street bombing, those trapped in the path of the explosion, those who witnessed the tragic aftermath and those who brought the bombers to justice, recall the day that changed their lives and policing in Victoria forever. This story originally appeared n The Police Association Journal in Victoria.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 19:46:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Sustainability: A briefing paper
    • Abstract: Jones, Peter; Comfort, Daphne; Hillier, David
      The aims of this briefing paper are to examine the origins and development of the concept of sustainability, to outline some of the current approaches to sustainability reporting and to offer some reflections on both sustainability and sustainability reporting. The paper draws attention to the contrasting and contested meanings of sustainability, to the theoretical frameworks developed to conceptualise sustainability and to the growing interest in sustainability reporting. In their discussion the authors explore some of the challenges police authorities may face in locking to develop and formalise their approach to sustainability as an integral part of their continuing commitment to protect and enhance the communities and environments in which they work.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 19:46:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Domestic abuse - a continuing problem for police
    • Abstract: Welch, Daniel
      The recent comments by the, then, Homo Secretary Theresa May at the Police Federation of England and Wales' annual conference in the UK, has once again placed the spotlight on how the police services in England and Wales deal with domestic abuse.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 19:46:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Disposing of the body
    • Abstract: Samuels, Alec
      Thankfully murder cases tend to be rare in today's western based societies, although trends vary across countries, in both urban and rural locations.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 19:46:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Aug 2017 19:46:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Official crime statistics: The dark figure of hate
           crime in Wales
    • Abstract: Cuerden, Gareth
      Crime Statistics in England and Wales are produced by the Home Office, whom also produce guidance to the Police within England and Wales on how to record crimes, however there is an element of scepticism about the accuracy of the published crime levels due to a belief in the general under reporting of crime.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 Aug 2017 18:57:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - The sustainability of policing domestic abuse: Insights
           from Wales and Australia
    • Abstract: Welch, Daniel
      The scale of domestic abuse and violence is one which is outlined by the World Health Organization as a worldwide problem. Upon reflection of the widespread and seriousness of the problem, the European commission (2010:5) have claimed that "domestic violence is a high priority for the European Union. In response to this, the UK Government, like many others across the continent, have stated that domestic violence and abuse is unacceptable and addressing the issue is a priority for the government" (Gov, 2016b, Online). This viewpoint appears to be widely accepted and encouraged by many, for example, within all of 43 Home Office police forces in England and Wales (HMIC, 2014). This article will aim to critically debate the extent of this commitment, and question what impact austerity has had on the sustainability of policing domestic abuse. In addition, this article will aim to question whether these measures have outweighed, and overlooked the risks posed toy victims of domestic abuse in the UK, and Australia.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 Aug 2017 18:57:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Presentation on increased needs for both security and
           police departments
    • Abstract: Cutajar, Mick
      The nature of policing appears to have gained significant political, social and media interest in recent decades. The apparent escalation in serious and organised crime such as that of terrorism, appears to have raised many questions for poilce services around the world, such as the role and ability of other security organisations, such as the private security sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 Aug 2017 18:57:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Food crime and the UK's food crime unit
    • Abstract: Jones, Peter; Hillier, David; Comfort, Daphne
      As the use of Information and Communication Technologies have become increasingly commonplace, and in many ways an essential element, in almost all walks of life so cybercrime has become a new, high profile, rapidly growing, multifaceted arid almost everyday concern for businesses, law enforcement agencies, governments and for the population at large. By way of contrast food has always been an essential element for all human life, but while a few food scandals (e. g. the horserneat scandal in Europe in 2013) have certainly made media headlines, food crime often goes undetected and unreported and has received much less public attention. Croall (2013a), for example, suggests that 'the many crimes that are involved v the production, distribution and selling of basic foodstuffs touch everyone as food is an essential commodity and a major part of persona) expenditure' With this in mind this short commentary paper provides an outline of the nature and characteristics of food crime and a short case study of the establishment of the National Food Crime Unit (NFCU) in the UK.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 Aug 2017 18:57:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Theory or not theory': That is the question
    • Abstract: Hesketh, Ian; Graham, Les
      Peter Jones and Daphne Comfort work in The Business School at the university of Gloucestershire and David Hillier was an Emeritus Professor in the Centre Policing and Security at the University of South Wales. Police interest in using evidence has grown rapidly in the past decade (Sherman, 2013), In 1999 the UK Home Office committed more than 250 million to the Crime Reduction Programme mat had the objective of generating evidence-based policy (Hope, 2004). There are clear signs within the policy context and academic literature that evidence-based approaches in management are becoming increasingly used and influential, as noted by Morrell "the momentum behind the evidence-based school is considerable and shows no sign of diminishing." (2008: 630).

      PubDate: Fri, 4 Aug 2017 18:57:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colln
      PubDate: Fri, 4 Aug 2017 18:57:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 21:17:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Sustainability: A briefing paper
    • Abstract: Jones, Peter; Hillier, David; Comfort, Daphne
      The aims of this briefing paper are to examine the origins and development of the concept of sustainability, to outline some of the current approaches to sustainability reporting and to offer some reflections on both sustainability and sustainability reporting. The paper draws attention to the contrasting and contested meanings of sustainability, to the theoretical frameworks developed to conceptualise sustainability and to the growing interest in sustainability reporting. In their discussion the authors explore some of the challenges police authorities may face in looking to develop and formalise their approach to sustainability as an integral part of their continuing commitment to protect and enhance the communities and environments in which they work.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 21:17:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - The Russell Street Bombing 30 years on
    • Abstract: Roberts, Brendan
      At 1.01 pm on March 27, 1986, the heart of policing in Victoria was pierced, when a stolen car full of explosives was detonated outside the Entrance to Melbourne's Russell Street police headquarters. The blast claimed the life of 21-year-old Constable Angela Taylor and injured dozens more. On the 30th anniversary of the Russell Street bombing, those trapped in the path of the explosion, those who witnessed the tragic aftermath and those who brought the bombers to justice, recall the day that changed their lives and policing in Victoria forever. This story originally appeared in The Police Association Journal in Victoria.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 21:17:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Critical incidents and potential impact upon race hate
           crime reporting
    • Abstract: Cuerden, Gareth; Rogers, Colin
      In recent times, many countries have suffered terrorist and other terror attacks, and have also suffered from the economic downturn due to austerity etc. In many instances, countries have seen a retreat to so called 'core values' and a swing towards a more right wing type of political consensus appears evident. The recent decision by the electorate in the United Kingdom referendum to leave the European Union for example, has impacted upon the social and political thought in the country. Economically, ties with Europe will of course hopefully remain, as well as other aspects of the former union, particularly when it comes to policing for local, national and international arrangements. During the so called Brexit debates, however, there were claims and counterclaims regarding the topic of immigration. This political issue appears to have been a major contributing factor in the decision to leave the EU, but it may also have encouraged some individuals to engage in open hostility towards immigrants across the country. For example, incidents have been reported in the media of racial abuse being hurled at minority ethnic individuals in places such as Manchester, Basingstoke, and Cardiff amongst many other places, as well as online race hate abuse towards individuals. Given that most countries have diverse populations which include minority ethnic communities and individuals, the question arises as to whether or not crimes and other incidents of a race hate nature are more prevalent during these types of incidents.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 21:17:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Domestic abuse - a continuing problem for police
    • Abstract: Welch, Daniel
      The recent comments by the , then, Home Secretary Theresa May at the Police Federation of England and Wales' annual conference in the UK, has once again placed the spotlight on how the police services in England and Wales deal with domestic abuse.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 21:17:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Disposing of the body
    • Abstract: Samuels, Alec
      Thankfully murder cases tend to be rare in today's western based societies, although trends vary across countries, in both urban and rural locations.

      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 21:17:09 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Policing and integrity - what's the problem?
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      The changing landscape of policing in most mature democratic countries, fuelled in part by the economic recession, has meant a refocusing and questioning by communities and others regarding the attitudes and behaviour of their police service. In England and Wales there has been concerted questioning within the media and from other sources regarding the way the police deal with people as part of their day to day activities. In particular the question of the use of integrity in decision making by police officers has been a constant theme. Recent changes in the accountability processes have and will continue to focus upon how the police deal with their customers. This article seeks to examine the concept of police integrity and discusses why its use is so important for any country that utilises the democratic policing model, whereby the police work within communities. In doing so it considers what is meant by the terms police and democratic policing and examines the importance of police integrity in supporting these ideas. Further, this paper argues that without the use, maintenance and increase of integrity within policing organisations, the future of any true democratic policing model would be under jeopardy.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 14:24:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Processing the numbers: Data as institutional practice
    • Abstract: Fleming, Jenny; King, Rachel
      Data collected by police remains an important source of information for external bodies, other government agencies, state budgetary processes and indeed, academics (Maguire 2007: 254; Manning 2009: 451). Most of us who have worked with police have confronted some of the issues associated with primary and indeed secondary data analysis. Researchers are constantly seeking to make sense of data, understand the codes, classifications, and narratives in police data collection and uncover more of the organisational imperatives and processes that drive the collection and use of data. In this paper we seek to identify potential changes in recording practices that may assist in clarifying outcomes that have been recorded previously. The use of secondary data while much easier in some respects, raises issues about how that data was collected and whether or not previous researchers have considered some of the broader issues associated with data collection in vast bureaucracies. Data that has been used by individuals/groups with a variety of legitimate interests is often interpreted in different ways. A new researcher often finds it difficult to reconcile the 'evidence' and conclusions of others with their own interpretations of the same data (or data from the same source).

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 14:18:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Five years on ANZPAA and professionalization
    • Abstract: Proud, Larry
      Since Federation, the various Australian police agencies have established robust inter-jurisdictional forms of coordination and cooperation, at the Ministerial, Commissioner and organisational level. The Police Commissioners have held regular conferences since 1903, the first meeting of which established an agenda to explore the possibilities of greater co-operation between the police forces of the newly formed federation. New Zealand Police joined the Conference in 1937, and other Pacific nations (such as Fiji and Papua New Guinea) have also participated, in what was known informally as the Police Commissioners' Conference.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 14:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Applied ethics: A call for a new approach to police
           'diversity' training
    • Abstract: Palmer, Phil
      The police service in the United Kingdom has approached the issue of policing a multicultural society by making it more complex than it should be. This paper suggests that what is required is a set of ethical principles that apply to all policing policy and practice. To achieve any progress in this area it will be necessary to re-think the whole area of race and diversity policy and practice. If UK policing continues down the path that highlights difference as the prime policing consideration, it will significantly undermine police officers confidence in policing all communities.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 14:07:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Toward a new professionalism in policing
    • Abstract: Stone, Christopher; Travis, Jeremy
      Across the United States, police organizations are striving for a new professionalism. Their leaders are committing themselves to stricter accountability for both their effectiveness and their conduct while they seek to increase their legitimacy in the eyes of those they police and to encourage continuous innovation in police practices. The traffic in these ideas, policies and practices is now so vigorous across the nation that it suggests a fourth element of this new professionalism: its national coherence. These four principles - accountability, legitimacy, innovation and coherence - are not new in themselves, but together they provide an account of developments in policing during the last 20 years that distinguishes the policing of the present era from that of 30, 50 or 100 years ago.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 11:35:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Community Intelligence: Exploring human source as a new
           frontier
    • Abstract: Rajakaruna, Nikki; Henry, Pamela; Crous, Charl; Fordham, Alf
      The use of informants is by no means a new or novel method to obtaining intelligence about criminal activity. However, over the last decade many police agencies have reviewed and changed the way they engage with informants to devise efficient crime reduction and problem solving strategies. In particular, policing agencies have made significant developments towards professionalising the police-informant relationship (Madinger, 2000; Innes, 2000; Crous, 2009). These changes are reflected in the replacement of the term 'police informant'; a term commonly associated with secrecy and 'snitching' with terms that reflect a much stronger focus on the development of human intelligence (HUMINT) capabilities such as 'Covert Human Intelligence Sources' (CHISs) or 'Human Sources' (HSs). Police agencies have also sought to improve processes and practices governing the cultivation and management of HSs (Crous, 2011). Agency policies and frameworks have been introduced, each of which have a dual purpose; to increase the depth and breadth of information obtained from HSs and to provide appropriate governance in an area of high risk. The purpose of this article is to reflect on recent efforts by Western Australian Police (WA Police) to improve police use of HSs. To achieve this, reference is made to a pilot project implemented by WA Police which focussed on building HS capability at a local District level. The article highlights the outcomes and lessons learnt by WA Police in adopting a localised approach to developing human intelligence capabilities.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 11:35:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Instructions for authors
    • PubDate: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 11:35:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - How people decide to act on risk; an organisational
           behaviour perspective of risk assessment and decision making
    • Abstract: Linsdell, Greg
      The emergency management community of academics and practitioners have devoted considerable effort to the creation of processes that can be used to identify and manage the risks presented by natural and man-made disasters. Adopting a divergent multi-disciplinary approach this paper draws on organisational behaviour theory to suggest that the theoretical framework underpinning the most accepted processes have significant and potentially counterproductive weaknesses. A range of historical and recent events are reviewed through the lens of selected organisational behavioural theories to illustrate the human element that impacts on risk assessment and decision making. This analysis identifies the need for further research and proposes that the impact of subconscious perceptions and biases on existing risk assessment processes may be reduced by appropriate training.

      PubDate: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 11:35:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - The capability challenge
    • Abstract: Homden, Michael
      Capability building is about change in all of its forms and the modern police service is at the forefront of it. Due to policing's highly adaptive nature in the face of operational events and incidents there exists a greater (organisational) opportunity for innovation and success in achieving sustained capability. This is not just about designing frameworks, establishing structures, creating talent strategies and the other layers of organisational improvement, but in a sense more fundamental; in that it recognises that capability shifts according to the environment. Its manifestations and nature 'surges' to meet a need and then dissipates or re-locates in the organisation. This is not a comfortable proposition where efficiencies must be evidenced and performance embedded in strong corporate (and fixed) structures. This article argues that the modern solution to building capability in policing needs to be less fixed and more fluid in its responses.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - A small step forward: Empowering female police officers
           and prosecutors to curb violence against women in Afghanistan
    • Abstract: Holtge, Kristin
      Taliban, Kalashnikov and Burqa - these are typical associations with Afghanistan. Undoubtedly, widespread violence, in particular against women, is still part of the daily life across the country.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - The extraordinary intricacies of policing vulnerability
    • Abstract: Bartkowiak-Theron, Isabelle; Asquith, Nicolette L
      Vulnerable people have become a key focus of policy over the past few decades. As a result, police organisations have had to adapt to ongoing requests for specialised attention and protocol development to mediate the interactions between frontline officers and members of a variety of vulnerable groups. This article examines the various socio-political developments that have led to contemporary policing practices in relation to vulnerable people, and untangles a series of problems in our current approach to vulnerability. Additionally, we propose an alternative operationalisation of vulnerability, which shifts the focus from siloed cultural competency to integrated critical diversity, and in doing so, attempts to relieve some of the institutional, political and operational pressure faced by policing services.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Police interactions with Maori: A contributing factor
           in disproportionate crime statistics
    • Abstract: Elers, Steven
      "Policing the Indigenous" is a global topic of interest in colonial jurisdictions such as New Zealand, Australia and Canada. This paper reviews Maori crime statistics in New Zealand and suggests that police interactions with Maori are a contributing factor to the disproportionate crime statistics.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Characteristics of offenders and the grooming of
           children online for sexual purposes: 'The role of police in understanding
           and investigating the behaviour'
    • Abstract: Davis, Natalie
      The internet has facilitated great advances in communication, social media, business and education. However, it has also facilitated the access and distribution of child abuse material, and assisted in the access to, and grooming of children online for sexual purposes. Grooming (sometimes referred to as seduction, predation or luring) involves access to children, time to invest and interpersonal skills and is facilitated by the perceived anonymity of the Internet user. The increasing number of young people using social media makes grooming children easier for those with an interest in child sexual abuse. Stages in the grooming of children online have been described as dynamic, complex and multi-faceted. The dynamism of grooming behaviours mean no single modus operandi dominates, nor that offenders have similar goals or proceed towards those goals along similar paths. Further, grooming on the internet has both similarities and dissimilarities to "real world" grooming (for instance sexual themes often are introduced more quickly). Various pathways have been developed to describe grooming behaviours, and serve as heuristics to formulate law enforcement strategies to interdict people engaged in grooming behaviour. The role of law enforcement is to develop technological skills and strategies to identify offenders, understand their behavior, investigate offences and protect young people from those who have a sexual interest in them. This paper outlines the challenges raised by people grooming children on the internet, and the use of child pornography and reviews law enforcement strategies to restrict such behaviour.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Fathers, fathering and preventing violence against
           women: The white ribbon research series - preventing men's violence
           against women
    • Abstract: Flynn, David
      Contributing to the prevention of men's violence against women requires more than simply being a non-violent man. It requires an understanding of the factors which underlie and contribute to violence against women and how these factors are deeply engrained in our culture, to the degree to which they are sometimes not immediately obvious. It requires an awareness of how these factors influence our beliefs, attitudes and behaviours - about what it is to be a man and how to relate to others. It requires the courage to change, to adopt new beliefs and new attitudes, and it requires the knowledge and skills to put new actions and behaviours in place.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Police, legitimacy and crime prevention: What are the
           intersections?
    • Abstract: Sarre, Rick
      In the centuries before the industrial revolution, societies functioned without a formal criminal justice system. Peace keeping and the control of deviant behaviour were private matters, or were placed in the hands of village watchmen. 'Policing' was haphazard and uncoordinated, amateur and prone to corruption. With the growth of the modern nation-state came a trend towards formal specialist agents assuming primary responsibility for the policing function.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Instructions to authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 2 - Bring back the 'gig' to Australian law enforcement:
           Human source developments
    • Abstract: French, Nicole; Green, Tracey
      The arguments for and against the use of informants, now known as human sources, in law enforcement practice is not a new debate. Australian law enforcement agencies, like many of their international counterparts have experienced decades of change in the movement toward and away from the use of human sources in criminal investigations and the intelligence gathering process. In this article, some of the reasons for this inertia are explored within the context of historical changes in the Australian law enforcement landscape. In this study, in-depth interviews were conducted with seven Australian policing and intelligence agencies with senior management and operational police officers working at recruiting and handling informants. Analysed transcripts from key agency representative interviews identified core themes on the historical political, regulatory systems and social drivers exerting influence on Australian human source management including the more recent trends in the resurgence of informant management practices. A secondary source review and analysis of current and past Australian law enforcement policies and internal reports was also undertaken as part of the methodology applied in this study. As part of good reporting practice for ensuring confidentiality and agency anonymity is maintained, sensitive and operational information has been sanitised from the themes reported in this article. This paper will argue that a great deal of work continues to be done across our Australian Law enforcement agencies in terms of broadening the present day focus in both the 'notional type' of who is considered a human source, how human sources are deployed and the expanding on the expertise and training for those working with human sources.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 09:07:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Instructions for authors
    • PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - From violence to coercive control: Renaming men's abuse
           of women
    • Abstract: Fisher, Stephen
      The White Ribbon Campaign is the largest global male‑led movement to stop men's violence against women. It engages and enables men and boys to lead this social change. In Australia, White Ribbon is an organisation that works to prevent violence by changing attitudes and behaviours. The prevention work is driven through social marketing, Ambassadors and initiatives with communities, schools, universities, sporting codes and workplaces.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Karo Araua: Armed constabulary (Papua)
    • Abstract: Hayes, Maxwell R
      This paper was compiled from personal conversations with Sgt Major Bagita, recollections from other long serving native police, notes from Rita O'Neil (daughter of T.P. Gough), assistance from Rick Giddings, a former long serving district officer and magistrate, and from "Karo: the life and fate of a Papuan", Amirah Inglis, ANU, 1982, to whom I extend my thanks.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Pluralised policing in Australia: Answering the
           questions
    • Abstract: Sarre, Rick; Prenzler, Tim
      There has been an undeniable shift in public thinking in recent years about privatised forms of policing. In the past it was nearly impossible to conceive of private security personnel operating entirely in the public interest, especially when considering Australia's national security and anti-terrorism strategies. That notion has been consistently challenged in the last decade, as public expectations regarding security have increased, and as policy-makers and the public alike have become increasingly comfortable with private policing endeavours. The faith shown in the private sector in relation to getting policing and security tasks done effectively and efficiently has largely borne fruit. This paper answers some of the commonly asked questions that continue to arise where policing is becoming more 'pluralised' every day.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Knowledge management and capability profiling
    • Abstract: Peake, John
      The standard of living of a nation's people depends increasingly on the ideas, skills, insights and knowledge they are able to contribute to the global economy, rather than on what they own. As Hames (1994: 11) puts it, "Knowledge is no longer simply one of a number of resources, it is the resource."

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Misericordiae Antemortem - the 1955 mount superbus
           crash
    • Abstract: Loft, Keith
      On the 9th April 1955, RAAF Lincoln Bomber A73-64, on a mercy flight to transfer a critically ill infant from Townsville to Brisbane, crashed at Mount Superbus killing the four crew and two civilians on board. The immediate search and rescue was organised by a group of Brisbane bushwalkers who were camping in the area. Police and RAAF personnel subsequently joined the civilians at the crash site to recover the victims. During their initial search of the crash they located what were believed to be the remains of five adults. The arrival of the RAAF Senior Medical Officer (SMO) the following day revealed that only four adult bodies had been found and the bodies of both civilians, an adult and infant, were missing. Later that day the remains of six victims were recovered from the crash site and conveyed to the Warwick Police Station for identification. The RAAF SMO was responsible for the identifications of the aircrew while the Government Medical Officer, police and coroner were responsible for the identifications of the civilians. Eight days later, further remains of the infant were found by a civilian looking through the wreckage. This paper uses archival records not previously researched from a Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) perspective to stimulate interest among forensic practitioners, criminologists and other interested parties in the history of DVI and how practices in Australia have evolved.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Making it happen: Strategies for personal success
    • Abstract: Schulz, Dorothy M
      The 7th Australasian Council of Women and Policing (ACWAP) Conference was held on 21/24 August 2011 in Hobart, Tasmania. The Conference theme was Police and Community - Making it Happen. ACWAP was established in 1997 and is a growing group of women and men within police services and the community who are working together to improve the policing services provided to women, to improve opportunities and outcomes for women within policing and participate in the global network of women in policing. The plenary sessions at the 2011 Conference included a talk by Professor Dorothy M. Schulz from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice (CUNY) in New York. Professor Schulz has had a long professional career in law enforcement and is the author of From Social Worker to Crimefighter: Women in United States Municipal Policing (1995) and Breaking the Brass ceiling: Women Police Chiefs and their paths to the top (2004).

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Tackling the wicked problems inherent in the law
           enforcement and public health intersection
    • Abstract: Kent, Graham
      This paper aims to initiate reflection and discussion among police practitioners on the problems and issues inherent in the intersection between law enforcement and public health.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - Educating police leaders: Police and University
           partnerships
    • Abstract: Palmer, Phil
      The recent Neyroud Report on Police Training and Leadership in England and Wales (2011) proposes significant reforms to the training and education of senior police officers. The extraordinary pace of national and international change is stretching the knowledge, skills, and values of all police organisations. Any reform must acknowledge these challenges and seek to solve them. Reforming police education and training is a difficult process that demands leadership and requires changing perspectives, work styles, and good relationships between all stakeholders. If this is to be achieved it will require a series of instructional and institutional reforms which should be guided by two outcomes: transformative learning and interdependence in education. This paper calls for the most important constituencies to debate the proposed reforms before taking action on them. It is suggested that the police and professional educators are key players in this dialogue since change will not be possible without their leadership and ownership.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - NGO engagement in environmental law enforcement:
           Critical reflections
    • Abstract: White, Rob
      In recent years Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) have played a growing and increasingly significant role in investigating and exposing environmental crimes. This article examines the kinds of skills and capacities associated with environmental law enforcement and the ways in which NGOs are contributing to this task. It provides critical reflections on two sets of issues stemming from NGO engagement in this area: issues that parallel those of conventional environmental law enforcement agencies (such as expertise, training, and collaboration); and issues that arise from the status and ideological orientation of the NGO itself (such as views of harm/crime, legality of actions, and accountability).

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 4 Issue 1 - The importance of law enforcement in promoting and
           protecting the public health
    • Abstract: Crofts, Nick; James, Steve; Herrington, Victoria; Thomson, Nick
      As front-line practitioners police deal with a wide range of social problems. A significant number of those problems involve threats to public health, in the shape for instance of road trauma, violence, mental health episodes, drug-affected behavior, infectious disease and natural disasters. Yet police are not usually recognized as crucial to the protection of public health. We argue here that this needs to be remedied.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Sep 2012 10:07:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 3 Issue 2 - Community engagement and public trust in the police: A
           'pragmatic' view on police and community relationships and liaison schemes
           
    • Abstract: Bartkowiak-Theron, Isabelle
      Over the past two decades, there have been many studies about police performance, and especially how performance relates to attitudes of communities towards police and police work. A range of topics and variables have been explored, including fear of crime, measures of distributive and procedural justice, police-community relationships, and perceptions of legitimacy. In recent years, studies looking at community engagement have questioned the ability of police to 'implement effective, sustained engagement at an organisational level' (Myhill, 2006, v). This paper considers the issue of community engagement from a pragmatic point of view for police officers and police organisations. After defining community engagement, the paper looks at how far, from the perspective of both community members and police, 'community engagement' extends and considers how current engagement practices impact on police operations, including intelligence gathering and crime prevention. The paper summarises the information obtained in a pilot study conducted in two regional areas of Australia. The study, conducted in regional Victoria and New South Wales (with an n of 300), was part of broader research activity looking at new forms of community policing in Australia (Bartkowiak- Theron and Corbo Crehan, 2010a). within the generic framework of communities' knowledge of, attitudes towards and satisfaction with police, the study interrogated the strategic and tactical value of community engagement for frontline police and their organisation.

      PubDate: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 09:16:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 3 Issue 2 - From unity comes strength: Thoughts on policing
           fragmented metropolitan areas
    • Abstract: Alach, Zhivan
      There are few metropolitan areas around the world lucky enough to have only a single policing agency responsible for them. As such, metropolitan areas are often fragmented in terms of policing responsibility. This in turn can have negative effects, especially when dealing with complex, organised, and geographically mobile criminality, which often crosses jurisdictional boundaries. Altering organisational structures to better counter the environmental challenge is not easy. A multitude of internal tensions and challenges make designing an optimal structure near impossible. These range from inter- and intra-agency tensions, conflict between centralisation and decentralisation, and even the warring philosophies of New Public Management and Intelligence-Led Policing. However, by examining a range of potential structural options, including some borrowed from the military, some recommendations for enhanced organisational structures can be made. This article uses Auckland, New Zealand as its primary focus but its analysis and recommendations are globally applicable.

      PubDate: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 09:16:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 3 Issue 2 - Policing for women
    • Abstract: Beare, Margaret E
      The 7th Australasian Council of Women and Policing (ACWAP1) Conference was held on 21/24 August in Hobart, Tasmania. The Conference theme was - Police and Community: Making it Happen. ACWAP was established in August 1997 and is a growing group of women and men within police services and the community who are working together to improve the policing services provided to women; improve opportunities and outcomes for women within policing and participate in the global network of women in policing. The plenary sessions this year included a talk by Professor Margaret Beare from York University, Toronto, Canada on Policing for Women. The talk has been edited for the purposes of this publication.

      PubDate: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 09:16:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 3 Issue 2 - Managing covert human intelligence sources: Lessons for
           police commanders
    • Abstract: Crous, Charl
      The development of formal Covert Human Intelligence Sources (CHIS) management has occurred over the last decade in many policing organisations world wide as part of the greater emphasis on Intelligence Led Policing. The use of confidential informants is referred to in contemporary policing as the management of CHIS. The relationship between police and those in the criminal world is however fraught with risk as this relationship is prone to unethical conduct or even corruption. The development of formal CHIS management includes the formulation of new policies and directives governing the relationship between police and informants to mitigate the risk of unethical behaviour. However the richness of CHIS information is invaluable for policing. Analysis of six month's worth of data from the Auckland Metro Crime and Operations Support (AMCOS) CHIS programme indicates that CHIS information predominantly relates to organised crime activity, illicit firearms and the illicit drug environment. The complexity associated with management of this type of information poses a significant risk for policing, regardless of the governing process initiated. Research in the United Kingdom (UK) and case studies in both Northern Ireland and Queensland indicate that irrespective of policy development and governance structures, police handlers will defy process if continuous training at all levels in the organisation, coupled with some level of intrusive supervision is not occurring. A review of these international examples provides some valuable indicators for police managers in terms of risk mitigation.

      PubDate: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 09:16:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 3 Issue 2 - Learning to work together: police and academics
    • Abstract: Fleming, Jenny
      There has been increasing recognition in Australia of the potential for collaborative research relationships between police and academics. Despite significant improvements in partnership arrangements and research outcomes however, it would be na ve to suggest that the working relationship is always smooth. Drawing on the author's personal experiences and understanding of working with police, the article considers the views of both police and academics working together. It suggests that continuous communication, negotiation and understanding where the other party sits are crucial to productive working relationships.

      PubDate: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 09:16:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 3 Issue 2 - Making it happen: Police and community: Assam: In the
           shadow of extremist violence
    • Abstract: Parasor, Sanjukta
      Imagine a world where the police man on duty is not sure if he will return to see his family at the end of the day. Imagine a world where a mother doesn't know if the security forces will kill her son in an encounter today. Imagine a world where a housewife doesn't know if a bomb will go off in the market place as she is buying onions in the evening. The common masses in Assam are poor, illiterate, underfed, living below the poverty line with no scope for improvement. No developmental work has taken place, most roads are dilapidated, every monsoon the swollen rivers tear the embankments flooding the village and damage their crop, there is hardly any potable water, disease is rampant, help is far away.

      PubDate: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 09:16:56 GMT
       
  • Volume 3 Issue 2 - Control of Weapons Act (Victoria): Declared area search
           operations
    • Abstract: Green, Philip
      In December 2009, Victoria enacted 'stop and search' powers through amendments to the Control of Weapons Act 1990.1 Whilst this essay is State-specific to Victoria, in discussing the enabling legislation, the international experience remains highly relevant, particularly when considered in the context of Victoria operating under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act2 (the Charter) and a decision3 arising from British police exercise of powers under their Terrorism Act 2000.

      PubDate: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 09:16:56 GMT
       
 
 
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