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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover
Australasian Policing
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1837-7009
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Davies, Amanda
      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Welcome to our new editor Dr Amanda Davies
    • Abstract: Farrell, Luke
      The Australasian Institute of Policing (AiPol) welcomes Dr Amanda Davies to the Chair as our AiPol journal editor. Amanda brings with her a wealth of knowledge in relation to policing and law enforcement and we are privileged to have her performing this important role on behalf of AiPol.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Apple health data used in murder trial
    • Abstract:
      Health data has provided crucial evidence at a trial in Germany, in which a refugee is accused of rape and murder.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Fighting crime with Slack
    • Abstract:
      Shots are fired midday on Park Street in Hartford, Connecticut.

      At the Hartford Police Department's Capital City Crime Center (known as C4) - a technology-driven, real-time crime and data intelligence center - a team of analysts uses a combination of audio transmitted from the ShotSpotter software system, along with video from nearby security cameras, to map the location of the incident as units are responding.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Technology, data and reliable prediction
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      Predicting the future, and events, is of course not an exact science, and recent political elections and referendums will testify. However, in part as an answer to economic cuts, reduced workforce and resources and other demands upon their services, the police in England and Wales have naturally looked to technology to assist. This technology includes such as automatic identification for vehicle registration numbers, the increased use of drones, hand held computer for officers and of course different types of analyses of data and information to assist in providing adequate resources at high demand times. The use of technology and computer assisted decision making has even reached the hallowed halls of the custody office. Witness reports that Durham constabulary are using 'artificial intelligence' designed to help officers decide whether or not a suspect should be kept in custody. The system classifies suspects at a low, medium or high risk of offending and has been tested by the force, and it has been trained on five years of offending histories data. It is alleged the tool could be useful, and Data for the Harm Assessment Risk Tool (Hart) was taken from Durham police records between 2008 and 2012. Apparently the system was tested during 2013, and the results showing whether suspects did in fact offend or not were monitored over the following two years. It appears forecasts that a suspect was low risk turned out to be accurate 98% of the time, while forecasts that they were high risk were accurate 88% of the time. Indeed, Kent police, considered to be one of the pioneers of this type of predictive policing in the UK reported that their trial of software based upon data analysis utilizing certain algorithms, was 60% better at spotting where crimes would take place than the force analyst. These kind of initiatives, and similar approaches to the use of data, could well become the norm as police try rationalize their working processes. It appears to fit into the already well-known use of information and data for 'geospace' analysis for crime and incidents and the general intelligence led policing approach. These approaches are of course dependent upon what is commonly referred to as 'Big Data' the analysis of such, particularly the use of algorithms.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Cops use murdered woman's Fitbit to charge her husband
    • Abstract: Watts, Amand
      The attack, as Richard Dabate described it to police, was horrific. A masked intruder barged into his Connecticut home, he said, tied up and tortured him and - when his wife came home - shot and killed her. His story, however, would not hold up with investigators. And when cops ultimately charged him with murdering his wife, they relied on evidence gathered from an unlikely source.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Artificial Intelligenceand Law Enforcement
    • Abstract: Wulff, John
      After the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States, the law enforcement and intelligence communities began efforts to combine their talents and information gathering assets to create an efficient method for sharing data. The central focus of these cooperative efforts for sharing information was state fusion centers, tasked with collecting data from several database sources and distributing that information to various agencies. This vast amount of intelligence data eventually overwhelmed the investigative organizations. The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to parse data and extract patterns of behavior that can create actionable intelligence for the recipient agencies is a technology that is desperately needed in order to shape the methodology of critical data sharing for crime and terrorism prevention.

      AI can analyze threat data and historical information and then create attack hypotheses for predicting when and where crimes will be committed. Statistical and tactical analysis of criminal and terrorist patterns of behavior by AI's intelligent software agents can provide economical operations and resource management. By predicting the most logical locations for criminal activity, equipment and personnel can be directed to those areas to prevent those events from occurring. Financial resources must be allocated to allow for the development of these applications and for the exhaustive study of test results to ensure the accuracy and efficacy of AI's machine-learning techniques for increasing the crime fighting options available to law enforcement and the intelligence communities.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Hitachi built an AI security system that follows you
           through a crowd
    • Abstract: Toomey, Max
      A new AI security system for airports can pick out every little detail about you. And then it follows you.

      Hitachi's new AI system can classify people based on more than a hundred characteristics, including your gender, what you're wearing, what you're carrying, how old you are and how you're walking.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Eerie tech promises to copy anyone's voice from just
           one minute of audio
    • Abstract: Ghoshal, Abhimanyu
      I'm not sure how I feel about the upcoming launch of Montreal-based Lyrebird's new service. The company says its API will let you synthesize speech in anyone's voice from just a minute-long recording - which means you could, for instance, generate a clip of President Trump declaring war on Canada.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - This crime-solving AI was originally developed to help
           astronauts-in-training
    • Abstract: McCall, Rosie
      Your local police force's newest recruit could be more machine than human. Security departments in the UK and Belgium are, right now, testing an artificial intelligence (AI) program that will take on the arduous task of sifting through potential evidence (a process that is usually completed manually) to help solve crimes. Rather bizarrely, VALCRI (Visual Analytics for Sense-Making in Criminal Intelligence) was built from software originally designed to prepare trainee-astronauts for stints in space.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Kanagawa police to launch AI-based predictive policing
           system before Olympics
    • Abstract:
      Yokohama - The Kanagawa Prefectural Police plan to become the first in the nation to introduce predictive policing, a method of anticipating crimes and accidents using artificial intelligence, sources said Sunday.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Of, for, and by the people: the legal lacuna of
           synthetic persons Of, for, and by the people: the legal lacuna of
           synthetic persons
    • Abstract: Bryson, Joanna J; Diamantis, Mihailis E; Grant, Thomas D
      Conferring legal personhood on purely synthetic entities is a very real legal possibility, one under consideration presently by the European Union. We show here that such legislative action would be morally unnecessary and legally troublesome. While AI legal personhood may have some emotional or economic appeal, so do many superficially desirable hazards against which the law protects us. We review the utility and history of legal fictions of personhood, discussing salient precedents where such fictions resulted in abuse or incoherence. We conclude that difficulties in holding ''electronic persons'' accountable when they violate the rights of others outweigh the highly precarious moral interests that AI legal personhood might protect.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Dutch police use augmented reality to investigate
           crime scenes
    • Abstract: Revell, Timothy
      You are the first police officer to arrive at the scene: a suspected ecstasy lab. There is drug paraphernalia everywhere, but which piece of evidence could be most helpful for your investigation' Then, a massive virtual arrow appears, pointing out a bottle of chemicals, accompanied by a note saying: "Bag this please".

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Policing, technology and terrorism in the 21st century
    • Abstract: Scally, Emily
      Contemporary policing is full of threats that were unimaginable twenty years ago, particularly the threat of terrorism. Following the events of 9/11, society's perceptions of policing and terrorism changed (Rubin and Rubin, 2015), and was at this point that the so-called 'War on Terror' began (Combs, 2016; Jeffreys-Jones, 2017) in contemporary terms.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - AI uses Bitcoin trail to find and help sex-trafficking
           victims
    • Abstract: Revell, Timothy
      After Kubiiki Pride's 13-year-old daughter disappeared, it took 270 days for her mother to find her. When she did, it was as an escort available to be rented out on an online classified web site. Her daughter had been drugged and beaten into compliance by a sex trafficker.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - As Artificial Intelligence evolves, so does its
           criminal potential
    • Abstract:
      Imagine receiving a phone call from your aging mother seeking your help because she has forgotten her banking password. Except it's not your mother.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 10 Issue 1 - Dubai police to deploy robotic patrols
    • Abstract: Al Shouk, Ali
      Self-driving mini police vehicles will use biometrics to scan crowds and identify criminals, or suspects.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 05:37:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - A strong and secure Australia
    • Abstract:
      The Turnbull Government will undertake the most significant reform of Australia's national intelligence and domestic security arrangements in more than 40 years.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Press conference with chief of the defence force, air
           chief marshal mark binskin AC
    • PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Defence support to domestic counter-terrorism
           arrangements
    • Abstract:
      The Australian Defence Force will expand its role in assisting the states to respond to terrorist incidents under new changes being made by the Turnbull Government.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - The 45 recommendations of lindt cafe siege inquest
    • PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Statement on NSW Coroner's findings and recommendations
           into the lindt cafe siege
    • Abstract: Brandis, George
      As honourable Senators would be aware, this morning the New South Wales Coroner, Mr Michael Barnes, handed down the report of his inquest into the Lindt Cafe siege.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - The true story of the lindt cafe
    • Abstract: King, Tony
      They were preparing to storm the Lindt Caf where a mentally ill criminal Man Haron Monis, out on bail, was holed up with four of the 18 hostages he had taken 16 hours earlier. They had been advised there was a bomb that the hostage-taker would likely detonate. Entire city blocks had been cleared with this expectation.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Social media and police: Potential for conflict and
           mistrust
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      The recent 'Twitter' debate between the Chief Constable of Essex Police in the UK and apparent members of that organisation, has once again focused many upon the use and impact of social media on Policing. It was reported by the BBC that the Chief Constable apologised for the poor parking of one of the force's police vehicles to the public on Twitter. In response, members of that force apparently berated the Chief Constable, questioning how he spent his working day, and his priorities. The important point about the Chief's Tweet however, was that he regretted that his officers had behaved in a manner that could cause the public to question their fairness and integrity. This incident, is therefore, useful for understanding how social media can in fact influence the public's perception of police.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Police legitimacy and engaging with terrorism
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      Recent events across the world, particularly in Australia and the UK, have demonstrated that terrorist activity is still ongoing, despite an increase in resources and improvements in technology introduced to deal with the threat. Whilst there has been no doubt a dramatic improvement in technology and its use in this sphere, and that governments have introduced legislation designed to curb or at least control activities linked to terrorist acts, events such as those witnessed in London and Sydney continue to occur.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Reviewing the ADF's role in domestic counter-terrorism
           responses
    • Abstract: Batt, Micah
      Responses to the federal government's announcement two weeks ago that it's expanding the ADF's role in domestic counterterrorism (CT) responses were quickly subsumed by public discussion about the new Home Affairs portfolio. But with public discourse now moving on, it's worth taking a closer look at how the announcement came about and what it might mean for the ADF into the future.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Inquest finding into the death of radicalised teen
           numan haider
    • Abstract: Dowling, James
      A missed phone call in which a radicalised youth boasted he would have stabbed police officers if he had a knife was the only piece of information that may have stopped a fatal meeting with detectives.

      PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 2 - Press conference with the Attorney-General, senator the
           Hon. George brandis QC, ,minister for immigration and border Protection,
           the Hon. peter Dutton MP and minister for Justice, the Hon. Michael Keenan
           MP
    • PubDate: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:07:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Official crime statistics: The dark figure of hate
           crime in Wales
    • Abstract: Cuerden, Gareth
      Crime Statistics in England and Wales are produced by the Home Office, whom also produce guidance to the Police within England and Wales on how to record crimes, however there is an element of scepticism about the accuracy of the published crime levels due to a belief in the general under reporting of crime.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - The sustainability of policing domestic abuse: Insights
           from Wales and Australia
    • Abstract: Welch, Daniel
      The scale of domestic abuse and violence is one which is outlined by the World Health Organization as a worldwide problem. Upon reflection of the widespread and seriousness of the problem, the European commission (2010:5) have claimed that "domestic violence is a high priority for the European Union. In response to this, the UK Government, like many others across the continent, have stated that domestic violence and abuse is unacceptable and addressing the issue is a priority for the government" (Gov, 2016b, Online). This viewpoint appears to be widely accepted and encouraged by many, for example, within all of 43 Home Office police forces in England and Wales (HMIC, 2014). This article will aim to critically debate the extent of this commitment, and question what impact austerity has had on the sustainability of policing domestic abuse. In addition, this article will aim to question whether these measures have outweighed, and overlooked the risks posed toy victims of domestic abuse in the UK, and Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Presentation on increased needs for both security and
           police departments
    • Abstract: Cutajar, Mick
      The nature of policing appears to have gained significant political, social and media interest in recent decades. The apparent escalation in serious and organised crime such as that of terrorism, appears to have raised many questions for poilce services around the world, such as the role and ability of other security organisations, such as the private security sector.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Food crime and the UK's food crime unit
    • Abstract: Jones, Peter; Hillier, David; Comfort, Daphne
      As the use of Information and Communication Technologies have become increasingly commonplace, and in many ways an essential element, in almost all walks of life so cybercrime has become a new, high profile, rapidly growing, multifaceted arid almost everyday concern for businesses, law enforcement agencies, governments and for the population at large. By way of contrast food has always been an essential element for all human life, but while a few food scandals (e. g. the horserneat scandal in Europe in 2013) have certainly made media headlines, food crime often goes undetected and unreported and has received much less public attention. Croall (2013a), for example, suggests that 'the many crimes that are involved v the production, distribution and selling of basic foodstuffs touch everyone as food is an essential commodity and a major part of persona) expenditure' With this in mind this short commentary paper provides an outline of the nature and characteristics of food crime and a short case study of the establishment of the National Food Crime Unit (NFCU) in the UK.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Theory or not theory': That is the question
    • Abstract: Hesketh, Ian; Graham, Les
      Peter Jones and Daphne Comfort work in The Business School at the university of Gloucestershire and David Hillier was an Emeritus Professor in the Centre Policing and Security at the University of South Wales. Police interest in using evidence has grown rapidly in the past decade (Sherman, 2013), In 1999 the UK Home Office committed more than 250 million to the Crime Reduction Programme mat had the objective of generating evidence-based policy (Hope, 2004). There are clear signs within the policy context and academic literature that evidence-based approaches in management are becoming increasingly used and influential, as noted by Morrell "the momentum behind the evidence-based school is considerable and shows no sign of diminishing." (2008: 630).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 9 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colln
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Critical incidents and potential impact upon race hate
           crime reporting
    • Abstract: Cuerden, Gareth; Rogers, Colin
      In recent times, many countries have suffered terrorist and ether terror attacks, and have also suffered from the economic downturn due to austerity etc. In many instances, countries have seen a retreat to so called 'core values: and a swing towards a more right wing type of political consensus appears evident. The recent decision by the electorate in the United Kingdom referendum to leave the European United for example, has impacted upon the social and political thought in the country. Economically, ties with Europe will of course hopefully remain, as well as ether aspects of the former union, particularly when it comes to policing for local, national and international arrangements. During the so called Brexit debates, however, there were claims and counterclaims regarding the topic of immigration. This political issue appears to have been a major contributing factor in the decision to leave the ED, but it may also have encouraged some individuals to engage in open hostility towards immigrants across the country. For example, incidents have been reported in the media of racial abuse being hurled at minority ethnic individuals in places such as Manchester, Basingstoke, and Cardiff amongst many other places, as well as online race hate abuse towards individuals. Given that most countries have diverse populations which include minority ethnic communities and individuals, the question arises as to whether or not crimes and other incidents of a race hate nature are more prevalent during these types of incidents.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - The Russell Street Bombing 30 years on
    • Abstract: Roberts, Brendan
      At 1.01 pm on March 27, 1986, the heart of policing in Victoria was pierced, when a stolen car full of explosives was detonated outside the Entrance to Melbourne's Russell Street police headquarters. The blast claimed the life of 21-year-old Constable Angela Taylor and injured dozens more. On the 30th anniversary of the Russell Street bombing, those trapped in the path of the explosion, those who witnessed the tragic aftermath and those who brought the bombers to justice, recall the day that changed their lives and policing in Victoria forever. This story originally appeared n The Police Association Journal in Victoria.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Sustainability: A briefing paper
    • Abstract: Jones, Peter; Comfort, Daphne; Hillier, David
      The aims of this briefing paper are to examine the origins and development of the concept of sustainability, to outline some of the current approaches to sustainability reporting and to offer some reflections on both sustainability and sustainability reporting. The paper draws attention to the contrasting and contested meanings of sustainability, to the theoretical frameworks developed to conceptualise sustainability and to the growing interest in sustainability reporting. In their discussion the authors explore some of the challenges police authorities may face in locking to develop and formalise their approach to sustainability as an integral part of their continuing commitment to protect and enhance the communities and environments in which they work.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Domestic abuse - a continuing problem for police
    • Abstract: Welch, Daniel
      The recent comments by the, then, Homo Secretary Theresa May at the Police Federation of England and Wales' annual conference in the UK, has once again placed the spotlight on how the police services in England and Wales deal with domestic abuse.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Disposing of the body
    • Abstract: Samuels, Alec
      Thankfully murder cases tend to be rare in today's western based societies, although trends vary across countries, in both urban and rural locations.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Sustainability: A briefing paper
    • Abstract: Jones, Peter; Hillier, David; Comfort, Daphne
      The aims of this briefing paper are to examine the origins and development of the concept of sustainability, to outline some of the current approaches to sustainability reporting and to offer some reflections on both sustainability and sustainability reporting. The paper draws attention to the contrasting and contested meanings of sustainability, to the theoretical frameworks developed to conceptualise sustainability and to the growing interest in sustainability reporting. In their discussion the authors explore some of the challenges police authorities may face in looking to develop and formalise their approach to sustainability as an integral part of their continuing commitment to protect and enhance the communities and environments in which they work.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - The Russell Street Bombing 30 years on
    • Abstract: Roberts, Brendan
      At 1.01 pm on March 27, 1986, the heart of policing in Victoria was pierced, when a stolen car full of explosives was detonated outside the Entrance to Melbourne's Russell Street police headquarters. The blast claimed the life of 21-year-old Constable Angela Taylor and injured dozens more. On the 30th anniversary of the Russell Street bombing, those trapped in the path of the explosion, those who witnessed the tragic aftermath and those who brought the bombers to justice, recall the day that changed their lives and policing in Victoria forever. This story originally appeared in The Police Association Journal in Victoria.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Critical incidents and potential impact upon race hate
           crime reporting
    • Abstract: Cuerden, Gareth; Rogers, Colin
      In recent times, many countries have suffered terrorist and other terror attacks, and have also suffered from the economic downturn due to austerity etc. In many instances, countries have seen a retreat to so called 'core values' and a swing towards a more right wing type of political consensus appears evident. The recent decision by the electorate in the United Kingdom referendum to leave the European Union for example, has impacted upon the social and political thought in the country. Economically, ties with Europe will of course hopefully remain, as well as other aspects of the former union, particularly when it comes to policing for local, national and international arrangements. During the so called Brexit debates, however, there were claims and counterclaims regarding the topic of immigration. This political issue appears to have been a major contributing factor in the decision to leave the EU, but it may also have encouraged some individuals to engage in open hostility towards immigrants across the country. For example, incidents have been reported in the media of racial abuse being hurled at minority ethnic individuals in places such as Manchester, Basingstoke, and Cardiff amongst many other places, as well as online race hate abuse towards individuals. Given that most countries have diverse populations which include minority ethnic communities and individuals, the question arises as to whether or not crimes and other incidents of a race hate nature are more prevalent during these types of incidents.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Domestic abuse - a continuing problem for police
    • Abstract: Welch, Daniel
      The recent comments by the , then, Home Secretary Theresa May at the Police Federation of England and Wales' annual conference in the UK, has once again placed the spotlight on how the police services in England and Wales deal with domestic abuse.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 8 Issue 1 - Disposing of the body
    • Abstract: Samuels, Alec
      Thankfully murder cases tend to be rare in today's western based societies, although trends vary across countries, in both urban and rural locations.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Crime and tourism: The police response
    • Abstract: Mawby, RI
      Tourism has long been recognised as a crime generator, with resorts honeypots for offenders. Much of the early research on tourism and crime was conducted in Australia, and this and other studies suggested that many tourist resorts suffer higher than average crime rates and that tourists are disproportionately victimised, but that tourists also often cause crime and disorder problems. This poses a dilemma for areas seeking to expand their tourism industry and in many resort areas the police have worked in local partnerships to alleviate the problems. However, there is surprisingly little hard data available for resort areas to allow policy makers to develop and evaluate appropriate responses. Using the author's experience as external advisor to a recent European initiative, this article considers the contribution of the police on two levels: firstly as providers of robust data on the relationship between tourism and crime; and secondly on responding to the problems identified by developing effective policies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Trends in low light surveillance - peak tactical
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Migrants in police forces: A sociological attempt to
           get a broader picture
    • Abstract: Grutzpalk, Jonas
      In Europe there has been a lot of talk about the integration of migrants into the local and national police forces in the last quarter of a century. In my article I propose to practice what philosophers call epoche and suggest that we need to take a sociological step back to get a broader picture of what seems to be the problem in this debate.

      Sociologically speaking the question of the integration of migrants into police forces is the question of the integration of minorities into organisations. So from a sociological point of view the question is a rather general one: how are minorities integrated into organisations'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Starting from scratch: Planning practices of police
           recruits in Western Australia
    • Abstract: Tudor-Owen, Jane; Scott, Adrian J; Henry, Pamela J; Bull, Ray
      Given the limited body of research concerning planning for investigative interviews, the aim of the present study was to examine what police recruits plan for in investigative interviews with witnesses. The study analysed the plans of 37 police recruits prepared on four occasions following specific points in their training at the Western Australia Police Academy. Each of the items from the plans was assigned to one of twelve categories: Introduction, Witness demographics, Interview demographics, Pre-existing information, Incident details, Elements, Defences, Legal, procedure, Interview procedure, Rapport building, Interviewing technique, and Other.

      Statistical analyses were conducted to determine how the proportion of items included in the categories changed across the four occasions. Findings indicate recruits consistently emphasise planning around Incident details, and include comparatively less items relating to Introduction and Rapport building. Encouragingly, items relating to Interview procedure and Interview technique occupy a greater proportion of the items in plans prepared following interviewing training. The findings presented provide encouragement for interview trainers as they show that targeted training may influence recruits' planning. As such, it is important to identify areas that are generally neglected in plans and to develop training that emphasises the inclusion of items related to these areas in order to facilitate the preparation of more balanced plans and interviews.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Who are the police and what is policing'
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      At this time of much change to police organisations across the world, due to austerity or other issues such as increased terrorist threat, an opportunity arises for reflection upon what we actually mean by the terms police and policing. This is quite an important point, as there is a need to differentiate between the two concepts in order to introduce such changes and to provide an effective response to perceived threats.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Preventing violence in Australia: Practice, policy and
           solutions [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Blakemore, Brian
      Review(s) of: Preventing violence in Australia: Practice, policy and solutions, by Andrew Day and Ephrem Fernandez, Editors, 2015 The Federation Press, Leichhardt NSW Australia ISBN 978 186287 994 2 (ppb).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - Social media and police legitimacy
    • Abstract: Kelly, Andrew
      Police organisations in Australia and across the globe are increasingly turning to social media to enshrine and enhance their legitimacy. For more than five decades police and researchers have applied themselves to developing new and better ways to gain the consent and cooperation of citizens, without which police in a democratic society would be unable to operate effectively. Community policing provided the strategic and philosophical basis for many of the changes that have occurred over this time, but as a policing approach it has seemingly become less of a priority in many jurisdictions in recent years.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 2 - County lines and wicked problems: Exploring the need
           for improved policing approaches to vulnerability and early intervention
    • Abstract: Coliandris, Geoff
      The UK National Crime Agency (NCA) intelligence assessment on the 'County Lines' criminal business model aims to raise awareness of an established though hitherto largely hidden and complex crime problem centred on the supply of Class A drugs. Key features of County Lines as 'wicked problem'-type enterprises are the exploitation and abuse of vulnerable people. The NCA assessment rightly highlights the safeguarding issues raised and makes a valuable contribution to the first stages of a viable problem-solving approach. However, subsequent efforts to deliver effective and sustainable responses are likely to be hampered by weaknesses located in the wider domain of policing, and in particular in the knowledge and understanding bases surrounding the concept of 'vulnerability'. Two emerging policing frameworks suggest promising ways forward for policing generally and responses to County Lines specifically. The one, referred to as 'vulnerable people policing', is centred in Australia while the other, termed 'early intervention', is emerging within mainstream UK policing discourse. This paper explores both frameworks and their interconnections. It argues that together, they offer fruitful possibilities for improving responses to vulnerable people, as well as for police effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Methamphetamine use among Australian police detainees
    • Abstract: Goldsmid, Susan; Brown, Rick
      Police are on the frontline, dealing with the harms associated with illegal drug use. The National Drug Strategy noted that the role of police included the management and control of harms and risks associated with the extreme behaviours displayed by amphetamine type stimulants users (Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy 2011). Since publication of the National Drug Strategy, methamphetamine has been identified as a substance of particular concern to police and other frontline service personnel (Law Reform, Drugs and Crime Prevention Committee 2014).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - For the public: Responding to an 'active shooter'
           incident
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Responding to 'active shooter' incidents in Australia
    • Abstract: Hodgins, Gene; Saliba, Anthony
      The following article presents a summary of research that was undertaken for the NSW Police Force in 2014 to provide a review of the relevant worldwide 'active shooter' literature. The aims of the research were to identify: what makes a situation an 'active shooter' incident; the characteristics of previous 'active shooter' incidents, how they have been dealt with, and what has been found to work; and current 'best practice' for police in dealing effectively with an 'active shooter' incident (for full report see: Hodgins and Saliba, 2014). While the full report covers the international literature, the following article focuses on Australian 'active shooter' incidents and recommended police responses.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Instructions for authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Incident command decision-making: Perception vs Reality
    • Abstract: Davies, Amanda
      As the world turns to building resilience to the increasing threats to global and local peace and order research initiatives which inform on the training endeavours designed to advance decision-making skill development for incident commanders becomes a compelling imperative. In the often chaotic fast paced business of policing it is understandable that officers have little opportunity to pause and take stock of how the reality of decision-making experience transforms from perception to reality. This paper discusses a research project which traced the learning experience for a cohort of senior officers as they transitioned through an Incident Command and Control simulation based learning exercise to application on the frontline of policing. The key focus of the research was to identify the factors and their relative importance which are perceived to influence decision-making during management of a high risk high stakes policing response and whether in the reality of application the influential factors and their ranking change. A pre and post simulation survey was conducted followed by a field based interview four months post simulation participation. The findings suggest a clear shift in the factors and their level of influence identified prior to the simulation exercise and a further shift when decisions are made in the field of operation. The findings have implications for the strategic positioning of simulation based training and its content within police education and training for operational policing. More widely the findings offer guidance for education and training initiatives for practitioners in professions with responsibilities for emergency management.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Taser! Taser! Problems underlying the police mis-use of
           electronic stun guns
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      The use of Tasers, or electronic stun guns, in many western democratic style countries such as the UK and Australia, appears to be on the rise and often involves contentious circumstances that are reported in the media. In conjunction with other forms of state sanctioned force available to the police, the use of such devices rests within what is termed a continuum of force. Here an escalation of police force depends upon the resistance offered towards the police, or perceived levels of danger to other individuals. Notwithstanding the general right of the police to use coercive force, the misuse of such devices can have a detrimental impact upon police/community relations. This article explores the relationship between police and community with regard to the misuse of Taser, utilising examples from England and wales and Australia, and suggests this misuse or 'over- use' of devices can have a damaging effect upon police legitimacy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 7 Issue 1 - Is anyone remotely interested': The rise of the
           police drone
    • Abstract: Coliandris, Mike; Coliandris, Geoff
      Drone (known by other names) use is proliferating worldwide, driven by a commercial imperative. Police services are variously considering, trialling, routinely using or planning to expand use of such technology though the overall picture can be characterised as piecemeal, limited and variable. Drones face an image problem largely due to their warfare connotations. Beyond this image problem lie more substantive concerns about drone use generally linked to questions around public privacy, civil liberties, ethics, governance and accountability. Each of these concerns has relevance to the policing domain and holds potential to adversely impact police-public relations and police legitimacy.

      The police-technology relation is already contested and controversial, particularly around issues of social control and the weaknesses of the empirical foundations underpinning related strategies and claims. For some, drones represent a further step towards a dystopian future. A balanced assessment of drones for policing purposes suggests both possibilities and advantages as well as challenges and threats, particularly from a democratic policing model perspective. However, the debate at present on this unfolding landscape of police use of drones is marked by a lack of information, transparency and rigour.

      Police in democratic societies have multiple roles and responsibilities. This includes exploiting the most effective technologies to deliver safety and security. However, they are also required to engage with communities at each important stage in the development of policing. Finally, any future drone governance and accountability framework will need to take into account as far as is practicable a range of voices and be founded on the principles that police in democratic societies are charged to safeguard and adopt.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Instructions for authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Governing science
    • Abstract: Sparrow, Malcolm K
      A favorite family pastime is to discover road signs that, either through ambiguous wording or lack of punctuation, lend themselves to multiple different interpretations.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Missing persons in Australia
    • Abstract: Clements, Natalie
      This paper provides an overview of the service delivery and policy context relating to missing persons in Australia and presents available data. Despite research evidence of the high financial cost to the community and the impact experienced by families and friends of missing persons, there has been little policy focus on missing persons in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Police 'modernising the gateway to the criminal justice
           system'
    • Abstract: Neyroud, Peter
      A three year randomised control trial has highlighted some crucial initial findings regarding the effect deferred prosecutions have on offenders. Peter Neyroud reports.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Re-thinking counter-terrorism and crime prevention
           strategies from a harm perspective
    • Abstract: Prenzler, Tim
      This paper reviews a number of aspects of Australia's counter-terror strategies and its achievements. The positive outcomes are then contrasted with major ongoing harms associated with a number of significantly under-regulated areas: traffic, alcohol and tobacco, and workplace injuries. The evidence suggests that much more attention needs to be addressed to these latter areas, without necessarily reducing efforts to combat terrorism.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Police Overseas Service Medal awarded to Royal Papua
           New Guinea constabulary
    • Abstract: Hayes, Maxwell R
      The Police Overseas Service Medal (POSM) was created by Royal letters patent on 25th April 1991. It is an award within the Australian Honours and Awards to "members of Australian police forces and certain other persons who render service in international peacekeeping operations, or following a request from another government for assistance". As at 1.2.2008 approximately 4,200 medals had been awarded.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - The utility of community policing - insights from
           England and Wales and Uruguay
    • Abstract: del Castillo, Federico; Fraiman, Ricardo; Rogers, Colin
      Democratic policing models if they are to be successful depend upon many factors, not least the ability of the police to engage with communities and involve them in various prevention activities. It is believed that this, coupled with increased perceived legitimacy of the police from within the community, fuelled by procedural justice, will combine to produce a more crime resistant community which works well with the police, producing a safe environment. This article compares current policing activities in two countries, Uruguay and England and Wales and considers the perceived impact that recent government policies may have upon the future of policing in both countries.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Mental health and policing in the UK - a watershed
           moment'
    • Abstract: Fleming, Jenny
      Mental health issues take up to 20 percent of police time - a significant contributor to overall police demand. Every year in England and Wales the police detain approximately 22,500 people under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 and some suggest that 'the number of people arrested for substantive offences who may be experiencing a serious mental health problem equates to between 25% and 40% of all those detained' (Brown 2014).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Policing youth curfews: The 'Wee Willie Winkie' model
           of enforcing bail conditions
    • Abstract: Robinson, Angela; Bartkowiak-Theron, Isabelle
      This paper examines the criminalisation of young people placed on bail. It focuses specifically on Tasmanian youth subject to curfew bail conditions and how police intervene should they breach curfew. Curfew policing involves officers attending residences to verify the youth's presence during the night or early hours of the morning - the 'Wee Willie Winkie Policing Model'. Secondary analysis of data from the Magistrates Court demonstrated the prevalence of arrest or detention in custody for youths charged with breaching bail without associated further offending.

      These figures were compared to rates of arrest and detention in custody for youths charged with criminal offences at the time of breaching bail conditions. The study analyses the adherence of pro-active curfew policing to legislated youth justice principles and international charters proclaiming the rights of the child. In doing so, it discusses the appropriateness of formally processing young people through the criminal justice system for non-crime related breaches of bail.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 2 - Decision making and the national intelligence model: No
           accounting for decision bias
    • Abstract: Palmer, P; Pournara, M; Espinosa, Delgardo I; Palmer, H
      This paper discusses the role of decision making within the context of the Intelligence Led Policing (ILP) and suggests that reliance on this model may lead to some profound abstractions because 'knowledge' based on intelligence can be partial or incomplete and should not necessarily become the sole basis for constructing a strategic or tactical response to solving (at least in the long term) a crime problem. Intelligence is often limited, separate objects of information that then become the basis for constructing a view of a larger whole.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Therapeutic jurisprudence and partnerships
    • Abstract: Toohey, Noreen
      The Victorian Magistrates' Court has increasingly adopted a multidisciplinary approach to addressing the underlying causes of offending. Specialist Courts such as The Family Violence Division, Drug Court, Koori Courts (Indigenous Victorians), The Neighbourhood Justice Centre and the Assessment and Referral Court (ARC) have all been established to ensure a specialist response by the court and also to help address particular offending behaviour in a more holistic way. Many Judicial Officers have embraced the principles of therapeutic jurisprudence or solution focussed judging in everyday lists.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Dynamics of gender and police culture: A case study of
           Tamil Nadu, India
    • Abstract: Natarajan, Mangai
      In 1997, Indian Labour Law legislation required a 33% representation of women in all government sectors. The then Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu, Ms. Jayalalitha Jayaraman (a champion for women and their welfare), one of the southern states of India, seized the opportunity to ensure that 33% of new recruits to the state's police force were women.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Women police networking in Pakistan
    • Abstract: Sethi, Aliya
      Networking is an empowering process for women to galvanize initiatives aimed at cultivating women's leadership, empowerment and equality across identity lines. The context of women in policing in Pakistan unfolds a set of opportunities and challenges to engage in collaborative actions to improve the situation of women in police and enhance delivery of police services for women in the community.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Arresting behaviours social media and its uses in
           helping victims of sexual assault
    • Abstract: Worth, Carolyn
      This article offers an alternate view about social media and its possibilities for victims of sexual assault to the e-crime version where people are at risk of predators. It also looks at some of the questions we receive from users of social media and how we deal with the issues.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Gender and perceptions of police: Findings from the
           Australian community capacity study
    • Abstract: Sargeant, Elise; Mazerolle, Lorraine
      The way police engage with people in the community is a topic of great interest to police, politicians and to a wide range of groups across different types of communities. One of the questions that women in policing might ask is whether or not males and females in communities think differently about police. In a unique study of policing in communities across Brisbane and Melbourne, researchers at the University of Queensland are studying the dynamics of police-citizen relations. In this article, we describe the Australian Community Capacity Study (ACCS) and report the results of how differently male and female citizens think about police across communities in Brisbane and Melbourne.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Long-term declines in firearms-related deaths and
           injuries for officers and the public
    • Abstract: Prenzler, Tim
      Falling crime rates in New York City have received a great deal of attention from the media and from academics - especially those crime rates from the 1990s. However, a closely related area that has received much less attention is the large, long-term reductions in firearms discharges by police, with apparent flow on effects to injuries and fatalities. A 2011 article in the New York Times described 'the steep decline in shootings by the police in recent decades,' noting that 2010 data revealed record lows.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Modern, motivated, progressive and professional':
           Flexible work practices and the retention of female members in SAPOL
    • Abstract: Przibilla, Krysten
      The discussion in this paper is framed by a concern, supported by both Australian and international studies, that a disproportionate number of female members resign from policing due to conflict between work and home commitments. Firstly, this paper contends that Australian society has undergone enormous social change, particularly in the last 50 years, and this is further examined with reference to the changes in modern policing policy and practice during the same time period.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - White ribbon
    • Abstract:
      What is Primary Prevention' The main focus of the White Ribbon Campaign is primary prevention on the issue of violence against women. By engaging men as part of the solution, the White Ribbon aims to challenge the cultural norms that inform the attitudes and behaviours that 'give licence' to some men to be violent towards women. Primary prevention efforts complement work with victims and survivors, but do not replace or take priority over it. Activities to prevent and respond to sexual violence can be classified in a number of ways. One of the most common is a three-part classification of activities according to when they occur in relation to violence.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Online investigation: Using the internet for
           investigative policing practice
    • Abstract: Elers, Steve
      Digital technology continues to advance with devices such as smart phones, tablet devices and personal computers containing a growing number of features and applications that facilitate both interpersonal and mass communication. The internet has become an important part of global culture in the 21st century (Witkowski, 2002) and provides additional options for how messages are generated and received (Day, 2013). This rapid development of technology has impacted upon how law enforcement agencies collate digital evidence (Nelson, Phillips and Steuart, 2010). The training of police officers in the use of digital and online investigative techniques appears to be restricted to police officers in specialised units. The purpose of this paper is to present some examples of basic online investigative tools which utilise freely available methods that are accessible to anyone with an internet connection. The methods that are discussed below may assist police officers with their investigations. This paper is an introductory guide and serves as an approach as opposed to a rule book or manual. By understanding an approach to online tools, it becomes easier to extrapolate suitable methods of inquiry when required. This paper does not cover techniques which gain unauthorised access to data in a system or any other activities that would require a court order or warrant to execute. Further, it is important to note that the process or procedures in gathering digital evidence has a direct influence on the outcome of an investigation (Yusoff, Ismail and Hassan, 2011). Therefore it is recommended that the methods explained in this paper are rigorously documented if used in an investigation and that advice from specialists is sought during all stages of the investigation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Social media and police leadership: Lessons from Boston
    • Abstract: Davis, Edward F; Alves, Alejandro A; Sklansky, David Alan
      The Boston Police Department (BPD) has long embraced both community policing and the use of social media. The department put its experience to good and highly visible use in April 2013 during the dramatic, rapidly developing investigation that followed the deadly explosion of two bombs at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. BPD successfully used Twitter to keep the public informed about the status of the investigation, to calm nerves and request assistance, to correct mistaken information reported by the press, and to ask for public restraint in the tweeting of information from police scanners. This demonstrated the level of trust and interaction that a department and a community can attain online. In the aftermath of the investigation, BPD was "applauded for leading an honest conversation with the public during a time of crisis in a way that no police department has done before."

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - 'The state we are in' - thoughts about devolution
           proposals for Welsh policing
    • Abstract: Rogers, Colin
      The recent publication of the Silk committee's second report into devolved powers to the Welsh government situated in Cardiff has included a suggestion of transfer of policing powers from London to that body. These recommendations are now under consideration by the UK parliament. However, should these recommendations be adopted, then there are several major areas that would need to be carefully considered and plans provided to ensure that policing provision, both in Wales and in England are not adversely affected by such a move. This article considers some of the major concerns and issues surrounding the possible devolution of policing powers to the Welsh Government and includes thoughts and considerations regarding their potential impact and repercussions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 6 Issue 1 - Instructions for Authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Policing domestic abuse effectively: A blueprint for
           success'
    • Abstract: Coliandris, Geoff; Rogers, Colin
      Domestic abuse is a global social problem that is well established on criminal justice and human rights agendas worldwide. Yet it continues to present significant challenges to police services in particular despite the combined effects of advances in knowledge, practices, structures, systems and skills. There is evidence to suggest that historically domestic disputes have been viewed negatively by frontline police officers. This idea is often associated with the contested and change-resistant concept of police culture(s). Advances in knowledge continue to reveal the complexities of domestic abuse. These complexities benefit from effective collaborative responses between multiple agencies as well as co-production of safety approaches. The US-based The Blueprint for Safety: An Interagency Response to Domestic Violence Crimes (Praxis International, 2010) offers a framework for global communities to adopt and adapt in the drive to embed more aligned, coordinated and integrated responses to domestic abuse. In particular, it emphasises the special role and responsibilities of the frontline police officer as gatekeeper for the victim's access to different services and as a key player in the collective approach to protecting vulnerable victims.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Reducing the influence of outlaw motorcycle gangs: Some
           reflections on current Australian legislation
    • Abstract: Sarre, Rick
      In October 2011, demonstrators angry with the part that big business may play in fostering social and economic inequality assembled in the heart of the Sydney CBD. The protest mirrored similar gatherings around Australia, all under the 'Occupy' umbrella. A Mr Eamonn O'Flaherty was one of the Sydney protesters. When he did not vacate his camping spot when asked to, he was charged with the offence of failing to comply with the terms of a notice in a public place (not to stay overnight) contrary to s 632(1) of the 'Local Government Act 1993' (NSW).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Postcard from the UK - police and crime commissioners
    • Abstract: Fleming, Jenny
      It has been a year since what Lister (2013) has termed 'the most significant constitutional change in the governance of the police in the past 50 years' - the election of Police Crime Commissioners.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Instructions for authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Police science: Toward a new paradigm
    • Abstract: Weisburd, David; Neyroud, Peter
      We believe that a radical reformation of the role of science in policing will be necessary if policing is to become an arena of evidence-based policies. We also think that the advancement of science in policing is essential if police are to retain public support and legitimacy, cope with recessionary budget reductions, and if the policing industry is to alleviate the problems that have become a part of the policing task. In this paper, we outline a proposal for a new paradigm that changes the relationship between science and policing. This paradigm demands that the police adopt and advance evidence-based policy and that universities become active participants in the everyday world of police practice. But it also calls for a shift in ownership of police science from the universities to police agencies. Such ownership would facilitate the implementation of evidence-based practices and policies in policing and would change the fundamental relationship between research and practice. It would also increase the prestige and credibility of police science in the universities. We think that bringing the universities into police centers and having the police take ownership of police science will improve policing and ensure its survival in a competitive world of provision of public services.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Developments in Commonwealth privacy legislation for
           locating missing persons
    • Abstract: Clements, Natalie
      Locating missing persons can be facilitated through access to personal information held by government, non-government, and private agencies. Legislation that authorises the release of personal information for law enforcement purposes is usually worded in relation to a criminal offence or breach of the law. As a result of numerous reviews of privacy legislation over the last ten years, an exemption has been created in the new'Privacy Amendment (Enhancing Privacy Protection) Act 2012 for the disclosure by agencies of personal information, where a person has been reported as missing to police. This paper provides an overview of missing persons in Australia and discusses the development of the new exemption and whether this is the most effective way to allow access to information about a missing person.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Are newly recruited police officers blank slates':
           An examination of the 'natural' interviewing skills of untrained recruits
           in Western Australia
    • Abstract: Scott, Adrian J; Pedretti, Paul; Tudor-Owen, Jane; Bull, Ray
      The PEACE model of investigative interviewing has been widely adopted both internationally and within Australia since its inception in the United Kingdom in the early 1990s. PEACE is a mnemonic for the five stages of the interview process: Preparation and planning; Engage and explain; Account, clarification and challenge (Account); Closure; and Evaluation. Thus far, research examining the use of the PEACE model has predominantly evaluated experienced police officers' use of the model in practice. The present study is unique in that it explored the 'natural' interviewing skills of 43 newly recruited police officers (i.e., untrained recruits) with reference to the five stages of the PEACE model. University students acted as witnesses who watched a short video recording of a mock assault before being individually interviewed by one of the recruits. The recruits were given the opportunity to prepare written plans before the interview and completed written self-evaluations after the interview. Analyses revealed that the recruits largely neglected the Preparation and planning stage, and when planning occurred, it predominantly focused on the Account stage of the model. With regard to the interview itself, the recruits again focused on the Account stage while neglecting the Engage and explain and Closure stages of the model. Finally, the recruits' self-evaluations noted deficiencies particularly with respect to the Engage and explain stage, demonstrating some insight into the importance of this stage of the model. Overall, it appears that the recruits found the Account stage to be the most natural, suggesting that particular attention needs to be given to the other stages of the PEACE model during interview training.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - He aha tenei': A content analysis of Maori
           representation on the New Zealand Police homepage
    • Abstract: Elers, Steve; Elers, Phoebe
      The use of websites and social media by police agencies are a valuable asset (Hess, Orthmann and Cho, 2012). Websites are an essential tool for police organisations and provide a range of useful services including details of emergency and non-emergency contact information, understanding laws, crime statistics among other things (Kasper, 2011). Police websites tend to fit the mould of Grunig and Hunt's (1984) public information model pertaining to one-way dissemination of information. However, despite the classification of the public information model, an official website of a police organisation is essentially the online gateway to the organisation and thus needs to cater to the community it serves. This includes accommodating for ethnic minority groups and in particular, the indigenous people of the policing jurisdiction.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Police on postage stamps - Papua the world's first
    • Abstract: Hayes, Maxwell R
      One of the world's most popular collectables is postage stamps. There are, however, many more serious collectors who branch out into other aspects of philately, air mail covers, first day covers, various post office cancels, Antarctic covers, Olympic games issues, a particular country, prisoner-of-war mail, censorship covers, and many more diversified specialized interests.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 2 - Australasian Council of Women and Policing - Annual
           Awards 2013 results
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - How people decide to act on risk; an organisational
           behaviour perspective of risk assessment and decision making
    • Abstract: Linsdell, Greg
      The emergency management community of academics and practitioners have devoted considerable effort to the creation of processes that can be used to identify and manage the risks presented by natural and man-made disasters. Adopting a divergent multi-disciplinary approach this paper draws on organisational behaviour theory to suggest that the theoretical framework underpinning the most accepted processes have significant and potentially counterproductive weaknesses. A range of historical and recent events are reviewed through the lens of selected organisational behavioural theories to illustrate the human element that impacts on risk assessment and decision making. This analysis identifies the need for further research and proposes that the impact of subconscious perceptions and biases on existing risk assessment processes may be reduced by appropriate training.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Applied ethics: A call for a new approach to police
           'diversity' training
    • Abstract: Palmer, Phil
      The police service in the United Kingdom has approached the issue of policing a multicultural society by making it more complex than it should be. This paper suggests that what is required is a set of ethical principles that apply to all policing policy and practice. To achieve any progress in this area it will be necessary to re-think the whole area of race and diversity policy and practice. If UK policing continues down the path that highlights difference as the prime policing consideration, it will significantly undermine police officers confidence in policing all communities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Instructions for authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Five years on ANZPAA and professionalization
    • Abstract: Proud, Larry
      Since Federation, the various Australian police agencies have established robust inter-jurisdictional forms of coordination and cooperation, at the Ministerial, Commissioner and organisational level. The Police Commissioners have held regular conferences since 1903, the first meeting of which established an agenda to explore the possibilities of greater co-operation between the police forces of the newly formed federation. New Zealand Police joined the Conference in 1937, and other Pacific nations (such as Fiji and Papua New Guinea) have also participated, in what was known informally as the Police Commissioners' Conference.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Processing the numbers: Data as institutional practice
    • Abstract: Fleming, Jenny; King, Rachel
      Data collected by police remains an important source of information for external bodies, other government agencies, state budgetary processes and indeed, academics (Maguire 2007: 254; Manning 2009: 451). Most of us who have worked with police have confronted some of the issues associated with primary and indeed secondary data analysis. Researchers are constantly seeking to make sense of data, understand the codes, classifications, and narratives in police data collection and uncover more of the organisational imperatives and processes that drive the collection and use of data. In this paper we seek to identify potential changes in recording practices that may assist in clarifying outcomes that have been recorded previously. The use of secondary data while much easier in some respects, raises issues about how that data was collected and whether or not previous researchers have considered some of the broader issues associated with data collection in vast bureaucracies. Data that has been used by individuals/groups with a variety of legitimate interests is often interpreted in different ways. A new researcher often finds it difficult to reconcile the 'evidence' and conclusions of others with their own interpretations of the same data (or data from the same source).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
  • Volume 5 Issue 1 - Community Intelligence: Exploring human source as a new
           frontier
    • Abstract: Rajakaruna, Nikki; Henry, Pamela; Crous, Charl; Fordham, Alf
      The use of informants is by no means a new or novel method to obtaining intelligence about criminal activity. However, over the last decade many police agencies have reviewed and changed the way they engage with informants to devise efficient crime reduction and problem solving strategies. In particular, policing agencies have made significant developments towards professionalising the police-informant relationship (Madinger, 2000; Innes, 2000; Crous, 2009). These changes are reflected in the replacement of the term 'police informant'; a term commonly associated with secrecy and 'snitching' with terms that reflect a much stronger focus on the development of human intelligence (HUMINT) capabilities such as 'Covert Human Intelligence Sources' (CHISs) or 'Human Sources' (HSs). Police agencies have also sought to improve processes and practices governing the cultivation and management of HSs (Crous, 2011). Agency policies and frameworks have been introduced, each of which have a dual purpose; to increase the depth and breadth of information obtained from HSs and to provide appropriate governance in an area of high risk. The purpose of this article is to reflect on recent efforts by Western Australian Police (WA Police) to improve police use of HSs. To achieve this, reference is made to a pilot project implemented by WA Police which focussed on building HS capability at a local District level. The article highlights the outcomes and lessons learnt by WA Police in adopting a localised approach to developing human intelligence capabilities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:41 GMT
       
 
 
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