for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation
  [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1039-6500
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - ANPC corporate members
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - From the editor
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - FREE plant conservation activities for children
    • Abstract: Westbye, Carly
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Research roundup
    • Abstract: Cowley, Kirsten
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Conferences and courses
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - News
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - ANPC workshop reports
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - A field guide for the southern tablelands (NSW and
           ACT) [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul
      Review(s) of: Woodland flora: A field guide for the southern tablelands (NSW and ACT), by Sarah Sharp, Rainer Rehwinkel, Dave Mallinson and David Eddy. (2015) Friends of Grasslands, Canberra, ISBN 978-0-994 4958-0-8. 285pp.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Sheoaks - wind harps from desert to the sea [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Driver, Martin
      Review(s) of: Sheoaks - wind harps from desert to the sea, by Neville Bonney. Published by Neville Bonney, PO Box 37 Tantanoola SA 5280, ISBN 978-0-646-96037-1 AUS $40.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - ANPC member profile
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - News from the Australian seedbank partnership
    • Abstract: Wrigley, Damian
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Best practice provenance for a changing climate: A
           workshop summary
    • Abstract: Bickerton, Doug; Russell, Vicki-Jo; Breed, Martin; Wake, Ruby; Davis, Natasha; Hancock, Nola; Broadhurst, Linda; Lowe, Andy; Ellis, Mark
      Trees For Life (TFL) is a not-for-profit organisation working to revegetate South Australia and conserve its remnant vegetation, with a focus on achieving effective on-ground results. Formed in 1981, TFL has volunteers who grow native seedlings at home for landholders across the state. TFL has a large propagation nursery that handles orders from local councils and industry. The organisation currently has 8,000 members including approximately 2,000 volunteers. Trees For Life also has a large volunteer program, Bush For Life, which supports and trains approximately 1,000 volunteers to undertake bush regeneration in remnant bushland.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - New insights into the ecology of the critically
           endangered 'Banksia conferta' (Proteaceae) from the mid-north coast of NSW
           
    • Abstract: Bell, Stephen
      Banksia conferta A.S. George (Proteaceae; Figure 1) is an erect tall shrub occurring within a restricted range in the rugged forests of northern New South Wales. Additional populations are also present in south-eastern Queensland (Mt Barney, Lamington Plateau, Glasshouse Mountains), the closest some 400 kilometres to the north. Listed as Critically Endangered on the NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995, this species has been allocated to the site-managed stream under the NSW Government's Saving our Species program (SoS). In New South Wales, Banksia conferta is currently only known from Coorabakh National Park on the Lansdowne Plateau, near Taree on the mid-north coast.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - The challenge of improving 'ex situ' collections for
           threatened plants: The example of the velvet zieria ('Zieria murphyi' -
           Rutaceae)
    • Abstract: Henery, Martin
      One of the main aims of the recently completed Saving Threatened Species project at the Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) was to identify plant species listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act 1999 that have low levels of genetic diversity held ex situ. This included an assessment of the seed and living collections at the ANBG as well as the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria and in NSW. A genetically representative ex situ collection of a species is essential if that material is to be used to reverse species declines or prevent extinctions. One of the threatened species identified in this process was Zieria murphyi commonly known as the Velvet Zieria.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Evidence-based provenance: Building informed
           provenance in the Cumberland plain
    • Abstract: Ridgeway, Peter; Smart, Daniel; Vella, Damien
      Decisions about the choice of provenance of planting material for use in conservation and restoration programs have long been contentious. Some divergences are founded on differences in the objectives. We suggest that the debate is additionally confounded by inadequate testing of competing models using local information. Here we test some assumptions underlying 'local' (FloraBank 2010a, 2010b) and 'climate-ready' (Hancock et al. 2016) provenance models with data from the Cumberland Plain. We caution against generic application of provenance approaches and recommend that non-local provenance should be used only after analysis of local data to demonstrate the specific risks and benefits for the target species and landscape.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Climate suitability of diverse provenances of a
           widely-distributed eucalypt: Testing the 'local is best' paradigm under
           climate warming
    • Abstract: Tjoelker, Mark G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Drake, John E
      It is commonly recommended that revegetation efforts use local provenances (seed sources) of tree species, as they will be well-adapted to the local environment. As climate warms, local provenances may cease to be well adapted. It is argued that assisted migration through translocation of seeds or plants originating in warmer climates will ensure that local vegetation is 'climate ready.' There are myriad factors that can potentially shape the environmental suitability of a local provenance, including rainfall, soil type, fire frequency or competition, among others. However, for many tree species, the importance of temperature in determining environmental suitability is not known.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - ANPC corporate members
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Research roundup
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - News
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Workshop reports
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Perth plants: A field guide to the Bushland and
           Coastal Flora of kings park and bold park, Second edition [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Millar, Melissa
      Review(s) of: Perth plants: A field guide to the Bushland and Coastal Flora of kings park and bold park, Second edition, by Russell Barrett and Eng Pin Tay, CSIRO Publishing, Clayton South, 2016, 423 + xii pp. ISBN 9781486306022, $49.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Pilbara seed atlas and field guide: Plant restoration
           in Australia's Arid Northwest [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cochrane, Anne
      Review(s) of: Pilbara seed atlas and field guide: Plant restoration in Australia's Arid Northwest, by Todd E. Erickson, Russell L. Barrett, David J. Merritt and Kingsley W. Dixon, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne. 2016, 295 pp ISBN 9781486305520, Paperback, AU$79.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - ANPC member profile
    • Abstract: Cochrane, Anne
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - News from the Australian seedbank partnership
    • Abstract: Walsh, Neville; Hirst, Megan; Messina, Andre
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - From the editor
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - The rainforest challenge - testing the 'unstorable
           seed' assumption
    • Abstract: Sommerville, Karen; Errington, Graeme; Newby, Zoe-Joy; Offord, Catherine A
      It is hard to imagine that, 55 million years ago, rainforest vegetation covered much of the Australian continent (Cameron-Smith, 1991). As the land mass drifted north and became more arid, the rainforests contracted to a discontinuous band following the north and east coast of the mainland and the western half of Tasmania (Adam, 1992). When Europeans arrived on the continent, these remaining rainforest stands were seen as a great resource for timber and agricultural land and were reduced further in size by large scale clearing, particularly in NSW and Queensland (Stork et al., 2011). Today, rainforests occupy less than 0.4% of the Australian land mass. Despite occupying such a small area, rainforests still retain a high proportion of Australia's plant diversity. Of the 277 seed-producing families currently listed on the Australian Plant Census, for example, over 60% are represented in rainforest habitats.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Changes in seed dormancy over time in fire-prone flora
    • Abstract: Liyanage, Ganesha; Ooi, Mark
      In fire-prone ecosystems, seed germination is controlled by different mechanisms to ensure that seedlings emerge into the post-fire environment, where high nutrients and low competition levels are conducive to successful recruitment. Seed dormancy is one such mechanism which can delay germination, with fire-related dormancy-breaking and germination cues promoting post-fire emergence.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - How fire and seasonal temperatures influence the
           germination of many plant species: Insights from 'Boronia' (Rutaceae)
    • Abstract: Mackenzie, Berin DE; Auld, Tony D; Keith, David A; Ooi, Mark KJ
      An understanding of the mechanisms that promote plant recruitment is essential for effective management of native flora for biodiversity conservation. The first step is identifying how and when seed dormancy is overcome, and the cues required to stimulate germination in nature. Together, these determine the regeneration niche and control the timing of seedling emergence, with important consequences for seedling survival and growth, and for population persistence. They also provide important clues to the most effective treatments for ex situ germination for conservation or horticultural purposes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - How do germination responses to smoke relate to
           phylogeny, growth form, fire response strategies and vegetation type'
           A focus on eastern Australia
    • Abstract: Carthey, Alexandra JR; Leishman, Michelle R
      It has been known since the 1990's that exposure to smoke promotes seed germination in some species. Smoke has been shown to affect timing and success of germination, as well as seedling vigour, in native, weed and commercial species. In contrast, smoke can also inhibit germination in some species. An understanding of regeneration responses to smoke is critical for the management of threatened plant species and vegetation communities under changing climate, including increased fire frequency.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Counting the uncountable: Estimating abundance of the
           rhizomatous Stackhousia subterranea W.R.Barker (Celastraceae)
    • Abstract: Wapstra, Mark; Yates, Lorilee V
      Stackhousia subterranea (Grassland Candles) is listed as endangered (Schedule 3) under the Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995. While it is quite widespread on mainland Australia, within Tasmania it is much more restricted.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - A non-seed based method for enhancement planting of
           the critically endangered Pomaderris delicata
    • Abstract: McAuliffe, Joe; Taylor, David; McDougall, Keith
      Threatened plant species are typically grown from seed for enhancement and translocation actions associated with recovery. However, propagation from seed is not always possible due to difficulties in obtaining viable seed and germination and cultivation challenges. This presents a problem when there is a need to produce plants for species that are in rapid decline. Such a scenario arose when the New South Wales Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) and the Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) worked together to enhance populations of one of NSW's rarest Pomaderris species.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 2 - Seeds of change: A case study in improving
           rehabilitation success
    • Abstract: Quarmby, Alice
      Cost effective plant establishment in large scale rehabilitation and restoration programs is reliant on the broad-scale application of seeds (Merritt and Dixon, 2011; Quarmby, 2015). Where possible this is achieved through re-spreading stockpiled topsoil but often supplemented with mechanical direct seeding (Merritt and Dixon, 2011; Quarmby, 2015). However, it is common that 10% or less of broadcasted seed produce seedlings, with the failure to assess, manage and account for quality of seed collections directly impacting the success and cost of achieving intended goals (e.g. plants/ha) (Merritt and Dixon, 2011 Quarmby, 2015).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - News from the Australian seedbank partnership: The
           restoration seed bank initiative - a focus on biodiverse restoration at
           the landscape scale
    • Abstract: Turner, Shane; Erickson, Todd; Rojas, Miriam Munoz; Merritt, David
      The Australian Seed Bank Partnership (ASBP) is an alliance of 12 conservation-focused agencies across Australia. The Partnership undertakes nationally-collaborative seed banking initiatives as well as research to enhance the utility of native seeds in plant conservation and ecological restoration projects. Whilst seeds are at the heart of landscape-scale restoration, poor seed quality and low establishment can frustrate attempts to re-instate biodiverse plant communities (Merritt and Dixon 2011; James et al. 2013). With the growing recognition of the importance of landscape-scale ecological restoration in biodiversity protection comes an increasing demand for biological and technical knowledge of seeds. The Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority (BGPA), one of two ASBP Partners in Western Australia, leads a number of research projects aimed at improving restoration techniques and technologies using seeds which increasingly underpin major restoration efforts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - ANPC corporate members
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Workshop Report: Sandhill Paddock Walk at Booroorban,
           south of Hay NSW - 1 June 2016
    • Abstract: Ware, Sally; Driver, Martin
      With the native vegetation bouncing back after a series of recent rain events following a long dry summer and autumn, a third successive Paddock Walk was organised in early June by staff from the Hay office of Riverina Local Land Services in conjunction with Landcare, Greening Australia and other agencies focusing on the Riverine White Cypress Pine Sandhills. This time the destination was the sandhill communities around Booroorban. Funding for the Walk was provided by the National Landcare program.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Vegetation of Australian riverine landscapes [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Driver, Martin
      Review(s) of: Vegetation of Australian riverine landscapes, edited by Samantha Capon, Cassandra James and Michael Reid, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne. 2016. 440 pp. ISBN 9780643096318 paperback AU $140.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Plants of central Queensland: Identification and uses
           of native and introduced species [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Purdie, Rosemary
      Review(s) of: Plants of central Queensland: Identification and uses of native and introduced species, by Eric Anderson, CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne April 2016. 576 pp. ISBN 9781486302253 Hardback AU $160.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - ANPC member profile: Zoe Knapp
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Workshop report: Barham landcare plant ID workshop
    • Abstract: Dartnell, Christine
      On Thursday 28 April a plant identification workshop was held at the Barham Federation Botanic Reserve near the Murray River in south west NSW. Alan Mathers, President of Barham Landcare, welcomed everyone to the first workshop at the Reserve, gave a brief introduction to the invited guests which included Keith McDougall from cluBarham, Esther Kirby, Aboriginal Elder and Martin Driver from the ANPC and the presenter of the workshop, and then thanked all the Landcare group's sponsors. Keith McDougall then officially re-launched the Reserve and told of how his family lived close to the Reserve and how it was once used to grow Lucerne. The Welcome to Country was then carried out by Esther Kirby, Aboriginal Elder for the Barapa Barapa and Wemba Wemba tribes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Research roundup
    • Abstract: Cowley, Kirsten
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - News: Tweed - Byron native species planting guide -
           2016-2018
    • Abstract: Turnbull, John
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - How do you identify your plant'
    • Abstract: Murray, Louisa; Wiecek, Barbara; Cohen, Joel
      Identifying plants has often been a mystery to many and a dedication of a few. Historically, publications about the flora of a particular area or time period, also called "Flora" have been used to guide plant identification. Today, plant identification is supported by a combination of printed books, electronic resources, and social media. Here, we outline several useful tools for identifying plants in NSW and provide links to other Australian and international Floras and other tools for plant identification.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Australian tropical rainforest plants identification
           system
    • Abstract: Zich, Frank; Kerrigan, Raelee
      The Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants Identification System is a LUCID-based computer-aided identification tool for rainforest plants in northern Australia. It includes the vascular plants found in rainforest (including dry rainforest, or deciduous vine thicket) from Townsville to Cape York and west through the Northern Territory and Western Australia. The "RFK" as it is affectionately known by long-time users has been available online since late 2010. The RFK is a comprehensive, accessible and authoritative resource for identifying and learning about rainforest plants of northern Australia. For other Australian flora, including other biomes in northern Australia (e.g. savanna), resources for plant identification are dispersed in technical literature, inconsistent in format, taxonomy and geographic scope, and incomplete.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - FunKey or not so fun: Creating interactive keys to
           macrofungi
    • Abstract: May, Tom
      FunKey - Agarics is an interactive key to the genera of Australian agarics (mushrooms) using Lucid software. FunKey is available on USB (May et al. 2014) or as an app for smart phones and tablets (Figures 1, 2). Compilation of FunKey took around a decade, during which time I had the pleasure of collaborating with Kevin Thiele (one of the developers of the Lucid software) and dedicated research officers Simon Lewis and Chris Dunk, as well as assistance from many people who provided photographs or tested earlier versions of the key.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - An eFlora of Australasia: A collaborative and dynamic
           online platform for managing Floras
    • Abstract: Knapp, Zoe; Thiele, Kevin; Pirzl, Rebecca; Hope, Michael
      The Australian Biological Resources Study (ABRS) and the Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria (CHAH) have partnered with the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) to develop an Australasian eFlora platform (herein referred to as the eFlora platform). The eFlora platform project responds to an identified need among the botanical community for an effective and efficient platform for collaborative creation, editing, sharing, management and deployment of flora content.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - KeyBase - teaching old keys new tricks
    • Abstract: Thiele, Kevin; Klazenga, Niels
      Plant identification keys are important for a wide range of people with an interest in, or need for, identifying plants, from environmental consultants, ecologists, conservation practitioners and researchers to field naturalists and members of the public. While some casual users may be able to adequately identify many plants of interest using pictorial field guides, anyone who really needs to know the name of a plant will generally need to use a key.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - From the editors
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul; Knapp, Zoe
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Images worth a thousand ideas: Digitising the national
           seed bank collection
    • Abstract: Clinton, Brook; Guja, Lydia
      Why digitise a biological collection' Why are we preparing and sharing images of seeds'

      The Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research is creating a visual library of seeds. The image library will take the conservation collections of the National Seed Bank at the Australian National Botanic Gardens "out of the freezer" (where they are safely stored to extend their longevity) and make them available to the world. The seed collections are a valuable and carefully curated scientific resource, and therefore form the starting point for many avenues of further research. Creating a library of seed images serves to illustrate the considerable diversity of Australian native seeds. Such diversity is largely unexplored yet presents a multitude of opportunities for understanding the ecology of Australian plants, the careful use of seeds in landscape restoration, and even potential commercial exploitation of plant materials.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - Considerations for large-scale biodiversity
           reforestation plantings. Part 8: Project monitoring and evaluation
    • Abstract: Cole, Dan; Siepen, Greg
      This article is the final in a series discussing considerations needed in large-scale tree planting for biodiversity outcomes. Monitoring and evaluation is key to understanding the successful aspects of the project and areas that need to be addressed to assist the required restoration outcomes. In this issue we discuss monitoring including the biophysical indicators of forest establishment through to the social indicators such as community attitudes towards such projects. The social context of reforestation at this scale is a future management consideration that requires improved planning so that these projects successfully integrate within cultural landscapes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 1 - The Key to Tasmanian vascular plants
    • Abstract: Jordan, Greg
      The Key to Tasmanian Vascular Plants (http://www.utas.edu.au/dicotkey/) is an online tool for identifying native and naturalised Tasmanian plants. My central idea was to provide something useful for both professionals and amateur botanists. So, in building the key, I tried to make the steps in the key as simple as possible, to avoid technical language, to explain essential technical terms and, where possible, to use features that are present on the plant in any season and do not require a microscope. The key is backed up by many images of species and key characteristics. This simplicity comes at some cost of rigour, and involves subjective judgements - many features that are obvious to me are confusing for other people with different experience.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Vale Roger Good
    • Abstract: Worboys, Graeme L; Spate, Andy; Nicotra, Adrienne; Enders, Graeme; Whinam, Jennie; Johnston, Stuart
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - From the editor
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - ANPC corporate members
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Research roundup
    • Abstract: Cowley, Kirsten
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Workshop report: Rangelands paddock walk at
           Booroorban, South of Hay
    • Abstract: Ware, Sally; Driver, Martin
      Following the success of a Rangelands Paddock Walk held at Hay in early October last year after a productive wet winter, a second Walk was organised for the end of March at Booroorban, a location approximately 30 km south of Hay. This time the landscape showed the effects of a long hot and dry summer with a four-month gap since the last effective rain.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - A national treasure: Dawyck: its fungal heritage.
           Observation and conservation [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul
      Review(s) of: A national treasure: Dawyck: its fungal heritage. Observation and conservation, by Roy Watling, A.H. Stockwell, Ifracombe. 2015. 215 pp. ISBN 978 - 0 - 7223 - 4538.2 paperback 10.95 pounds.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - News: Australasian systematic botany society
           conference 2015 in Canberra
    • Abstract: Schmidt-Lebuhn, Alexander N
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - ANPC member profile
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - News from the Australian seedbank partnership: Hanging
           out with King Billy: Seed collecting in Tasmania's highlands
    • Abstract: Wood, James A; Rudman, Tim
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Towards a centre for intergrated adaption research in
           the Australian mountains
    • Abstract: Nicotra, Adrienne B; Borevitz, Justin; Dunlop, Michael; Hoffmann, Ary; Kirkpatrick, Jamie; Moles, Angela; Morgan, John; van Dijk, Albert; Good, Roger
      In July 2015 an Expression of Interest for an Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for High Mountain Adaptation (ARC CoE) was submitted by a consortium of more than 20 universities, industry bodies, GOs and NGOs. Together they made a diverse, multidisciplinary team that included senior scientists in the field, as well as outstanding emerging researchers, international collaborators and world leaders in the field with long-standing collaborators in Australian Mountain research. Roger Good was a key driver and architect of the bid and, in many ways, it represented a vision he held for many years that no doubt grew from his earliest efforts and experience with the New South Wales Soil Conservation Service.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - The impacts of increasing solar ultraviolet light on
           the wetland mires of the mainland Australian Alps
    • Abstract: Good, Roger; Wright, Genevieve; Hope, Geoff; Whinam, Jennie
      The wetland mires of the Australian Alps were listed in 2009 as a nationally threatened ecological community (Alpine Sphagnum Bogs and Associated Fens) under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. This was because the area of bogs and fens has declined dramatically over the past 150 years due to grazing by domestic stock, recreation activities, infrastructure development, increasing feral animal damage and exotic weed invasion.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Explaining feedbacks between fire and flammability in
           the Snowgums and beyond
    • Abstract: Zylstra, Philip
      Changing fire regimes are gaining recognition as one of the chief impacts of a changing climate on terrestrial biota, partially due to growing awareness that the feedbacks between fire and the flammability of a forest have the potential to amplify any other changes. If we are to effectively respond to this, it is essential that we learn to understand and quantify those feedbacks as they apply in each situation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Roger Good's role in developing restoration techniques
           in temperate highland peat swamp on sandstone in the Blue Mountains
    • Abstract: Grundy, Shane
      I was first introduced to Roger at a swamp rehabilitation workshop in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales in 2007. It was organised by the Blue Mountains City Council who were co-hosting a project called 'Save Our Swamps' (SOS).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Roger Good and the bogs and fens of the Australian
           Alps
    • Abstract: Whinam, Jennie; Wright, Genevieve
      Roger Good spent over 50 years working on the restoration of alpine ecosystems, particularly bogs and fens, with his ideas and techniques evolving over this time in response to on-ground results, changing objectives and allied research. We were fortunate to share Roger's passion for peaty things and to work with him for more than two decades.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Tribute from the Australian National Botanic Gardens
           to Roger Good
    • Abstract: Sonntag, Sabrina
      Roger Good was a highly regarded colleague, mentor and friend to many staff at the Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG). In particular, he was also a driving force behind the Gardens' alpine plant conservation and research activities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - Management of Herbivory in the Montane heath and
           thicket TEC of the eastern Stirling range, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Barrett, Sarah; Rathbone, Damien
      The Montane Heath and Thicket of the eastern Stirling Range, Western Australia, is an EPBC Act-listed threatened ecological community (TEC), ranked critically endangered due to the extent and severity of Phytophthora dieback (Barrett 2000). It contains a number of species endemic to the community as well as 11 Threatened flora species. Less than 14 % of the community retains a representation of the original suite of plant species that were once common and many dieback-susceptible species have become locally extinct (Keith et al. 2014). During the past 50 years, fire frequency has also increased and 74% of the ecosystem has experienced a nine-year fire interval as a result of extensive fires in 1991 and 2000 (Barrett and Yates 2014) Much of the TEC, including its threatened species, is comprised of obligate re-seeders with many very slow to mature in this montane environment. Fire, in conjunction with Phytophthora dieback (Moore et al. 2015), has led to severe population declines, particularly after the 2000 fire. Climate change also threatens these mountain-top species that have literally nowhere to migrate to in response to a warming climate.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - The benefits of restored linear vegetation corridors
           for biodiversity conservation - a case study
    • Abstract: Johnston, Stuart; Good, Roger
      Linear corridors of native vegetation are significant links between larger remnant areas of native vegetation, in terms of biodiversity conservation and movement of native fauna across the landscape. This is particularly important in regions where extensive decline or clearing of native woodlands for agriculture and other agricultural industries has occurred, e.g. the western slopes of New South Wales (NSW). Unfortunately in many regions the decline or loss of native vegetation linkages has contributed to larger remnant patches of native vegetation being 'islands' in a landscape of cleared agricultural lands. In these regions the restoration and re-establishment of the vegetation linkages can be readily achieved by replanting of trees and shrubs together with the natural regeneration of native species.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 24 Issue 4 - The unique and surprising environments of temperate
           highland peat swamps on sandstone (THPSS) in the Blue Mountains, NSW
    • Abstract: Mooney, Scott; Martin, Len
      The Blue Mountains region, around 80 km west of Sydney, conserves a variety of unique landscapes and ecological communities in a series of National Parks which are collectively listed as the Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. This World Heritage Area contains a relatively large number of mires which have been recognised as ecologically important, for example, Temperate Highland Peat Swamps on Sandstone (THPSS), is an Endangered Ecological Community listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act 1999) in May 2005 and a Vulnerable Ecological Community under the NSW Threatened Species Conservation (TSC) Act 1995. In the Sydney Basin Bioregion this protection under the TSC Act also extends to the Blue Mountains Swamps and Newnes Plateau Shrub Swamps both Endangered Ecological Communities, and these all share characteristics with Coastal Upland Swamps in the Sydney Basin Bioregion, an Endangered Ecological Community occurring at lower elevations, which was listed under the TSC Act 1999 in 2012.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - Report on APCC11 conference field trip to wilsons
           promontory national park
    • Abstract: Robertson, Geoff
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - Friends of the royal Tasmanian botanic gardens grant
           recipient report 2016 - attending the 11th Australasian plant conservation
           conference (APCC11)
    • Abstract: Perrins, Lorraine
      The Australasian Plant Conservation Conference (APCC) is a biennial conference organised by the Australian Network for Plant Conservation (ANPC). Regular readers of Fagus would remember that in 2014 the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens hosted the APCC10 and the Friends played a major role in providing logistical support and tours for the visiting delegates. I was involved in the organising committee and gained many insights into the management of a national conference, however due to my close involvement, was unable to attend many of the presentations or utilise the opportunity to network with the visiting delegates. The ongoing financial constraints in Government agencies mean that the opportunities for horticultural staff to attend conferences are extremely rare, which is why I was delighted to receive a Friends grant to attend the APCC11.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - New approaches to fighting native plant extinction
    • Abstract: Andrews, Gregory
      Last November, I was honoured to be the keynote speaker at the 11th Australasian Plant Conservation Conference in Melbourne. It was a wonderful opportunity to engage with some of Australia's leading botanists and conservationists and share ideas on preserving our incredible native plants. Protecting Australia's endangered plants and vegetation communities is one of my highest priorities. In my address, I spoke about the Australian Government's commitment and the innovative approaches being used to protect some of our most vulnerable flora species from extinction.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - Restore and Renew, a wealth of new information in
           support of ecological restoration practices
    • Abstract: Rossetto, Maurizio
      Evolutionary challenges in restoration.

      The Restore and Renew project at Sydney's Royal Botanic Gardens aims to equip restoration practitioners and land managers with easily accessible evolutionary, environmental and ecological information that has previously been missing from their tool kits. This ambitious project has the potential to save time and resources by increasing the chances that newly planted areas are genetically suitable and likely to flourish over time.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - Climate-ready revegetation. A guide for natural
           resource managers
    • Abstract: Hancock, Nola; Harris, Rebecca; Broadhurst, Linda; Hughes, Lesley
      Globally, 2016 was the hottest year on record, the third hottest year in a row (Steffan et al. 2017). At the current rate of emissions, the annual mean air temperature in Australia is projected to increase by 2.8 - 5.1 C (above the climate period of 1986-2005) by 2090 (CSIRO and Bureau of Meteorology 2015). Extreme weather events have already increased in frequency and in some cases, intensity, and this trend will continue e.g. extreme heat, bushfires, coral bleaching and storms (Steffan et al. 2017). These changes are already problematic for some species and populations, and planting lists for future revegetation activities need to consider the long-term sustainability of local plants. A new publication, Climateready revegetation. A guide for natural resource managers, provides step-by-step guidance on where to find and to how to use on-line tools to gauge if existing vegetation (species and local populations) are likely to be sustainable as the climate continues to change. A brief summary of the steps detailed in the Guide is provided below.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - Genetic rescue of the Plains Yam Daisy ('Microseris
           scapigera') on the Merri Creek
    • Abstract: Bainbridge, Brian
      A five-year (2011-2016) project aimed to secure the Plains Yam Daisy (Microseris scapigera) in the Merri Creek valley, north of Melbourne. Citizen scientists contributed to a monitoring program into the population, ecology and lifecycle of remnants that informed management and translocation trials.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - Managing imperfection in post-mined landscapes:
           Determining the best practicable ecosystem reference sites
    • Abstract: McCaffrey, Nic; Erskine, Peter; Doley, David
      Conventional and widespread approaches to the restoration and rehabilitation of mine sites consist of attempting to restore ecosystems to a non-degraded version of the ecosystem prior to mining. Reference or analogue sites of the target ecosystem are often used as a model or benchmark against which the progress of restoration and rehabilitation is monitored. This approach may be suitable for a handful of ecosystems and mine sites where there is a high likelihood of near-natural recovery. However, for many open cut mine sites and highly modified ecosystems, this kind of baseline has been likened to restoring the 'Garden of Eden': an unrealistic aspiration (Breed, Lowe and Mortimer 2016).

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - The devolved grant model: Achieving lasting
           conservation outcomes across Tasmania
    • Abstract: Stronach, Peter
      Landcare Tasmania delivered the Landcare Biodiversity Grants (LBG) from June 2012 to September 2015. All three key themes of the Fund were addressed through this program. 1800 hectares of high conservation vegetation was protected or enhanced, threats removed from 4100 hectares and 260 hectares of revegetation or natural regeneration established to buffer high conservation vegetation across Tasmania through 62 projects and 125 sites.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - Engineered co-existence of novel green roof habitat
           holds conservation promise
    • Abstract: Spencer, Pamela JA
      Conservation opportunity in a new landscape.

      The extensive anthropogenic green roof landscape provides an opportunity to mimic natural habitat in a city/urban setting and support species of conservation value. Comparatively, major limiting factors to on ground habitat restoration success, such as disease transmitting vectors, herbivores, and weed competition at establishment are greatly reduced in the engineered substrate of the green roof island habitat. Importantly, in addition to demonstrated value as a biodiversity provider, extensive green roof systems provide ecosystem services such as storm water mitigation, thermal buffering of buildings and cooling of the surrounding environment (Pickett et al., 2011). However, functional green roof ecosystem services and conservation potential are frequently negated, due to slow vegetation establishment and persistence of species rich cover (Van Mechelen et al., 2015). This suggests that green roof conservation provision necessitates identifying an establishment practice that optimises stable habitat development within the constructed shallow resource poor substrate and desiccating microclimate habitat.

      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - From the editor
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - News from the Australian seedbank partnership: ASBP
           partnership update
    • Abstract: Cochrane, Anne
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - ANPC member profile
    • Abstract: Tourenq, Christophe; Field, Tim
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - ANPC workshop reports
    • Abstract: Weatherly, Katrina
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - News
    • PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - Research roundup
    • Abstract: Cowley, Kirsten
      PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 4 - ANPC corporate members
    • PubDate: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:40:24 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Holding on to Tea-tree fingers: A critically
           endangered fungus
    • Abstract: May, Tom W; McMullan-Fisher, Sapphire JM
      Tea-tree fingers monitoring project: Tea-tree fingers (Hypocreopsis amplectens) is one of the few fungi listed under conservation legislation in Australia. It was formally listed under the Victorian Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act in 2004, while still undescribed. In recent years, Tea-tree fingers has been reported infrequently. In 2016, funding from the Threatened Species Protection Initiative - Community Volunteer Action Grants program of the Victorian Government enabled Fungimap to develop survey protocols for rare fungi and carry out surveys specifically for Tea-tree fingers.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - The threat of myrtle rust to the conservation of the
           endangered tree, Gossia gonoclada (Myrtaceae) in south east Queensland
    • Abstract: Taylor, Tamara; Morin, Louise; Pegg, Geoff; Zalucki, Jacinta
      Myrtle rust (Puccinia psidii) is a fungal plant pathogen that rapidly spread throughout vegetation along the east coast of Australia after its detection in 2010. This biotrophic fungus has an unusually large number of host species, with 346 taxa from 57 genera within the Myrtaceae family identified as being susceptible (Giblin and Carnegie, 2014). The disease caused by the fungus adversely affects the growth of new shoots and leaves and, in highly susceptible species, all the new season's foliage growth dies. In some species, recurrent infection of buds prevents flower and fruit development, which is likely to have long-term impacts on reproduction. Gossia gonoclada is an endangered species that is highly susceptible to myrtle rust. Data collected over the last three years indicate that the disease is affecting the health and reproductive capacity of the species.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - President's report
    • Abstract: Broadhurst, Linda
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Effect of fire and digestion by herbivores on seeds of
           the exotic invasive species Acacia nilotica in savanna at Baluran National
           Park Indonesia
    • Abstract: van Etten, Eddie
      Acacia nilotica is abundant in Africa but has been scantly studied in relation to savanna ecology. In Australia, a study by Radford et al. (2001), acknowledged that A. nilotica has negative impacts on savannas. A. nilotica can be threatening to savannas as its adult trees are apparently fire tolerant and can form thorny thickets. Acacia nilotica was introduced into Zizyphus rotundifolia savanna in Baluran National Park, East Java, Indonesia in the late 1960s, where its original purpose was to create fire breaks to prevent fire spreading from savanna to the adjacent teak forest. However, A. nilotica has spread rapidly and is threatening the existence of savanna in Baluran National Park, as it has been observed to change the ecosystem from open savanna to a closed canopy of A. nilotica in some areas (Figure 1) (Sutomo et al., 2016). There has been a lack of empirical studies on the cause and extent of the spread of A. nilotica in the Baluran savanna. We propose an hypotheses that fire and grazing by the introduced water buffalo (Buballus sp.) play an important role in the establishment of A. nilotica.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - New approaches to plant conservation challenges.
           Conservation for people and nature, benefiting both. Reflecting on FOG's
           experience, learning and vision
    • Abstract: Robertson, Geoff
      The central theme of the conference is 'New approaches to plant conservation' and the sub-theme I am addressing is how does conservation effort benefit both nature and people' While our past achievements are many, it is timely to reassess our approaches, refine our visions and strategies, and to move forward. I have been considering these questions for some time, as I have been attempting to complete a history of the first twenty years of Friends of Grasslands (FOG), reflecting on FOG's experience, learning and vision.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Parks and people: Promoting plant conservation
    • Abstract: Cochrane, Anne
      Are we really 'blind' to plants' [theconversation.com/ people-are-blind-to-plants-and-thats-bad-news-forconservation- 65240 and online in Conservation Biology
      DOI : 10.1111/cobi.12738]. This interesting piece by Balding and Williams from the School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences, University of Melbourne discusses how frequently plant conservation initiatives slip under the radar in favour of animal projects. But this is nothing new, we've known about this shortage of interest in plants for a long time. It goes hand-in-hand with a shortage of funds for plant conservation projects relative to that allocated for animal conservation. Why is this' Are animals inherently more interesting' Is it because they are more elusive' Is it because they are considered 'cute and cuddly' and we can relate to domestic pets and a sense of nurturing' Or is it because we don't try hard enough to promote the good work being done in plant conservation'

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Threatened species management on the rural-urban
           interface: Insight from a critically endangered shrub
    • Abstract: Patykowski, John; Dell, Matt; Gibson, Maria
      As urban development increases throughout rural areas around the world, habitat fragmentation and changes to disturbance regimes become ever-pressing issues for indigenous flora and fauna. Fragmentation impacts upon ecosystem processes; for example, it prevents gene flow, dispersal, and migration (particularly with climate change). It also can dramatically alter top-down or bottom-up ecological processes, promote competition from invasive species and alter fire behaviour. Fire is a major disturbance factor across the globe, and particularly for Australian vegetation. The expansion of urban development can lead to reduced fire frequency through fire exclusion and suppression around residential areas, or can increase the frequency of fire through fuel-reduction burns or unintended ignitions; both can have dramatic effects on the type of species able to persist in these areas. Further, travelling with the expanding urban boundaries are concomitant suites of native and introduced urbanophile species that threaten to compete with, and displace, locally indigenous taxa (McKinney, 2006).

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Fontainea dude thinks he's a lady - recovery of the
           Coastal Fontainea and investigation into temporal monoecy
    • Abstract: Brown, Dianne; James, Rhonda; McKinley, Annette
      The Coastal Fontainea (Fontainea oraria: Euphorbiaceae) is probably the rarest rainforest tree in New South Wales (NSW) with a population of only ten wild mature plants and 52 seedlings. It is a small tree restricted to littoral rainforest remnants on basaltic soils at Lennox Head in north-east NSW. The plants are dioecious (separate male and female plants), and it was originally thought that there was only one female mature tree remaining. Eight of the mature plants are on private property and two on land managed by Ballina Shire Council. A conservation translocation program has been underway since 2010, which has included a component of ecological monitoring of the wild and translocated specimens.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - News from the Australian seedbank partnership: A
           thankyou note to our volunteers from the South Australian seed
           conservation centre
    • Abstract: Guerin, JR; Duval, DJ
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - ANPC member profile
    • Abstract: Bickerton, Doug
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Wildlife conservation in farm landscapes [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul
      Review(s) of: Wildlife conservation in farm landscapes, by David Lindenmayer, Damian Michael, Mason Crane, Sachiko Okada, Daniel Florance, Philip Barton and Karen Ikin, CSIRO Publishing, Clayton South, 2016 232pp ISBN 978148303106 paperback $49.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - ANPC workshop reports
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - News
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - ANPC corporate members
    • PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - Research roundup
    • Abstract: Cowley, Kirsten
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 25 Issue 3 - From the editor
    • Abstract: Adam, Paul
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2017 14:51:58 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.196.2.131
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016