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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
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Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
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Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
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Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
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HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Journal Cover Australasian Journal of Human Security, The
  [3 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1176-8614
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Lautensach, Sabina W
      PubDate: Sat, 6 Oct 2012 14:13:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Lautensach, Sabina
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Apr 2012 09:31:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Lautensach, Sabina
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Lautensach, Sabina WB
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - Editorial [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Yang, Jian
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Lautensach, Sabina W
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 3 - HS News
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 3 - Ethnic Prejudice against Roma
    • Abstract: Petkovic, Toni
      This report provides one practical example of how it is possible to examine the conscious, as well as to provoke the more or less unconscious components of ethnic prejudices into explication. The desired potential outcome is a change in attitude. Small group workshops provided the setting for this research. In this work I examine the results of research initially constructed to investigate the practical usefulness of such workshops. Though it was initially developed for general purpose in war circumstances, the goal of the workshops was eventually changed to examine ethnic prejudices against the Roma population in Balkan countries.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 3 - Irresponsible Transfers of Small Arms and Humanitarian
           Norms: Principles of Humanity and Public Conscience Perspective
    • Abstract: Yihdego, Zeray W
      The excessive availability of small arms and light weapons (SALW) including their unregulated transfer into areas of conflict has been a major threat to humanitarian norms. While those norms have largely remained in the background, the consequences of the arms transfer are obvious to everyone. This article explores the principles of humanity and public conscience also known as 'The Martens Clause' and its potential application to highlight irresponsibility in arms transfer. The Clause simply means that in the absence of express international treaties on the means and methods of warfare (including the manner in which weaponry is used), the principles of humanity and the dictates of public conscience apply. Getting an ethic to function in place of a formal treaty is problematic. The first part of this article introduces the problem in general, with emphasis on the link between small arms proliferation and violations of humanitarian norms. The second part examines the implicit features of the Clause and the controversies behind it. It also examines the reaction of the international community to this pressing challenge, including the position of civil societies. The third and final part of the article identifies the main findings, and it concludes with some recommendations. It is proposed that, despite the absence of an international convention on arms transfers, a normative restriction on such transactions may well be derived from the principles of humanity and universal values of humankind. This argument does not necessarily deny the critical role of states' consent in the formulating of international humanitarian law.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 3 - HIV/AIDS and Its Implications - a Global Long-wave
           Threat That Medicine Alone Cannot Cure
    • Abstract: Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Liljestrand, Jerker; Barnett, Tony
      During the last twenty-five years we have learned how the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS, how it spreads and how it does not. We have also watched as AIDS has destroyed whole populations, and observed which responses appear most efficacious. One of the most alarming characteristics of HIV is that it typically strikes healthy young people. Yet most of the people who have HIV still do not know it. Efforts to confront the epidemic are further stymied by contentious differences about how best do so, compounded by a persistent stigmatisation of and discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS. There are some 4.1 million new cases every year, and though the recent rapid expansion of antiretroviral treatment will prolong the lives of millions, there is no immediate prospect of a vaccine or cure. Thus, though still at an early stage, the pandemic is often described as 'a long-wave event', with ramifications that will persist for decades. In this article, we review the relationship between HIV/AIDS and development, social stability and security. After considering the societal implications of HIV/AIDS control - with special attention to gender issues, human rights and the involvement of civil society - we conclude by discussing both Europe's responsibility and role as well as HIV/AIDS as a long-wave event, drawing some parallels with global climate change. It is of the greatest importance that we do not fall into the trap of ascribing to such long-wave events short-term significance - such as in the case of HIV/AIDS and security. This would be inappropriate because it links to contemporary moral and political panics when the real concerns have to do with much longer-term problems of common human well-being and security.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 3 - Expanding Human Security
    • Abstract: Lautensach, Alexander K
      Efforts to achieve peace and security in the world's crisis areas have generally met with limited success at best. I propose that part of this failure derives not so much from technical or logistic problems but from conceptual inadequacies in our understanding of human security and its determinants. They lead to, for example, an excessive focus on 'freedom from needs' and 'freedom from wants'. I review the ontogeny of human security as a concept, beginning with the traditional interpretation of security as state security. Two conceptual problems with current models of human security are identified. Addressing them leads to a more constructive, expanded approach for analysing and ensuring human security, one that combines the advantages of being more scientific and more comprehensive. This expanded concept, which we call the 'Four Pillar Model', promises to help improve future chances of successful mitigation of insecurity and violent conflict.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - Instructions for Authors
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - HS News
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - A Human Security Doctrine for Europe: Project,
           Principles, Practicalities [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Yang, Jian
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - Deliberative Environmental Politics: Democracy and
           Ecological Rationality [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hayward, Bronwyn
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - Small Steps or Giant Leaps': Defining
           Reconciliation in the Transition from Conflict in Northern Ireland
    • Abstract: Potter, Michael
      The context of Northern Ireland in the transition of conflict has produced a range of efforts to bring about reconciliation. However, definitions and understandings of the nature of reconciliation differ. This paper draws together how reconciliation has been defined in theory in Northern Ireland and elsewhere, examines some models of practice in the light of that theory and illustrates the process of reconciliation through general initiatives in Northern Ireland and specific projects seeking to reconcile at community level. It is concluded that, while political and public processes can set a context and space for engagement to take place, reconciliation is fundamentally about personal encounter and relationship, which have to take place in a range of settings and at all levels of a society that has experienced conflict.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - Food Security and the Millennium Development Goals:
           Toward a Strategy to Realise a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa
    • Abstract: Otsuka, Keijiro
      Since the adoption of the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, the right to adequate food has been formally recognised as a basic human right. Its importance has been reaffirmed and further enhanced in recent years. In particular, the UN adopted the Millennium Declaration in September 2000 in order to provide a decent livelihood to millions of poor people and to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger around the world. While the population still continues to grow rapidly in Sub-Saharan Africa, the food production per capita has declined. Undoubtedly if the current trend continues, food insecurity will continue to increase and chronic hunger is likely to arise in the near future. In order to achieve food security in Sub-Saharan Africa, it is essential for the region to realise a green revolution of its own. Yet to my knowledge, no effective strategy to realise a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa has ever been developed. The objective of this paper is to explore the possibility of a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan agriculture based on a review of the Asian Green Revolution and own case studies of emerging new farming systems in East Africa. Doubling of crop yield per hectare, which has been realised in Asia, seems potentially possible in Sub-Saharan Africa. If this is achieved, food insecurity can be reduced to a significant extent for the years to come.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - Timor-Leste's Military Combats HIV/AIDS
    • Abstract: Leroux, Elise
      In February of 2006, thirty senior leaders of the Timorese Defense Force, the Falintil-For a de Defesa de Timor-Leste (F-FDTL), came together at the Baucau, Timor-Leste1 military training facility to plan the military's program for the prevention, mitigation, and control of HIV/AIDS in the F-FDTL. Timor-Leste, one of the world's newest nations, despite its current political unrest, is in an enviable position in the arena of HIV/AIDS, having a low prevalence rate of HIV (FHI 2004). To keep prevalence low, the government has been taking steps toward prevention and mitigation of HIV/AIDS. The F-FDTL is at the forefront of these activities. For more than a year, the F-FDTL has been implementing a prevention program that includes peer leader training and condom distribution. Information, education, and communication materials have been developed in two local languages, Tetun and Bahasa Indonesia. These programs have been managed by the local office of the non-governmental organization (NGO) Family Health International (FHI), with funding from the US Agency for International Development (USAID). The programs are implemented by a local NGO, Fundasaun Timor Harii (FTH). In the global health realm, HIV/AIDS remains a significant peril, even though avian flu is currently leading public health news reports throughout the world. With the rising threat of avian flu, along with other reasons mentioned below, continued efforts to combat HIV/AIDS are more important than ever. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 'people with HIV/AIDS are considered at increased risk from serious influenza-related complications' (CDC 2006). It can be argued further that countries with high HIV/AIDS prevalence would suffer an increased risk from other epidemics, such as a virulent avian influenza. There are other reasons to continue efforts to combat HIV/AIDS. One, of course, is human security - the health and security of the individual. Another reason is national security. This involves keeping military and police forces healthy, because illness within the uniformed services compromises the readiness of the forces and thus their ability to defend the country.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 2 - Building the Afghanistan National Army's Defense Health
           Sector: A Lesson in 'Little Victories' One Day at a Time
    • Abstract: Betancourt, Jose A; Hong, Rathavuth
      The people of Afghanistan who have withstood over twenty-three years of conflict have suffered in many ways, including the lack of an essential and effective health system. This has resulted in one of the worst health situations in the world. The fledgling government of Afghanistan is attempting to establish a stable country where democracy can promote peace, stability and security for its people. The Afghanistan National Army's Defense Health Sector plays a critical role related to those aims that underscores the significant need for collaborative efforts between the Afghan Government, the United States, the United Nations, various non-governmental organisations and the broad international community. The United States (US) Army Medical Department's doctrine of providing Combat Health Support utilises the tenets of science-based health care to deliver: (1) lifesaving services to the soldier and the beneficiary population, (2) restorative treatment, (3) medical evacuation when appropriate, (4) logistics to support all delivery services and services planning, and (5) preventive medicine to preclude illness and injury and effective patient administration services to facilitate positive outcomes. It is within this framework that US military medical professionals have worked jointly with the Afghan Military Medical System to build an effective, efficient and sustainable military medical healthcare system for the Army and a growing beneficiary population which may eventually exceed one million family members and government officials. In this paper we describe the current roles of various civil and military agencies in support of the Afghanistan military medical system and highlight new and ongoing initiatives in logistics, laboratory services, evacuation and preventive health.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 1 - Instructions for Authors
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 1 - HS News
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 1 - Fear and Loathing in Yala: Investigating Conflict and
           Security in Southern Thailand
    • Abstract: Petersen, Christopher
      The concept of human security gained recognition in policy and institutional circles following the Cold War. State leaders are beginning to acknowledge that human needs affect state security in ways that armed force has never been able to. Thailand's Prime Minister, Thaksin Shinawatra, is one such leader. While most of the country's citizens enjoy peace, economic opportunity, and democratic representation, the Muslim minority in the southern provinces are victims of violence, poverty, and discrimination. In this region, illicit businesses, police and army corruption, criminal gangs, separatist organisations, radical Islamic fundamentalists, and regional terror groups' operate with impunity along the porous border with Malaysia. These groups terrorize local citizens and engage in internecine warfare. As a result, Muslim and Buddhist citizens live in a state of fear. If the security climate worsens, the region could become a foothold for international terrorist groups like Jemaah Islamiya and Al-Qaeda.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 1 - Globalisation, Economic Injustice, and Health
    • Abstract: Mulrooney, Lynn Anne; Neubauer, Deane
      Almost a 50-year disparity exists between Japan with the highest life expectancy at birth of 82 years, and Swaziland, the country with the lowest life expectancy at birth, of 32.5 years. Declining life expectancies in sub-Saharan Africa and negative health consequences result from a range of social processes, including economic injustice, created and exacerbated by the dynamics of contemporary globalisation. This paper denaturalises the argument that poverty is an immutable condition of humanity by arguing that economic injustice is a predictable outcome of neoliberalism. As globalisation's ideology, neoliberalism as evinced by Reagonomics and the Thatcher Revolution, has promoted trade liberalization, privatization, deregulation, and devolution of the Welfare State while sidestepping the increasing disparities in wealth throughout the globe.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 1 - Depleted Uranium Munitions: Legal Analysis of a Threat
           to Human Security
    • Abstract: Morton, Jeffrey S
      The legality of depleted uranium (DU) munitions, used in tank-killing projectiles and protective armour, has been hotly debated for more than a decade. Exposure to DU by peacekeepers in the Balkans reignited accusations that the use of DU creates health and environmental harm inconsistent with prevailing laws of armed conflict. At present, there is no international treaty that specifically prohibits or regulates the use of DU munitions. Scientific studies undertaken to determine the health and environmental threats posed by DU have provided both advocates and critics of DU munitions with ample reason to remain steadfast in their positions. This paper examines the debate revolving around DU munitions from the perspective of international humanitarian law. The aim of this paper is to provide a basis for the regulation of DU that neither bans nor endorses the materials use in arsenals. The proposed treaty principles would, however, provide greater protections for unintended victims of DU exposure and would establish a basis from which to continue the discussion of the legal status of DU munitions.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 2 Issue 1 - Reflections on Islam and Pacifism
    • Abstract: Brown, Malcolm
      This paper contends that the discourses that assume or assert that Islam and pacifism are incompatible are mistaken. They are premised on a homogenising discourse of Islam and of pacifism, inattention to Islam as an extant (rather than abstract) phenomenon, logical inconsistencies, and a limited Quranic hermeneutic. In contrast, I argue that Islam and pacifism are compatible, because pacifism has different meanings, because of de facto pacifism in Islam, because the logic of Islam, in certain cases, points towards pacifism, because pacifism can be discerned in the Quran and Hadith, because there is a concept of the secular within Islam that allows for pacifism, and because it is the image of Muslim violence that is primarily responsible for the belief that Islam and pacifism are incompatible.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - Instructions for Authors
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - HS News
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - Managing and Settling Ethnic Conflicts [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Headley, Jim
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Lautensach, Alexander K
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - Letter to the Editor: A New Policy Approach to Human
           Security
    • Abstract: Haija, Rammy M
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - Care and Capabilities: Enriching the Human Capital
           Concept
    • Abstract: Kesting, Stefan
      In its first part, this paper provides an extensive foundational critique of the neoclassical approach to investment into human capital and well-being. Such an approach is not sufficient to implant a sense of human security into young people while they are growing up to become autonomous, confident and civilized members of their society. Providing a sense of human security for future generations is crucial for a peaceful, prosperous and ecologically sustainable development of our democratic societies. Hence, in the second part, the paper attempts to develop an alternative framework of human skills and competencies based on ideas of Amartya Sen, Martha Nussbaum, Nancy Folbre and John Davis. This alternative framework combines the concepts of capabilities, care and structures of constraint and offers a wider value base for human security in a social and economic sense. Contrary to the neoclassical approach which is founded on methodological individualism, this alternative socio-economic approach is based on socially embedded individuals.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - The UN's New Approach to Postconflict
           Governance-implications for Accountability
    • Abstract: Lineham, Rebecca
      Since the mid-1990s the international community has demonstrated its growing willingness to hand responsibility for governing post-conflict territories to the United Nations in the form of interim international administrations. Far from being models of democracy and accountability, the hallmarks of the international administration are more likely to be absolute power and immunity. The dangers of not being a showcase of democratic accountability for an international administration are two-fold. Firstly it undermines the principle of democracy which the administration seeks to instill respect for and understanding of the territory. And secondly, it can make governance practically complicated. An approach of 'earned sovereignty' appears to be a good way of managing interim administrations and enhancing democratic accountability and local legitimacy for the interim administration - with the interim administration progressively ceding power to local political institutions, instead of retaining the full immunity that they arrive with. This becomes particularly significant in the area of rule of law and the immunity from prosecution that most civilian peacekeepers have. These issues are explored using examples from the UN Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) and the UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) as two of the international administrations with the most extensive powers.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 3 - 'The Society of States under Siege'': An English
           School Perspective on the Emergence of Global Civil Society
    • Abstract: Taylor, Monique
      In this article I critically examine the theoretical and empirical relationship between world society, whereby global civil society is taken to be its physical or empirical counterpart, and the society of states. This relationship is typically portrayed as contradictory or confrontational, and I contend that this mainstream perspective is reliant on a superficial analysis of the relationship. If one examines the deeper dynamics, viewed in their contemporary international normative context, then one can identify the more constructive and permissive aspects of the relationship. Rather than being wholly incompatible I argue that world society and international society are mutually constitutive and mutually dependent regimes, whose relationship is more often marked by cooperation than by conflict. English School theory provides the conceptual framework for this analysis. The relationship between international and world society presents a core ontological tension within this theory, and again they tend to occupy polarised positions. A synthesis of four international theories - pluralist international society theory, solidarist international society theory, critical international theory, and the discourse of global civil society - informs the hypothesis that the relationship can be normatively and empirically reconciled. In order to empirically support this explanation I analyse two phenomena in world politics - transnational advocacy networks and humanitarian intervention - where there is an apparent tension between international and world society.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - Instructions for Authors
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - HS News
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - China, Arms Control, and Nonproliferation [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Chan, Gerald
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - Ritual and Symbol in Peacebuilding [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Brown, Malcolm D
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - Searching for Human Security in 'Disturbed' Areas:
           Women as Agents for Change in Manipur, India
    • Abstract: McDuie-Ra, Duncan
      This paper takes issue with normative theories of civil society and operational aspects of human security and seeks to contribute to a more empirical understanding of the potential of civil society to act as an emancipatory agent. In Northeast India, decades of insurgency and counter-insurgency have left civil society fragmented and partisan, severely undermining the prospects of human security for the people of the region. Using the state of Manipur as an example, this paper examines the role of women in challenging this status quo and argues that in a largely ineffective civil society the actions of a small group of women has redefined civil society and the distinctions between the public and the private. This has brought the issue of insecurity caused by insurgency and counter-insurgency operations in the state into the wider discourse over the future of the Indian Armed Forces in the Northeast region and reclaimed a space for other civil society organisations to voice their protest.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - Economy and Epidemic: Microfinance and HIV/AIDS in Asia
    • Abstract: Mathison, Stuart
      Proponents of microfinance often state that its primary purpose is to provide investment capital for microenterprise development so that clients can grow their income and assets. A complementary microfinance strategy is to assist clients to protect their income and assets from the impact of crisis events such as AIDS, natural disasters or conflict. Financial risk management is, or at least should be, a key goal and activity of Microfinance Institutions (MFIs). Asia faces a serious AIDS epidemic and the people most at risk - the poor in general, and poor women in particular - are also target groups for microfinance initiatives. MFIs in Asia cannot ignore the reality of HIV/AIDS, given the impact it does and will continue to have on their clients. This paper describes ways that MFIs in Asia can assist their clients to cope with the impact of HIV/AIDS. For MFIs in Asia, there is a window of opportunity to prepare policies, products and services now that will enable client households that are impacted by HIV/AIDS to fare better, especially in financial terms, than they otherwise might. This paper enunciates policy recommendations to help MFIs embrace the reality of HIV/AIDS in meaningful and effective ways, support the prevention of HIV/AIDS, and mitigate the economic impact of HIV/AIDS on affected households.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - War on Terror or Pretext for Power': Putin,
           Chechnya, and the 'Terrorist International'
    • Abstract: Headley, Jim
      For some time before the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, Russian diplomats had been warning of the development of links between terrorist groups across an 'arc of instability' spreading from South-East Asia to the Balkans. They argued that the situation in Chechnya should be understood in this context since it had become a hotbed of religious extremism with support from external terrorist groups. Russian discourse on 'international terrorism' was at the same time a defence of Russian actions in Chechnya, and a call for concerted action against a common threat. After September 2001, Western governments - in particular the Bush administration began to respond. This article examines how Russian policy makers have used the notion of 'international terrorism' to justify their policy in Chechnya and wider foreign policy. It considers the validity of Russian claims to be fighting international terrorism in Chechnya and examines the role that the Chechen conflict and counter-terrorism have played in Putin's rise to power and subsequent consolidation of power. Finally, it highlights the dangers that lie behind the rhetoric of a global 'war on terror'. Putin has attempted to position Russia on the front-line of the 'war on terror', defending Western/European 'civilisation' against the 'threat from the south'; but does Russian policy over Chechnya really match developing European norms of coping with ethnic diversity'

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 2 - Globalisation and Human Security
    • Abstract: Fischer, Dietrich
      Globalisation has greatly increased the flow of people, ideas, goods and capital across borders. This can either lead to a growing concentration of wealth and power in fewer and fewer hands, through a series of vicious cycles, undermining human security for all; or it can lead to a decentralisation of power and an overall improvement of human security. This article considers four forms of power - military, economic, cultural and political and mechanisms which lead to greater concentration or greater decentralisation of these forms of power. It examines who has the capacity and motivation to help democratise power and thus advance human security.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - Instructions for Authors
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - HS News
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - The Declining World Order: America's Imperial
           Geopolitics [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hoadley, Stephen
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - Comparative Education, Terrorism and Human Security:
           From Critical Theory to Peacebuilding' [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lautensach, Alexander K
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - Environmental Politics with Chinese Characteristics
    • Abstract: Yang, Jian
      This paper examines the political dimension, national and international, of China's environmental policy. While it attempts to highlight the Chinese characteristics, these characteristics are not necessarily unique to China. The paper first looks into Beijing's efforts to use traditional Chinese culture to legitimise its environmental protection policy and to mobilise the nation. It then examines China's environmental nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), followed by a discussion of the environment issue in China's economy-politics nexus. The final section investigates China's environmental diplomacy.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - Violence Begets Violence: How Ordinary Civilians Become
           Drawn into the Cycle of Military Intervention and Violent Resistance
    • Abstract: Burgess, Mark; Ferguson, Neil; Hollywood, Ian
      Social scientists have speculated about the most effective ways for governments to react to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on 11 September 2001. Many of these speculations have addressed the danger of responding in a manner that would increase the likelihood of future attacks against America and its allies. Drawing upon data from interviews with people centrally involved in the intergroup conflict in Northern Ireland, we provide analyses of how intergroup dynamics affect individual support for violence and also suggest that violent military intervention is not likely to reduce future terrorist attacks. To the contrary, such intervention will likely fuel violent intergroup conflict and bolster the membership of terrorist groups. This research note is based on analyses of an ongoing study involving a series of detailed semi-structured interviews with representatives from all aspects of the ethnic and political spectrum of Northern Ireland. Our participants include members of paramilitary groups, civil rights demonstrators, the security forces, politicians, community workers, church leaders and victims of violence.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - The Ethical Dilemmas of Humanitarian Intervention
    • Abstract: Janzekovic, John
      The international community has not demonstrated any coherent logic or moral consistency regarding why direct humanitarian intervention is warranted in some cases and not in others. The moral acceptability of using force to try to resolve international conflicts is problematic. If a civil and caring society professes concern about human rights then it is difficult to argue that some sort of obligation does not exist to do something effective to address clear and repeated gross abuses of human rights. Realists question the basic premise that morality has anything to do with military engagement in the first place and many pacifists object to the use of military force on the assumption that physical force creates more problems than it tries to solve, and that it is morally wrong anyway to use directed force. Just-war theorists and utilitarians support a view somewhere in the middle. That is, sometimes it is morally appropriate to use force, particularly in response to threat, but at other times it is not appropriate where the anticipated solution or outcome would cause more harm than good. The ethical dilemmas of whether or not to use force to counter severe humanitarian abuses are, to a significant extent, contingent on the levels of outrage felt by the international community. This sense of international outrage is usually very selectively applied to specific humanitarian circumstances. It is also generally short lived and it relies more on an observer's immediate feelings of revulsion or shock regarding a particular act. This is not an objective appraisal of the seriousness of the situation.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Issue 1 - Caring for Former Child Combatants: Evidence-based
           Practices for Reintegration
    • Abstract: Ditzler, Thomas F; Hubner, Mark; Batzer, Wayne Bemis
      In armed conflict around the globe, children bear a disproportionate amount of suffering. In nearly 50 nations, children are routinely killed, tortured, sexually assaulted, and displaced as part of the tragic legacy of conflict. In the last ten years of the twentieth century, the toll on children is mind numbing: 2 million killed, 6 million disabled, 12 million homeless, 1 million orphaned, at least 10 million psychologically traumatised. There are currently at least 20 million children who have become displaced within or outside their home countries. Each month, approximately 800 children are killed or maimed by land mines (UNICEF 2004). The conflicts that have precipitated these tragedies are usually not the international geopolitical conflicts of the past, waged with professionally trained soldiers across national borders. They are internal conflicts, fought with informal militias, private warlord armies or simply roving bands of armed aggressors operating in anarchic environments with no meaningful accountability or leadership. Estimates put the proportion of civilian casualties in these ongoing conflicts at up to 90 per cent, many of whom are women and children (McManimon 1999).

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2010 09:06:14 GMT
       
 
 
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