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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
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Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
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Journal Cover Australasian Drama Studies
  [SJR: 0.101]   [H-I: 2]   [0 followers]  Follow
    
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   ISSN (Print) 0810-4123
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Issue 70 - Japanese Robot culture: Performance, imagination and modernity
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: O'Donnell, David
      Review(s) of: Japanese Robot culture: Performance, imagination and modernity, by Yuji Sone, New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Best playwriting book ever; Shift: Three plays [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Warrington, Lisa
      Review(s) of: Best playwriting book ever, by Roger Hall, Wellington: Playmarket, 2016; and Shift: Three plays, by Alison Quigan, Vivienne Plumb and Lynda Chanwai-Earle, by David O'Donnell (ed.), Wellington: Playmarket, 2016.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Dramaturgy of mobility: Towards crossover and fusion in out of
           the ordinary
    • Abstract: Ivanova, Maggie; Vickery-Howe, Alex
      This article examines the implications that the new cultural competencies and literacies associated with participatory and popular cultures might hold for dramaturgy in terms of characterisation, creating a sense of space-time, and the artist's role in society.Our analysis focuses on Alex Vickery-Howe's new Australian play Out of the Ordinary (2016), situating it in the context of his earlier explorations of alternative dramaturgies, Once Upon a Midnight (2008) and Molly's Shoes (2011).Drawing structurally on the ways crossover and fusion have developed new cultural expression and reached new audiences in music and film, we investigate the creative potential that comics, manga, anime and related fan cultures might hold for dramaturgy.Our goal is to explore the thinking that underlies crossover and fusion as artistic practices requiring a kind of creative bilingualism - in our case, a mastery of the cultural competencies and literacies associated with cross- and multi-modal creative expression.We suggest that such creative bilingualism has been a continuing element in culture since the rise of melodrama, reminding us that expressive turns towards mystery, magic, intense spiritual experiences, etc.could, in fact, underscore social engagement.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - 'Mad March' in the festival city: Place-making and cultural
           clash at Adelaide's festivals
    • Abstract: Thomasson, Sarah
      Each year, Adelaide hosts a range of diverse sporting and cultural events - headlined by the Adelaide Festival, Adelaide Fringe, and WOMADelaide - in 'Mad March'.When the 2012 open-air opening night concert of the Adelaide Festival by Ennio Morricone was disrupted by the nearby Clipsal 500 V8 Supercar Race, this concentration of events led to an unprecedented contest over Adelaide's urban space.This clash between cultural and sporting fans was indicative of what geographer Don Mitchell calls a 'culture war' that exposes a conflict within the place-making narratives of Adelaide as the capital of the 'Festival State'.In this article, I read the events, debates and discourses surrounding Adelaide's festivals in 2012 for how local cultural identities and priorities were staged, contested and renegotiated within the public sphere.I argue - drawing on theoretical concepts borrowed from cultural geography - that the cultural clash between V8s and violins was a competition between two groups exercising what David Harvey terms their 'right to the city' and 'power over the processes of urbanization' through their choice of leisure activity.This controversy calls into question South Australia's ongoing status as the nation's premier Festival State and provides a case study through which to examine the role of ubiquitous arts festivals in place promotion and their impact on local culture.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Audience as performer: The changing role of theatre audiences
           in the Twenty-First century [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Casey, Maryrose
      Review(s) of: Audience as performer: The changing role of theatre audiences in the Twenty-First century, by Caroline Heim, London and New York: Routledge, 2016.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - 'A rare opportunity to fail': STAB's legacy of theatrical
           experimentation
    • Abstract: Willis, Emma
      In 2016, Wellington's BATS Theatre's annual STAB commission, given for cutting-edge performance projects, celebrated its twenty-first birthday.The successful and long-lived commission has funded works that push the boundaries of performance practice for almost as long as national arts funding body Creative New Zealand has existed.The commission functions as a hothouse for the creative and professional development of emerging practitioners, as well as serving as a vehicle for audience development.In this way, STAB has made a significant impact on the creative ecology of the Wellington theatre sector.This article gives a brief history of the commission and its contribution to the development of local contemporary theatre practices.It surveys the aesthetic innovations emerging from the commissioned projects, paying particular attention to the key role that STAB has had in developing devising and design practices.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Performing emotion to remember a Pakeha worldview
    • Abstract: Smith, Adriann
      The theatrical depiction of emotion can be a powerful vehicle for the representation of cultural identity.Examining the theatrical use of emotion in Gary Henderson's play Home Land and Stuart Hoar and Chris Blake's opera Bitter Calm, this article considers how performed emotions may represent Pākehā cultural identity on the stage.

      The cultural memories underlying theatrical emotions empower them to challenge ideas, and this article considers how the theatrical use of emotion represents memories of, and ideas about, Pākehā cultural identity.As a form of cultural language, a performance, as Bert O.States observes, 'offers an aesthetic completion to a process we know to be endless ... The play imitates the timely in order to move it from time, to give time a shape.'

      Within this shape, the remembered and reconfigured past is emotionally represented, at multiple performances, to an ever-changing present.This representation to an audience allows for an ongoing examination of personal and cultural identity in which emotional representation performs a key role.For, as Peta Tait notes, '[i]f emotions are socially meaningful only as natural, this locates them as opposite to culture and camouflages their immense social power'.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Hyperrealism and the everyday: The plays of Ranters Theatre
    • Abstract: Cortese, Raimondo
      This article reflects on the performance texts that I have written and dramaturged with Ranters Theatre over a twenty-two-year period, covering three phases of work, each of which engages everydayness as part of its methodology.A key focus is textual dramaturgy, how the text is constructed, critiqued and dramaturged in order to create a finished performance text or play.Comparison is drawn with other contemporary theatre practitioners in Melbourne and overseas who also engage the everyday as a central component of their raison d' tre.

      The application of everyday aesthetics within narrative and dramaturgical structures provides the performers with a platform to focus on the moment-to-moment minutiae of actions that take place between them.

      In the theatre of the everyday that I describe, the audience is invited into the same conceptual space and time as the performers, one that sits in the blurred lines between the fictive and the real.The narrative frame is partly supplied and defined by the audience in a way that elicits and intensifies a need for the performance of the text to take place.

      This article explores the ways in which everyday theatre and dialogue/ situation reveal hidden agendas and subtextual content that would otherwise not present itself and would remain invisible within the everyday field itself.This same content, recontextualised and manipulated, while suggesting and inspiring new texts and actions, now offers itself as a 'reading' with the potential for profound implications for the viewer.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Black, White, and Red faces: Race and performance at NIDA
    • Abstract: Hay, Christopher
      On 12 May 1960, writes John Clark, 'Robert Quentin's remarkable production of Marc Connelly's The Green Pastures put NIDA on the theatrical map'.It was, indeed, NIDA's first public performance - the commonly cited Our Town was performed in-house in 1959, and the well-regarded repertory season of Hay Fever and Love's Labour's Lost made up the first graduation shows in October 1960.Despite the importance that Clark ascribes to it in his 2003 history of NIDA (quoted above), The Green Pastures is conspicuously absent from almost all institutional histories, and even for Clark it merits only this one sentence.

      Deep South.NIDA, not at the time noted for the ethnic diversity of its students or staff, presented the play in full blackface.A contemporary issue of PIX Magazine reports that 'all the students had to put on dark brown grease paint so often that many developed a "tan" lasting for weeks.But most of them enjoyed this ordeal to learn their art'.Although this was industry practice at the time, the fraught history of blackface performance is one reason that this show has dropped out of the narrative.

      This article will argue that understanding the racial blindness on which the institution is built has implications for contemporary practice there.In particular, I will draw on a recent student production of The Importance of Being Earnest, in which a group of students of colour began their performance in full whiteface make-up.The students used this performance to critique the assumptions of racial neutrality that underpin their training, and to instead propose embracing their difference as a source of dramatic power.

      As well as returning a historical performance to the chronology of NIDA's early work, this article contributes important insight to the perceived neutrality of actor training.If conservatoire-style training is to endure in the twenty-first century, I argue that it must take seriously the specific cultural context of its students, as well as the historical context in which the institution operates.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - 'Chaos' and 'Convergence' on the Western Australian goldfields:
           The politics of performance in the 1890s
    • Abstract: Dunstone, William; Grehan, Helena
      This article adapts Doreen Massey's concept of space as a simultaneity and multiplicity of social relationships 'stretched out' over time, as a lens through which to consider the rapid emergence of a regional theatre sector during the 1890s mining boom on Western Australia's 'default frontier' Eastern Goldfields.In effect, we argue that while the locational surface of Eastern Goldfields theatre production was intensely local in its geographic and cultural specificities, it was also inalienably and reflexively affiliated with metropolitan centres of theatre production and consumption elsewhere in colonial Australia and the wider Anglosphere.We analyse the historical record of turn-of-the-twentieth-century Eastern Goldfields theatre performances to instantiate elements of 'chaos', by which Massey means 'happenstance juxtapositions' of cause and effect in theatre production within and beyond the region.At the same time, we argue that 'chaos' others itself as 'convergence', as local interests sought to consolidate regional control of the 'spatial ordering' of Goldfields theatre production and consumption.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Editorial note
    • Abstract: Meyrick, Julian; Rogers, Meredith
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - 'The elasticity of her spirits': Actresses and resilience on
           the Nineteenth-century colonial stage
    • Abstract: Woollard, Jane
      Eliza Winstanley (1818-82) and Maria Taylor (1805'-41) were English-born actors who were among the early leading performers in Barnett Levey's acting company at his Theatre Royal in George Street, Sydney.Taylor's parents were 'singing actors' who, in the first years of the nineteenth century, performed at London's Haymarket and Covent Garden theatres, and were regularly engaged for the summer seasons in provincial theatres.Winstanley also came from a theatrical family - her father was a scenic painter and her younger sister Ann was a performer.This article describes how Maria Taylor and Eliza Winstanley brought their theatrical skills and resilience to the task of building a theatrical culture in Australia.Both women faced many challenges in their personal and professional lives, but both possessed the capacity to bounce back, continuing to practise and refine their craft in difficult circumstances.

      Winstanley observed and worked with many performers over the course of her thirty-year acting career in Australia, England and America.In the preface to her first book, Shifting Scenes in Theatrical Life (1859), Winstanley writes that her narrative is 'founded on facts, gathered in the course of an extensive professional career'.Winstanley adds that her characters 'are also equally real, but sufficiently disguised in their portraiture ... to avoid the charge of ill-natured personality'.Her intention in writing Shifting Scenes, she claims, is to celebrate the skills, qualities and virtues of performers, which she describes as the 'best qualities that do honour to human nature'.In this article, I propose that the 'best qualities' Winstanley identified in her colleagues can be described as 'personal resilience'.I reflect on how the resilience of Maria Taylor and Eliza Winstanley was shaped by their personal traits and aspirations.Both women used the press to defend their reputations or confront enemies.However, Maria Taylor's 'giddy and volatile disposition' prompted her to defy convention with bold and risky choices in her personal life.In contrast, Eliza Winstanley placed a high value on conventional respectability, and carefully maintained her reputation as a skilled professional performer and moral servant of the public.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Mary Luckhurst [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Richards, Sally
      Review(s) of: Mary Luckhurst, by Caryl Churchill, Michigan: Routledge Modern and Contemporary Dramatists, 2015.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 70 - Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2017 21:14:38 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Contributors
    • PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Remaking Pacific pasts: History, memory, and identity in
           contemporary theater from Oceania [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mazer, Sharon
      Review(s) of: Remaking Pacific pasts: History, memory, and identity in contemporary theater from Oceania, by Diana Looser, (Honolulu: University Of Hawai'i Press, 2014) And William Peterson, Places For Happiness: Community, Self, And Performance In The Philippines (Honolulu: University Of Hawai'i Press, 2016).

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Performing mobilities
    • Abstract: Douglas, Mick
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Editorial note
    • Abstract: Rogers, Meredith; Douglas, Mick; Hadley, Bree
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Layne Waerea's public laughter
    • Abstract: Braddock, Christopher
      This article discusses the itinerant art practice of Auckland-based Layne Waerea. As Maori lawyer turned performance artist, Waerea's mobile public gestures escape clear categorisation - they are temporal and inscrutable. She will mow grass berms in the affluent Auckland suburbs of Remuera and Orakei, advertise 'free' water on Queen Street, sell 'free' air and create new Maori bus lanes. Her 'injunctions' (as she calls them) challenge ideas of artistic, legal and social discipline.

      Layne Waerea's provocative performances reveal ongoing tensions between British Crown (manifest in the New Zealand Government) and Maori. As Waerea seeks out performance places for 'disagreement and injunction', she explores notions of kawanatanga (governorship), tino rangatiratanga (self-determination and a right to exercise authority) and kaitiakitanga (an obligation to nurture and protect). These notions pertaining to a Maori worldview are imbued with expectations of right behaviour, appropriate priorities and ethical decision-making.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Ship inventory: Preparations across Twelve months
    • Abstract: Raheem, Amaara
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Moving 'Misfits'
    • Abstract: Maguire-Rosier, Kate
      In Dianne Reid's recent work Dance Interrogations (a Diptych), performed as part of the 2015 Melbourne Fringe Festival by Reid and collaborating artist Melinda Smith, spectators had no seats but rather roamed, observing two mature dancers. In this article, I explore Reid and Smith's live performance, a combination of structured movement improvisation and screendance, as a provocation of the relationship between movement and agency. I address the theatrical event through the multifaceted lens of the performers' experiences, spectators' responses and my own observations. Smith is also a wheelchair user and her movement quality is in stark contrast to that of fellow performer Reid, who sweeps through the space with the typical ease and flow of a trained dancer. Spectators' identification of Smith's particular movement aesthetic not only expands traditional conceptions of the dancerly body, but bears social implications for those of us perceived to be with disability. Most poignantly, one such implication is the importance of being seen on one's own terms. As Smith crawls on the floor, stands precariously on her knees and is lifted in the air, her palpable effort and slow movement defy what Tobin Siebers identifies as an 'ideology of ability' (2010). The performance draws our attention to the physical environment - an old train carriage and a convent - creating a strong concern with relationship to place and how that relationship enables or disables freedom of expression, or movement in that space. My empirical study considers this concern in relation to Rosemarie Garland-Thomson's concept of 'misfits' - 'a material-discursive becoming' (2011) - and, in doing so, uncovers a radical aesthetic anchored in Reid and Smith's deviance as mature dancers, and in the case of Smith, as a dancer with disability. Smith and Reid also speak so that their words - both organic and computer-generated - shape their movement with a palpable sense of agency. Spectators are moved, literally and otherwise, as they make space and even accommodate the performers' movements. I suggest that the performers mobilise particular aesthetic strategies: the visibility of disability and maturity; the establishments of 'fits' and 'misfits' between the performers, their environment and their audiences; the extension of material presence across bodies, but also through digital images and sounds; the cultivation of mindfulness in spectators; and the materialisation of a motif of slowness. I argue that these aesthetic strategies give rise to a politicised agency which is illuminated by the notion of 'misfits'.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Mobilising the mobilities paradigm in drama, theatre and
           performance studies: Potentials, politics and pitfalls
    • Abstract: Hadley, Bree
      It is now more than a decade since the emergence of the 'mobilities turn' in the social sciences. Popularised in John Urry's books on Mobilities, and Sociology Beyond Societies, as well as in the work of Tim Cresswell, Mimi Sheller, and others, the 'mobilities turn' has rapidly begun to Influence approaches to the analysis of social life, agency, status and Power. According to Urry, twentieth-century theorisations of power relations - and, in particular, the power relations that prevail in public sites, spaces and places - paid too much attention to the experience of fixed territorial formations and too little to the experience of flow in and between these formations. As Friederike Ziegler and Tim Schwanen put it, 'cultural sociologists and cultural geographers have too long tended to examine social life without due recognition of the crucial role of the systematic movement of people for work and family life, for leisure and pleasure, or for politics and protest'.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - 5 short blasts
    • Abstract: Flynn, Madeleine; Humphrey, Tim
      5 Short Blasts is an encounter with a city on the water for a flotilla of boats and radio broadcast.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Unsteady belongings: Rethinking the experience of nation
           through movement
    • Abstract: Pearson, Justine Shih
      The new mobilities paradigm identified by Mimi Sheller and John Urry in 2006 was in part a descriptive response to a contemporary world 'on the move', but it was also a critique of what the authors saw as a 'sedentarist' social science that posed stasis as normal and 'treats as abnormal distance, change and placelessness'. This interest in mobile or fluid ways of conceptualising place and subject formation follows the postcolonial revision of our understanding of culture itself in the 1990s, in which contested and unstable identities and attachments to place and people were under examination. However, these discussions posed the concept of movement as largely abstract, as a hermeneutic for dismantling prevailing structures of thinking.

      In this article, I take the idea of a world 'on the move' and fluid concepts of culture, and put them up against the resistantly fixed and stable ways in which nation is employed. Following previous work in 2012, in which I sought to extend our understanding about the mobility of culture in embodied terms (i.e., as experienced or enacted), this article turns its attention to the key term 'movement' to focus on the kinaesthetics of national and transnational belonging. Performance, I argue, proposes a fundamental concern with the material body in movement and in space; it therefore allows for particular theoretical and methodological insights into the study of the embodied experience of belonging. It is perhaps the very disciplinary tincture needed to counter the 'sedentarist' social science that Urry and Sheller critique.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Migrant mobilities: Cruel optimism and the case of A.J. D'Cruz
    • Abstract: D'Cruz, Glenn
      Migrants are mobile by definition. They literally uproot themselves and move to sometimes-distant lands for a variety of reasons. Some move away from real or imagined threats to their very existence. Others seek a better quality of life. And some adventurous souls are inhabited by a restless wanderlust - a desire to roll the dice and see what happens. Such mobility requires fortitude and faith. Migrants move through space and, if they have an aspirational disposition, they attempt to accumulate symbolic capital to move up those social and economic hierarchies that bestow status and prestige within their adopted homes. The migrant journey to Australia often ends with the realisation that one has to make and remake one's identity, and perform a series of adjustments - adjustments in terms of comportment, dress, accent and disposition. This article is a critical reflection on a multimedia presentation that tells a story about the author's father, A.J. D'Cruz. It draws on historical archives and the material remnants of A.J. D'Cruz's relatively short life (letters, photographs, sound recordings, 8mm films). It also provides a singular account of the performance practices involved in becoming a 'New Australian'. Combining personal anecdotes and philosophical ruminations on history, technology, and cultural identity, the article interrogates and performs a series of migrant mobilities.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - 14 thoughts about the Ghan - in the shape of a train
    • Abstract: Rogers, Meredith
      The material train...

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Here/now: 8 plays by award-winning NZ playwrights [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hyland, Nicola
      Review(s) of: Here/now: 8 plays by award-winning NZ playwrights, by David O'donnell (ed.), wellington: playmarket, 2015.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - I shudder to think: Performance as philosophy [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Marshall, Jonathan W
      Review(s) of: I shudder to think: Performance as philosophy, by Margaret Cameron, Brisbane: Ladyfinger, 2016.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Like riding a bicycle: Achieving balance through mobility in
           site-specific performance - a comparative study of railway wonderland
           (2015) by northern rivers performing arts and Sir Don v the Ratpack (2009)
           by Guerrilla Street Theatre
    • Abstract: Davies, Paul
      According to Peter Brook's famous dictum, it requires more than just an empty space, an actor and someone watching to constitute an 'act of theatre' (The Empty Space). The actor must also walk across the space. Setting aside questions of why she is walking or where (the narrative factor), it is motion in theatre practice that remains the connecting spark. And that for site-specific theatre especially, it is mobility - either of audience, performers or stage - that 'ignites' into being the dramatic space in which events may occur. De Certeau also finds that space is 'composed of intersections of mobile elements' and is 'in a sense actuated by the ensemble of movements within it'. Space is 'like a word when it is spoken' (Everyday Life). Lefebvre, taking his cue from the astrophysics of Fred Hoyle, similarly argues that space may be created 'by the energy deployed within it' (Production of Space).

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Imagined landscapes: Geovisualizing Australian spatial
           narratives [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Woollard, Jane
      Review(s) of: Imagined landscapes: Geovisualizing Australian spatial narratives, by Jane Stadler, Peta Mitchell and Stephen Carleton, Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2016.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - Despatch [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Willis, Emma
      Review(s) of: Despatch, by Angie Farrow, Wellington: Steele Roberts, 2015.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
  • Issue 69 - The Fitzgerald brothers' circus: Spectacle, identity and
           nationhood at the Australian Circus [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Warrington, Lisa
      Review(s) of: The Fitzgerald brothers' circus: Spectacle, identity and nationhood at the Australian Circus, by Gillian Arrighi, Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2015.

      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 23:52:41 GMT
       
 
 
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