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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
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Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
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Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australasian Catholic Record, The
  [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0727-3215
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - The fourth dimension: Why time is of the essence in
           sacramental theology
    • Abstract: Wright, Claire Louise
      If the sacraments are, as Louis-Marie Chauvet argues, the major symbolic expressions of 'the body as the point where God writes God's self in us', few concepts could be more central to sacramental theology than time, the medium in which human, ecclesial, cultural and cosmic 'bodies' have their being and expression. Christian narratives, traditions and rituals are founded in history and the shared memory of culture. As Miroslav Volf notes, the 'sacred memory' of the death and resurrection of Christ defines the identity of Christians as 'the pulsating heart that energizes and directs their actions (in the present) and forms their hopes (for the future)'. Indeed, all human experience, identity and meaning-making are mediated by an awareness of time, the flow and relativity of chronos and the moment(ousness) of kairos. As Chauvet puts it, the 'sensible mediation' of history (together with language, body and desire) comprises 'the very milieu within which human beings attain their truth and thus correspond to the Truth which calls them'.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Death and displacement: Catholic missionaries in New
           Guinea in World War 2
    • Abstract: Nolan, Malachy J
      When Japanese forces invaded New Guinea during the Second World War, there was a large missionary presence in the territory that had been built up in the preceding fifty years. The territory was previously a German possession but had been administered as a trust territory of Australia under a League of Nations mandate after the First World War. Geographically, it consisted of the northern part of the eastern half of the New Guinea mainland; the large islands of New Britain and New Ireland, which lay to the north-east; and the Bougainville portion of the Solomon Islands, further to the east. There were missionaries from both Protestant and Catholic Churches and, because of history, many of these were of German background.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - The search for the missing Gallipoli grave
    • Abstract: Tyquin, Michael
      We all associate war with death-and remembrance. But amidst the slaughter of World War One, and, for Australians, the Gallipoli campaign, it is easy to forget the anguish of those who did not fight. These were the parents, siblings, lovers and friends of soldiers who went to war and who never came home. This is the story of a father who went to extreme lengths to find the last resting pace of his young son who was killed on Gallipoli in 1915.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Trent and modernity
    • Abstract: Thornhill, John
      The evolution of Catholic culture in the modern era, with its maturing historical awareness, brings a new self-understanding better able to enter into a productive relationship with an emerging world culture. This sums up the main argument of this article.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - 'Everything is interconnected': The trinity and the
           natural World in Laudato Si'
    • Abstract: Edwards, Denis
      All those who read Laudato Si' are struck by the way Pope Francis says over and over again that everything is interconnected, or that everything is interrelated. In this article I will seek to explore the significance of this theme. In particular, I will ask about its theological meaning, attempting to bring out two aspects of Pope Francis's thought: (1) the insight that interrelationships of the natural world can be seen as a pale reflection of the dynamic relations of trinitarian life; (2) the conviction that ecological conversion-learning to relate to the natural world, as well as to other humans and to God-is essential to the very nature of the human made in the image of the dynamically relational God.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Reflections on the readings of Sundays and feasts
           March-May 2017
    • Abstract: Dunn, Geoffrey D
      Lent is a time of preparation for Easter. It developed during the fourth century as a time when sinners, who could no longer participate as full members of the church due to the serious and public nature of their offences, prepared for reconciliation with the church through penance, and adult catechumens, who were seeking to join the church as new members, prepared for initiation into the church. The season is a time of renewal of relationships for the community, of renewal of our relationship with God and of renewal of our relationships with others. The central theme is conversion: a conversion as radical as reorienting one's whole life according to the gospel of Jesus, and as total as requiring the surrender of life. We surrender our old way of life and allow the Spirit to conform us to the new way of life as a disciple of Jesus. The Year A readings have a particular focus on the initiation of catechumens, who, at the start of Lent, celebrate the rite of election and enter the final period of purification and enlightenment before initiation at Easter. On the Third, Fourth, and Fifth Sundays the elect celebrate the scrutinies, when the community examines their readiness for initiation. The symbols of the Easter liturgy feature in the readings of these three Sundays: water, light, and life.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - An exploration of the eucharistic spirituality of the
           eastern fathers of the church
    • Abstract: Thorp, Luke
      If one were to undertake an enquiry as to what constituted early Christian eucharistic spirituality in the church, both East and West, in the first seven centuries, an immediate problem would be encountered-in fact, several problems. The first would be that for the Christians of the first seven centuries, spirituality and theology were synonymous. One did not exist without the other; they were part of a seamless garment. The second issue would be that the term 'eucharistic spirituality' is a relatively modern one and difficult to retroactively apply to a previous age. The third issue that one would encounter would be the fact that any spirituality or theology is never formed in a vacuum: time, place, people and experience all play a role in developing unique spiritual expressions. The legacy that Ignatius of Antioch leaves us in relation to the Eucharist differs markedly from that of either Maximus the Confessor or John Chrysostom. While it might seem trite to suggest this, it is important for a twenty-first century mindset to be reminded of it in order to better appreciate and enter more fully into a eucharistic spirituality.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Tradition: God's future, our past, and the challenge
           of the present
    • Abstract: Lennan, Richard
      Among courses that I teach is one entitled simply 'Tradition'. A standard response from colleagues and students when they hear the name of the course is to quote, perhaps even sing, the opening chorus from Fiddler on the Roof. While conclusions drawn from such a small sample are not necessarily definitive, it may be that the lyrics from Fiddler on the Roof encapsulate perfectly the perception of 'tradition' that prevails in our culture and church.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Responding to the gospel in the marriage relationship
    • Abstract: O'Loughlin, Frank
      Over recent years there has been a great deal of discussion and disagreement about the nature of marriage and family both in the public sphere and within the church. Almost every aspect of human relationships and sexuality has come up for discussion. The two synods on marriage and the family that took place in Rome in 2014 and 2015 have been a watershed for Catholics in these discussions. Similar discussions will need to continue for some time yet if we are to come to greater clarity and depth in our understanding of the many issues involved. In this article I am seeking to put forward elements of the Christian tradition concerning marriage that, I hope, may be helpful background in these current discussions.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Letters from the marist missionaries in Oceania
           1836-1854 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Roddy, Mary
      Review(s) of: Letters from the marist missionaries in Oceania 1836-1854, by ed. Charles Girard, Adelaide: ATF, 2015, pp. 753, hardback, $105.00; paperback, $79.95; pdf, $50.00.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Pioneer priests of Australia 1800-1870 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Daniel, Michael E
      Review(s) of: Pioneer priests of Australia 1800-1870, by Ted Cooper, Strathfield, NSW: St Pauls, 2015, pp. 135, paperback, $22.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Books received
    • PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 94 Issue 1 - Guidelines for articles submitted
    • PubDate: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 23:14:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - General index
    • PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - Books received
    • PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - Santamaria: A most unusual man [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Easson, Michael
      Review(s) of: Santamaria: A most unusual man, by Gerard Henderson, South Carlton, VIC: Miegunyah, 2015, pp. 452, hardback, $59.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - Nostra Aetate (1965): Historical genesis, key
           elements, and reception by the church in Australia
    • Abstract: Canning, Raymond
      I was born on 15 September 1947. That same year, on 5 August, the International Council of Christians and Jews, meeting in Switzerland, had issued what have become known as 'The Ten Points of Seelisberg'.1 As grief and shame over the Shoah took root, the necessity for a radical change of theological, cultural and political attitudes on the part of Christians became clear. These Ten Points articulate key dimensions of that growing perception. They can therefore be understood as forming an initial basis for the Christian-Jewish dialogue that was already gathering momentum.2 They also represent a first step in the process that led, eighteen years later, to Nostra Aetate, the document on the Catholic Church's relation to non-Christian religions that would emerge from the Second Vatican Council in late 1965. At various stages during the council years, it had appeared that the bishops' engagement with the new demands and manifold ramifications of Christian-Jewish relations expressed at Seelisberg might fail to produce any new official statement of Catholic Church teaching on the matter. Would the council after all remain silent on this crucial question? Yves Congar expressed the sentiments of many when, faced with this prospect in May 1965, he wrote in his council diary: 'For myself, however, I am in no way in favour of the pure and simple withdrawal of the text. Twenty years after Auschwitz it is impossible for the Council to say nothing'.3 And, as we now know, with the declaration Nostra Aetate the 'something' the council did succeed in saying, however small it may have appeared at that time, continues to resonate more than fifty years later.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - Mercy, happiness and human growth in the teaching of
           pope Francis
    • Abstract: Lam, Joseph
      On 11 April 2015 Pope Francis called for a special of Year of Mercy, which subsequently was symbolically inaugurated with the opening of the Holy Doors of the Basilicas of St Peter and of St John in Rome on 8 December. According to the Argentinian Pontiff, upon whose episcopal ministry is placed the maxim miserendo atque eligendo, mercy is the key element leading to the rediscovery of the spiritual joy that appears to have faded away in the life of the church. To counter this pessimism, Francis reminds his flock of the affectionate and tenderhearted look of God, whose merciful and loving gaze enriches and liberates the life of every Christian: 'Thanks solely to this encounter or renewed encounter with God's love, which blossoms into an enriching friendship, we are liberated from our narrowness and self-absorption'. Yet, Francis in his major teaching documents seems to caution against the concept of happiness, even though his description of the effects produced by the mercy and joy of the Gospel leads to human growth, within which human happiness is understood as a right. He has called for an integral development that includes society's most neglected members,6 and that respects and includes all forms of existence. Nonetheless, it is not a soft choice, as if mercy opens the door to all forms of pleasure as long as they make people happy.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - On faith and reason: Synthesis as a principle of
           catholic social teaching in 'Ludato Si'
    • Abstract: Stollenwerk, Daniel J
      Like so much of Catholic social teaching before it, Pope Francis' Laudato Si' points to synthesis-a synthesis of reason and faith, science and religion, technology and ethics, practicality and beauty-as the key to not only care for our common home, but also the alleviation of poverty, and a sustainable and integral, ecological and human development. What the social teachings of the church have slowly established as a principle for development, education and ecumenism, Pope Francis specifically applies to today's ecological and humanitarian crisis. This article will look at the principle of synthesis as crucial to understanding Laudato Si' and its place in recent Catholic social teaching.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - Reflections on the readings of Sundays and feasts
           November 2016 - February 2017
    • Abstract: Dunn, Geoffrey D
      As a seminary student I was taught that a homily ought to end with a eucharistic link. Mature reflection leads me to conclude that the entire homily is itself the eucharistic link. It joins together the interplay of the life of the assembly and the Scriptures, on the one hand, and the great prayer of thanksgiving on the other. My reflections are missing the element of the life of the assembly, which can be supplied only by individual preachers in touch with their communities, but hopefully they provide something of the reason why, on this particular occasion, the assembly can move on to offer God thanks.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - The spirituality of Mother Teresa
    • Abstract: Chidiac, Anthony
      Saint Teresa of Calcutta made a significant impact on Christian spiritual thought and practice in the twentieth century by dedicating her entire life to serving the poorest of the poor. Her spirituality is based on the premise that through serving the marginalised and disenfranchised in our society we are in essence ministering to Christ and consequently helping to 'quench his thirst'. Her effective work made her one of the most highly respected and venerated figures of recent times, and it made her a readily acknowledged saint by Christians and non-Christians alike. She generated a tremendous amount of publicity by her determination to help the poor and to love the unwanted, the most vulnerable in society. At times she was criticised unfairly by some people regarding her conservative stance on issues, her fundraising activities and her effectiveness in dealing with the issue of poverty. Nevertheless strong yardsticks of her success are the countless awards she received and her ability to establish a dynamic congregation of 4500 dedicated nuns, active in over 130 countries, who continue to make a real difference to our world.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - A judge, the church and the Royal commission
    • Abstract: Kunc, Francois
      When I told another lawyer that I was coming here tonight he sent me an email commiserating that 'the art of after dinner speaking is doubly difficult for judges who are expected to be witty and entertaining, but not say anything controversial-or maybe nothing at all'. I also had the pleasure of spending some time recently with your Bishop Peter, who admonished me to 'keep it light'.

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 4 - Pope Francis and the changing, unchanging church
    • Abstract: Lennan, Richard
      When Pope Francis appeared on the papal balcony for the first time, I was sitting in a television studio in Boston, doing some commentary for a local cable-news network. As an 'expert analyst', I'm afraid that I was, to quote a memorable expression from Paul Keating, 'a bit of a fizzer'. Not only did I have no idea who Jorge Maria Bergolio was, I managed to confuse Buenos Aires, where Bergolio had been archbishop, with Rio de Janiero, where he had not been archbishop, and also muddled Argentina, Bergolio's homeland, with Brazil, not Bergolio's homeland. While I do not expect to be invited back to comment on the next conclave, it is not my spotty performance or even the whiz-bang technology of a modern television studio that most stays with me from that afternoon in March 2013. Rather, what is most vivid in my memory is a comment from one of the news anchors, a comment he repeated a number of times, both on-air and off-camera: 'He's so old', he said of the new pope. 'Why would they choose someone so old?'

      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 21:13:12 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Books received
    • PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Enjoy the good news: A new testament guide [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Lucas, Brian
      Review(s) of: Enjoy the good news: A new testament guide, by Alan Hogan, Adelaide: ATF Theology, 2016), pp. 216, paperback, $33.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Thinking about political things: An Aristotelian
           approach to Pacific life [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Owens, John F
      Review(s) of: Thinking about political things: An Aristotelian approach to Pacific life, by Andrew Murray SM (Adelaide: ATF Press 2016), pp. 193, paperback, $24.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - The comic book bible [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Daniel, Michael E
      Review(s) of: The comic book bible, by Toni Matas, Strathfield, NSW: St Pauls, 2015, hardback, pp. 168, $24.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Report of Rosendo Salvado to propaganda fide in 1883
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Long, Kevin
      Review(s) of: Report of Rosendo Salvado to propaganda fide in 1883, translated and edited by Stefano Girola, introduction by John Molony, Northcote, VIC: Abbey Press, 2015, pp. 307, $34.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Religious vocations today
    • Abstract: Rymarz, Richard
      The most striking feature of any study on vocations in the Catholic Church is the steep decline in many aspects of religious life in recent decades. No group in the world has done more high-quality empirical research on the question of religious life and vocations than the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA), and all who work in this area are in their debt. Based at Georgetown in Washington, DC, CARA provides the figures detailed in Table 1 for the United States of America.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - The word of god, Jesus Christ, and the Eucharist:
           Christian Hope in a secularised world
    • Abstract: Moloney, Francis J
      In 1996 the American sociologist, Rodney Stark, published a provocative sociological study called The Rise of Christianity. He wrote this book because his reading of the work of the historians of early Christianity showed that their history was good, but their sociology was nonexistent. He minimalised many theories about the rise of Christianity. Theologians and church historians regularly point to the transforming effect of the purity of the doctrine, the teaching of the resurrection, the blood of the martyrs, a sacramental life, and other such central Christian beliefs and phenomena as the reasons for its rapid spread in the Roman Empire. Stark questions this, insisting that the fundamental motivation for the phenomenon was that the Christians cared for one another, especially their women.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - The mission of the kingdom of god: Ultimate source of
           meaning, value and energy for Jesus
    • Abstract: Gleeson, Brian
      Among peoples today, the phenomenon of faith takes many different forms. Beyond the different religious expressions of faith within the great world religions, there exists a variety of other forms and objects of faith. Terence Tilley discusses these around his 'working definition of faith' as a relationship-'the relationship between one and the irreducible energizing source of meaning and centre of value in one's life'. Metaphorically speaking, those dominant sources of meaning, value, and energy for their devotees are their 'gods'. Among those that Tilley identifies are the following: the family, the nation, secular humanism (the good of humanity), truth, justice, money, success, pleasure, the body beautiful, power. He suggests that 'discovering our gods' involves asking such questions as these: For what do we live? What energises our life? What would we die for? Why would we die for that?

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - From wandering to journeying: Thoughts on a synodal
           church
    • Abstract: Coleridge, Mark
      Many thanks indeed, Master, for your words of welcome. When I was in your position, I never thought I'd be back to give the Knox Lecture. But I was pleased to be invited and glad that I was able to accept, and I'm delighted to be back among the community of Catholic Theological College. I had a hand in designing the new college in East Melbourne, but I never had the chance to work there. So it's good to be back-at least close by-after all these years during which so much water has flowed beneath the bridge. It's also good to honour the memory of Cardinal James Knox, founder of CTC, and to pray that he will find eternal rest beyond the travails of this life, both in Melbourne and beyond.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Reflections on the readings of Sundays and feasts
           September-November 2016
    • Abstract: Craig, Barry M
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Steering wheel or spare tyre?: The obligation of
           the priest to pray
    • Abstract: Daly, Brendan
      People place great value on the prayers of priests, and often ask priests to pray for them or family members. St Monica told her son St Augustine just before her death not to worry about burying her in Ostia, away from her native land. Then she said, 'Lay this body anywhere, and do not let the care of it be a trouble to you at all. Only this I ask: that you will remember me at the Lord's altar, wherever you are'.1 She realised the value of the prayers of a priest.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Thinking being: Introduction to metaphysics in the
           classical tradition [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Zimmerman, Brandon
      Review(s) of: Thinking being: Introduction to metaphysics in the classical tradition, by Eric D. Perl, Leiden: Brill, 2014, pp. 215, $141.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - The blessing of mercy: Biblical perspectives and
           ecological challenges [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ranson, David
      Review(s) of: The blessing of mercy: Biblical perspectives and ecological challenges, by Veronica M. Lawson, Northcote, VIC: Morning Star, 2015, pp. 86, $19.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - From north to south: Southern scholars engage With
           Edward Schillebeeckx [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lennan, Richard
      Review(s) of: From north to south: Southern scholars engage With Edward Schillebeeckx, edited by Helen F. Bergin, OP, Adelaide: ATF Theology, 2013, pp. 163, epub, $31; hardback, $50; paperback, $37.95; pdf, $19.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Australian religious thought: Six explorations [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Coleridge, Mark
      Review(s) of: Australian religious thought: Six explorations, by Wayne Hudson, Clayton, VIC: Monash University Publishing, 2016, pp. 352, paperback, $39.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Lay people in the church: A critical study of the
           theology of the laity in the documents of the federation of Asian bishops'
           conferences with special reference to John Paul's apostolic exhortation
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Chia, Edmund Kee-Fook
      Review(s) of: Lay people in the church: A critical study of the theology of the laity in the documents of the federation of Asian bishops' conferences with special reference to John Paul's apostolic exhortation, by Peter Nguyen Van Hai, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2015, pp. 290, US$76.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 3 - Triplex munus in the 1983 code: A blessing or a
           curse?
    • Abstract: Expo, Anthony
      The Code of Canon Law is intended to be a canonical reception of the ecclesial and theological insights of the Second Vatican Council. In other words, the Code puts into canonical terms the ecclesial and theological discoveries and rediscoveries of Vatican II. In doing that, the Code also inherited and appropriated the terminological, theological, intratextual and intertextual difficulties evident in the final texts of Vatican II, which were left to theologians to interpret and synthesise in the ongoing reception of the council's theology. Triplex munus is one such difficulty that made its way into the text of the Code. The Latin triplex munus ('threefold office') or tria munera ('three offices') is a phrase or rubric used retrospectively by theologians to refer to the priestly, prophetic and kingly offices of the post-resurrection Jesus. This trilogy constitutes the overarching framework of the conciliar documents, particularly Lumen Gentium. This rubric is also one of the most influential structural principles underlying the ecclesiology and theology of the Code, even if it is applied somewhat inadequately in a certain sense.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:45:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - Books received
    • PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - Child, arise! the courage to stand: A spiritual
           handbook for survivors of sexual abuse [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cashen, Paul
      Review(s) of: Child, arise! the courage to stand: A spiritual handbook for survivors of sexual abuse, by Jane N. Dowling (Melbourne: David Lovell, 2015), pp. 260, $29.95.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - A public god: Natural theology reconsidered [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Jacobs-Vandegeer, Christiaan
      Review(s) of: A public god: natural theology reconsidered, by Neil Ormerod (Minneapolis, MN: Fortress, 2015), pp. 196, paperback, $69.99, ebook, $51.72.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - Words from the wound: selected addresses, letters and
           homilies of archbishop mark coleridge [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Daniel, Michael E
      Review(s) of: Words from the wound: selected addresses, letters and homilies of archbishop mark coleridge, by Mark Coleridge, edited by Anthony Ekpo and David Pascoe (Strathfield: St Pauls Publications, 2014), pp. 342, $24.95.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - The Vietnam war and the cross: A narrative for peace
    • Abstract: Dinh, Hoa Trung
      Every war is sustained by a narrative that explains the conflict and the necessity of the use of force. A war narrative gives the assembly a common identity, a sense of solidarity, and a mandate for action. This paper examines the ethical significance of war narratives, with particular reference to the Vietnam War, and how war narratives can continue to foster enmity for decades after the fighting. The paper discusses two war narratives that played vital roles in the Vietnam conflict: the Revolution narrative, and the Republic narrative. Drawing from the works of Jon Sobrino and Jurgen Moltmann, who identify the crucified Christ with the victims of violence, this paper demonstrates that the cross can offer a new vision for peaceful coexistence beyond war and animosity.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - Reconciliation: From sectarianism to ecumenism
    • Abstract: Roche, Marcia
      Sectarianism has been defined as 'adherence or excessive devotion to a particular religious denomination or sect'.1 However, as Kildea notes, dictionary definitions of the term fail to square with its 'distinctive' meaning in the Australian context.2A more accurate representation of the Australian connotation is conveyed by Hogan, who says that it refers to 'the hostility between different churches or "sects" which has manifested itself in the wider arena of social and political conflict'.3 The social, political and economic discrimination and exclusion that has existed in Australia between Catholics and Protestants was most intense from the beginning of European settlement until the 1960s, when the Catholic Church's endorsement of ecumenism offered a means of positive engagement with members of other Christian denominations.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - Pope Francis and the second Vatican council (1962-65)
    • Abstract: O'Collins, Gerald
      Different templates are available for assessing where Pope Francis has been leading the church since his election on 13 March 2013. The fiftieth anniversary of the closing of the Second Vatican Council on 8 December 1965 suggests one broad template for interpreting and evaluating the Pope's continuing contribution. It is not that Francis has been beating the drum about the teaching of Vatican II and how he wants to put it into practice. Yet much of what he has already taught and done shows him picking up themes of the council's teaching and taking them further. He is faithful to Vatican II, with a fidelity that is properly creative.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - The Justice and mercy of god
    • Abstract: Kelly, Gerard
      There has always been a tension between the justice and the mercy of God. The two seem very uneasy companions. In the mind of some, justice and mercy are mutually exclusive. This, then, plays out in society and the way we practise justice. From my point of view, as a theologian, there is a genuine theological question here and it concerns how we understand God, and as a consequence how we understand the relationship between justice and mercy. On the one hand, the traditional metaphysical starting point for the doctrine of God leaves little room for the mercy of God since God as perfect Being cannot suffer-to suffer would be a deficiency.1 On the other hand, there is a strong tradition, particularly since the Reformation, of the justice of God, where justice is an expression of the mercy of God. Yet this tradition struggles today to have an impact on religious consciousness. The theological question also has implications for the wider society. If Western society is no longer being shaped by the Christian faith, then the meaning of both mercy and justice may undergo change in such a way that they become incompatible. I will explore this question by referring to three articles that have appeared in popular journalism. This will lead me to a theological examination of mercy and justice.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - Humilitas Iesu Christi as Model of a poor church:
           Augustine's idea of a humble church for the poor
    • Abstract: Lam, Joseph
      In an audience for journalists shortly after his election in 2013 Pope Francis revealed not only the reason for his choice of name, but also his vision of the church: 'Francis of Assisi. For me he is the man of poverty, the man of peace, the man who loves and safeguards creation ... He is the man who gives us this spirit of peace, the poor man ... Oh, how I wish for a Church that is poor and for the poor!' The Pontiff in his 2014 Lenten message re-emphasised the church's commitment to the poor. The responsibility of the church is 'to bear witness to all those who live in material, moral and spiritual destitution the Gospel message of the merciful love of God our Father, who is ready to embrace everyone in Christ. We can do this to the extent that we imitate Christ who became poor and enriched us by his poverty'. Pope Francis' concern for the poor is again reechoed in his latest encyclical, Laudato Si, in which he re-emphasises the church's commitment to the poor by calling Catholics especially to be stewards God's creation. A poor church for the poor, as Pope Francis envisages, has its foundation in the poverty of Jesus Christ: 'For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that by his poverty you might become rich' (2 Cor 8:9).

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - The liturgical homily: Its theological development in
           Vatican II and Pope Francis
    • Abstract: White, Don
      The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops in 'Preaching the Mystery of Faith: The Sunday Homily' (PMF) identified a problem with liturgical preaching in the Catholic Church: 'in survey after survey over the past years, the People of God have called for more powerful and inspiring preaching. A steady diet of tepid or poorly prepared homilies is often cited as a cause for discouragement on the part of the laity and even leading some to turn away from the Church'. Pope Francis in Evangelii Gaudium (EG) has referred to the same problem, saying that 'so many concerns have been expressed about this important ministry and we cannot simply ignore them'.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - A proposal for a season of creation in the liturgical
           year
    • Abstract: Rue, Charles
      Inserting a Season of Creation into the Catholic liturgical year during September is one way to structurally help implement the vision of Pope Francis given in his encyclical Laudato Si'. As a pastoral initiative a new liturgical season would help believers face the twenty-first-century ecological challenge. This article first looks at the liturgical reform initiated by the Second Vatican Council as an example of reform. The second part explores recent initiatives to express the creation dimension of theology in communal worship. In 1993 the ecumenical association, Church and Environment (oeku), proposed a Creation Time running from 1 September to 4 October. In 2004 Norman Habel in Adelaide developed a set of scriptural readings and ecological themes on this timetable. It was adapted by some Protestant communities around the world. Catholic and Orthodox communities wanting to celebrate creation during September have tended to focus on a particular day, often 1 September. Taking a more systematic approach, for the last three years the Columban Mission Institute in Sydney has prepared resources as an ecological reading of the existing lectionary to celebrate a Catholic Season of Creation during September. Creating a new lectionary would be a more radical reform.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - Same-sex 'marriage': Evolution or deconstruction of
           marriage and the family?
    • Abstract: Fisher, Anthony
      The campaign to redefine marriage has recently gained such momentum- with now three and soon four Bills before the Commonwealth Parliament-that many think it is inevitable; this can leave those with misgivings feeling that they are already losers in a done deal. Some think it's the inexorable progress of liberty and equality-which leaves the doubters 'on the wrong side of history'. In this context supporters of classical marriage are presumed to have no real arguments to offer. So in this paper I want to offer some reasons-not decrees from on high or from the past, not expressions of hatred or prejudice-but reasons I hope anyone can understand. I also hope you find these reasons persuasive and helpful in proclaiming and witnessing to true marriage among your families, friends and colleagues. But even if you disagree with me on this matter, I at least hope to help you understand why Australian law has always held, and many people still hold, that marriage is for people of opposite sex.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 2 - Reflections on the readings of Sundays and feasts
           June-August 2016
    • Abstract: Craig, Barry M
      Our last Sunday in Ordinary Time before Lent was the Fifth (7 February); we were in Luke's fifth chapter when the first disciples were called. We now return to the Sundays in Ordinary Time, picking up on the Tenth Sunday and two chapters later, and so we begin our first sustained reading from Luke's gospel, chapters 7 to 14, but skip all but the opening verses of chapter 8. Jesus' Galilean ministry occupies until the end of chapter 9, then he begins the procession to Jerusalem, during which various teachings are located without being specific to the journey.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 22:52:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Biblical scholarship today makes it clear that St
           Thomas Aquinas could not have all the answers
    • Abstract: Thornhill, John
      The somewhat provocative title I have given this article may surprise readers aware that from the beginning of my work as a theologian I have been proud to be known as a follower of Aquinas. I am glad for this opportunity to explain my position. The main purpose of this article, however, is giving an account of the significant developments I refer to and what they can contribute to the life of God's people.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Reflections on the readings of Sundays and feasts
           March-May 2016
    • Abstract: Craig, Barry M
      Today's gospel reading (Luke 15:1-3, 11-32) includes one of the eleven parables unique to Luke; it is also one of the most well known, and is often said to be misnamed in its common designation as the Prodigal Son (15:11-32). Many parables are similarly named in ways that appear to miss the point of their telling, but this tendency actually points to how we engage with all stories, and the power of Christ's storytelling. We need to realise that the mind does not distinguish between reality and fiction, for all viewing and understanding of the world takes place in our heads. Thus we respond emotionally and even physically in the same way to what we see unfolding, be it real-time events in the world or depicted events, historical or fictional, as mediated by actors and machinery at the movies. In the same way, we do not distinguish between reports of actual happenings and fictional stories. Should there be any doubt about this, ask yourself: Have I ever cried at a movie, or laughed, or grown angry, or felt anything, or ducked, jumped or reacted in any way at all? At a recent viewing of Les Miserables someone at the end of the row was overcome with uncontrollable sobbing as the movie drew to an end. This distraction provided suitable cover for not a few people to sneak hankies out of pockets and return them before lights returned. If we did not respond to movies there would be no point in seeing them. Similarly with novels. They are also fodder for our imaginations, where we in a sense try on the experiences of others, imaginatively inhabiting the bodies and feelings of others. This is the basis of empathy, and the source of the power of storytelling.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - The freedom of the children of god
    • Abstract: Nagle, Cormac
      The goal of this essay is to seek a better understanding of the freedom of the children of God that Jesus Christ lived, taught and bequeathed to the world. To pursue this we consider briefly the meaning of independence as distinct from childish dependence and libertarianism. The essay goes on to present an overview of the teaching of the New Testament on law and freedom. Since there have been different understandings of the nature of authority in the church and especially the practical exercise of authority, we examine its history and tradition. This helps us to avoid being impaled exclusively on one or other approach, whether legalist or relativist or one burdened by a particular culture or historical circumstance.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Finding god in art
    • Abstract: Cirocco, Josie
      My mini thesis of 'Finding God in Art: Karl Rahner on the Nature of Religious Art' was part of my master's project with the Flinders University, South Australia, completed in December 2014. With my research topic, 'Finding God in Art', in mind, I was seeking to go beyond the classical idea of sacred art to explore the way other art may genuinely be religious even though it is not overtly about a religious subject. To do this I adopted some of the insights of Karl Rahner's theology. The immense success of Rahner's work is a tribute to his ability to speak profoundly about the everyday life of ordinary men and women. I explored Rahner's thought about art, both verbal and non-verbal, within a Christian context.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Church and priesthood: Model and style
    • Abstract: Hill, John
      In a previous article, I broached the subject of priesthood as style, along the lines taken by Christoph Theobald and other contemporary French theologians.1 In that article I argued for a priestly style that fitted in with Theobald's vision of the Christian life as apprenticeship to Christ's own style (as conceived by Theobald) of hospitable and eschatological messianism, and that also addressed current charges of clericalism and infantilism. I began to formulate that style in terms of citizenship (in the kingdom of heaven), and I wish to develop that approach in this article.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - We need a hundred more like him! The challenge of
           catechesis and new ecclesial communities
    • Abstract: Rymarz, Richard
      A significant challenge facing the Catholic Church today is the breakdown in traditional catechetical structures such as the close connection between parish, school and family. A consequence of this is a decline in the number of pathways open to Catholics who wish to strengthen their religious commitment. In light of this a pertinent question is: How can new structures support catechesis? This paper explores the role that New Ecclesial Communities (NECs) can play in catechesis in a changed cultural milieu. A number of features of these groups are discussed in relation to supporting plausibility. Some of these features include the establishment of reinforcing boundaries and providing an ongoing sense of involvement in a supportive moral community.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - The conversation's the thing: The gospel in Australian
           culture
    • Abstract: McEvoy, James
      There's something distinctive about Australia, not only about its landscape, its vegetation, its wildlife, and its history, but also about the patterns of life and understanding that we, the country's human inhabitants, have developed together. There's something distinctive about Australian culture.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Eastern catholic churches in Australia: Canonical
           issues for catholic clergy and pastoral workers
    • Abstract: Waters, Ian; McGuckin, Robert
      The following document has been produced to assist priests and deacons of the Latin Catholic Church in their parish pastoral ministry. It does not attempt to be a scholarly or technical treatment. Often, as regards questions about marriage, a canonist will need to be consulted.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - The obligation of a judge to apply the law in a
           functioning democracy
    • Abstract: Beazley, Margaret
      Australia rightfully places itself amongst democratic countries governed by the rule of law. It is a tradition in which I hold a firm belief. An essential aspect of the rule of law is its non-arbitrary application, and its guarantee of equality before the law. When describing the rule of law, A. V. Dicey stated that the rule of law meant:

      the absolute supremacy or predominance of regular law as opposed to the influence of arbitrary power, and excludes the existence of arbitrariness, of prerogative, or even of wide discretionary authority on the part of the government.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Faith in action: Hammondcare [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lucas, Brian
      Review(s) of: Faith in action: Hammondcare, by Meredith Lake, Sydney: UNSW Press, 2013, pp. 404, hardback, $69.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Our quest for god [Book Review]
    • Abstract: McEvoy, James
      Review(s) of: Our quest for god, by Neil Brown, Strathfield, NSW: St Pauls Publications, 2014, pp. 166, $19.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Faith, Ireland and empire: The life of Patrick Joseph
           Clune CSSR 1864-1935, archbishop of Perth, Western Australia [Book Review]
           
    • Abstract: Cooper, Austin
      Review(s) of: Faith, Ireland and empire: The life of Patrick Joseph Clune CSSR 1864-1935, archbishop of Perth, Western Australia, by Christopher Dowd, Strathfield: St Pauls Publications, 2014, pp. xxiv + 416, paperback, $39.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Saving St Brigid's [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Vodola, Max
      Review(s) of: Saving St Brigid's, by Regina Lane, Carlton South: Bridin Books, 2014, pp. 250, hardback, $40.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Wehrmacht priests: Catholicism and the Nazi war of
           Annihilation [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Daniel, Michael E
      Review(s) of: Wehrmacht priests: Catholicism and the Nazi war of Annihilation, by Lauren Faulkner Rossi, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015, pp. 255, hardback, $79.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Theology for ministry: An introduction for lay
           ministers [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lennan, Richard
      Review(s) of: Theology for ministry: An introduction for lay ministers, by Edward P. Hahnenberg, Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2014, pp. 133, $24.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Books received
    • PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 93 Issue 1 - Guidelines for articles submitted
    • PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2016 22:50:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - General index: Contents of volume 92
    • PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - Books received
    • PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - Connected toward communion: The church and social
           communication in the digital age [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lucas, Brian
      Review(s) of: Connected toward communion: The church and social communication in the digital age, by Daniella Zsupan-Jerome, Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2014, pp. 130, paperback, $36.95.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - Mannix [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cooper, Austin
      Review(s) of: Mannix, by Brenda Niall, Melbourne: Text Publishing, 2015, pp. 439, $50.00.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - Soldier of Christ: The life of pope Pius XII [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Lucas, Brian
      Review(s) of: Soldier of Christ: The life of pope Pius XII, by Robert A. Ventresca, Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2013, pp. 405, hardback, US$35.00.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - 'Ad Gentes to Evangelii Gaudium: Mission's move to the
           centre
    • Abstract: Connolly, Noel
      Pope Francis in Evangelii Gaudium defines the church as a 'community of missionary disciples'. We have to be missionary to be called disciples. He dreams of 'a missionary option' that will transform everything. For Francis, mission is clearly essential to the church. He is continuing a movement that began with Ad Gentes, the missionary document of Vatican II. The fathers at the council insisted, 'The pilgrim Church is missionary by her very nature. For it is from the mission of the Son and the mission of the Holy Spirit that she takes her origin, in accordance with the decree of God the Father'. This was reiterated by Paul VI in Evangelii Nuntiandi: 'Evangelizing is in fact the grace and vocation proper to the Church, her deepest identity. She exists in order to evangelize'; and by John Paul II in Redemptoris Missio: 'the Church is missionary by her very nature'.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - Reflections on the readings of Sundays and feasts:
           December 2015-February 2016
    • Abstract: Craig, Barry M
      A characteristic feature of Luke's Gospel is that of the journey, with Jesus from chapter 9 resolutely heading to Jerusalem; of the more than eighty verses naming Jerusalem in the New Testament only a handful are not in Luke-Acts (Matthew has one, and Mark none). Last Sunday's gospel reading was taken from the last day of teaching given after entering Jerusalem and reclaiming the Temple, and before the Passover and arrest. But Jesus is not the only one to whom the journey motif applies. Last Sunday reference was made to the Son of Man coming in power, and the exhortation to the disciples to stand ready is akin to that of people prepared for a journey. Today we return to just before the commencement of the public ministry, with John the Baptist exhorting people to prepare a way for the Lord. A simple reading of this text suggests that it is the way on which God proceeds that needs making straight, but it is not: it refers to the path on which those God rescues are brought in procession. This is the procession referred to in the second reading (Bar 5:1-9), for which mountains are levelled and the valleys filled so that Jerusalem's captive children may be brought back safely from the land of bondage, Babylon.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - Plato's argument for celibacy
    • Abstract: Zimmerman, Brandon
      I teach philosophy at Good Shepherd Seminary in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. My specialty is ancient philosophy and the reception of pagan philosophy by Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. This paper is my attempt to use ideas from ancient philosophy to respond to a serious problem that the Catholic Church faces today in Papua New Guinea. All my students are young PNG nationals discerning a call to the priesthood within the Catholic Church. Unlike the other Christian denominations, the Catholic Church requires its priests to be celibate, that is, to remain unmarried and to abstain from sexual relationships. I myself am a married layman with three young children, and I steadfastly support my students in their development of a celibate lifestyle.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - Knitter's pluralism and Christian orthodoxy
    • Abstract: Siniscalchi, Glenn B
      Undoubtedly, the unique mediatorial role that Jesus has for salvation has been defended by Christians from the earliest days of the church. In recent years some theologians have tried to reverse the church's traditional understandings of Jesus for the sake of reinterpreting Catholic doctrine in more defensible terms in the modern world. Sometimes these revised understandings of Christ's uniqueness result in unacceptable versions of 'religious pluralism'. In essence, these religious pluralists deny the unique salvific role of Jesus Christ.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - St Teresa of Avila: Spiritual guide for today
    • Abstract: Cooper, Austin
      Some years ago a priest who was dying told me that he had not had a spiritual director for years: he just kept reading St Teresa. Having a continuing conversation with a holy person by engaging with his or her writings would seem to conform to our beliefs: in the Apostles' Creed we affirm that the Holy Spirit enlivens the church and the communion of saints. And T. S. Eliot articulated the truth in poetic terms when he wrote, 'the communication of the dead is tongued with fire beyond the language of the living'.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - War and peace: The catholic church, Max Charlesworth
           and B. A. Santamaria
    • Abstract: McCarthy, Kathleen
      Dad, you were a devoted, but always critical, member of the Catholic Church and taught us that, each of us, in our way, must always challenge institutions to live up to their ideals. May your beloved Church have the courage to confront its past injustices and may we be brave enough to keep on calling on it to do so.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - 'We Proclaim the crucified Christ' (1 Cor 2:2): Being,
           truth, beauty and the cross according to Joseph Ratzinger
    • Abstract: Lam, Joseph
      The reception of Augustine's theology and thoughts in Thomas Aquinas's works has never been a point of serious disagreement among scholars. What divides scholars is rather the question of how to assess the weight of Aristotelian influence and Thomas's Augustinian heritage. According to Gilson, the answer is evident in itself. While acknowledging in the works of the Dominican friar a close familiarity with Augustine's theology, the French philosopher nevertheless argued for a distinct Aristotelian colour in Thomas's philosophical approach to the question of natural truths. To the question of how human reasoning arrives at the truth, Gilson wrote: 'What is it to know truth? It is intellectually to grasp the essences of things such as they are and to associate them in our minds, by means of judgements, in the same way they are associated in reality'. Knowledge, therefore, is not the result of a subjective mind, but rather an outcome of a conscious judgement that concords with the objective intellection of the given objects. In this Gilson observed a basic difference between Augustine and Thomas:

      Both St. Thomas's philosophy and St. Augustine's philosophy are philosophies of the concrete, but their attitude toward the concrete is not the same. St. Augustine always seeks notions comprehensive enough to embrace the concrete in its complexity. Thomas always seeks notions precise enough to define the elements that constitute the concrete. In a word, the former expresses the concrete, the latter analyses it.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - The 'Tablet' at the opening of the council:
           September-December 1962
    • Abstract: O'Collins, Gerald
      As far as I know, very little research indeed has focused on how particular journals, whether they were scholarly quarterlies, monthlies, or weekly papers, first followed and interpreted the proceedings of the Second Vatican Council (1962-65) and then did the same for the implementation of the council in succeeding years. Beyond question, journals played a subordinate role when compared with the world's bishops and, of course, with the popes and their collaborators in Rome. Nevertheless, Catholic and other journals were and often remain significant in the story of Vatican II's reception. They deserve more historical and theological attention. Let me offer one sample of what I have in mind, the way in which the London 'Tablet' covered the opening session of the council.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 92 Issue 4 - The old as well as the New: Catholic education fifty
           years on from Vatican II
    • Abstract: D'Orsa, Therese
      This passage is a kind of a signature statement of the author of Matthew as gospel writer and as Christian educator. Matthew's Gospel was written in a very demanding context following the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the temple, a situation of chaos and exile for the community, about a half-century on from the death of Jesus. In the circumstances, Matthew's meaning-making task as leader within his community was daunting. What he was about was a task not dissimilar to that confronting Catholic educators today.

      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:10:00 GMT
       
 
 
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