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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Art Monthly Australia
  [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1033-4025
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Issue 298 - 'I can see a shadow thinking': Tracey Moffatt in conversation
    • Abstract: King, Natalie
      Since graduating from the Queensland College of Art in 1982, Tracey Moffatt has become one of Australia's most visible contemporary artists. Her moving archive of images gleaned from photographic series such as 'Scarred for Life' (1994 and 2000) and 'Night Spirits' (2013) - along with her film montages created with Gary Hillberg such as Lip (1999) and Other (2009) - are loaded with emotive themes touching on belonging, bedevilment and black-and-white race relations in Australia, about which the artist has rarely spoken. On the eve of her presentation of two newly commissioned photographic series and two new video works for the 57th Venice Biennale as Australia's first solo Indigenous artist, Moffatt speaks about the artistic inspiration for her elaborately staged fictions.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - Notes on perception: Gordon Bennett and Daniel Boyd
    • Abstract: Walsh, Tim
      Gordon Bennett (1955-2014) was a groundbreaking figure in contemporary Australian art. Never complacent, Bennett's career was a series of daring stylistic and conceptual breaks with convention. His courage as an artist remains under-acknowledged to this day. Australia's contemporary art scene is indebted to his influence and it would be difficult to conceive of many familiar names and movements without him. One of those artists is the Cairns-born, Sydney-based painter Daniel Boyd. Boyd is a post-Bennett artist in a globalised art context and, like many of his peers, has inherited an art world more self-aware because of Bennett's legacy.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - The chase: Finding the hidden figures of history
    • Abstract: Gough, Julie
      During the onset of British colonisation of Van Diemen's Land, between the years of 1803 and 1830, almost no colonial artists depicted Tasmanian Aboriginal people.1 From the late 1820s the island was perceived in Britain as a colony at war with 'its Natives', culminating in the 'Black Line', when, over a period of six weeks from October 1830, some 3500 armed 'settlers' and military, supported by 30,000 pounds of Government money, attempted to force Aboriginal people remaining at large in the 'settled districts' onto the Tasman Peninsula, before their exile to Flinders Island. After the Aboriginal population was decimated, from perhaps 8000 to about 200 people, they began to appear in a range of artforms produced by a small group of artists.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - On rattling spears [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Stephen, Ann
      Review(s) of: Rattling spears: A history of Indigenous Australian art, by Ian McLean, Reaktion Books, London, 2016, 296 pages, AU$59.99.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Stephens, Andrew
      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - Welina mai ke aupuni o Hawai'i: Greetings from the Hawaiian
           Kingdom
    • Abstract: Eshraghi, Leuli
      In early March 2017, I travelled east of Honolulu to He'eia to visit the restored lo'i along the Waipao river and the nearby heiau and hale pili maintained by the Papahana Kuaola organisation. This was my third visit to the island of O'ahu, but the first time in the embrace of the mountains and valleys. With Sama Alshaibi and Sean Connelly, both Honolulu Biennial artists, I swam in the fresh waters, my toes touching the smooth river stones and smelling the fresh light raindrops bring sustenance to the forest and kalo plots nearby.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - An-archival: Brook Andrew's 'The right to offend is sacred'
    • Abstract: Knezic, Sophie
      Excavation is a word that pithily encapsulates Brook Andrew's practice. Created through painstaking processes of archival research, Andrew's sculptural installations, photographs, collages and coloured screenprints bear the imprint of a close looking at artefacts from the past; a mining of history. 'The Right to Offend is Sacred' is a survey show that presents a select grouping of Andrew's works ranging from 1992 to 2017. Colonial photographs, human bones, old linen-bound volumes encased in glass vitrines and ethnographic film footage materialise in atmospheric juxtaposition. The dimmed gallery lighting, shot through with luminous colour emanating from the neon components of Andrew's installations, transforms the exhibition space into an environment of muted encounters with the past. Photographed faces loom from shadowy grounds with countenances that range from wariness to dispassion and expressions much more inscrutable.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - Papunya painting: Revisiting the genesis of the movement
    • Abstract: Finnane, Kieran
      Paintings, photographs, film from the earliest years of the Western Desert art movement, many not seen since the early 1970s, and some never in public before: this alone would be enough to mark 'Tjungunutja: from having come together' as an important exhibition.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - Spreading like wildfire: The 'Kulata Tjuta Project' in the APY
           lands
    • Abstract: Kaika-Burton, Nyurpaya
      In every community across the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands today you will see houses with kulata (spears) out the front in different stages of completion, and you'll see Anangu men, young and old, straightening spears around camp fires. Frank Young, a leader of the Amata community, has described the spread of the spear-making project established by the senior men as 'wildfire'. My husband Willy Kaika, who has led the 'Kulata Tjuta Project' since its inception at Tjala Arts in 2010, represents the deep knowledge gained over a lifetime and held by senior men about the traditional art of spear making.

      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 298 - Welcome to issue 298
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Mon, 8 May 2017 22:25:58 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - On the crest: 40 years of the ANU school of art
    • Abstract: Norris, Yolande
      The School of Art (SoA) sits atop the crest of Childers Street, resplendent in its art deco symmetry, clock tower against the sky. Completed in 1939, the building is one of the relatively few constants of Canberra architecture, and once stood lonesome among the sheep paddocks in its former role as Canberra High School. Now the building is at the heart of the Australian National University (ANU) precinct: the School of Music, established in 1965 with its own brutalist beauty, sits at its side. Entering the SoA is to be met first by the smell of oils and tinctures - exotic, but familiar to the initiated. There's a reverence in the air; decades of artistic devotion permeates.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Teaching tomorrow's artists in a changing world: A roundtable
    • Abstract:
      'What's happening to Australia's art schools?' NAVA Executive Director Tamara Winikoff wrote in February 2016. 'There was a time when art schools were regarded as a thrilling hotbed of experimentation, bohemianism and great new anarchic ideas. But the gradual funding squeeze and the Dawkins reforms around the early 1990s saw them moved under the umbrella of the universities and required to be more business-like and set "performance targets". What has been the consequence?'

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Kirstie Rea: Glass alchemies
    • Abstract: Soboslay, Zsuzsi
      Kirstie Rea has long been a fierce interrogator of her medium and her practice, but when she and I first met during her residency at the Canberra region's Namadgi National Park in 2009, she was preparing an exhibition for which she fabricated nothing in glass. Sitting on the porch of the residency cottage, watching the roll of the land and in turn being watched by kangaroos, she became obsessed with:

      The way the eye moves through space ... The outline; the way of looking out into that space; the delineation of the edge of the hut and its certainty, against opening to that place.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Toba Khedoori: Tracing time
    • Abstract: Dufour, Gary
      At the time, it may have seemed an extraordinary comparison. The paintings were by a young artist who, in 1999, was just five years out of graduate school at the University of California, Los Angeles. Village Voice critic Jerry Saltz was commenting on Toba Khedoori's second solo exhibition at David Zwirner's gallery in New York. But it wasn't just Saltz taking note of Khedoori's prodigious talent. A mere three years later, in 2002, she was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, becoming the only Australian artist to date to receive this prestigious five-year endowment, known colloquially as the 'Genius Grant'.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - The museum of modern love
    • Abstract: Rose, Heather
      Levin returned to the side of the square where he could see both people in profile once more. He sat down on the floor. A young man now sat opposite the woman. He was strikingly handsome with luminous eyes, a wide mouth and shoulder-length curls, the face of an angel sent to visit dying children. Levin was interested to see if the woman would respond to this aesthetic but she didn't, as far as he could see. She maintained the exact same gaze she'd been giving everyone else. She gazed gently and intently. Her body didn't move. She sat very straight with her hands in her lap. From time to time her eyelids blinked but nothing else.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Carpark chic: Art fair Philippines 2017
    • Abstract: Wolifson, Chloe
      Review(s) of: The 5th art fair Philippines, The Link Carpark, Ayala Center, Manila, 16-19 February 2017.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Chang sae tang: The material conditions of the archive
    • Abstract: Veal, Clare
      Chang's attractiveness to curators interested in understanding the contemporary by way of nuanced understandings of the modern is a result of the ways in which his practice exceeds the limits of national art histories while remaining fundamentally tied to them.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Alex Martinis Roe: Recovering feminism's past
    • Abstract: Robinson, Macushla
      In 1973, two philosophy students proposed a course at the University of Sydney called 'Philosophical Aspects of Feminist Thought'. The department rejected their proposal, prompting teachers and students alike to strike. The protesting philosophers formed an alliance with the New South Wales Builders Labourers Federation (BLF) - whose members, working on campus buildings at the time, went on strike in solidarity. Eventually, the philosophy department was split in two to accommodate the demands of feminist thought, and General Philosophy emerged as a department in its own right.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Running to-and-fro [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Knezic, Sophie
      Review(s) of: Talking contemporary curating, by Terry Smith, 'Perspectives in Curating' series, Independent Curators International, New York, 2015, 344 pages, US$19.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Modernism in motion [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Scarlett, Ken
      Review(s) of: Gerald lewers sculptor, by Peter Pinson, Phillip Mathews Book Publishers, Sydney, 2016, 83 pages, AU$40.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Subcontinental shifts: The 9th India art fair
    • Abstract: Goldspink, Sebastian
      Review(s) of: The 9th India art fair, NSIC Exhibition Complex, New Delhi, 2-5 February 2017.

      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Welcome to issue 297
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 297 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Stephens, Andrew
      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:14:31 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - S. Teddy D. 1970 - 2016
    • Abstract: Irianto, Asmudjo Jono; Clark, Christine
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Stephens, Andrew
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Welcome to issue 295
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Huang Zhuan 1958 - 2016
    • Abstract: Roberts, Claire
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Miriam Stannage 1939 - 2016
    • Abstract: Kinsella, Lee
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Another country: Half the sky: Conversations with women
           artists in China [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Tai, Mikala
      Review(s) of: Half the sky: Conversations with women artists in China, by Luise Guest, Piper Press, Sydney, 2016, 224 pages, AU$69.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - The view from the South: Bernard Smith's antipodean visions
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Haese, Richard
      Review(s) of: Hegel's owl: The life of Bernard Smith, by Sheridan Palmer, Power Publications, Sydney, 2016, 415 pages, AU$39.95.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Careful gestures: Curatorial work and the poetic potential of
           metaphor
    • Abstract: Philip, Isobel Parker
      Photography is slippery. This is an ontological fact: a photograph is at once both an image and an object. Often, when people discuss a photograph, they ignore the material on which the image is transcribed. When we show someone a photograph of our grandmother, we may simply say, 'this is my grandmother', rather than the comparatively longwinded, 'this is a photograph of my grandmother'. By conflating the image of the subject with the subject itself, we bypass the material properties - or, rather, the material fact - of the medium. We look through a photograph, not at it. Photography incites this kind of misleading equivalence because of its complex relationship to time and the mechanics of reproduction. As an image inscribed by the light that once reflected off a subject, a photograph is indelibly linked (or tethered to) the site and the instant of capture. It exists in the present but remains connected to the past; it is a mirrored reflection that is alien and othered; it bears witness to an object's physical presence but also catalogues its absence.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - A transfer of stimulus and creativity: 25 years of 'Primavera'
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      Celebrating the 25th edition in 2016, 'Primavera' is not only Australia's longest-running high-profile exhibition dedicated to new or emerging practice, but also one that places such work in a particular curatorial focus that, like the work itself, has constantly evolved and shifted over time. The current touring anniversary exhibition drawn from the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA) Collection, 'Primavera at 25: MCA Collection', provides a timely opportunity to bring together a small cross-section of the 191 artists and 22 curators who have participated over the years - Abdul Abdullah (artist 2015); David Broker (curator 2002); Mikala Dwyer (artist 1992, curator 2014); Hannah Mathews (curator 2008); Danie Mellor (artist 2005); Nell (artist 1999); and Aaron Seeto (curator 2006) - to ponder Primavera's past and speculate on its future in the following edited roundtable.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - 'Dwelling' as a political form: Architecture and memory in the
           practice of Archie Moore
    • Abstract: Maunder, Tess
      To dwell on an idea means to linger with it, to consider it, to ponder on it for a prolonged duration. It can also mean to physically stay still in one place and reimagine the various potentialities it could offer. The practice of dwelling is conventionally seen as a moment of quietness, reprieve and thoughtfulness; however, in some cases it can also be staged as an avenue of protest, anger and resilience.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - 'Sovereignty': Indigenising and decolonising curatorial
           practice
    • Abstract: Carroll, Khadija von Zinnenburg
      There is irony in an exhibition named 'Sovereignty' that is curated by a 'sovereign Wemba-Wemba/Gunditjmara woman' in collaboration with a white male Artistic Director/CEO. However, that doesn't undermine its contribution to the ongoing effort to bring Aboriginal voices into Australian institutions, as Paola Balla and Max Delany so vividly articulated in our conversation about the exhibition they have curated together to showcase South East Aboriginal art. Also the current political goodwill of the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA) shouldn't seem merely to be redressing its own institutional legacy. It promises an exciting Indigenous survey from old artist-diplomat William Barak (c. 1824 - 1903) to new artist-activists WAR (Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance), the collateral of protest for Aboriginal rights. With 'Sovereignty', what is at stake is the current (and past) under-representation of this contemporary and historic South East Aboriginal art.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - The realm of the senses: The artwork of teamLab in Australia
           and Japan
    • Abstract: Kelty, Russell
      We live in a world today where the natural environment is pushed to the periphery; our engagement with it has become largely virtual. Throughout the history of Japan, the conception of the natural world has been re-envisioned by artists to evoke the ethos of their own era. Currently, the Tokyo-based collective of 'ultra-technologists', teamLab, founded in 2001 by Toshiyuki Inoko (born 1977), is featured in two major exhibitions which portray their unique vision: 'Ever Blossoming' at the Art Gallery of South Australia (AGSA), Adelaide, and 'The Universe and Art: Princess Kaguya, Leonardo da Vinci, teamLab' at the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo. Their practice, which ingeniously integrates high technology with elements of Japanese art and history, is the result of a diversity of specialists and professionals from various fields whose self-professed aim is to 'achieve a balance between art, science, technology and creativity', expressing a sensibility unique to contemporary life.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - 'For your enjoyment': Australian galleries turns 60
    • Abstract: Grishin, Sasha
      When I was a very small child, my father took me to see an exhibition at the Australian Galleries. It was on a warm November day in 1957 that I had my first conscious encounter with art in a commercial gallery. I do not remember very much of what I saw, but it did change my life. There and then I decided that when I grew up I would be an artist and show my work at the Australian Galleries. The exhibition was of John Brack's nudes, and it would be more than 20 years later that I would meet the artist.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Centre and periphery: Establishing Galerie Allen in Paris
    • Abstract: Hancock, Caroline
      Lodged in a busy street near one of the main Parisian train stations, Gare du Nord, and the picturesque tourist hub of Montmartre, Galerie Allen was founded in 2013 by the Sydney-born, Paris-based artist Mel O'Callaghan and her graphic designer husband Clemens Habicht together with the formerly Sydneybased independent curator Joseph Allen Shea. They currently collaborate closely with ten artists ranging from emerging to mid-career artists (and including an artist estate), working in all types of media in a rich cross-disciplinary fashion with a conceptual backbone. Performance and video are prominent. Quickly they have built a city-wide reputation as a friendly and serious space committed to quality presentations.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - A delicate balance
    • Abstract: Mitsuji, Tai
      Review(s) of: 'Sriwhana Spong and Maria Taniguchi: Oceanic feeling', Curated by Susan Gibb, Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) Singapore from 20 August until 16 October 2016.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - A poignant intimacy
    • Abstract: Montana, Andrew
      Review(s) of: 'Nyonya needlework: Embroidery and beadwork from the Peranakan world', Peranakan Museum, Singapore, until 26 March 2017.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - 'Fragil': An Australian art exhibition in Ecuador
    • Abstract: Ahn, En Young
      Review(s) of: Fragil, Curated by Natalia Bradshaw, Salon de Pueblo, Cuenca, until 31 December 2016.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - The 32nd Sao Paulo biennial: In praise of uncertainty
    • Abstract: Ahn, En Young
      Review(s) of: The 32nd Sao Paulo biennial, 'Live Uncertainty', Ciccillo Matarazzo Pavilion until 11 December 2016.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Through the looking glass: The 5th Singapore biennale
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      Review(s) of: The 5th Singapore biennale, 'An Atlas of Mirrors', Singapore Art Museum, National Museum of Singapore, Asian Civilisations Museum, Peranakan Museum and Singapore Management University until 26 February 2017.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Reproducing history: New Zealand Photography collected
    • Abstract: Batchen, Geoffrey
      Review(s) of: 'New Zealand photography collected', Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, 6 November 2015 until 7 August 2016, and accompanied by the eponymous publication (Te Papa Press, Wellington, 2015, 368 pages, NZ$99.99).

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 295 - Firsts and lasts
    • Abstract: Inwald, Minerva
      Review(s) of: 'Zhang Peili: From painting to video', Australian Centre on China in the World, Australian National University, Canberra, from 27 August until 5 December 2016.

      PubDate: Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:29:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Stephens, Andrew
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Welcome to issue 294
    • Abstract: Ormella, Raquel
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Michael Taylor at CMAG
    • Abstract: Desmond, Michael
      Before beginning this review, I should, in the spirit of full disclosure, tell you upfront that Michael Taylor was my teacher at the Canberra (now ANU) School of Art in the early 1970s. He was, at that time, celebrated for the mural-sized paintings decorating the Canberra Theatre, a bold commission sponsored by the youthful James Mollison, then at the height of his notoriety for the daring acquisitions made for the new National Gallery of Australia. The gloss surrounding Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning's abstract work at the time attached itself to Taylor's expressionist works. As a teacher, Taylor spoke very little and it was clear that he preferred to be in his studio. His chosen language was always that of paint. And it is sometimes difficult to find words for the tides, strokes and splatters of colour that characterise Taylor's paintings. His is a highly romantic vision, centred on emotional reactions to the landscape, using marks and colours to evoke responses that are often difficult to articulate. Indeed, it is not always easy to know what he is describing in his unique pictorial language, or what the viewer is seeing beyond the complex grammar of paint, but an aesthetic and elevated mood is conveyed as directly as might be by music.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Driving around bad water
    • Abstract: Conroy, Rowan
      Lake George, or Weereewa in Ngunnawal language, is most commonly encountered by car. The Federal Highway that runs north-south along its western edge is a key geographical feature of the lake's shore and is punctuated by lookouts and Victoria Cross memorial rest stops. When approached from the north the immense flatness of the lakebed and its extension to the horizon is hypnotic. During hot summer weather a fata morgana effect gives the illusion of a vast body of distant water.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - On reflection and collaboration: The Anzac centenary print
           portfolio
    • Abstract: Graham, Brett
      Canberrans are a little like New Zealanders in that they are always apologising for how quiet their town is and wanting to know whether you like it. As an artist who travels a lot, my best experiences have always been measured by the hospitality of the people I meet. In Canberra, I was fortunate enough to find many supportive and creative souls.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - The uniform project: Saluting artistic endeavour
    • Abstract: Norris, Yolande
      Throughout history, what women wear has been seemingly inseparable from endeavour, even when serving the revolution. From the Blue Blouse movement of the early twentieth-century Soviet Union to the Women's Land Army of the First and Second World Wars and Rosie the Riveter herself, swathes of archival imagery reveal the importance of the uniform: uniforms for action, for hard work; uniforms to flatter and impress; uniforms as propaganda, a call to arms.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Textual poetics in this small corner
    • Abstract: Florance, Caren
      Poetry is often something that evokes eye-rolling from people who find it elitist, or boring or challenging. Most of these perceptions stem from school, or specifically high school, where we were forced to do analytical close reading of other people's poems. Primary school, on the other hand, had the right idea: play with the words, use them to pay attention to the world around you (and within you), and make images, as fanciful or abstract as you like, that respond to them. That sudden shift from informality to formality is brutal, and has profound consequences for our cultural development.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Backyard and back room conversations
    • Abstract: Ormella, Raquel
      Australia's high property prices impact on the entire arts sector. Whether it is the multi-millions needed for a new modest museum, or the recent example of Gertrude Contemporary being crippled by high rents to a private landlord, the people profiting don't work in the arts. As Canberra is a relatively young city where most of its architecture is purpose-built, and its population is, on average, relatively affluent, this affects artists across all stages of their career in different ways to other cities. As noted by Jay Kochel in his earlier article in this edition, contemporary artist-run initiatives (ARIs) in Canberra are either multifunction spaces, or have become institutions with studio complexes. These kinds of galleries require larger start-up funds and higher financial turnovers to be sustainable. For these reasons, the wellworn path of arts graduates leaving university, getting a group studio and maybe also setting up an artist-run space has not been the convention in the ACT. However, unlike larger and more crammed cities, most Canberra homes have the great make-do solo studio: the garage. As the site of suburban creativity, it is not unique to the city. However, with domestic (as opposed to commercial) property being the most affordable to rent or buy, Canberra has a long and interesting history of galleries being run in garages and homes.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Linking time, distance and peoples: Aboriginal and Torres
           Strait Islander art in the capital
    • Abstract: Baum, Tina
      Living and working in Canberra, you get used to its nuances, rhythm and lifestyle. Many who visit see rolling countryside surrounded by mountains, sitting within the cultural country of the Ngunnawal and Ngambri across the Territory boundaries. But contrary to Canberra's 'reputation' as a boring, cold and uninviting locale, many simply don't know of the teeming underbelly of vibrant arts, music and performance that remains the local mainstay between major national festivals. Although our proximity to Sydney and Melbourne gives us access to some major events, Canberra and its regions offer so much more than first impressions give.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Small, medium and national: Capital art cultures
    • Abstract: Kochel, Jay
      am sitting at The Front, a small cafe and gallery in Canberra's Inner North. The atmosphere is warmly nostalgic, being popular with art school graduates and decked out in second-hand furniture. I am talking with fellow artist Ellis Hutch about Canberra, the arts landscape here. We discuss practice, that elusive thing for artists, always tied to time, the most valuable of commodities. Canberra seems to exude quiet and space and as such is a wonderful place to engage in practice. Inevitably, talk turns to money, and in turn to funding, and then with some difficulty to the philosophy of value itself - of art, of culture. Canberra may be one of the world's most livable cities with Burley Griffin's idyllic optimism an ongoing experiment, but there is a dystopian edge in the capital at the moment. The national cultural institutions are falling under a cloud of austerity, while artists and smaller arts organisations are coming to terms with the restructuring of funding from the Australia Council.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Klaus Moje ao 1936 - 2016
    • Abstract: Anderson, Nola
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Robert Foster 1962 - 2016
    • Abstract: Brennan, Anne
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 294 - Shaping culture: Conversations on craft and design with Robert
           Bell
    • Abstract: Hely, Patsy
      Dr Robert Bell AM is Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and Design (DAAD) at the National Gallery of Australia (NGA), Canberra. He came to the NGA in 2000 after 22 years in a similar position at the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Exhibition highlights of his long career have included, in Perth, 'International Directions in Glass Art' (1982) and three iterations of the Australian International Crafts Triennial (1989, 1992 and 1998) - all major shows considered firsts for this country. At the NGA he has been responsible for a number of significant exhibitions including 'Material Culture: Aspects of Contemporary Australian Craft and Design' (2002) and 'Transformations: The Language of Craft' (2005-06), both focusing on Australian practice. From his vantage point as a curator in a national institution and as a key figure in the area and one of its strongest advocates, Bell has worked consistently to ensure craft and design remain part of the dialogue about Australian creative practice.

      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:53:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Welcome to issue 293
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Stephens, Andrew
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Wittily subversive: Stephen Bird's 'Bastard son of Royal
           Doulton'
    • Abstract: Jones, Julia
      Viewed by this writer at Casula Powerhouse earlier this year, and most recently on display at Grafton Regional Gallery, 'Stephen Bird: Bastard Son of Royal Doulton' explodes tradition and reassembles the fragments with a witty and satirical perspective. A Wollongong Art Gallery touring exhibition, curated by Louise Brand, its schedule includes over six New South Wales venues from 2015 to 2018. Featuring work produced between 1992 and 2014, it demonstrates how Sydney-based Bird's subversive ceramic practice relates to his works in other mediums, including painting, drawing, prints, assemblages and animation. Many autobiographical pieces have been sourced from the artist's personal collection, including a wide range of watercolour paintings.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Trace, breath and touch: Katthy Cavaliere at Carriageworks
    • Abstract: Frost, Andrew
      It's not often that an exhibition of contemporary art is genuinely moving. Certainly, we are often told what a show is meant to make us feel or think, but a genuine emotional response is rare. 'Katthy Cavaliere: Loved' at Carriageworks was one such show.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Reframing emerging art: The 2016 NSW visual arts fellowship
           (emerging)
    • Abstract: Linz, Talia; Glass-Kantor, Alexie; Pinder, Lola
      Profiling the dynamism and breadth of emerging contemporary artistic practice, the NSW Visual Arts Fellowship (Emerging) is awarded annually by Arts NSW and presented in partnership with Artspace. Each year Arts NSW convenes an independent judging panel of artists and industry professionals to determine the finalists from a highly competitive pool of NSW-based applicants. This group of artists then undertakes a three-month period of development with the Artspace curatorial team, working towards an ambitious group exhibition of works from which the winner is selected. The Fellowship is valued at AU$30,000 and the finalist exhibition has been held annually at Artspace since 1997, continuing to nurture new generations of contemporary artists and audiences.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Without censure: 'Black white and restive' at Newcastle
    • Abstract: Martin-Chew, Louise
      Cross-cultural engagement is an ethical 'hot spot' in the academic world, requiring gatekeepers, sign-offs and adoption of universally applied protocols prior to engagement of white researchers with Indigenous subjects. This comes from an important need to redress the balance in Australia's contested histories but, as a consequence, unpatrolled initiatives are rare. 'Black White and Restive' was one such initiative, and presented an ambitious undertaking by Newcastle Art Gallery.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - On 'solid ground'
    • Abstract: Albert, Tony
      2015 will forever be remembered as the year I realised a lifelong ambition. I moved to New York, where I was fortunate enough to undertake a six-month residency at the International Studio and Curatorial Program in Brooklyn. It was a life-changing experience and one that a younger me could only dream of. Three months into the program I was joined by my family, who spent two weeks with me taking in all the sites, smells and sounds of Manhattan. It was the first time we had ever been overseas together, and a memorable trip for all. On one humid Manhattan evening, we found ourselves standing in the middle of Times Square. I distinctly recall being struck by how far away I felt from my childhood. Growing up in suburban Brisbane, my sister and I were the only people of colour in our school. Yet here we were, at the epicentre of the most diverse city in the world. It was a surreal experience for my sister and I, and a far cry from our school years.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Actions and reflections: 'Space to dream: Recent art from
           South America'
    • Abstract: Ross, Toni
      'Space to Dream' opened with much local fanfare at the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki in May of this year. By hosting this event the gallery assumed the distinction of being the first Australasian venue to initiate a meticulously researched, historically nuanced survey of contemporary art from South America. The fruit of a three-year collaboration between Chilean curator Beatriz Bustos Oyanedel and the gallery's Principal Curator Zara Stanhope, this landmark show deserved attention beyond the shores of New Zealand.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks!: 'Tempest' at TMAG
    • Abstract: Judd, Craig
      'Tempest' is the jewel in the crown of the 2016 Dark Mofo, Hobart's winter festival. For an island state so exposed to extreme weather events, it is surprising that such a thematic had not been explored in previous exhibitions and festivals. I think it is also significant that the exhibition is staged in buildings situated on the low bluff where Europeans began permanent settlement on the island then known as Van Diemen's Land. Shakespeare's The Tempest (1610-11), a play about the illusions and delusions of island life and now viewed as a paradigm of postcolonialism, is another obvious linkage. Locals are often blind to what is habituated, so congratulations are in order to Guest Curator Juliana Engberg and to Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG) staff, particularly Curator Jane Stewart, who worked tirelessly to realise this charming and provocative crowd-pleaser. It is an exhibition that inhabits, condenses and swirls across six large galleries and into the many nooks and crannies of the accretive architecture of TMAG.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Parr's penance: 'Asylum' at Willow court
    • Abstract: Hawthorne, Lucy
      It's the eve of the winter solstice and I'm alone on the top floor of C Ward, the 'Male Maximum Security Ward for the Criminally Insane', at the former Willow Court asylum in New Norfolk, just outside Hobart. I'm conducting a final sweep of the building before we close Mike Parr's 'Asylum' when I hear a crash at the end of the building. I reluctantly make my way down the long hallway, possum poo crunching underfoot. I shine my torch into each of the rooms, all in various states of ruin. In one of the small patient rooms, light from the full moon shines through a dirty window, bouncing off a mirror and onto the ceiling - the gridlike pattern of the window panes perfectly replicated. There's a scuffle and a small dark form whips past my feet, and runs down the hallway. In the absence of human occupants, Willow Court is now the domain of possums.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Diversionary tacticsL Mike Parr at the NGA
    • Abstract: Richards, Bree
      Mike Parr is widely regarded as one of Australia's most innovative and influential artists, with a prolific career spanning nearly five decades. While his works have undergone distinct phases, varied in approach and media, autobiographical embodiment is a foundational concept to which the artist has continually returned. Whatever the subject, whatever the medium, Parr has consistently tested the limits of his physical and mental endurance, inviting viewers to identify with often extreme actions, and using his body as subject and object to investigate themes such as memory, identity and psychology.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Mountain mapping
    • Abstract: Bond, Tony
      In spite of its reputation as eccentric and slightly feral, the Blue Mountains community is more complicated than that - and a lot more interesting. The mountains are home to an astonishing number of highly established artists with international reputations, including Roger Foley-Fogg, David Haines and Joyce Hinterding, Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro, WeiZen Ho, Ian Milliss, Mike Parr, Jon Rose, Joan Ross and Alan Schacher, to name a few. There are many more who take an active part in the community through exhibitions and events at a number of different venues. Four years ago the local council opened a new public gallery in Katoomba, the Blue Mountains Cultural Centre (BMCC). The Sydney art world still has not fully realised that this is a very sophisticated venue with excellent facilities and a very ambitious program less than two hours from the CBD.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Anne Graham: Gathering
    • Abstract: Kronenberg, Simeon
      Entering Anne Graham's studio is to be welcomed into a gathering of familiar but also strangely unfamiliar objects - all fundamentally to do with nurture and connection, across time and place. The collection is both generous and generative.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - From manner to materiality: Sculpture in the hunter
    • Abstract: Stowell, Jill
      It is a rare occasion for two of the most prominent sculptors of the Lower Hunter to be exhibiting simultaneously in the same public gallery. Paul Selwood and Braddon Snape are a generation apart, but at present each has extensive representation at Maitland Regional Art Gallery.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - An unsettling ambivalence: Matthew Ngui's 'every point of view
    • Abstract: Mateer, John
      For over two decades, Matthew Ngui has divided his time between Fremantle and Singapore, sometimes being better recognised as a Singaporean rather than Australian artist. His work was the subject of a large survey show, 'Points of View', which began its Australia-Singapore tour at Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art in 2007, and he has shown in numerous high-profile exhibitions, including 'Cities on the Move' (1997-98), curated by Hou Hanru and Hans-Ulrich Obrist.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - An antipodean view of 'Conceptual art in Britain 1964-1979'
    • Abstract: Stephen, Ann
      As conceptual art is the touchstone for much contemporary art, it is surprising that the reception to the recent Tate survey of conceptual art in Britain has been largely hostile, with the display attacked as 'excruciatingly dull' and the artists 'terminally glum'. Maybe it is some consolation that work, now more than half a century old, still provokes.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 293 - Alicia Frankovich and Tehching Hsieh: Well-matched in Brooklyn
    • Abstract: Robinson, Macushla
      The Brooklyn space is hot and filled with people. Two artists - Alicia Frankovich, from Auckland via Melbourne and Berlin, and Tehching Hsieh, a Taiwanese-born New Yorker - have just spoken about their works, hosted by the International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP).1 At the conclusion of their slide shows they stand up and look as if they are about to shake hands. Instead, they bend and charge one another. Shoulders interlocking, arms by their sides, they push against each other's body, moving barely centimetres back and forth across the floor.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:24:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Welcome to issue 292
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Stephens, Andrew
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Everywhen there is time for Aboriginal art in America: An
           interview with Stephen Gilchrist
    • Abstract: Carroll, Khadija von Zinnenburg; Gilchrist, Stephen
      Curator Stephen Gilchrist is standing at the entrance to his exhibition 'Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia' at the Harvard Art Museums, doing an Acknowledgement of Country. These few performative words spoken in acknowledgment of largely silent erasures of Indigenous presence are ephemeral but potent gestures. This cultural protocol is largely alien to the exhibition's American audiences who may have never considered the histories of erasure that make the United States East Coast largely 'free' - 'clear', 'died out', 'gone', I am told - of Native Americans. Shortly before visiting 'Everywhen' I was at the Clark Art Institute in nearby Williamstown, Massachusetts, enacting an Acknowledgement of Country with Mohawk, Mahican and other visiting collaborators for the conference 'Challenging Art History in Settler-Colonial Societies'. It is April 2016, and I could see the Clark and Harvard audiences were thinking for the first time about a presence of Indigenous people in Massachusetts. But that was just the first gift of 'Everywhen'.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Angelina Pwerle: An artist from Utopia
    • Abstract: Schmidt, Chrischona
      'I grew up on a station, not far from here,' recounts Angelina Pwerle, the international artist from the Utopia region in Central Australia acclaimed for her highly abstract and minimalist paintings of myriads of meticulous dots depicting her Altyerr or Dreaming. 'My father and my mother, we all lived there.' Thought to have been born in 1946, Pwerle is a senior Anmatyerr lady who lives in the outstation Camel Camp, at the southern edge of the Utopia homelands. She is one of nine female artists being shown in the latest Indigenous Australian art exhibition in the United States, 'Marking the Infinite: Contemporary Women Artists from Aboriginal Australia', in which William Fox and Henry Skerritt draw on the extensive collection of Miami-based philanthropists Debra and Dennis Scholl.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Angela Cavalieri: Narrative tones
    • Abstract: Garden, Wendy
      Storytelling has been an intrinsic part of culture since humans developed the faculty for language. It has been instrumental in fostering group identification, conveying moral codes and sharing understandings of the world. While contemporary society's reliance on writing has largely usurped the conventional role of storytelling, this has not diminished the power of the spoken word. Indeed, testament to its enduring influence is the global success of online TED Talks - a twenty-first century version of gathering around a campfire listening to stories.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Quick, raw and physical: Franck Gohier's monoprints
    • Abstract: Barrkman, Joanna
      When Franck Gohier was a Fine Arts student at Northern Territory University (now Charles Darwin University) in 1991, he unwittingly caused controversy by exhibiting monoprints in his graduation exhibition. He had created these one-off images by inking up and directly creating an image on the back of cast-off etching plates before printing them onto paper. Gohier's painting and printmaking lecturers were flummoxed as they could not agree whether his monoprints were paintings or prints. Their request that he cease making monoprints was ignored. Gohier maintained that he was concerned with making art, not ticking boxes. 'I scraped through with a credit because they couldn't work it - or me - out,' the artist now says.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Connection and belonging: The 33rd NATSIAAs at MAGNT
    • Abstract: Scholes, Luke
      Since its genesis in 1984, the Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards (NATSIAA) have provided a unique platform for the diverse practices of Indigenous artists from across Australia. As the longest running and most prestigious award of its type, NATSIAA is firmly established as a critical event on Australia's cultural calendar. Such is its success and longevity, it can now lay claim to having nurtured a generation of followers who annually flock to the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (MAGNT) in Darwin to immerse themselves in the best contemporary Indigenous art of the previous 12 months.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Fragile environments: The 'sea pearl white cloud' project
    • Abstract: Inwald, Minerva
      Guangzhou has rich, wet heat. Plants grow out of concrete overpasses and off apartment balconies. Gardens can be glimpsed spouting from the roofs of buildings. Everything is glazed with a film of rain, and water drips off tiled walls and hanging leaves. The air is filled with the vibration of cicadas.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Spaces for reflection: Natasha Johns-messenger at Heide
    • Abstract: Knezic, Sophie
      Natasha Johns-Messenger delights in optical conceits and guileful explorations of embodied perception. Her room-scaled installations cleverly inhabit a space between the virtual and the real, beckoning the viewer into their phantasmatic realms. Often designed as architectural interventions produced from the materials of MDF and sheets of mirror and perspex, Johns-Messenger's installations play games with the viewer's mirror image by subverting these reflections in unexpected ways. Through the use of false walls and multiple angled mirrors, the artist creates structures whose labyrinthine reflections confuse the spectator's depth perception and sense of interior architectural space in ways which are both amusing and intriguing.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Material presence: 'Emanations' at Govett-Brewster
    • Abstract: Palmer, Daniel
      'Emanations' took its inspiration from Len Lye's 'shadowgraphs' produced in the 1930s and 1940s. A series of 1947 portraits, barely known during Lye's astonishingly productive lifetime, in which he persuaded notable subjects such as Georgia O'Keeffe and Le Corbusier to press the sides of their faces to a sheet of photographic paper, formed the centre of the exhibition. From here, Wellington-based curator Geoffrey Batchen, one of the world's leading photography scholars, travelled backwards to the origins of photography and forwards to its most recent material experimentations. His research delivered extraordinary diversity, bringing together more than 200 examples of cameraless imagery across the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery and the new Len Lye Centre (which opened in July 2015 and whose wavy stainless steel exterior has, coincidentally, become a magnetic backdrop to take selfies). A potentially repetitive history of photography in its 'primal', often abstract, state was instead turned into a surprising new perspective on the medium. In his writing, Batchen regularly calls for new ways of doing photographic history; here he offered us an instance of such a history that suddenly rendered all previous histories as camera-focused.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 292 - Tautai matagofie, the wonderful navigator: 30 years of tautai
           contemporary Pacific arts trust
    • Abstract: Tonga, Nina
      Located in the foyer of the Aotea Centre in downtown Auckland is the iconic 1990 mural Tautai Matagofie (The Wonderful Navigator) by renowned Samoan artist Fatu Feu'u. The mural takes the form of a tableau that celebrates the migration of Pacific peoples to Aotearoa and the visionary role of the Tautai, the expert navigators who traversed the ocean with an in-depth knowledge of the world around them. This holistic wayfinding tradition also inspired Feu'u alongside a raft of artist and supporters who established Tautai Contemporary Pacific Arts Trust. For the last three decades, Tautai has been a beacon for contemporary Pacific art in New Zealand.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:33:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Playful allegories and powerful gestalts: A conversation with
           Ian North
    • Abstract: North, Ian; Nicholls, Christine
      The Australian painter and photographic artist Ian North (born 1945) has lived in Australia since 1971, when he emigrated from New Zealand to take up a curatorial position at the Art Gallery of South Australia. Well-known as a writer and curator, he has for many years pursued his art practice with the rigour that he showed during his time working in art museums. These included the National Gallery of Australia where he was foundation Curator of Photography and later a member of the gallery's Council.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Stephens, Andrew
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Welcome to issue 291
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - William Yaxley: An authentic innocence
    • Abstract: Svendsen, Mark
      In Rockhampton in the mid-1970s, a public art gallery was built by legendary mayor Rex Pilbeam. Having built the space, Pilbeam got busy coaxing, cajoling and coercing dollars from the community to purchase art to fill it. Some of the work purchased was by a certain William Yaxley who, on the coast at nearby Farnborough and later at Byfield, farmed and made art for many years. How fitting it is that Diana Warnes, Curator at the Rockhampton Art Gallery, has created the excellent survey exhibition 'The Adventures of William Yaxley' in part from this legacy.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - In every direction: 'Overundersidewaysdown' at Manly
    • Abstract: Warburton, Toni
      Contemporary ceramic art exhibitions recently occupied opposite shores of Sydney Harbour: Grayson Perry's 'My Pretty Little Art Career' at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia at Circular Quay and curator Glenn Barkley's 'OVERUNDERSIDEWAYSDOWN' at Manly Art Gallery and Museum. As a prolific and at times subversive curator, Barkley questions genres and pulls focus. This 'trickster' agility does not belie the seriousness of his intent. Barkley is also a self-taught maker of ceramics: 'desperate to see and know more'.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Signifiers of lost times: Chen Qiulin at SAM
    • Abstract: Durrant, Jacqui
      'Astounding and appalling,' is how a friend recently returned from Sichuan province describes the pace of urbanisation and industrialisation in Southwest China. 'The Chinese are engaged in a race towards the new,' he said. 'And the old is being discarded like ballast.' And so it was that Shepparton Art Gallery's midwinter exhibition, Chen Qiulin's 'One Hundred Names', offered an uneasy insight into this furious pace of change, coupled with a poetic lamentation at the widespread failure to recognise what is being lost in the process.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - A vast universe within: Nasreen Mohamedi at the met
    • Abstract: Buttrose, Ellie
      The Metropolitan Museum of Art's adoption of the Marcel Breuer- designed building on Madison Avenue which formerly housed the Whitney Museum of American Art opened in March this year with a touring exhibition of Nasreen Mohamedi's paintings, drawings and photographs alongside the vast group exhibition 'Unfinished: Thoughts Left Visible'. Renamed The Met Breuer, the building is dedicated to the institution's expanded program of modern and contemporary art, which has seen recent appointments for curators of art from South Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, North Africa and Turkey.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Open space: National gallery Singapore
    • Abstract: Ewington, Julie
      It is hard to know if the new National Gallery Singapore - opened November 2015 - is the answer to a nationalist's prayer or the largest Trojan horse in Southeast Asia. Is it an expensive monument to past histories, or will it prove an irresistible force for cultural change?

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - 'Anangu culture is family culture': Collaborative painting in
           the APY Lands
    • Abstract: Kaika-Burton, Nyurpaya; Kothe, Hannah
      Recently more than 20 senior women from the seven Aboriginal art centres dotted across communities throughout the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands in the far north of South Australia gathered together at Kaltjiti Arts in Fregon community. The project, the creation of a grand women's collaborative painting, is a first for the artists and their art centres. Unprecedented in scale for a collaborative painting seen anywhere throughout the Central Desert, the artists were confronted with an impressive blank canvas, 4.5 metres long by 3 metres high. The resultant painting, along with a men's equivalent, will be exhibited at the major APY survey exhibition to be held at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and Arts Centre in October.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Dark lament: Fiona Hall's all the king's men
    • Abstract: McKenzie, Jenna
      In 2015 Fiona Hall presented 'Wrong Way Time' at the 56th Venice Biennale. One of Australia's foremost contemporary artists, for the past four decades Hall has explored the relationships between culture and nature in her work. Transforming everyday objects into detailed works of art, the Adelaide-based artist masterfully repurposes the quotidian to create works charged with meaning that engage with a range of contemporary issues such as colonisation, consumerism and conservation. Hall's observations and reflections often contain warnings and alert us to immanent and impending danger, making her much like a canary in the coalmine for our times.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - His mortal eye: Stanley Spencer at Carrick hill
    • Abstract: Gibbons, Geoff
      'Stanley Spencer: A Twentieth Century British Master' is only the second major exhibition of the work of Spencer to be held in Australia. It marks the fiftieth year since an exhibition was mounted in Adelaide in 1966 and includes 30 works by the artist (1891 - 1959) drawn from state art museums in Australia and New Zealand, as well as three from private collections. It is supplemented by a book published by Wakefield Press with important essays by Ted Gott, Paul Gough, Carrick Hill's Associate Curator Anna Jug and Director Richard Heathcote.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Territorial encounters
    • Abstract: Tylor, James
      'Territorial Encounters' explores the process of how Europeans colonised South Australia and dispossessed land from Nunga people.1 From 1802 Matthew Flinders circumnavigated the Australian continent to lay claim to the area as British territory and to stop the French Empire from colonising Australia. During Flinders's expedition he mapped the South Australian coastline in search of suitable water supplies and harbours for the British to build colonies on the southern coast of Australia. In 1836 the British officially colonised Karta (Kangaroo Island) under the control of the South Australian Company, setting up the township of Kingscote. However, when they arrived on Karta, they found that it had already been inhabited - first by the Ramindjeri people who settled the island about 60,000 years ago when the island was attached to the continent of Australia, and then by commercial whalers and sealers. After less than a year on Karta, the British colonists decided there was insufficient water to hold a large population on the island and, from the vantage point of Kingscote, Colonel William Light sets his sights on the mainland, eventually choosing the site of Adelaide, and from there the British colonised the rest of South Australia.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Inge King 1915 - 2016
    • Abstract: Eckett, Jane
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Jan Senbergs: Melbourne brutal
    • Abstract: Butler, Rex
      It is perhaps no coincidence that just as the Jan Senbergs retrospective was winding down at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), a month-long festival devoted to the architectural style of brutalism was opening in Melbourne. In May, architectural critic Jonathan Meades's television series Bunkers, Brutalism and Bloodymindedness screened at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, while the month also saw a series of talks and workshops entitled 'Brutalist Block Party'. Indeed, it is not a little ironic that we are able to speak about the long-running influence of brutalism at all because over the course of its almost 70-year history the style has been repressed, derided, mocked and even acknowledged by its founders as something of a failure, and is even now only being brought back - as the titles of the film and workshops above reveal - as something antithetical, a guilty pleasure, almost like one of those periodic revivals of 'bad taste'.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 291 - Awesome: Cameron Robbins at MONA
    • Abstract: Hill, Peter
      While Mike Parr was scratching and scribbling in a bleak former asylum cell 35 kilometres outside Hobart, and others were preparing for a darkly bacchanalian night to be spent in one of the city's bespoke undertakers (marshmallows toasted above burning crematorium coals), there was an almost Enlightenment feel of reason and curiosity about the new work of Melbourne artist Cameron Robbins unveiled at the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) during the run of Dark Mofo, Hobart's annual winter festival.

      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 20:20:29 GMT
       
 
 
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