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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 398 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 398 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)

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Art Monthly Australia
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1033-4025
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [398 journals]
  • Issue 286 - Patriotism, patriarchy and politics
    • Abstract: Wolifson, Chloe
      Twelve months ago, museums and regional galleries around the country were gearing up to commemorate a milestone in 2015. On the fortieth anniversary of the United Nations-declared International Women's Year and the twentieth anniversary of the Beijing Declaration, the Australian Government had committed AU$4.7 million to - wait for it - the Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund. Money was available for projects that 'tell the story of the Anzacs and how their sacrifice shaped our nation'. The result was a proliferation of Anzac-themed exhibitions, while Commonwealth recognition of the feminist milestone took the form of a booklet and video. Cultural institutions were left to fund International Women's Day (IWD)-themed events via existing avenues.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 286 - Political feminism
    • Abstract: Coombs, Courtney
      Recent discussions both in the art world and beyond have increased the profile and demystified the notion of feminism in the twenty-first century, and the term has once again become integrated into mainstream discussion internationally and in Australia. Now that pop music star Taylor Swift has declared herself a feminist, you could be persuaded that the 'f' word has finally become socially acceptable. However, while many artists have adopted the feminist label across the country, it often feels like feminism has become a lifestyle choice rather than a political one. When the badge is so readily worn by many, society can be fooled into thinking that there is no more work to be done. With the 'f' word once again acceptable while the 'p' word (patriarchy) remains so pass , how are artists responding to the changed conditions but continued imposition of what bell hooks has described as the 'imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy''

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 286 - A proliferous moment
    • Abstract: Mayhew, Louise R
      In this moment of revived interest in feminism, there is also an identifiable resurgence of women's collaborative and collective activity. Newly formed groups are appearing in experimental spaces, established state galleries and prestigious international programming, making an indelible mark on the Australian art world. Four local groups - Clark Beaumont, Alexandra Clapham and Penelope Benton, zin and The Sisters Hayes - exemplify tendencies common to this emerging wave of collaborators.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 286 - Forty years and counting
    • Abstract: Mayhew, Louise R
      The timeline that you will find in the following inside centrefold pages charts a history of Australia's women-only collective and collaborative art projects, locating contemporary practices within a fertile landscape of women's galleries, curatorial initiatives, publications, discussion networks and group art practices.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 286 - Ladies' legacies: Women gifting art by women
    • Abstract: Bryan-Brown, Lisa
      The importance of deliberate and considered collecting strategies is implicit in the process of building insightful and revelatory art collections. However, it is when these strategies are underpinned by a collector's passion for a particular area, and the drive to explore it, that truly significant collections are realised.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 286 - Notes on the formation of a feminist curatorial practice for
           today
    • Abstract: Burns, Aileen
      Recent news broadcasts in Queensland have violently thrown into relief the ongoing need for feminist action. On 11 September it was reported by ABC News that a 24-year-old woman, Tara Brown, was run off the road on the Gold Coast and beaten to death by her partner. She had sought protection and support from the police just days before her death and was given none. On 10 September a 49-year-old woman and mother of four was shot by a 57-year-old man at McDonald's on the Gold Coast. These two shocking events, which took place only days apart, are sadly just two high-profile markers of the ongoing structures of inequality that underpin the social context in which we are operating.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 286 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 286 - Welcome to issue 286
    • Abstract: Best, Susan; Mayhew, Louise
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 286 - Queer spritz
    • Abstract: Britton, Kate
      The conversation took place three days later at the residential studio of Frances Barrett in Sydney, and included Frances, Kelly Doley, Elliott Bryce Foulkes, Astrid Lorange, Anna McMahon, Spence Messih, Claudia Nicholson, Emily O'Connor, Okapi Neon and Salote Tawale.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Through a glass darkly: 'Myth + magic' at the NGA
    • Abstract: Losche, Diane
      Review(s) of: Myth + magic: Art of the sepik river, Papua New Guinea, exhibition views, National Gallery of Australia (NGA), Canberra, until 1 November 2015.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Slow burn
    • Abstract: Murphy, John
      Review(s) of: 'If you do not speak, do I speak for you'', by Robyn Backen.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Continental drift
    • Abstract: Marcon, Marco
      Review(s) of: 'Accident and process' at PICA, by Derek Kreckler.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Everyone, everything, everywhere
    • Abstract: Thomas, Daniel
      Review(s) of: Everyone, everything, everywhere, by Robert MacPherson.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Peter Rushforth oa
    • Abstract: Freeland, John
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Reflecting a figure: The Govett-Brewster's new Len Lye centre
    • Abstract: Curnow, Wystan
      For most of his life Len Lye lived and worked in London and New York, but in 1980, shortly before his death, he bequeathed his work to New Zealand, the land of his birth. It was shipped to the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery (GBAG), on loan but owned by a Foundation bearing his name. New Plymouth was, you would have thought, an unlikely and unreliable custodian, but it happened because in 1977 its gallery gave Lye a major show and, more importantly, it was the hometown of a young engineer, John Matthews, who facilitated the making of major new works for the gallery. It is the same John Matthews who today chairs the Foundation and whose satisfaction with the opening of the Len Lye Centre is surely the deepest and most deserved of all those who have been involved in its planning.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - The past is a foreign climate: Shigeyuki Kihara meets the
           Anthropocene
    • Abstract: Seja, Nina
      A young Samoan woman stands constrained in a voluminous black dress. The black-and-white photographs emphasise a Victorian formality and sensibility. This ancestor from the past is Shigeyuki Kihara's Salome, a young ancient who stands at the interstices of the past, present and future. Surveying diverse topographies of the Pacific nation, she looks at what was, and is, and what will be. She is the common thread in Kihara's recent series 'Where do we come from' What are we' Where are we going'' (2013). The philosophical undercurrent about the nature of existence echoes Paul Gauguin's 1897-98 painting of the same name. But the self-reflexivity - a common trope in the oeuvre of this Apia and Auckland-based artist - renders Gauguin's Pacific through a postcolonial lens. Salome has returned after centuries have passed, to see, as Kihara reflects: 'whether the aspirations that she had in her time have been realised by the descendants, only to come back and perhaps be disappointed by some of the results.'

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - My big ugly art world: Grayson Perry on Aboriginal art and how
           to be undiplomatic in the history wars
    • Abstract: Carroll, Khadija von Zinnenburg
      My Pretty Little Art Career is the title of a 2003 vase by Grayson Perry in which he parodies the way in which an artist's CV is what sells in the art market. Its decoration is a chaotic diagram of references, the mental map of the blue chip artist, the dream checklist of institutional legitimation. 'I think the MCA might have figured on one of those things you've got to have on your ideal CV [among the names floating on] my pretty little vase,' he says.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Depicting durchblicke: The wall works of Klaus Moje
    • Abstract: Anderson, Nola
      For over three decades, the German-born, New South Wales South Coast-based glass artist Klaus Moje has worked almost exclusively in the vessel format. Simple forms, sometimes exhibiting outrageous colour and always a confident independence: in the early years his work gained occasional notoriety as too brashly colourful for some European survey shows, or too technically finessed for the then-American preference for free expression. It didn't worry the artist a bit. Moje's language was profoundly and distinctly his own, and has remained so.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - A desirous mind: Matthys Gerber at the MCA
    • Abstract: Delany, Max
      Review(s) of: MCA, by Matthys Gerber.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Multiple flows: 'Saltwater: A theory of thought forms', the
           14th Istanbul Biennial
    • Abstract: Ewington, Julie
      Review(s) of: The most beautiful of all mothers, 2015, by Adrian Villar Rojas; Tall man, 2010, by Vernon Ah Kee.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Welcome to issue 285
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - New Zealand at Venice: Simon Denny's 'secret power'
    • Abstract: Barton, Christina
      Simon Denny's presentation at the 56th Venice Biennale has been an undoubted success, for the artist and for New Zealand. Staged across two high-profile sites - Marco Polo International Airport and the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana in the Piazza San Marco - there have never been more visible locations for a New Zealand artist since we started attending the Biennale in 2001. Denny has turned the disadvantage of having to seek a temporary venue outside the Giardini and Arsenale into a major component of the success of his two-part installation, 'Secret Power'.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 285 - Re-animating encounter: Lisa Reihana's in pursuit of Venus
           [infected]
    • Abstract: Webb, Vivienne
      An artwork of astonishing experiential power and conceptual richness, Lisa Reihana's in Pursuit of Venus [infected] (2015) explores the complex territory of early contact between Pacific peoples and Europeans at the time of the Enlightenment voyages of exploration. The work delves into the intertwined histories of these diverse cultures, drawing and fleshing out the stories to retrieve and deliver critical insights and visual delights.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - In the moment: Marina Abramovic's 'private archaeology' at
           MONA
    • Abstract: Soumilas, Diane
      Marina Abramovic is internationally celebrated for challenging audiences with radical and confrontational long durational performances since the early 1970s, pushing the physical and mental limits of her body, enduring extreme pain and exhaustion in a search for spiritual and emotional transformation. Four decades later, Abramovic continues to embrace the transcendental practices learnt from Brazilian shamanism, Tibetan Buddhism, the healing powers of ancient civilisations, the idea of 'the here and now' from Aboriginal cultures, Balkan rituals and mythology. Her recent work investigates the importance of public interaction as being central to the viewing experience, concerns with slowing the mind, stillness and what the artist has called 'the art of the immaterial'. As Justin Clemens has written, Abramovic 'integrates the audience into new ritual forms', transforming viewers into performers.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - A growing medium: The garden in art and design
    • Abstract: Jones, Julia
      The garden operates as a powerful growing medium within contemporary culture. In this essay I investigate the Australian field of interdisciplinary practice within art and design in which contemporary garden practices and concepts play a pivotal and integrated role. When these art and design projects engage closely with the medium of the garden, they provide inspirational and tangible models and sites for reflection in an era of environmental change and fragility. My investigation features a diverse range of contemporary projects, including those of Lauren Berkowitz, Diego Bonetto, Emily Floyd, Simryn Gill, Janet Laurence and Amanda Levete. These projects intersect with the innovative, experimental approaches found in gardening practices today, ranging from environmental regeneration and sustainability to the creation of sites for healing, sanctuary and cultural symbolism.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - Suspending disbelief
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: 'The photograph and Australia', Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - Against the grain
    • Abstract: Barnes, Carolyn
      Review(s) of: 'Colour sensation', by Melinda Harper, Heide.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - Coincident lines
    • Abstract: Paull, James
      Review(s) of: 'Rambangi: Together as equals', by Ruark Lewis and Barayuwa Mununggurr, Northern Centre for Contemporary Art, Darwin, from 7 August to 5 September 2015.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - Closing the temporal distance [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Gilchrist, Stephen
      Review(s) of: Art in the time of colony, by Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll, Ashgate Press, London, 2014, 307 pages, AU$143.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - Connecting threads [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Wolifson, Chloe
      Review(s) of: Go East: The Gene and Brian Sherman Collection, 248 pages, AU$85; Chinese Bible, by Yang Zhichao, 128 pages, AU$50; Public Notice 2, 128 pages, AU$50, all three were published by Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation and Art Gallery , New South Wales, Sydney, 2015.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - Welcome to issue 284
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - Dispatches
    • PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - The Tasmanian effect
    • Abstract: do Campo, Fernando
      Coloured gestures from floor to ceiling stretch along a curved wall at Brisbane's International Terminal. Sunlit by a facing window looking onto the landing strip, it guides the new arrivals from plane to customs. Before I registered the origin of the image, I was already running my fingers along its surface, triggered by other passengers doing the same in front of me. It was a recently installed commission by the late Indigenous Queensland artist Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda (Mrs Gabori). I recognised her marks and palette almost immediately and was overcome with joy that an Indigenous local artist be celebrated at this scale, offering me a beautiful welcome passage into Australia.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - World-in-a-world: 'The shadows calling' at Detached
    • Abstract: Kent, Rachel
      To enter 'The Shadows Calling', the collaborative exhibition by Patricia Piccinini and Peter Hennessey, is to enter another world - or universe - altogether. Created as a permanent installation on the ground level of Hobart's Old Mercury Building in the first stage of its redevelopment, the artists' works are eerie, immersive and utterly compelling. Objects, video, sound and smell envelop visitors as they pass through two cavernous spaces, one replete with vast red ink stains from the building's past as a newspaper printing press. Commissioned by the building's new owner, the Detached Cultural Organisation, 'The Shadows Calling' is a first for both Melbourne-based artists who have worked side-by-side for many years, supporting one another's practice, but never together before as one unique voice.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 284 - Lola Greeno and Marina Abramovic
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      When in December 2014 the Museum of Old and New Art's Research Curator Delia Nicholls first spoke with Tasmanian Indigenous artist Lola Greeno to commission one of her signature shell necklaces for the formidable Marina Abramovic, Greeno had not even heard of the Belgrade-born diva of performance art. While widely exhibited, the Launceston-based artist has traditionally worked close to home, hardly a fixture of the international art world. An internet search, however, quickly acquainted Greeno with Abramovic's startling, stoic, extreme and exposing performances, and she decided that Abramovic was just the sort of woman who could carry off a shell necklace worthy of a warrior. 'I thought, wow, these shells actually do suit that woman,' Greeno says.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - 'Small enough to be agile': A South Australian roundtable
    • Abstract: Walker, Wendy
      'Funding in crisis'' A shifting landscape' At an important time in the evolution of the visual arts in South Australia (SA), Art Monthly Australia brings together seven directors of influential SA institutions or organisations: Steve Eland (Australian Experimental Art Foundation); Erica Green (Anne and Gordon Samstag Museum of Art); Nick Mitzevich (Art Gallery of SA) and Melinda Rankin (Murray Bridge Regional Gallery). Liz Nowell, who communicates from New York, returns in October to take up the position of Director at the Contemporary Art Centre of SA. Brigid Noone and Ben Leslie are co-founders of the successful artist-run initiative (ARI), Fontanelle Gallery and Studios, which was established in the inner-city suburb of Bowden in 2012.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - Greg Semu: Bridging the gap
    • Abstract: Vance, Rachael
      While on a recent residency at the K nstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin, New Zealand-born artist Greg Semu discusses how he espouses his unique position as an initiated Samoan man in order to 'make a statement beyond himself '. Known for producing choreographed figurative photographs depicting traditional Pacific imagery, Semu offers a contemporary voice on topics of ancestral heritage and cultural displacement.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - Lawrence Daws: Gondwana dreaming
    • Abstract: Neylon, John
      The imagery of Lawrence Daws runs like a river through the landscape of modern Australian art. Its distinctive identity is based on a blending of observed and invented landscape with symbolic elements and motifs. The artist's exploration of the subconscious couched in, or defined by landscape, belongs to a particular narrative in Australian art that has its origins in the Federation era when artists fed popular perceptions of Australia having a unique identity as defined by a vast hinterland, encompassing oceans, majestic gum trees and, above all, a distinctive light and colour. The postwar mythologising of the Australian bush in the art of Arthur Boyd, Sidney Nolan, Albert Tucker and others built on the Federation narrative, and set an agenda in which the coopting of actual landscapes into intensely personal subconscious realms became mainstream. From around the mid-twentieth century, successive generations of artists colonised parts of Australia to the extent that it has become impossible to look at particular sites, locales and regions without thinking of the art which made them famous. Think, for example, of Boyd's Shoalhaven, Russell Drysdale's Hill End, Nolan's Wimmera and Fred Williams's You Yangs. To this (potentially) long list must be added Lawrence Daws's Glass House Mountains.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - Lee Ufan: Close encounters with nothingness
    • Abstract: Hutchings, Patrick
      Lee Ufan has a whole museum, opened in 2010 and designed by Tadao Ando, dedicated to him at the Benesse Art Site Naoshima in Japan's Seto Inland Sea. The Korean artist's work is haunted by a nothingness which one can feel, but not quite understand. The Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitaro (1870-1945) wrote: 'we can distinguish the west as having taken being as the ground of reality, and the east as having taken nothing[ness] as its ground.'

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - A coming forth on Kaurna land
    • Abstract: Cumpston, Nici
      Named after the Kaurna word of the traditional owners of the Adelaide Plains meaning 'to come forth or appear', 'TARNANTHI' is a groundbreaking project for the Art Gallery of South Australia, which has partnered with nearly 30 diverse cultural organisations across Adelaide to present this inaugural festival during October 2015. As Artistic Director, I have worked closely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists from across the country to partner them with South Australian organisations that have links to their practice and may provide a legacy for further exchange.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - Michelle Nikou: In the evening there is feeling
    • Abstract: Freak, Elle
      It is one of the more accepted roles of the artist to intuitively produce metaphor, with emotion as the driving force. And we play the willing role of interpreter, identifying in the work our own sensory responses and memory-based associations. Michelle Nikou delights in this game. She allows the stream of her thoughts, feelings and desires to flow and her objects become vessels for her mind. Metaphors provide access. The Adelaide-based artist recasts imagery, language and matter from our shared material culture. These are things external to us and things that nourish us. We know them intimately, even unconsciously - we have held, touched, tasted, smelt and listened to them - but they have undergone a transformation and occupy a new context. The original sensations or memories we associate with them are returned to us and we are asked to reconsider.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda (Mrs Gabori) c. 1924 - 2015
    • Abstract: McLean, Bruce
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 283 - On the edge of the unknown: 'Believe not every spirit, but try
           the spirits'
    • Abstract: McFarlane, Jenny
      'Alien, impossible objects', is how Marco Pasi has described the watercolours of English spiritualist Georgiana Houghton (1814-1884). In 'Believe not every spirit, but try the spirits', an enigma of an exhibition seen recently at the Monash University Museum of Art in Melbourne, the celebrated European curators Pasi and Lars Bang Larsen enabled a glimpse of a lost continent, a wilfully forgotten past that was enormously influential for the twentieth century and whose influence continues into the present. If ever a past was a foreign country, that past is the fascination with spiritualism that gripped Europe and Australia from the 1860s through to the terrible losses of the First World War. It has been largely wiped from our consciousness, but the language it developed to represent an invisible reality continues to shape our visual and critical vocabulary.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - The Mulka project: The whole picture
    • Abstract: Wanambi, Wukun; Skerritt, Henry
      What is The Mulka Project' Sometimes words are not enough! In short: The Mulka Project is a library; it is an open parliament; it is a gateway to culture; it is a set of keys for us to access our knowledge and history.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - Beauty and the burial of difference: The Yirrkala drawings
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      In 1947 the anthropologist Ronald Berndt was worried that the bark paintings he had collected at Yirrkala would not make it back to Darwin without getting damaged on the mission lugger. He asked the local men to switch to crayons on paper, and the result was a spectacular collection of colourful and bold drawings of Macassan boats, maps, ceremonies and journeys. Those that show clan designs and fishing nets are beautifully geometric, with diamonds and grids sprawling across the page. Among the artists was Mawalan Marika (c. 1908-1967), with his work standing out from the rest for its purposeful outlines of Macassan swords and maps of the coastline

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - Alice or Taos: Two sides of the same coin
    • Abstract: Butler, Rex; Donaldson, ADS
      Continuing a long tradition of decisive international contributions to Australian arts and letters, the New Zealandborn Martin Edmond is undoubtedly one of Australia's leading art historians. He is one of those rewriting Australian - even Australasian - art history, and he does so first of all in form. Brought to his writings on art are great literary skills from a previous life in theatre and film, and as a novelist and essayist, so that the characters in his latest book, Battarbee and Namatjira, come alive for us in a manner never seen before. They seem almost to step off the page and into our present, the very embodiment of issues that still confront us today. In some ways, we are tempted to compare him at the end of Australian art history with the critic William Moore at the beginning, whose 'rationales frequently took on the form of anecdotal history, with stories shrewdly selected and edited to make the most telling points'.1 And perhaps the other writer we would compare him to, for whom we also have the greatest of respect, is the long-time commentator on Aboriginal art Nicolas Rothwell, who also brings an unabashed authorial presence to his work.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - Pushing boundaries: 25 years of 'desert mob'
    • Abstract: Raja, Christopher
      As we enter the current 'Desert Mob' retrospective at the Araluen Arts Centre in Alice Springs, we are greeted by a neat row of pottery made by Western Arrernte artists representing Hermannsburg Potters. There is a naive camel on top of a pot, Camel (1995), made by Irene Mpetyane Entata, using hand-coiled terracotta that immediately entices the eye. Featuring an underglaze and a glazed interior, the pot is decorated with painted images of the West MacDonnell Ranges. It is a small, simple work, but it catapults the imagination through time and space, towards the history of this vast and ancient continent. At once, we are transported to Dreaming stories, early inland exploration, Afghan cameleers, colonialism and, at the same time, the little sculpture connects us to the present day. This curious Camel is among 93 works on show from a total of 185 acquired for the Araluen Art Collection during the annual 'Desert Mob' exhibition since 1992. The retrospective, 'Capturing the History of a Movement', is part of a celebration of the 25 years of showcasing the best works produced by the many Aboriginal art centres dotting the middle of our dry continent.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - Jacobus Capone: 'Dark learning'
    • Abstract: Day, Jess
      Outside Pakenham Street Art Space (PSAS) in Fremantle, I tighten my jacket: the cool winter air holds wood smoke, long black shadows join the growing night, and asphalt glistens from the recent rain. In just a few moments Jacobus Capone's latest body of work, Dark Learning, will open. The Perth-based artist came to my attention in 2013, but Capone's laborious performances have been occurring since 2006, when he stopped talking for six months (Enounce). Other patiently undertaken works such as To love (subtitled Walking from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific, to pour water from the Indian Ocean into the Pacific) involved Capone trudging from Perth to Wollongong over the course of five-and-a-half months, to pour a vessel of water from one ocean into another. Commenced in 2014, Dark Learning represents the beginning of a series of works inspired by the eastern philosophical concept of Xuanxue, which encourages unknowing or unlearning - distancing intellectualisation from actions and, instead, placing faith in sensation.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - 'Things I once knew': Revealing Patrick Hall at TMAG
    • Abstract: Holmes, Jonathan
      When the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG) reopened in March 2013 after a lengthy period of redevelopment and restoration, two commissions created by Patrick Hall were displayed in the Central Gallery which now provides an echo of its early function as the TMAG Trophy Room. In 1902 John Watt Beattie (1859-1930) had photographed the gallery with his 600 landscape photos of Tasmania vying for attention with trophy animals that included a giraffe, lion and tiger, as these exotic beasts competed for space with the displays of Tasmanian timbers and assays of locally mined gold.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - John R. Walker: The catching point
    • Abstract: Zubrzycki, John
      John R. Walker is on a pilgrimage to a granite boulder halfway up Mount Gillamatong overlooking the New South Wales town of Braidwood. He's wearing a knitted dusky brown jumper that bears the scars of numerous encounters with barbwire fences and brambles. There's nothing religious about this short trek, but for an artist walking through a landscape layered with subliminal meanings, the journey has a spiritual quality.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - A tale of two cities
    • Abstract: Henry, Chayni
      Darwin is a young city, its landscape changed many times over its relatively brief history by extreme weather events and war. As a near lifelong resident, I have an intimate relationship with its architectural landscape. While most of the works in my 2013 series of paintings, 'Foundation', are based on my lived experience, also included are buildings that existed well before my time to round off the historical narrative. I haven't always had smooth sailing in my past. I use humor as a way of smoothing out some of the jagged edges in a tale, and the buildings become the medium to deliver it.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 282 - Theatre of labour: The 56th Venice Biennale
    • Abstract: Engberg, Juliana
      Okwui Enwezor's 'All the World's Futures' is gloomy. It is a place of labyrinthine character in which one is detoured and disoriented around routes that turn from bleak to bleaker, heavy to heavier. Working with architect David Adjaye, the curator has devised his space as a metaphor for our times. Perplexing, claustrophobic and strangely deja vu - we feel we have seen and been here before: works about war, displacement, injustice; works from the edge, the periphery and frontier places. The difference with 'All the World's Futures', and what makes Enwezor's 56th Venice Biennale new, is that these works are frequently not made by white people feeling guilt and horror about others, but by artists representing their own histories and dilemmas. From an art point of view, the quality can be uneven. From a sociopolitical position, this is a correction of an important kind.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      When a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal in late April, resulting in the deaths of more than 8800 people and the displacement of hundreds of thousands of others, Melbourne ceramicist Vipoo Srivilasa, like so many observers around the world, was overwhelmed by sadness. But he refused to wallow in grief or helplessness. His response was to galvanise ceramicists across the globe to raise money for the people affected by the horrific disaster that had flattened entire villages and devastated vast swathes of Nepal's ruggedly beautiful landscape.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Barkley, Glenn
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Janet DeBoos: Hybrid and borderless
    • Abstract: Cochrane, Grace
      Janet DeBoos is well-known for her long involvement in ceramics as a maker, teacher and ambassador. In 2015 she was chosen to be Master of Ceremonies for 'Stepping Up', the 14th Australian Ceramics Triennale, a regular conference and forum which attracts participants from across Australia and around the globe and held this year in Canberra. DeBoos was an excellent choice as she has lived in the region since 1981 and had been head of the Australian National University's School of Art Ceramics Workshop for 15 years. She is now an Emeritus Fellow at ANU, and her considerable international experience and reputation includes being the Australasian representative on the Council of the International Academy of Ceramics, Geneva.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran: Clay iconoclast
    • Abstract: Allas, Tess
      Working in an art school places me in an incredibly privileged position. Everyday I meet young and energetic creative students who bring their talent and imagination onto the campus. I often wonder which one of these fabulous young people will be 'the next big thing'. And every once in a while one of those smart, savvy artists breaks out with such a splash they leave in their wake a campus trying to catch its breath and marvelling at its own creation.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Breaking ground: A history of Indigenous ceramics
    • Abstract: Moulton, Kimberley
      Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ceramic arts have been positioned as a fairly recent movement. However, for thousands of generations, Indigenous people have shifted the land to form installations used in ceremony, and painted and carved story into stone. Ochre has been gently extracted from the earth to be used on the body and moulded into cultural material made of fibre, wood and animal. The relationship to the earth and the tangibility of its offerings have been connected to Indigenous peoples from time immemorial. The foundations of Indigenous contemporary art practice, including ceramics, are entwined in these histories and relationships with country which have undeniably remained connected.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Aleks Danko: I had an idea
    • Abstract: Robson, Megan
      On 28 November 1972, Aleks Danko opened his second solo exhibition, 'ideas, words, processes', at Watters Gallery in Sydney. The premise of the exhibition was simple: to make a series of objects by hand using two tons of clay.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Here today, tomorrow next week!: A ceramics roundtable
    • Abstract: Barkley, Glenn
      I recently walked around an exhibition with a fellow curator, and she spoke about contemporary ceramics and traditional ceramics. I'm not exactly sure what she meant by the difference, but I also think that the contemporary art world is a weird place. I've always thought if art is being made now, it's contemporary. And if you think it's contemporary, well it is.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Margaret Tuckson AM 1921 - 2014
    • Abstract: Isaacs, Jennifer
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 281 - Ron Nagle's small good things
    • Abstract: Paton, Justin
      The sculptures of Ron Nagle will not be filling every room of a large art museum near you soon. No teams of fabricators are currently scaling them up for sale in the global art marketplace. And, to the best of my knowledge, Larry Gagosian is not lifting the roof off one of his galleries so a group of Nagles can be craned into position. In a world of big art, big ambition and big exhibition spaces, Nagle's sculptures are easy to overlook. But the only thing that proves is that we need to look again and with greater curiosity. Exquisite, funny, sometimes eerie, oddly poignant, and made by just one pair of hands, Nagle's works dwell with dignity in a zone of their own. Call it Nagle's domain or perhaps the Realm of Ron: a tabletop kingdom of strangely perfect and perfectly strange sculptural things.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - On audiences, artists and connectivity: A NSW roundtable
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      In late April when Art Monthly Australia gathered together a panel of leading gallery directors and curators to discuss the visual arts of New South Wales (NSW), the state was being battered by a series of storms that saw golf ball-sized hail in the Blue Mountains and widespread damage, including the temporary closure of galleries across the Hunter. Perhaps it's testament to the strength and resilience of the state's visual arts institutions, and their experience buffeting other storms (political, economic, social), that the six panellists - Brett Adlington, Director of Lismore Regional Gallery; Michael Dagostino, Director of Campbelltown Arts Centre; Lisa Havilah, Director of Carriageworks; Talia Linz, Curator at Artspace; Elizabeth Ann Macgregor, Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia; and Suhanya Raffel, Director of Collections at the Art Gallery of New South Wales - braved the weather and arrived in an array of wet-weather gear, and in chipper spirits, for a wide-ranging conversation about the major issues impacting on the vast and complex visual arts ecosystem that is NSW. The following is an edited version of the discussion that took place at Carriageworks, Sydney, on 22 April 2015.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Reflections on the 'regional': Joe Eisenberg in conversation
    • Abstract: Waldmann, Anna
      Joe Eisenberg OAM was director of the New England Regional Art Museum (NERAM) in Armidale for over 20 years before becoming head of the Maitland Regional Art Gallery (MRAG) in 2004. Over time, his enthusiasm, energy and vision have helped transform these two regional cities into hubs of artistic activity. In addition, Eisenberg has served on a number of State and Federal Government boards and committees and has recently been appointed to the National Cultural Heritage Committee. Now, after almost 40 years of significant service to the arts, Eisenberg is retiring. To celebrate his leadership, MRAG has been undertaking a range of events and exhibitions. The following interview was conducted on 26 March 2015.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Betty Churcher 1931 - 2015
    • Abstract: Dodge, Alan
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Vernon Treweeke 1939 - 2015
    • Abstract: Davis, Rhonda
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Margaret West 1936 - 2014
    • Abstract: Czernis-Ryl, Eva
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Dark poet: Trent Parke's 'the black rose'
    • Abstract: de Almeida, Pedro
      A decade ago, unbeknownst to him, I witnessed Australian photographer Trent Parke at work. Passing through Sydney's Martin Place I recognised Parke watching and waiting, as nimble as a gymnast, arms raised with fabled Leica in hand, lining up the contingencies of urban life in his viewfinder. As an assortment of pedestrians stood in line waiting to cross Elizabeth Street, a narrow strip of high-noon sun pierced city blocks, perfectly spotlighting this human traffic. Later, coming across the resulting photograph of this encounter as part of his 2005 series 'Coming Soon', I wasn't surprised to see that Parke's visual mastery relies not just in a magician's timing and sleight of hand, but in his ability to render the most light-filled continent on earth in cavernous darkness. Armed with a mere black box with a hole in it, Parke tests the limits of mechanically engineered silver halide crystals to render the numinous as dramatically as Caravaggio achieved using oil on canvas in picturing Saint Matthew at the moment of his conversion.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - The elephant in the room: Uses and misuses of animals in
           curatorial practice
    • Abstract: Burke, Janine
      Positioned at the entrance to 'Menagerie', the recent exhibition at Melbourne's Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Robert Gligorov's video Bobe's Legend (1998) was an arresting work. In a time-lapse sequence, the artist, lying flat, slowly opened his mouth, allowing a canary to emerge and then fly away. As curator Juliana Engberg wrote:

      Gligorov's endurance seems acute, and his physicality stretched, as his mouth must first hold inwards to provide protection for the embryonic form, then widen outwards to allow the escaping bird to fulfil its own destiny.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Nigel Milsom: Surface tension
    • Abstract: Kent, Rachel
      Nigel Milsom has long explored the contrast between darkness and light, background and surface in his paintings. Working from a black background through to white foreground and imagery, the contrast between extremes allows for a range of tonality in between, introduced as subtle elements of colour and shading in some works, and muted areas of grey in others.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - The big picture
    • Abstract: Jones, Locust
      The first thing I do when I wake up in the morning is turn on the radio, then the internet - Al Jazeera, followed by other world mass-media internet sites. I listen to stock market quotes, financial information, reports on who has died, what plane has crashed, what politician has been assassinated, what climate change disaster is coming, endangered species, nuclear accidents ...

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - An untold story: How three artistic couples became the 'Sydney
           6'
    • Abstract: Plate, Cassi
      The New South Wales city of Newcastle opened an art gallery in 1957, at the very moment when abstract art was finally finding favour in Australia. Newcastle supported contemporary art and built a comprehensive collection. The city experienced its own 'Sydney Opera House' moment four years later when it controversially awarded a prize to a pioneer of abstract sculpture, Margel Hinder, to create the now much-loved and highly regarded Captain James Cook Memorial Fountain. Archival photos show dusty, bare ground used for parking in front of the Newcastle Town Hall, transformed by Hinder's water sculpture into an oasis of trees and gardens in the heart of the city, adjacent to the Art Gallery.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - A total creative force: The 'Sydney 6'
    • Abstract: France, Christine
      During the 1950s, the two most vibrant centres of artists and creativity were outside of Melbourne and Sydney: John and Sunday Reed's Heide in Bulleen, Victoria, and Gerald and Margo Lewers' house in Emu Plains, New South Wales. Whereas much has been written about Heide, the artists associated with the Lewers at Emu Plains have not been subject to such scrutiny. As the late Joan Kerr once noted: 'Daniel Thomas falling into an incomplete well at one of Margo's evening parties has none of the mythic potential of Sidney Nolan falling into the Reeds' double bed.'1 While ideas flowed in both places, Heide was based on patronage and the generosity of the Reeds. At Emu Plains, apart from the fabulous parties attended by a wide range of creative people, those involved were active artists firing off each other and actively exploring the tenets of modernism.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 280 - Channelling a chameleon: 'Bungaree: The first Australian'
    • Abstract: Behrendt, Larissa
      An exhibition in two stages at Sydney's Mosman Art Gallery, initiated in 2012 and reprised earlier this year, 'Bungaree: The First Australian' has brought back into focus an important historical figure. Curated by the iconoclastic Djon Mundine, the project drew together a group of emerging and stalwart contemporary Indigenous artists to mediate on the life of an eccentric Aboriginal figure who lived at an extraordinary time.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - '#madeforinstagram': Art basel Hong Kong 2015
    • Abstract: Kubler, Alison
      As a litmus test for the state of the commercial arts internationally, one needs look no further than Art Basel. When it comes to art fairs, the franchise, with its Basel, Miami and Hong Kong versions, is the one that everyone wants in on. So important, too, is Art Basel Hong Kong now on the international art agenda that the dates were moved to accommodate the Venice Biennale, which is an acknowledgement that the audience for both is the same: people who buy art and people who talk about and curate art. Curators such as Hans-Ulrich Obrist, Klaus Biesenbach and veteran dealer Jeffrey Deitch, among others, were all notable attendees, as were a bevy of international celebrities, collectors and buyers. This heady mix of art-world power (money and brains) demonstrates that art fairs are not just about commerce. Well they are, but they are also about serious art. And isn't contemporary art about commerce now' Art's new-found status as a mega-commodity is much debated and theorised, lamented even, but certainly undeniable. Art is the new money.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - Robert Gober's 'the heart is not a metaphor'
    • Abstract: Ewington, Julie
      On the cover of the book that accompanied Robert Gober's exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is a photograph of the artist. He is seen from behind, in casual summer clothes, hightailing it down a wooded path to a lake, his dog bringing up the rear. We cannot see his face, but we do notice the plastic legs he carries under each arm. Except for that detail, this is classic summertime America. It sums up Robert Gober, on two counts: he looks at everyday life in America and sees it skewed; and he invites us to follow him into his work without promising any straight answers.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - A room of one's own: Australia's new pavilion in Venice
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael
      In late September 2014, when Art Monthly Australia journeyed to the Giardini in Venice, it was Architecture Biennale time, and few visitors seemed aware of the giant cube, shrouded in scaffolding and fabric, rising from trees on the edge of the Canale di S Elena. Seven months later and the wrapping is off, and Denton Corker Marshall's new AU$7.5 million Australian Pavilion is being unveiled with artist Fiona Hall's exhibition 'Wrong Way Time'. Whatever the critical verdicts might be in the coming months, it is a momentous occasion for Australia's visual arts, marking 61 years since the country's first official representation at Venice in 1954; 33 years since the late Franco Belgiorno-Nettis's first plans for an Australian pavilion in 1982; 27 years since Philip Cox's temporary pavilion was installed in 1988; and three years since the Australia Council for the Arts announced DCM's winning entry to build the country's first permanent pavilion at Venice.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - On pavilions and plurality: Venice biennale president Paolo
           Baratta in conversation
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Michael; Baratta, Paolo
      Michael Fitzgerald: How important have the national pavilions been within the history of the Biennale, and how much have they defined the contemporary Biennale we see today'

      Paolo Baratta: As you know, the Biennale of Art has been founded as an international exhibition, with the first edition in 1895. Pavilions came a bit later, one by one - first was Belgium in 1907... The great invention of the mayor of Venice at the time was that the exhibition had to be a biennale, so that Venice had a permanent salon of contemporary art every two years.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - Expanding the horizon: Future Perfect and the Singapore scene
    • Abstract: Rees, Lucy
      Since the mid-1990s, Singapore's visual arts scene has witnessed a massive groundswell with the establishment of a number of museums, non-collecting spaces, the Singapore Biennale, Art Stage Singapore, as well as a growing international recognition of its artists. Gillman Barracks joined the landscape in 2012 - a cluster of primarily commercial galleries nestled within a sprawling 6.4-hectare former military zone. Spearheaded by Eugene Tan - now Director of the National Gallery Singapore - and the Singapore Economic Development Board, the initiative aimed to bolster the island state's position as a commercial hub for the Southeast Asian region. Nearly three years since launching, Gillman Barracks is now home to 17 art spaces including ARDNT, FOST, Ota Fine Arts, Pearl Lam Galleries, Sundaram Tagore and, most recently, the Nanyang Technological University Centre for Contemporary Art.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - Anecdote and theme: Reflections on curating contemporary art
           from Southeast Asia
    • Abstract: Choy, Lee Weng
      1. Could we return to a fictional scene' A few years back, writing on the theme of 'global art history', I evoked a hypothetical elderly couple. The man was a retired professor of literature and the woman studied film. They met while she was doing her PhD at the university where he taught. One day she had a dream which recalled a moment from when they started dating - back then, she would go to his lectures once in a while. In her dream, the man, in his thirties, is waving his arms, pontificating in front of a class of sophomores: 'The purpose, the true purpose of literature, of reading novels when you are young, is this: so that they can provide certain images of the world, of life, that will come back and haunt you, if you are so lucky to grow old.'

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - What can institutions do': The IMA's Aileen Burns and
           Johan Lundh in conversation
    • Abstract: Walsh, Tim
      In 2015, Brisbane's Institute of Modern Art (IMA) celebrates its fortieth birthday with an ambitious program of exhibitions, discussions and lectures, as well as a symposium and accompanying publication. The exhibition 'Imaginary Accord' explores the IMA's historical mission and archive, as well as proposing a re-evaluation of the function of art institutions today. Ahead of its opening, the IMA's Executive Directors Aileen Burns and Johan Lundh spoke about the value of archives and speculate on what the Institute's past can tell us about the present and future.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - To the fore: The growing legacy of QCA's bachelor of
           contemporary Australian indigenous art
    • Abstract: Buttrose, Ellie
      The opening quote is how Vernon Ah Kee articulates the relationship between his colleagues in the Indigenous artists collective proppaNOW and the students of the Bachelor of Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art (BoCAIA) at the Queensland College of Art (QCA) in Brisbane. There are few visual arts degrees in Australia that can claim to have nurtured such a strong relationship between students and practising artist who are at the pinnacle of their careers. Since its inception in 1994, this course has consistently nurtured compelling practices, including well-known names such as Ah Kee, Tony Albert and Megan Cope, and those soon to be known: Robert Andrew, Dale Harding, Carol McGregor and Ryan Presley.The opening quote is how Vernon Ah Kee articulates the relationship between his colleagues in the Indigenous artists collective proppaNOW and the students of the Bachelor of Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art (BoCAIA) at the Queensland College of Art (QCA) in Brisbane. There are few visual arts degrees in Australia that can claim to have nurtured such a strong relationship between students and practising artist who are at the pinnacle of their careers. Since its inception in 1994, this course has consistently nurtured compelling practices, including well-known names such as Ah Kee, Tony Albert and Megan Cope, and those soon to be known: Robert Andrew, Dale Harding, Carol McGregor and Ryan Presley.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - Michael Zavros: Beyond beauty'
    • Abstract: McKay, Peter
      Michael Zavros's most recent series of photographs with Sean O'Pry - who is currently the most successful male model on measure of annual earnings - is probably the artist's most radical gesture to date alongside his recent performance for Melbourne Art Fair 2014 entitled Forty. Ostensibly a party in honour of the artist's fortieth birthday, Forty was, more broadly, a luxurious and decadent unveiling of Zavros's new still-life paintings styled for the occasion. It came complete with the product placement of a new Rolls Royce, the endorsement of the Stenmark twins - who are Australia's answer to Sean O'Pry in stereo - and an endless supply of personalised gold (chocolate) coins. Self-reflexive in the extreme, Forty was a spectacular about spectacle - a performance about commodifying commodities.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - Colin Lanceley 1938 - 2015
    • Abstract: Pearce, Barry
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 279 - Robert Jacks 1943 - 2014
    • Abstract: Grant, Kirsty
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 278 - Dispatches
    • Abstract: Coslovich, Gabriella
      Art Gallery of Western Australia (AGWA) Director. Stefano Carboni has revealed his exhibition program for 2015 and the focus is decidedly on the local, the regional and the Indigenous. Underscoring the 2015 program is a new vision statement that Carboni describes as a 'manifesto'. As manifestos go, it's not particularly revolutionary - but after the gallery's recent difficulties a statement of aims was necessary, not least as a morale-boosting exercise. Titled 'The essence of AGWA', the renewed vision emphasises a commitment to presenting Indigenous stories, celebrating Australian art and artists, and developing a collection that reflects the history and diversity of WA.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 278 - Straddling the spectrum: Rebecca Baumann and Brendan van Hek's
           'Colour restraint'
    • Abstract: Purvis, Andrew
      It is apt that the centrepiece of the Campbelltown. Arts Centre's new exhibition, 'Colour Restraint', is a multi-hued arrangement of reflective surfaces. A collaboration between artists Rebecca Baumann and Brendan van Hek, these coloured panes of mirrored acrylic combine to form a deceptively simple labyrinth which operates like a sideshow house of mirrors, folding space and light into a complex pattern of infinitely receding recurrences and modulated tones. Reflected in the work's glossy black exterior, the rest of the exhibition brings together the parallel practices of Baumann and Van Hek, teasing out the resonances and echoes that hum within their two equally formidable and unique bodies of work. Campbelltown Arts Centre Curator Megan Monte has selected highlights from the two artists' back catalogues and invited Baumann and Van Hek to collaborate for the first time on a new commission: YellowBluePink (2015), a work that embodies their shared interests in light, colour and spatial dynamics.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 278 - Speculations on site: 'Spaced 2: Future recall'
    • Abstract: Wilson, Laetitia
      The global mobility of artists in the twenty-first century has reached a frenzy of activity, and residency programs have mushroomed across the planet like never before. This has made for an array of artistic cross-cultural engagements with locality, responsiveness to different sites, cultures, histories, landscapes, politics and communities. In Western Australia, the Spaced residency program run by International Art Space (IAS) has been the most significant proponent of such a movement of artists towards the creation of socially engaged art

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 278 - Lover, fighter
    • Abstract: Cook, Robert
      In the micro scene of Perth's visual arts community, brothers Abdul-Rahman Abdullah and Abdul Abdullah hang with likeability and zippo artistic frippery. Down-to-earth and semi-defiantly masculine, both twitchy and boisterous, they could as well be bobcat drivers, cowboy electricians, 21 Jump Street-style undercover cops as artists. And right now - though this changes like the wind, and it could be wrong by the time this article hits the streets - they're the most prominent of Western Australia's emerging artists. Though to hell with it, in a culture where 'emerging' has a weird tendency to mean blessedly dominant, let's flat out call them 'most prominent' full stop.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 278 - Uprooted: Fred Williams's 'Stump I' at the Art gallery of
           Western Australia
    • Abstract: Paton, Justin
      Flying for the first time across Australia to Perth, I kept looking down at the country below and thinking about Fred Williams. Long before first visiting Australia I had pictured the country through Williams's eyes, thanks to a souvenir catalogue of his paintings that found its way to the family bookshelves in suburban New Zealand. And that habit was confirmed in 2002 on my first visit to Australia when I encountered, at the National Gallery of Victoria, the Pilbara series - Williams's great evocation of the heat and hugeness of the north-western Australian landscape. Hammered by the sun above Melbourne and dazed by the distances beyond it, I turned gratefully to Williams's paintings. He became for me, as for many others, the supreme artist-guide to Australia - painter-poet of the heat-rippled, hard-to-gauge middle distance.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 278 - Constituting community: 'Do it (adelaide)'
    • Abstract: McKenzie, Jenna
      'Do it' began in Paris in 1993 following a discussion between curator Hans-Ulrich Obrist and artists Christian Boltanski and Bertrand Lavier. Interested in subverting established exhibition models, the trio wanted to see what a more flexible, open-ended exhibition would look like. What if an exhibition was emancipated from the confines of its usual lifespan' What if it could be in a constant state of evolution and perpetual reincarnation' What if an exhibition could function more like a play, an opera or a musical score'

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 278 - Art is not a verb
    • Abstract: Brook, Donald
      The following remarks accompanied the launch of the exhibition entitled 'Art as a Verb', which opened at the Flinders University Art Museum, Adelaide, on 19 February 2015, having originally been staged at the Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, in late 2014.

      PubDate: Fri, 1 Feb 2019 09:55:22 GMT
       
 
 
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