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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover AQ - Australian Quarterly
  [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1443-3605
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - Australia's blue carbon future: Oceans fight back
           against climate change
    • Abstract: Macreadie, Peter
      Australia's marine industries are expected to contribute $100 billion pa to our economy by 2025, but there is uncertainty how our oceans will cope with increased exploitation and climate change. At risk are important ecosystem services that are also vital to our economy and society - such as carbon sequestration, coastal protection, and nutrient cycling - which are not commoditised or adequately valued, yet they underpin Australia's marine economy.

      PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - AQ: Q and A
    • Abstract: Jorgensen-Price, Jesse
      Theoretical physicist Brian Greene has spent his life understanding the gravity of the smallest questions of our Universe. A world leader in superstring theory, Prof Greene is the Director of the Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics at Colombia University.

      PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - Extreme climate change: Damage and responsibility
    • Abstract: Lewis, Sophie
      Climate scientists use the same statistical techniques to determine global warming's influence in extreme climate events as public health researchers use to investigate the health impacts of smoking and asbestos exposure. The last 31 years have been hotter than average, culminating in a recent increase in the frequency and severity of extreme climate events. The future will serve up more extremes. Public health parallels raise the question, who is responsible for future damages from climate change?

      PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea : Speculative fiction and
           the future of seafaring
    • Abstract: Guaran, Isabelle
      There were no helicopters now. Nothing so noisy. No downcast beams to light up what was coming, breaking water, way off the coast. It was only moonlit. A tower. A steeple of girders. Streaming, and rising. The girl stood. The metal was twisted. Off-true and angular like a skew-whiff crane, resisting collapse. It did not come steadily but lurched, hauling up and landward in huge jerks. After each a swaying hesitation; then another move higher, and closer.

      PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - Trust me, I'm a scientist
    • Abstract: Beckett, Emma
      Many scientific issues remain constant topics of debate in the political and public spheres. Climate change, water fluoridation, dietary guidelines, GM foods, vaccines and evolution are all seen as controversial despite enjoying general scientific consensus. If scientists are the experts, why don't we defer to them on scientific matters?

      PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - References
    • PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 1 - Between the cracks: Great expectations and the art of
           whinging
    • Abstract: Stapleton, Andrew
      With all the recent political upheaval, you can be forgiven for not noticing that there has been a landslide of blog and opinion pieces about the difficulties faced by early career researchers (ECRs).1-6 Whenever I read these articles, I imagine that behind the eyes of the battle-worn academic elite, 'What a bunch of whinging, entitled young scientists!' is being silently screamed.

      PubDate: Thu, 4 May 2017 16:12:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - The Plutocene: Portents for the post-anthropocene
           geological Era
    • Abstract: Glikson, Andrew
      "For a species to learn to trigger ignition and to split the atom, enhancing its energy output that leads to an increase in entropy in nature by orders of magnitude higher than the species' own physical capacity, the species needs to be perfectly wise and responsible, lest the invention gets out of control, engulfing nature. It is unlikely any species can achieve such levels of wisdom and responsibility". Consequently a greenhouse gas-dominated tropical anthropocentric era is born, from the late Anthropocene to the Plutocene, marked by a layer of 239+240Plutonium in the deep oceans, with radiation lasting for at least 24,100 years.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - References
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - Between the cracks: Science and SciComm with Andy
           Matter
    • Abstract: Stapleton, Andrew
      Post-truth, post-normal, post-fact, post-evidence... We now live in a world where nothing is as it is, everything's now post what it was. And if you're confused by 'post-reality', you're not alone. Science, that beacon of reason and predictability, has always had an engagement problem; and it's only going to get post-easier (harder).

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - Personalised Medicine: More than just personal
    • Abstract: Barlow-Stewart, Kristine
      Personalised medicine? What's new about that? Best practice in medicine has always had the patient at its centre. What is new however, is that the most unique and personal information a patient has - that which is contained in their DNA - is increasingly being taken into account in their clinical care. In only a decade, the cost and time of generating an analysis of just one person's genome has reduced from about $10 million to $2,000- 3,000, and from years to days respectively.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - State of the nation: Victoria: Curiosity, Passion and
           Life-long learning: Catalysts of Victoria's future prosperity
    • Abstract: Caples, Amanda
      Eureka moments happen to us all - those moments when there are significant global events or when we make significant personal decisions. I was reminded of this the other day when I was asked by a bright, young PhD student - how does one become a chief scientist? This is an excellent question that led me to reflect on how I arrived in this position after a multifaceted career spanning the private and public technology sector.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - Land of the free (market): The oxymoron of American
           democracy
    • Abstract: Maddox, Graham
      The paradox of democracy is that it is designed to defend the freedoms of all and to subject the government to the legitimate concerns of the people. Yet those very freedoms give licence to those who fundamentally spurn them and threaten the ideals of democracy themselves. The Inauguration of Donald Trump illustrates the paradox. The demonstrations against his accession were greater that the public show of support at his swearing in.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - A steampunk vision: Prosumers and frequency control
    • Abstract: James, Geoff
      The electricity system is created as a giant rotating mass. Hundreds of fast-spinning turbines are elegantly joined together by three-phase electrical currents twisting along the transmission network - Australia has the longest in the world. They are synchronised at 3,000 rpm divided by some number of electrical windings, so that the passing of rotors over stators forms an alternating current at the 50 Hz grid frequency.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - Open Source Drug discovery: Global solutions to global
           problems
    • Abstract: Williamson, Alice E
      Despite phenomenal advances in diagnostics, medical interventions, and therapeutics, universal access to medicines and healthcare has not been realised. While access to curative medicines for diseases such as Alzheimer's or diabetes is limited by progress in research and development, many other diseases are entirely preventable and/or treatable and their continued prevalence is inextricably linked with poverty. How can we achieve equitable global healthcare when disease solutions are so tightly bound to corporate profitability?

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 88 Issue 2 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Apr 2017 19:40:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - Nuclear power: Game over
    • Abstract: Abbott, Derek
      Every second humans globally consume roughly 15,000 gigawatts (GW) of power, in oil, coal, gas, nuclear, and renewables all added together.1 To put it another way, it means that, on average, we use 15,000 gigajoules (GJ) of energy every second of every day. That is an enormous number, equivalent to switching on billion electric kettles.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - A brave new world: Understanding the ethics of human
           enhancement
    • Abstract: Clarke, Steve
      For the past two decades a debate has raged in academic philosophy and bioethics about the rights and wrongs of using drug therapies, genetic interventions, mechanical augmentation and other medical procedures to enhance human physical and mental capacities above the normal upper limits for our species. Many 'bio-conservative' opponents of human enhancement argue that it is morally wrong to alter human nature, to 'Play God', or to 'seek mastery of ourselves', even if attempts to do so are likely to benefit humanity as a whole.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - Cell therapies - Australia playing catch up?
    • Abstract: Kothari, Sherry
      Health systems in developed nations worldwide are in crisis as they struggle to cope with the demands placed by an ageing population. As we live longer, the prevalence of chronic, degenerative conditions continues to increase. According to the World Health Organisation, the proportion of deaths from cancer, diabetes cardiovascular and respiratory conditions is increasing, and is estimated to collectively cause more than 65% of all deaths.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - From explosion to exposition: The evolution of SciComm
    • Abstract:
      Science communication, or SciComm, is an all-encompassing term for telling others about science and science-related topics. Importantly, science communication will morph and evolve according to which non-expert audience is on the receiving end of it and what the intended outcomes of the communication are.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - Rejuvenating the brain: Ageing with cognitive sparkle
    • Abstract: Bartlett, Perry
      Western society has never been adept at openly contemplating death. Yet with average lifespans expected to hit 100 years in the not too distant future, we now faces an even greater existential fear: the increasing likelihood that many of us will endure a lengthy period of impeded-consciousness - unaware of self and unresponsive to life's surrounding pleasures.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - The florey medal: A legacy of life
    • Abstract: Masters, Colin; Hopwood, John; Vinuesa, Carola
      In 1998, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Sir Howard Florey, the Australian Institute of Policy and Science (AIPS) created the Florey Medal. This honour is awarded biennially to an Australian biomedical researcher for significant achievements in the life sciences.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - Lost in translation?: Where to now for Australian
           Medical Research
    • Abstract: Douglas, Andrea
      Imagine living in a world without penicillin, insulin or the polio vaccine. Consider that cervical cancer could possibly be eradicated in Australia within a generation as a result of the HPV vaccine. Ponder how, for a little more than the cost of a cup of coffee, you can protect yourself from whichever potentially deadly influenza virus happens to circle the globe this year.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 4 - References
    • PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:48:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 3 - The difficult problem: Chronic pain and the politics
           of care
    • Abstract: Barker, Seamus; Moseley, GLorimer
      Chronic pain is arguably 'the difficult problem' in health care, not just because of its massive burden on the bottom line. Even though pain is essentially private and invisible, the Australian Government defines pain in terms of 'proof' - either of an organic lesion understood to cause the pain, or of a level of disability arising from the pain - with such proofs determined by a medical examiner.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:41:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 3 - The surprise state: More than rocks, crops and beaches
    • Abstract: Garrett, Geoffrey
      Personally, I've always been a fan of Queensland, and Queensland science - beginning with my first visits as a brand new Australian, to head up CSIRO, in January 2001.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:41:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 3 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:41:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 3 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:41:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 3 - Electoral reflux
    • Abstract: Eipper, Chris
      Dr Chris Eipper looks back at his 1998 article, Pauline and The Magic Pudding, and wonders whether history - as a dish served cold - is a cultural choking hazard.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:41:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 3 - Smart cities: Socio-technical innovation for
           empowering citizens
    • Abstract: Babar, Ali
      By 2020, 80% of the world's population is expected to be living in cities. Some estimates are predicting that the cost of urban congestion will reach $37.7 billion by 2030. Under the pressure of such drivers governments, councils and leaders in all spheres of life are rethinking urbanisation and are conceptualising futuristic solutions to improve the liveability, sustainability and economy of our urban spaces.

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:41:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 3 - References
    • PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:41:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 3 - From the archive: Pauline and the magic pudding
    • Abstract: Eipper, Chris
      Increasing numbers of Australians are chasing a new political dish. But having had their fill will they soon lose their taste for it?

      PubDate: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:41:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 2 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:10:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 2 - The ingredients to be a great state of innovation
    • Abstract: O'Kane, Mary
      New South Wales has good so-called innovation inputs - settings that support innovation. This includes a robust research and development sector - boasting outstanding strength across a diverse range of disciplines, including solar energy, quantum computing, nextgeneration communications, geotechnical engineering, robotics, biotechnology, health and medical research, and data analytics, including financial data analytics.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:10:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 2 - How Choir Music Discordant voices: Helped to shape our
           parliaments
    • Abstract: Macintyre, Clement
      In 1632 the Scots began work on the construction of their first formal parliamentary building. The decision to construct a purpose built parliament, replacing meetings in different towns and buildings, was partly driven by the changing nature of the relationship between the parliament and the monarch, and partly to reinforce Edinburgh's position as the principal Scottish city. Built in the classical style, the building was to be "an architectural expression of (Stuart) royal, state and civic power and justice". When the new parliament was first used in 1639, it is thought that the members sat on redecorated pews taken from (and later returned to) the nearby St Giles Cathedral.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:10:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 2 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:10:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 2 - References
    • PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:10:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 2 - Liberate or impoverish?: Human relations in a
           wired world
    • Abstract: Patterson, Malcolm Hugh
      Every day vast numbers of people communicate with one another through electronic technologies. This occurs for any number of reasons, at negligible cost and nearly effortless convenience. Unsurprisingly, the ubiquity of modern communications is widely perceived as indispensable and without alternative. However, there exists less certainty regarding the emergent psychological and social effects of virtual interactions that are replacing social intercourse in person.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:10:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 2 - Shane Howard: Spirit of place
    • Abstract: Sloane, Jane; Howard, Shane
      When I first heard the song Solid Rock, written by Australian musician Shane Howard, l felt I was being shaken awake from a pale understanding of my country and culture. I came fully alive in that song with a sense of anticipation, yearning and curiosity that was both raw and authentic. As the founder, in the 1970s, of the band Goanna, Howard used his lyrics to express his journey into the interior - of himself, and of Aboriginal Australia.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:10:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 2 - The 30-Year aberration: An aversion to minority
           government?
    • Abstract: Prosser, Brenton
      Recently I attended a lecture on the future of politics by one of UK Labour's next generation of leaders, Tristram Hunt. After diplomatically dancing around his disdain for the current leader, he described his concern about the widespread lack of interest in democracy and his vision for a new type of politics. To distil his argument down to just a few words, this new way involved the public switching off the internet and switching back on to traditional Labour values.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:10:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - Speciesism - the Ism that isn't
    • Abstract: Greer, Allen
      In 1970, UK-based Richard Ryder became concerned that animals were missing out on the 1960s revolutions against racism, sexism and classism. As a hospital scientist he believed that hundreds of other species suffer fear, pain and distress as much as he did. And while in the bath, he had an epiphany. Humans discriminated against these animals because of "speciesism" - a prejudice in favour of our own species. So he wrote and circulated around Oxford University a leaflet in which he asserted, evoking a confused view of Darwinism, "if all organisms are on one physical continuum, then we should also be on the same moral continuum." He did not elaborate on this assertion, so presumably he assumed its truth was self-evident.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - Race to renewables
    • PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - The Australian capital territory
    • Abstract: Baldwin, Ken
      The Australian Capital Territory leads the pack when it comes to the race to renewable energy, with a 90% renewable energy target by 2020.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - Time for Australia's states and territories to shine
    • Abstract: Thornton, Kane
      After a very tough 18 months, bipartisan support and stability has finally been restored to Australia's national Renewable Energy Target (RET). And with $40 billion up for grabs, the country's states and territories are already looking at policies that will attract lucrative renewable energy investment.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - Does Australia have a race problem?
    • Abstract: Smithers, Gregory
      When British comedian John Oliver referred to Australia as "the most comfortably racist place I've ever been" in April 2013,1 the response from talk-back radio and cable news was predictably defensive. On 2UE, Paul Murray rejected Oliver's accusations by insisting that Oliver "probably went and found some nasty people - here in Sydney or other parts of the country" and used them to smear Australia's reputation.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - References
    • PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 4 - Disintermediation: Digital wildfires in the age of
           misinformation
    • Abstract: Bessi, Alessandro; Quattrociocchi, Walter
      The quantitative analysis of social traces from online social media has allowed the study of social dynamics at an unprecedented level of resolution. According to the World Economic Forum 2013 report on Global Risks, one of the most interesting - as well as dangerous - issues our society faces is the virality of false rumours on the web leading to massive digital misinformation.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:29:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - Being Human: The ethics, law, and scientific progress
           of genome editing
    • Abstract: Newson, Ainsley; Wrigley, Anthony
      Genome editing can be viewed as a disruptive technology - fundamentally changing how scientists alter genomes. Despite the technique remaining imperfect, there is now a real possibility that we can precisely and accurately change almost any part of any genome, including plants, animals, and human beings. The question is, should we?

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - On the cutting edge: Ethics and surgical innovation
    • Abstract: Rogers, Wendy
      Surgery is such a central part of contemporary health care that we take much of it for granted. Joint replacements, once innovative, are now commonplace, while laparoscopic, or 'keyhole' surgery has become the norm for many surgical procedures. Developments like these are the result of innovation. Successful innovation can be highly beneficial to patients. Prior to the use of stents for coronary artery disease, many patients underwent invasive open heart surgery; while organ transplants have transformed the lives of countless recipients. Yet surgical innovation has a dark side. Sometimes trying something new can have catastrophic effects.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - A rough climate for migration: Ethics, climate change
           and forced migration
    • Abstract: Kelly, Elaine
      A short time ago a journalist with a major Australian news organisation called me. She wanted an opinion on how Australia should deal with the impending influx of 'climate refugees'. I drew a long breath. She had sent me a few questions in an email with an attachment to a new journal article that, she claimed, provided evidence of future mass migration as a result of climate change.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - Ethics in the information age
    • Abstract: Tuffley, David; Antonio, Amy
      Most Internet users love what they can do with it; access information on any conceivable topic at almost the speed of light. It is enormously useful at making everyday life easier, but there is also the dark side. Spies, paedophiles and drug dealers; a whole cast of shadowy figures lurking in virtual back alleys. George Orwell's dystopian vision of 1984 seems prescient; governments and others now have a window into almost everything we do. Our public and private lives open to scrutiny. It conjures the unsavoury image of a voyeur peering in at one's window, camera in hand.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - Indefinite disinformation: The political capital of
           fear
    • Abstract:
      The arrival of the Tampa in Australian waters in 2001 marked a dramatic turning point in Australia's response to boat people. Judgment in the Tampa litigation was handed down at 2.15pm (Melbourne time) on 11 September 2001. Nine hours later the attack on America happened, and John Howard had a potent new political weapon.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - References
    • PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 87 Issue 1 - Australian party think tanks: Symptoms of party
           malaise and party resilience
    • Abstract: Miragliotta, Narelle
      Australian political parties are distinctive compared to their Anglo-American counterparts in having official party think tanks funded by the state. There are four such entities aligned to the main parliamentary parties at the current time: the Chifley Research Centre, related to Labor; the Green Institute associated with the Australian Greens, the Menzies Research Centre attached to the Liberal Party; and the Page Research Centre, which is affiliated to the National Party.

      This essay explores the phenomenon of party think tanks in Australia and it suggests that their existence is a symptom of party malaise but also party resilience.

      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:28:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Glass ceilings and monastic men: Keeping women in
           science
    • Abstract: White, Kate
      Approximately 30 percent of research scientists world-wide are female. At first glance this figure is pretty shameful, but beneath that single percentage hides a raft of complexities. Unpack this 30 percent and you find that at PhD level in science in Australia, well over 50 percent of students are often female! Yet the higher up the chain you climb, the lower the rates of female participation become, often resulting in no women present in senior management roles. Moreover, if you look at the Australian Academy of Science only seven per cent of fellows are female. What is happening to stop women progressing to the heights of science leadership and what can be done to stop some of our country's best minds from bumping against the glass ceilings of old?

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Ergonomics and human factors: More than bums and backs
    • Abstract: Blewett, Verna
      This August Melbourne will see an influx of about 1200 human factors and ergonomics (HFE) specialists from around the world. The attraction is the Triennial International Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA). Established in 1961, the IEA is the global peak body for human factors and ergonomics researchers and practitioners. The IEA Members are HFE societies from over 50 countries, including Australia's HFE professional association, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia (HFESA), which was established in 1964.

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Tall Poppies: The value of recognition
    • Abstract: Buckley, Pat
      I have been involved with the Tall Poppy Campaign for some years now. In a number of ways. Encouraging applications for the Young Tall Poppy Science Awards, often from those somewhat reluctant to put themselves forward. Enjoying spirited discussions at interview as a member of the South Australian Tall Poppy Award Selection Committee. And delighting in their delight when the outcomes are known.

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - To create, not cut: 15 years of the young
    • Abstract: Thomson, Camille
      Never has the ability to communicate science, and translate scientific endeavour, to a public audience been more important to a researcher's work than it is today. Brave a quick search on Twitter for science-related terms and you'll be witness to the breadth and scope of study, opinions and debate - some informed, others not-so-much. Almost 20 years ago The Australian Institute of Policy and Science (AIPS) recognised the need for wider public recognition of Australia's leading scientists and the effective communication of their work into the mainstream.

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Success is the best revenge: Prof Carola Vinuesa
    • Abstract: Vinuesa, Carola
      I was fortunate to grow up with the best possible role model a young woman could have: a highly intelligent, hard-working and generous mother, who managed to maintain a successful academic career while raising four children, in a conservative country at that time (Spain), where women were not encouraged to work. I studied Medicine, travelled widely and believed the sky was the limit for me professionally; never had it occurred to me that gender would make a difference to my career. I was 30 when I arrived in Australia, and the world had rolled into the 21st century.

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Luminary: Dr. Ildiko Szabo
    • Abstract: Wright, Lauren
      We sit in the apparently controlled chaos that seems to be the ideal habitat for busy scientific investigators. I'm here to interview Dr Ildiko Szabo, electrophysiologist extraordinaire, who very graciously agreed to set aside a good chunk of her morning to talk to me.

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Earth, sea and sky: Communicate, collaborate and
           innovate
    • Abstract: Klinken, Peter
      This month marks one year since I was asked to take on the role of Chief Scientist of Western Australia. I remember feeling gobsmacked when I was asked by the Premier to take on the position. Even now I still regard it as a privilege and a huge honour, as I first did all those months ago.

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Federal budget
    • PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Towards 50:50: The power of role models for young
           women
    • Abstract: Sahajwalla, Veena; Terkes, Sarah
      I was the only girl in Metallurgical Engineering when I began my studies in India - it was a very isolating experience socially. I didn't have a strong peer network and I realised that nobody was going to go out of their way to help me succeed. So, I didn't wait around for opportunities to happen to me, I forced them to happen.

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - References
    • PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 3 - Awakening: Four lives in art [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Peers, Juliette
      Review(s) of: Awakening: Four lives in art, by Dr Eileen Chanin and Steven Miller.

      PubDate: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:32:13 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - Australia survival day
    • Abstract: Calma, Tom
      As another year ticks by and January 26th approaches, many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have mixed feelings. Australia Day is not a celebration embraced by all First Australians. In contrast to the broader community, many Aboriginal people mourn the day and the history that followed those first steps and refer to it as 'Invasion Day.'

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - The road to recognition
    • Abstract: Yettica-Paulson, Mark
      Across the nation, momentum is growing for a referendum to recognise Australia's first peoples and to remove racial discrimination from our country's rule book. In recent months, recognise campaigner Mark Yettica-Paulson has been among those on the road to recognition, speaking with everyday Australians in regional towns and cities about a coming moment that will lift us all up together.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - Recognise and represent: Getting indigenous kids into
           science
    • Abstract: Scholes, Colin A
      Indigenous Australians are vastly underrepresented in Australia's scientific and research community. This is a significant issue from both an Indigenous perspective, as well as for the development of Australian science. Scientific, technology and engineering professions are well recognised for their ability to provide rewarding careers, have positive impact on the broader society, and as a stepping stone in raising people to higher social-economic levels. Hence, the low engagement of Indigenous Australians in these professions limits their ability to access a pathway that can assist in overcoming their current disadvantage within the broader Australian society.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - STEM the gap: Science belongs to us mob too
    • Abstract: Ball, Rowena
      Article 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) states that everyone has the right to freely share in scientific advancement and its benefits, and Article 15 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966) recognizes the right of everyone to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - Biography: David Unaipon
    • Abstract: Leane, Jeanine
      David Unaipon is best known today as the face that looks out from the Australian fifty-dollar note. Behind this face, there is a very important story.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - Taking back voice: Indigenous social media activism
    • Abstract: Petray, Theresa
      Social media is big business. This is something that most of us take for granted without really thinking about it. But when we look at the numbers, the sheer enormity of social media is staggering.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - Close the gap: Don't just do something! The indigenous
           affairs budget
    • Abstract: Scott, Geoff
      The 2014-15 Budget for Indigenous Affairs is a convoluted one, fraught with innuendo and vagaries. Straight talk is avoided and questions are met with no official response, citing probity issues.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - References
    • PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 1 - Casestudy: Investing in Indigenous Australia: The
           Issue of Traditional Knowledge IP
    • Abstract: Simpson, Bradley
      It is perplexing why Australia does not invest more heavily in prospecting and developing the natural resources that have enabled one of the world's longest and continuous surviving civilizations to endure such harsh surroundings, for tens of thousands of years.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 23:30:36 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - Getting science in the spotlight: AusSMC and Scimex,
           the new science media exchange
    • Abstract: Eliott, Susannah; Bagg, Melanie; Milton, Joseph
      Since the Australian Science Media Centre (AusSMC) first opened its doors in 2005, the media landscape at home and abroad has changed beyond recognition. Some of those changes, such as the loss of specialist journalists and the implosion of the mainstream media's business model, have been undeniably negative, but there have been positive changes as well.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - Notes for contributors
    • PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - A word
    • Abstract: Mills, Grant
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - Magic Beans and Dragons: The war against pseudoscience
           and misinformation
    • Abstract: Wright, Lauren; Carter-Wiki, W
      In a world of mass-information and insatiable media there is little we can do to stem the drip, drip, drip of published 'studies' that persist in eroding our knowledge base with abominably bad science and illogical conclusions. Bad science is all too often captivating for people in search of easy answers - answers to relatively straightforward questions: How can I lose weight effectively? Are these drugs safe for my children? Why do I feel unwell?

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - Building trust with industry: 25 years of lessons for
           policy makers
    • Abstract: Peacock, Tony
      Australia's Cooperative Research Centres (CRC) Programme was a policy initiative announced during the 1990 Federal Election. The 1988-89 government budget had detailed severe expenditure cutbacks, some of which fell hard on science funding. The initially muted response from the science community was fired up when the then Science Minister, Barry Jones, labelled scientists "wimps" in terms of their lobbying effort. There was a loud demonstration at the opening of Canberra's Science and Technology Centre, Questacon, that both surprised and embarrassed the Prime Minister, Bob Hawke.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - Climate change and the new financial democracy: The
           dangers of a high carb(on) diet
    • Abstract: Poulter, Julian
      Climate change is the lens through which many of our institutions are increasingly scrutinised. In terms of financial and economic risk, the short termism of corporations and their lobbyists have combined with the short termism of governments to ensure that the usual risk management steps have been overlooked in favour of vested interest.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - Robbing Peter to fuel Paul: The misleading politics of
           divestment
    • Abstract: Davidson, Sinclair; Tommy-Flickr, Neon
      Late last year the Australian National University (ANU) caused some controversy when it announced that it would be selling some shares. Ordinarily a decision to buy or sell shares would be unremarkable - but the ANU didn't just rebalance its portfolio, or sell underperforming shares; it stated that the shares were being sold because the university would "not invest in companies that are doing some form of social harm".

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - Strand or be stranded: The growing case for divestment
    • Abstract: Dennis, Richard; Swann, Tom
      In just a couple of years, the fossil fuel divestment movement has grown from a few scattered campus campaigns into global momentum attracting an astonishing level of public attention and debate. In 2013, an Oxford study argued fossil fuel divestment was the fastest growing divestment movement in history.1 Since then the movement has found commitments from groups as diverse as the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, The World Council of Churches, the British Medical Association and Stanford University.

      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 86 Issue 2 - References
    • PubDate: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 18:58:51 GMT
       
 
 
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