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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples
  [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1177-1801
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - When the media asks about the Maori...
    • Abstract: Rolleston, Te Kahu
      I descend from the tides that crash and break against my ancestral mountain named Mauao. I am of the running currents that give life to our people. The island of Matakana is where I plant my feet and call home. Tauranga's sea, and Tauranga's people, are one. I am fortunate enough to spend a lot of my time doing what I am passionate about. I get to work with many different parts of the education system and with many wonderful communities by sharing my skills and culture, through workshops and guest speaking. I also get to share these same things by being invited to perform at many events, festivals and gigs where I perform poetry strongly rooted in a Maori-centric world view. I guess the aim of most poets is to publish a book. Personally, my goal is to make poetry, speaking well and oral traditions cool, so it will be appealing for young people to use.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - Introduction
    • Abstract: Harris, Michelle; Carlson, Bronwyn
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - Think global, act local: How underground hip-hop gets
           down down under
    • Abstract: Gooding, Frederick W; Brandel, Matthew; Jountti, Corbin; Shadwick, Andrew; Williams-Bailey, Bryantee
      This article explicitly focuses upon the relationship Aboriginal Australia has with hip-hop culture. Hip-hop has become not only a tool for larger identity formation for Aboriginal Australians, but also a way to preserve traditional styles that historically wilt from outside mainstream influences. After conducting a brief analysis of historical, political, and cultural similarities and differences between the African American and Aboriginal Australian experience, four mini-profiles of Aboriginal Australian hip-hop artists help explore what American and Canadian cultural critic and scholar Henry Giroux (1999) terms "public pedagogy" for direct political action and influence among those marginalized from mainstream culture. The article concludes after teasing out the tension of how hip-hop asserts itself as a liberating force when created and communicated within constrained political environs that potentially dictate its true force and impact.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - Where wounded knee meets wounded knees: Skate parks
           and Native American youth
    • Abstract: Weaver, Hilary N
      As contemporary peoples, Native Americans exist within multifaceted realities and participate in many everyday popular pleasures. One pleasure prominent in the lives of many young Native Americans is the activities that take place at skate parks. Skate parks have been linked to wellness promotion for both young people and communities and can function as a venue to nurture and mentor Native American youth in ways that parallel traditional methods. Some proponents of skate parks use the popularity of skateboards and skating to link past and present in ways that teach history and expand ideas about contemporary Indigenous aesthetics. This phenomenon can also be a visible means to challenge stereotypes and rigid definitions of us and them. This article draws on scholarly literature, the popular press, and personal experience to examine the growth of skate parks in Native American communities and their implications for Indigenous identity and wellbeing.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - Striking the right chord: Indigenous people and the
           love of country
    • Abstract: Carlson, Bronwyn
      Many Aboriginal Australians have participated in, and take pleasure from, country music. Country music has provided a vehicle for Aboriginal people to tell our stories and assert our connection to "Country" - term used to describe our ancestral lands. Country music is often associated with such terms as "redneck" and "hillbilly" (Malone, 2006) and is often associated with White working class. However, Indigenous participation in the country music genre disrupts this assumption. Indigenous people as both consumers and producers derive a great deal of pleasure from the country music genre. This paper will explore the appropriation of country music by Aboriginal Australians and Native Americans who continue to express their histories, beliefs and connection to Country through country music.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - Mudjil'dya'djurali Dabuwa'wurrata (how the white
           waratah became red): D'harawal storytelling and Welcome to Country
           "controversies"
    • Abstract: Bodkin-Andrews, Gawaian; Bodkin, Frances; Andrews, Gavin; Whittaker, Alison
      The overarching purpose of this paper is to critically engage with non-Indigenous representations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Welcome to Country ceremonies, particularly within the conservative mainstream media and academic setting. The foundations of the paper will be drawn from both the critical Indigenous standpoint theories of white pathology by Moreton-Robinson (2015) and colonial storytelling by Behrendt (2016). Both these theories suggest that, too often, non-Indigenous representations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are more a reflection of non-Indigenous ideologies than accurate portrayals of Indigenous positionings. Further, an ancestral D'harawal Law Story will be utilized to reveal that Welcome to Country ceremonies, despite their contemporary adaptations under colonization, may be considered an essential contextual representation of Australia's true history prior to colonization, and thus should not be dismissed due to ideological misrepresentations or even tampered with by a colour-blind rhetoric.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - Lipstick clapsticks: A yarn and a Kiki with an
           Aboriginal drag queen
    • Abstract: Farrell, Andrew
      With Aboriginal drag queens you never just "spin a yarn" - you have a Kiki. As depicted in the film Paris Is Burning (Livingston, 2005), having a "Kiki" means to discuss, chatter, gossip, and have a good time with your "good Judys", your girlfriends. It is a term created by transgender and Queer people of colour that I respectfully adopt in sharing my stories and experiences as a Queer-identified Aboriginal Australian who practices and enjoys the multifaceted art of drag transformation and performance. In the spirit of a Kiki, this article will give you an insight into my world as a gender-defying Queer Aboriginal drag queen.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - Embodying an imagined other through rebellion,
           resistance and joy: Mardi Gras Indians and Black indigeneity
    • Abstract: Guthrie, Ricardo
      This article examines embodied double and triple consciousness expressed by African Americans who reflect Indigenous and transplanted African/Indian heritages while performing as Mardi Gras "Indians" in New Orleans. Moving beyond simplistic dichotomies of "Africanness" and "indigeneity," Black Indians produce sustained historical and cultural identities which reinforce Afro-indigeneity to overcome oppressive conditions while creating a foundation for resilience. Mardi Gras Indians perform ritual parades and complex acts of resistance and joy - playfully appropriating and adapting African, Indian and American cultures to interrogate hybrid identities beyond Black/White paradigms. The playful ambiguities - and mocking stereotypical images of savage Indians and Africans - continue to be displayed through music, art and pop cultural expressions well into the post-Katrina era. An examination of Black Indians through a cultural-historical analysis sets the stage for a reassessment of popular culture and the HBO TV series Treme (Simon, 2010-2013) - specifically its use of fictive, triple-conscious imaginaries which give life to vibrant, joyful expressions of resistance.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - "I'm just as Indian standing before you with no
           feathers popping out of my head": Critiquing Indigenous performativity in
           the YouTube performances of the 1491s
    • Abstract: Berglund, Jeff
      This article analyzes two YouTube videos by the 1491s, a Native American sketch comedy troupe. By using the interpretive framework of social media and film studies, which considers the role of viewership and fan participation in shaping reception, this article argues that the 1491s challenge Indigenous people to resist becoming complicit in the processes of simulation through an assertion of "visual sovereignty". Additional analysis examines a representative range of viewers' responses to the videos to flesh out how the 1491s' work is understood and valued by various viewers, many of whom take the opportunity to self-identify as Native American. Taken together with additional insights provided by the performers themselves, this article assesses how comedy is used to draw attention to the ironic situation of Native people "redfacing," of fabricating false and stereotypical identities, to appeal to non-Native peoples, particularly consumers, but also to enact critiques.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 5 - Pedagogy, pleasure and the art of poking fun:
           Anti-colonial humour in Australian Indigenous studies
    • Abstract: Jones, Garry; McGloin, Colleen
      Australia's colonial history is fraught with ongoing social injustice and can be difficult to teach. The inclusion of humour on Australian Indigenous studies courses presents both challenges and opportunities for educators in the field. Students' reactions to the inclusion of humour are often varied and care must be taken to ensure that Indigenous histories are taught with a view to balancing pleasure in learning while maintaining a focus on content. This paper elucidates the inclusion of humour in an undergraduate course where the student cohort is primarily non-Indigenous. Drawing from a range of critical works on humour, and on the teaching experience of the authors, the paper constitutes a work in progress that seeks to contribute to a sparse body of work dealing with Australian Indigenous humour in pedagogical contexts. The paper reflects on the course in question through an examination of texts used to teach students about the effectiveness of humour and its uses and applications in teaching Australian Indigenous studies.

      PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 21:15:08 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - Tauira: Maori methods of learning and teaching [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Hall, Meegan
      Review(s) of: Tauira: Maori methods of learning and teaching, by Metge, Joan. (2015), Auckland, New Zealand: Auckland University Press. 309 pp. ISBN: 978-1-86940-822-0.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - Te Mata Ira - faces of the gene: Developing a cultural
           foundation for biobanking and genomic research involving Maori
    • Abstract: Hudson, Maui; Russell, Khyla; Uerata, Lynley; Milne, Moe; Wilcox, Phillip; Port, Ramari Viola; Smith, Barry; Toki, Valmaine; Beaton, Angela
      Te Mata Ira was a three-year research project (2012-2015) that explored Maori views on genomic research and biobanking for the development of culturally appropriate guidelines. A key component of this process has been to identify Maori concepts that provide cultural reference points for engaging with biobanking and genomic research. These cultural cues provide the basis for describing the cultural logic that underpins engagement in this context in a culturally acceptable manner. This paper outlines the role of two wananga (workshops) conducted as part of the larger project that were used to make sense of the Maori concepts that emerged from other data-collection activities. The wananga involved six experts who worked with the research team to make sense of the Maori concepts. The wananga process created the logic behind the cultural foundation for biobanking and genomic research, providing a basis for understanding Maori concepts, Maori ethical principles and their application to biobanking and genomic research.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - Nga Reanga o nga Tapuhi: Generations of Maori nurses
    • Abstract: Walker, Leonie; Clendon, Jill; Manson, Leanne; Nuku, Kerri
      The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of Maori nurses and student nurses in Aotearoa New Zealand who combine culturally specific customary obligations in all areas of whanau (family), hapu (kinship group) and iwi (wider kinship group) life (in particular, caregiving responsibilities) with working or studying. The study was underpinned by a collaborative Kaupapa Maori (Maori principles and values) approach. Paired or triad interviews were undertaken with 13 Maori nurses and two Maori student nurses (all women), aged between 22 and 57, and from all parts of Aotearoa New Zealand, between October and December 2015. Their stories give a picture of considerable community service and duty outside work. The impacts on emotional and physical health which caregiving responsibilities have on Maori nurses are under-reported to their management. Facilitating Maori voices and realities to be heard will raise awareness of the issues and help identify potential strategies, policies and employment practices that will validate and support Maori nurses in their workplaces and in the wider community.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - Indigenous positioning in health research: The
           importance of Kaupapa Maori theory-informed practice
    • Abstract: Curtis, Elana
      Understanding how to undertake Kaupapa Maori research can be a challenge for emerging health researchers. Unless emerging researchers have exposure to Kaupapa Maori theory or senior Maori health research expertise, the challenge of undertaking Kaupapa Maori research within health research contexts can seem daunting, and for some, too difficult to attempt. This article summarizes what an Indigenous positioning means to me as a health researcher, medical practitioner, academic and Maori community member, and why it is more than just a methodological approach. The theoretical basis of Kaupapa Maori - what it is, how it emerged and what it means for my own research practice - is explored. How Kaupapa Maori interacts with Pacific research methodologies, particularly when health research involves both Maori and Pacific participants, is discussed. It is hoped that this article will assist emerging researchers (both Indigenous and non-Indigenous) to embrace Indigenous-appropriate research approaches within their own work.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - E Hine: Talking about Maori teen pregnancy with
           government groups
    • Abstract: Adcock, Anna; Lawton, Beverley; Cram, Fiona
      Despite improved access to health services in Aotearoa New Zealand there remains a significant socio-economic and health gap between Maori (Indigenous New Zealanders) and Pakeha (nonMaori). E Hine (Girl) is a qualitative Kaupapa Maori (by Maori, for Maori) research project seeking to identify barriers and facilitators to positive health outcomes for young Maori mothers (under 20 years) and their infants. We present the findings of a discourse analysis of six semistructured interviews with 13 representatives from six government agencies who were asked how their agency catered to the needs of young Maori mothers. Interviews were conducted in Wellington in 2013. First, we discuss respondents' perspectives on how their agencies work to increase positive health outcomes. Next, we discuss structural issues, such as resource distribution, organization, and "silence", that may act as barriers to positive outcomes. Addressing these barriers is essential to successfully deliver policies and initiatives that meet the needs of young Maori mothers and their infants.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - A cause for nervousness: The proposed Maori land
           reforms in New Zealand
    • Abstract: Warbrick, Paerau
      This commentary reflects upon the major Maori land reforms in te Ture Whenua Maori Bill (2016). The reforms implement more bureaucracy and replace some mechanisms used by the Maori Land Court to protect against Maori land loss. The Waitangi Tribunal, which has dealt with Maori grievances over land loss for over 30 years, issued a critical report in March 2016 along with recommendations about the reforms. That report was largely ignored by the New Zealand Government. This commentary contains a review of the literature on Maori land to date, as it helps to understand the ideas behind the Tribunal's report as well as the reforms. There is also an examination of the main points made by the Waitangi Tribunal, as well as aspects of te Ture Whenua Maori Bill (2016). The overall conclusion is that the Maori people should be very nervous about the reforms for their lands.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - Experiences of urban Australian Indigenous peer
           mentors in a non-communicable disease prevention program
    • Abstract: Adams, Karen; Browne, Jennifer; Palermo, Claire; Radford, Gail
      This paper describes urban Indigenous Australian experiences of a peer mentor program (PMP) aiming to reduce non-communicable disease (NCD) risks and discusses its implications for future policy and practice. Much of the inequitable mortality for Indigenous Australians is related to NCD incidence. Using a qualitative approach the study reported here explored 21 people's experiences as peer mentors in an NCD risk reduction PMP, which took place between 2009 and 2011. Four key themes were identified, including community networks, collective wellbeing, skills development and problem solving, and sustainability. The PMP allowed for inclusiveness of individual strengths, diversity and cultural knowledge. Formal networks provided sustainability and information while peer informal networks provided increased participation, knowledge dissemination, practice of health-promoting skills and provision of support. Inclusion of collective cultural elements, such as connections to Elders, families, children and Country were particularly important for the peer mentors in this study.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - "We had not dared to do that earlier, but now we see
           that it works": Creating a culturally responsive mathematics exam
    • Abstract: Fyhn, Anne Birgitte; Nutti, Ylva Jannok; Nystad, Kristine; Sara Eira, Ellen J; Haetta, Ole Einar
      This paper describes two S mi mathematics teachers' development of an innovative instructional practice. Having recognized that Norway's national written exam disadvantaged their students, the teachers developed and established a culturally responsive local oral mathematics exam as part of a five-year research project that took place between 2010 and 2015 in Guovdageaidnu, Norway. The aim of the paper is to illuminate the role of teachers' autonomy in the process towards Indigenous educational self-determination. We analyse the teachers' development from a state of recovery to a state of self-determination with respect to a framework consisting of (a) the four states in Smith's (2012) Indigenous research agenda: survival, recovery, development and self-determination; and (b) Deci and Ryan's (2012) distinction between supporting autonomy and controlling behaviour. The teachers' development of a culturally responsive mathematics exam reflects their development towards self-determination. We draw on data consisting of audio recordings and handwritten notes from meetings between the teachers and researchers.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - Yijarni: True stories from Gurindji country [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Kwaymullina, Ambelin
      Review(s) of: Yijarni: True stories from Gurindji country, by Charola, Erika, and Meakins, Felicity. (Eds.), (2016), Canberra, Australia: Aboriginal Studies Press. 246 pp. ISBN: 9781925302028.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 4 - Research, ethics and Indigenous peoples: An Australian
           Indigenous perspective on three threshold considerations for respectful
           engagement
    • Abstract: Kwaymullina, Ambelin
      Indigenous peoples have long critiqued the harmful effects of Eurocentric research processes upon Indigenous cultures and communities. This paper-which is grounded in the author's knowledge and experience as an Aboriginal Australian academic-examines three threshold considerations relevant to non-Indigenous scholars who seek to enter into respectful research relationships with Indigenous peoples or knowledges. The first is the question of whether the research should be conducted at all. The second is positionality and how this affects research. The third is the need for scholars to comprehensively inform themselves about ethical research principles, including in relation to free, prior and informed consent, and Indigenous cultural and intellectual property.

      PubDate: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:41:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Buryat-Mongol and Alash autonomous movements before
           the Soviets, 1905-1917
    • Abstract: Sablin, Ivan; Korobeynikov, Alexander
      Despite the Stalinist myth, it was not the Bolsheviks but Indigenous intellectuals who introduced autonomy as a form of post-colonial settlement during the crisis and collapse of the Russian Empire to Siberia and Central Asia. Employing a comparative perspective, this article traces the development and implementation of two autonomous projects in Asian Russia. The Buryat-Mongol and Kazakh (Alash) Indigenous intellectuals synthesized local ideas and the globally circulating notions of national self-determination, enlightenment and democracy when articulating political unity of Indigenous peoples in national terms. By advocating their broader representation in existing and envisioned power structures they fought against discrimination and protected native languages and other forms of cultural expression from assimilation. This article shows that these Indigenous intellectuals were not silent recipients of the policies coming from the imperial and post-imperial centers but actively engaged in designing and ensuring the future of their communities.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Staking claim: Settler colonialism and racialization
           in Hawai'i [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Arvin, Maile
      Review(s) of: Staking claim: Settler colonialism and racialization in Hawai'i, by Rohrer, Judy, (2016), Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press, 228 pp. ISBN: 9780816502516.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Te Manako: The desire for self-determination
    • Abstract: Mokaraka-Harris, Jovan James; Thompson-Fawcett, Michelle; Ergler, Christina
      When a traditional Indigenous identity is submerged beneath a cloud of contemporary politics and power relations, how might such a situation undermine its educational and developmental aspirations? This article examines the case of Te Riu o Hokianga (the valley of Hokianga) in Aotearoa New Zealand, where the imposition of a contemporary political identity is adversely affecting the development of a more culturally appropriate identity, otherwise known as Hokianga whanui (the wider Hokianga family community). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six participants who shared an ancestral whakapapa (genealogy embodying layered connections) with the Hokianga. Voicing their interpretations, experiences and aspirations, participants disclosed how they envisioned educational and developmental success in Hokianga. Our interpretation of Te Ihomatua (a positive active essence for transformation) - informed by a hybrid theoretical framework that interweaves Marxist, elite and kaupapa Maori (based on Maori worldview) theory - is employed to discern the multifaceted whakapapa of place and how that might inform Indigenous arrangements that support identity and developmental aspirations.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Skawennati's TimeTraveller: Deconstructing the
           colonial matrix in virtual reality
    • Abstract: Pullen, Treva Michelle
      This article examines the decolonizing imperatives of the nine-episode machinima film series TimeTraveller (2008-2013) by the Mohawk artist, writer and curator Skawennati. TimeTraveller assesses the (re)presentation of Indigenous pasts and futures. Using avatar characters, Skawennati delinks (Mignolo, 2011) from colonial, Western and imperialistic narratives and the hegemonic structures of a Eurocentric worldview. Avatar bodies act as a catalyst in order to break down the contemporary, political episteme of classification and create spaces for fluid identities-in-politics (Mignolo, 2011) - virtual bodies that reflect the layering of subjective personal experiences which may be multiple and changing. In asserting her Indigenous presence in cyberspace, Skawennati's work lies in between new media art production and decolonial gesture, provoking a rereading of bodies and identities in order to reimagine and reassert denied and silenced Indigenous voices in virtual reality.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Wakan Tipi and Indian Mounds Park: Reclaiming an
           Indigenous feminine sacred site
    • Abstract: Gould, Roxanne; Rock, Jim
      The colonization of Turtle Island (North America) resulted in genocide and attempts to erase the Indigenous and feminine cosmologies that permeated Indigenous lands, particularly Indigenous centers of power. This article uses a case study approach to critically examine the history, cosmology, destruction and restoration of an Indigenous sacred site located near present-day St. Paul, Minnesota, known to the Dakota peoples as Wakaŋ Tipi or Wakaŋyaŋ Tipi, names once incompletely translated as "sacred dwelling place" or "they live sacredly." Wakaŋ Tipi, with its feminine birth mounds and unique ecology, is the place that connects earth and sky. The site has drawn Indigenous peoples from all over the world to learn from its teachings. The article includes discussion on the collaboration that has restored this sacred place from a toxic waste dump to a site where ceremony and learning can take place once again.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - PATU: Fighting fit, fighting fat! The Hinu Wero
           approach
    • Abstract: Forrest, Rachel; Taylor, Lee-Anne; Roberts, Jennifer; Pearson, Maria; Foxall, Donna; Scott-Chapman, Sue
      The PATU Aotearoa Hinu Wero (Fat Challenge) is a group exercise initiative that promotes physical activity and focuses on fat loss in order to reduce obesity in Maori. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the pilot nine-week Hinu Wero (August-October 2014) involving 66 participants (males n = 26, females n = 40, ages 17-63 years) using a mixed-methods approach. Pre-and post-Hinu Wero anthropometric data revealed whether changes in body fat percentage, body mass index, and weight occurred. Mean reductions in all these measurements were observed. An online focus group with 13 of the participants, and a trainer interview (n = 1, male, 28 years) was undertaken in June 2015 to obtain various perspectives of the Hinu Wero. The online focus group participants were very enthusiastic about the PATU Hinu Wero and the results being achieved. It was acknowledged that the Maori practice of whanaungatanga (connectedness, support) was of paramount importance. The PATU Hinu Wero functioned as an effective health intervention for reducing obesity in local Maori and working towards reducing health inequities in New Zealand.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Indigenous autonomy, community-based research, and
           development aid: Sumaq kawsay in three epistemic scenarios
    • Abstract: Gonzales, Tirso; Husain, Matt
      In this paper, the future of Indigenous autonomy and Indigenous community-based research is illustrated by analyzing re-Westernization, de-Westernization, and decoloniality in relation to the regeneration of the Indigenous glocal (global/local) concept of sumaq kawsay ("living well" in Quechua). The regeneration of sumaq kawsay as a new geopolitical and cultural polycentric and multipolar world is examined from an Indigenous studies decolonial perspective and an Indigenous Andean campesino (peasant) community-based perspective. Sumaq kawsay has encouraged an unexpected pan-Latin American perspective that supports decoloniality and its epistemic pluriversity as an alternative scenario to "progress" and the business approach of development aid embedded within re-/ de-Westernization.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Indigenous environmental autonomy in Aotearoa New
           Zealand
    • Abstract: Forster, Margaret
      British colonization of Aotearoa New Zealand diminished the influence of the tribal territory on Indigenous autonomy, identity and belonging. Yet land is still key to securing Indigenous futures. This paper explores the reassertion of Indigenous autonomy over the environment. A governmentality critique is used to explore efforts to embed indigeneity into environmental politics. As part of this critique three examples of Indigenous environmental autonomy are provided that show how Maori are asserting greater control over the tribal territory, particularly natural resources. I argue that resistance has been critical for the re-emergence of Maori autonomy over the environment, creating greater opportunities for assertions of local authority and the customary practice of kaitiakitanga (a Maori environmental ethic). Although there is still much to achieve in this space, Maori are now in a stronger position to resist ongoing colonization of the landscape and engage with the state around resource management of natural resources.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Resisting political colonization and American
           militarization in the Marianas Archipelago
    • Abstract: Frain, Sylvia C
      This article will explore the triangle of contemporary political colonization, increased American militarization, and the continued denial of Indigenous rights interlinked in the Marianas Archipelago. The 15-island chain is politically constructed as two separate insular areas of the United States: Guahan (Guam), an unincorporated territory, and the remaining 14 islands are the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas. Through its "Asia-Pacific pivot" foreign policy strategy, the US Department of Defense is expanding across the region, including the Marianas Archipelago. The environmental impact statement documents that describe the proposed military activities violate international and federal laws and neither invite nor require the consent of the Indigenous peoples. Chamoru (Chamorro) activists are utilizing social media sites to create solidarity across and beyond the archipelago. This article incorporates trending #hashtags used within the resistance campaigns.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Indigenous men and masculinities: Legacies,
           identities, regeneration [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Viernes, James Perez
      Review(s) of: Indigenous men and masculinities: Legacies, identities, regeneration, by Innes, Robert Alexander and Anderson, Kim (Eds.), (2015), Winnipeg, MN: University of Manitoba Press, 304 pp. ISBN: 9780887557903.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 3 - Aboriginal peoples, colonialism and international law:
           Raw law [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Reilly, Alexander
      Review(s) of: Aboriginal peoples, colonialism and international law: Raw law, by Watson, Irene. (2015), Oxford, England: Routledge, 188 pp. ISBN: 978-0-415-72175-2.

      PubDate: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Worlded object and its presentation: A Maori
           philosophy of language
    • Abstract: Mika, Carl Te Hira
      In an era concerned with the survival of Indigenous languages, language as a general phenomenon needs to be thought of as thoroughly connected to one's worldview. In this article, I propose a different conception of language that sides more with what I call 'the worlding of things' than linguistics. To foreshadow my speculations on language, I consider the possibility that, within the representation of one entity in perception, there exist all other entities. An entity is hence 'worlded' - a key aspect of the term 'whakapapa'. I then turn to think about language as a general phenomenon for Maori, and its complex ability to world an entity even as it adumbrates that thing's backdrop. I consider the verb 'to be' in that light, arguing that Maori identify language as a sort of gathering of entities rather than an instrument for singling out one thing as thoroughly and separably evident. This article is therefore as much about the full participation of the world as it is about language; it also aims to counter the belief that language is merely a conveyor of ideas.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - A genocide that precedes genocide: Reconciling
           "genocide" and "indigeneity" with a paradox of otherness
    • Abstract: Chalmers, James
      Genocide and settler colonialism are conceptually related ideas, although the specific relationship remains unclear. Whereas some scholars develop subcategories of "colonial genocide" or examine the historical origins of these concepts, I address the signification of "genocide" and "indigeneity." I explore the system of meanings underlying each concept to suggest that both are paradoxically rooted in otherness. The category of indigeneity reveals a basic paradox: the colonizer and Indigenous other are separate from but, simultaneously, dependent upon one another. Likewise, with genocide the perpetrator and othered victim are separate but at the same time dependent on each other. Genocide and indigeneity are conceptually related so that one can consider them as two aspects of the same phenomenon. I propose conceptualizing the relationship between indigeneity and genocide as a two-stage process of erasure in settler societies, with imposition of the category of indigeneity as a preliminary genocide that precedes a formal act of genocide.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Relating to va: Re-viewing the concept of
           relationships in Pasifika education in Aotearoa New Zealand
    • Abstract: Reynolds, Martyn
      Intercultural understanding is required for effective intercultural education. The education of Pasifi ka students (those with cultural and/or family ties to Pacific Islands) living in Aotearoa New Zealand is a negative case in point. Research has linked Pasifika educational achievement to the quality of relationships between teachers and Pasifika students, but has generally stopped short of framing the discussion through Pasifika concepts. This article explores the concept of va (relationship/relatedness) for its potential in telling a relational story in Pasifika conceptual language. It provides grounds for a more nuanced discussion of relationships in Pasifika education by addressing the breadth and transformational power of the application of va. If Pasifika educational research seeks to represent the world as Pasifika students experience it, an awareness of va has its place both in the classroom and in the New Zealand education system as a whole. Appreciating va can make a contribution to intercultural education through deeper intercultural understanding.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Talanoa'i 'a e talanoa - talking about talanoa: Some
           dilemmas of a novice researcher
    • Abstract: Fa'avae, David; Jones, Alison; Manu'atu, Linita
      Pasifika social science researchers in Pacific contexts are encouraged to use research methods that reflect the lived realities of their participants, rather than reproduce what are seen as Western methods of research. As a Pasifika process, talanoa has become a popular research method, often likened to narrative interviews. It has been defined as an open, informal conversation between people in which they share their stories, thoughts and feelings (Vaioleti, 2006). This paper is a critique of how talanoa as a research method is represented in the literature, based on an account of the difficulties I have encountered as a beginning researcher grappling with the idea and practice of talanoa in my own research practice. I argue that improving the practice and understanding of talanoa requires open discussion about the practical dilemmas sometimes experienced by researchers attempting to use this approach.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Matauranga Maori and reproduction: Inscribing
           connections between the natural environment, kin and the body
    • Abstract: Le Grice, Jade Sophia; Braun, Virginia
      The reproduction of Indigenous people, who have experienced ongoing cultural and ethnic marginalization, has long been a source of contention in colonizing contexts. There is scope to further decolonize and reinvigorate traditional Indigenous knowledge that has relevancy and utility in contemporary lives. The present article engages a purakau (narrative) methodology (Lee, 2009) to construct a culturally relevant PhD literature review and synthesize a range of source materials to develop an account of traditional Maori knowledge (matauranga Maori) pertaining to reproduction in a New Zealand context. Three areas are explored based on their novelty and distinctiveness from Western accounts of reproduction: connections between humans, spiritual domains and the natural environment; contextualization within social and familial structures; and a unique and refreshing view of masculine and feminine embodiment. Conclusions are drawn on novel implications of this knowledge for research and health services.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Lived realities: Birthing experiences of Maori women
           under 20 years of age
    • Abstract: Stevenson, Kendall; Filoche, Sara; Cram, Fiona; Lawton, Beverley
      This paper explores the birthing experiences of 16 pregnant Maori women under 20 years of age who were involved in E Hine, a Kaupapa Maori (by Maori, for Maori) longitudinal qualitative research study of young Maori women's journeys through pregnancy and into motherhood that ran from 2010 to 2013. This study provided these young women with an opportunity to share their birthing experiences during kanohi-ki-te-kanohi (face-to-face) interviews. Interpretive phenomenological analysis guided the analysis of these interviews. Following analysis, four themes emerged: some tikanga Maori (Maori practices) are being practised today; whanau (family) support is critical for these young Maori mothers; current system issues impact negatively on birth experiences; and adaptation to motherhood varies. From these themes, positive practices were drawn out that can be applied to clinical practice to improve the birthing experiences of young Maori women. These practices include promoting positive communication between patient and providers, facilitating supportive whanau environments, and enhancing support services accessibility.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Daughters of the drum: Decolonizing health and
           wellness with Native American women
    • Abstract: Brown, Danica Love
      In many pre-colonial tribal communities, Native American women held significant positions as keepers and teachers of health and wellness practices. Today, however, Native American women's status is often relegated to the margins in colonial society, as they are disproportionately affected by health disparities resulting from legacies of historical trauma. This study explores the decolonization of the health and wellness of Native American women in the United States Pacific Northwest. Through a culturally centered qualitative study utilizing photovoice and talking circles, several themes emerge illuminating important and nuanced aspects of resilience related to perceptions of health and wellness. Four Native American women aged 26-46, including myself, participated in the study in the summer of 2014. Utilizing the indigenist stress-coping model, interpretive coding in real time suggests that land, language, and diet are important principles of a decolonized perception of health and wellness centered on the women's experiences together as members of the drum group Daughters of the Drum.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Earth beings: Ecologies of practice across Andean
           worlds [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pawlowska-Mainville, Agnieszka
      Review(s) of: Earth beings: Ecologies of practice across Andean worlds, by De la Cadena, Marisol. (2015), Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 340 pp. ISBN: 978082235963.

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 2 - Eufrosina's revolution
    • Abstract: Lavoie, Sophie M
      Review(s) of: Eufrosina's revolution, by Hofmann, H., Pardo, L., and Bukantz, K. (Producers), and Kaplan, L. (Director). (2012).

      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:34:37 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Second chance education in Botswana: Implementing a
           holistic approach based on the botho philosophy to empower marginalized
           youth in the Kweneng District
    • Abstract: Khudu-Petersen, Kelone; Mamvuto, Attwell
      This paper reports on a project initiated by the non- governmental organization Springboard Humanism (SBH) based in Molepolole, the capital of the Kweneng District of Botswana. The project aims to empower young marginalized women, particularly indigenous BaSarwa and BaKgalagari, who dropped out of school at Junior Certificate Examination (JCE) level (Year 10). The modus operandi at SBH is botho, an African philosophy emphasizing caring, sharing, showing respect and compassion. Participatory action research was conducted with 60 purposively sampled students and other stakeholders who were asked to participate. The study used interviews, observations and document analysis to generate data. The project had been running for three years (2012-2014) at the time of the study and has shown potential to generate positive outcomes and to empower marginalized ethnic minority learners, especially females. Participants in the project have managed to pass the JCE which enables them to enter senior secondary school or vocational education. It is recommended that Botswana's education system adopt this pathway to mainstream education to help ethnic minority youth improve their academic performance.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Lost, found and troubled in translation: Reconsidering
           imagined Indigenous "communities" in post- disaster Taiwan settings
    • Abstract: Hsu, Minna
      Post- disaster discourses emphasize the importance of community in fostering reconstruction, yet the focus on recovering from a "natural" disaster can obscure the slower- paced disasters of displacement, dispossession and marginalization. The pre-disaster circumstances of Indigenous peoples influenced reconstruction after Typhoon Morakot, which devastated Taiwan in 2009, and have shaped the relations in which Indigenous groups are embedded as well as the terms used to represent them. "Community", already contested in its application within various settings, masks a multilingual complexity in Taiwan. This paper explores how the idea of community was mobilized in post- Morakot reconstruction between 2009 and 2015, drawing on ethnographic research within Indigenous Rukai domains and interviews with various institutions. Taking a historical approach to Rukai experiences in Wutai Township, it discusses how imaginings of community reinforce rather than address risk and vulnerability for Indigenous populations in hazardous landscapes, and how external agencies perceive as self- evident what they mean by "community development" and "needs".

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Development or devastation?: Epistemologies of Mayan
           women's resistance to an open-pit goldmine in Guatemala
    • Abstract: Macleod, Morna
      The Canadian corporation Goldcorp's Marlin Mine in San Miguel Ixtahuacan is the first open- pit goldmine in Guatemala. While Goldcorp depicts Marlin as a showcase for development and good business, many Mayan women express extreme distress at the multilayered destruction caused by the corporation. Under the guidance of the indigenous women's movement Tz'ununija', in May-June 2011 and July 2012, I held in- depth interviews with five Maya-Mam leaders and two workshops in San Miguel with more than 30 women opposing the mine. Analysing their visions and Goldcorp's public development discourse, I argue that the mine is decimating San Miguel's social fabric and environment. Although Goldcorp has created employment, infrastructure and injected money into the local economy, gains are short term in comparison with the long-term impacts of the mining venture on land and community. At heart, two fundamentally opposed visions are at stake: Western "development" versus tb'anil qchwinqlal, or quality of life.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - The place of the "Indio" in social research:
           Considerations from Mapuche history
    • Abstract: Nahuelpan, Hector
      This article traces pivotal moments in the history of Indigenous participation in social research as "objects" of study, informants, collaborators and researchers. It proposes that these racial and political hierarchies have been forged by colonization. Specifi c histories reveal the ways these links have developed over time. The Mapuche peoples' experience with the fi eld of history and knowledge production is understood here as both a political position and a site of enunciation that contributes to understanding these relations. Consequently, I argue that any challenge, weakening or dismantling of colonial relations moves us towards a (self- )criticism of hegemonic ideological and epistemological formations and the racial and political hierarchies that structure these relations.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Ancestral knowledge systems: A conceptual framework
           for decolonizing research in social science
    • Abstract: Moreno Sandoval, Cueponcaxochitl D; Lagunas, Rosalva Mojica; Montelongo, Lydia T; Diaz, Marisol Juarez
      Building on the seminal work of Linda T. Smith in decolonizing research methodologies, this paper introduces Ancestral Knowledge Systems (AKS) as a conceptual framework for social science research methodologies. We use autoethnography and critical self- reflection throughout the article to make visible the components of AKS. First, we lay out the context in which AKS was re- created after a doctoral course on decolonizing research methodologies. We unpack internalized colonization to address the need to go beyond identity politics and towards AKS thinking as an approach to promote a multiplicity of knowledge systems. Next, we discuss family epistemologies and collective memories as methods for reconnecting accountability systems to ancestral homeland(s). Finally, we discuss our visions for AKS across learning ecologies. The scholarly significance of our research is twofold: (1) it develops a framework for critical introspection and connectivity for decolonizing research, and (2) it promotes a multiplicity of knowledge systems in the academy.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Decolonizing archival methodology: Combating hegemony
           and moving towards a collaborative archival environment
    • Abstract: Genovese, Taylor R
      The foundation of archival methodology is influenced by colonialism and imperialism. This paternalistic system has created a hegemonic environment that has directly influenced archivists working with Indigenous materials. While positive steps have been made, such as the enactment of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (1990) and the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials (2006), severe limitations exist due to a difference in worldview and cultural beliefs. In order to reverse the effects of hegemony and decolonize archival methodology, an exerted effort must be made to increase collaboration between archives and Indigenous communities. Furthermore, higher education must attract Indigenous students to information science programs in order to create a more diverse workforce. However, in order to enact lasting change in methodology, the archival profession must receive an injection of activist principles. These principles will help advance decolonizing initiatives and ensure the end of paternalism and colonialism in archival science.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Engaging eco-hermeneutical methods: Integrating
           indigenous and environmental curricula through an
           eco-justice-arts-informed pedagogy
    • Abstract: Kulnieks, Andrejs; Longboat, Dan Roronhiakewen; Young, Kelly
      In this article we highlight the intersection of oral and literary traditions by conceptualizing landscape as archive through an integration of Indigenous knowledges into environmental education curriculum and teaching. We report on a study that focused on the experiences of pre-service teachers who engaged in ecological teachings in an established alternative settings placement as part of a pre- service teacher education program in rural Ontario, Canada. To inform our program we used the insights gained through a three-year qualitative methodological study using questionnaires and focus groups as part of an ongoing research project that started in 2012. The 44 male and 125 female participants ranged in age from 22 to 35 years. Our findings revealed that engaging in ecological teachings that have been passed along through generations of Indigenous storytellers can and should be an essential aspect of curricular development of North American systems of education.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Cinema, cross- cultural collaboration, and criticism:
           Filming on an uneven field [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Smith, Jo
      Review(s) of: Cinema, cross- cultural collaboration, and criticism: Filming on an uneven field, by Thornley, Davinia, (2014). Basingstoke, England: Palgrave Macmillan. 134 pp. ISBN 978-1-137-41158-7 EPUB.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Edgar heap of birds [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Wander, Maggie
      Review(s) of: Edgar heap of birds, by Anthes, Bill, (2015). Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 216 pp. ISBN: 978- 0- 8223-5994- 4.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
  • Volume 12 Issue 1 - Dying from improvement: Inquests and inquiries into
           Indigenous deaths in custody [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Kauvaka, Lea Lani
      Review(s) of: Dying from improvement: Inquests and inquiries into Indigenous deaths in custody, by Razack, Sherene H. (2015). Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press. 309 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4426-3737-5.

      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:02:18 GMT
       
 
 
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