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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 400 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 400 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover Agricultural Science
  [5 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1030-4614
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [400 journals]
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Biosecurity policy paper
    • Abstract:
      Australia's geographic location and isolation from other agricultural production and trading countries has meant that we have been free of many of the pests and diseases which trouble other producing countries. This has given us a competitive advantage both in costs and reduced complexities of production processes and in the world market place.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Biotechnology and agricultural innovation policy paper
    • Abstract:
      Advances in biotechnology tools provide opportunities to improve crop and livestock productivity by breeding higher yielding, better quality and more reliable varieties (such as with drought tolerance, insect or disease resistance) that can benefit society in general through improvements in health, the economy and the environment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Around the divisions
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Graduate supply for agriculture - a glimmer of hope
    • Abstract: Pratley, Jim
      In 2012 the Australian Farm Institute published an occasional paper entitled "Professional agriculture - a case of supply and demand" (3). The paper outlined the decline in the numbers of agricultural graduates each year and the mismatch with the buoyant employment market. It was a depressing picture overall. This article provides an update on that publication and, while graduate numbers have continued to fall, the job market remains positive. So much activity is occurring in this space and there is now much cause for optimism.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Horticultural research in Australia
    • Abstract: Pratley, Jim
      Market projections for Australian horticulture are strongly positive. The question is whether the horticultural sector is well positioned to take advantage. Analysis of R and D performance, based on publications, indicates that Australian researchers in horticulture perform well on the international stage in maintaining contributions and particularly in peer acceptance of their research. Its position though is threatened by the rapid increase in performance by other countries such as China and India as well as South Korea. Opportunity does exist to increase the funds available for Australian horticultural research by maximising the co-investment by government. The education and training aspects however remain a particular challenge with low and declining numbers at postgraduate, undergraduate and vocational levels. This education dearth needs to be addressed given the established link between education levels in the workforce, innovation and productivity growth. The establishment of a capacity building strategic fund by Horticulture Innovation Australia is significant as it signals recognition that action needs to be taken and provides a funding source to redress the issue.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Impact of agricultural engagement in NSW secondary
           schools
    • Abstract: Pratley, Jim
      Australian agriculture currently faces a range of production challenges, one of which has been the lack of skilled workers entering the sector. In order to understand the views of the emerging workforce on agriculture, a selfcompletion questionnaire was distributed to students in Years 11 and 12 in four high schools in the New South Wales public system; two agricultural high schools and two non-agricultural high schools offering agriculture subjects. This study was designed to understand what influences students to study Agriculture or Primary Industries electives, what encourages students to aim for a career in the sector and whether attending an agricultural specialist school has a positive impact on these

      This study showed that almost all students were positive about agriculture. Enrolments in Agriculture or Primary Industries electives were very high in the specialist schools but modest at the non-specialist schools, reflective of the common agricultural and urban backgrounds respectively. Enrolment was a personal choice influenced by enjoyment, interest or probable future careers. Around 42% of students studying these subjects indicated they were likely to continue towards a career in the sector. For those students, background and family in agriculture were the biggest influences on their decision to join the sector workforce. This was particularly evident in the specialist schools where the large majority of students saw their future in agriculture. The opposite was the case for the non-specialist schools although 17% of those studying Agriculture in these schools were looking to the sector for a career.

      The study also showed that students attribute most of their agricultural knowledge to school influences, being teachers or peers who are studying the subjects. There was no indication of discouragement in the schools related to studying agriculture. The importance of teachers in this process makes it imperative that Industries capitalise on this by forging stronger relationships with education institutions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Opinion - Risk, reward and research in the
           agrichemicals sector: have we got the balance rightR
    • Abstract: Guerin, Turlough
      After a record winter cropping season in Australia, despite flooding late in the season, it can be easy to miss the significant role that agrichemicals have played in this. As with many facets of business, risk needs to be considered against reward in the production, use and application of production inputs such as applied chemicals. This can be a balancing act. From my own lessons learnt as an early career scientist, and from a current chemical reclassification, research is important in ensuring this balance is optimised for all stakeholders. But as is often the case, finding the balance can be anything but straight forward.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Bridging the divide between science and commercial
           greenhouse practice in the use of parameters and their units
    • Abstract: Smith, Graeme
      There exists a great divide between the research community and commercial greenhouse growers that limits the knowledge transfer thereby devaluing a significant amount of practical and pure research.

      This divide is created by a language barrier that separates these broad groups and is predicated on the simple choice of scientific units used in day-to-day activities and nomenclature.

      We can 'bridge the divide' by categorising common scientific units used by both groups and ensuring future output by the research community includes the units as used by global commercial greenhouse growers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Surviving the 21st century 2016 : Humanity's ten great
           challenges and how we can overcome them [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Smith, David
      Review(s) of: Surviving the 21st century 2016 : Humanity's ten great challenges and how we can overcome them, by Julian Cribb, Springer International Publishing AG, ISBN10 3319412698, ISBN13 9783319412696.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - AIA submission into productivity commission draft
           report on regulation of Australian agriculture
    • Abstract: Guerin, Turlough
      AIA is the peak body representing the professions of agricultural science and natural resource management. AIA members include research and extension scientists, advisers, policy managers, consultants, agribusiness people and farmers. The majority of our members live and work in rural communities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Coffey, Shaun
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - From the Chairman's desk: Our institute - witnessing
           agricultural change
    • Abstract: Bishop, Andrew
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 2 - Research frontiers in Agrifood systems
    • Abstract: Copeland, Les
      This paper looks at research frontiers with potential to increase agricultural productivity. It considers how food production has benefited from agricultural innovations for thousands of years, with productivity gains achieved mostly by the accumulation of incremental advances in knowledge of the resource base, improvement of varieties and practices, and exploiting new enabling technologies not specifically targeted to agriculture and food production. The digital revolution has brought fresh and innovative approaches to answering fundamental questions about plants, animals and soils. Recent advances in biotechnology have opened up new ways to explore the genetic potential of food plants and animals, their response to stress, and the effects of genotype by environment interactions on complex traits such as yield, quality and plant-soil interactions. The massive increase in gene sequencing capacity has greatly improved the efficiency of identifying genetic variability for plant and animal breeding. Much excitement is being generated by the potential of CRISPR technology to deliver customisable gene editing tools that are easy-to-use, accurate and inexpensive. These tools are being adopted at a rate rarely seen before, with the recognition that current regulations may not adequately cover their use. The erosion of traditional discipline boundaries is providing greater flexibility for multidisciplinary, collaborative research. Yet, despite the enormous capacity for high-throughput data gathering, our ability to extract knowledge from the accumulated information is still limited by a rudimentary understanding of biology and the natural resource base. The key to capturing opportunities to boost productivity will be continuing to foster imaginative research leading to the discovery and adoption of new technology.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - SA division president's report
    • Abstract: McDonald, Glenn
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Tasmanian division chair's report 2016
    • Abstract: Chung, Konrad
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Life membership awarded to Geoff Thomas
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - WA division report
    • Abstract: Abbott, Lyn
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - From the chairman's desk
    • Abstract: Bishop, Andrew
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Coffey, Shaun
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Restructuring lucerne ('Medicago sativa') through
           introgression of the Medicago arborea genome
    • Abstract: Irwin, John AG; Sewell, James C; Woodfield, Derek R; Bingham, Edwin T
      This paper reports early generation studies on the agronomic potential of 'M. sativa' (lucerne) X 'M. arborea' partial hybrids and their derivatives, all of which are termed Alborea. Alborea lines were identified that were at least as vigorous and productive in the glasshouse and field (Gatton) as the best commercial control lines. Specific M. arborea traits, such as yellow flower colour, single coil flat pods, larger seed size, tallness and shrub/bush type growth habit, have been transmitted to Alborea. The work indicates that with further breeding and selection, the utilisation of lucerne can be increased.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - From the social media: Dialogue not debate needed for
           GMOS
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Public hearing: Parliamentary inquiry on innovation in
           agriculture
    • Abstract:
      The AIA presented evidence to the Parliamentary Inquiry on Innovation on Agriculture at the University of Sydney on 14 April 2016. Chris Russel, Daniel Tan and Shaun Coffey represented the Institute. AIA was congratulated on the quality of the written submission and the evidence presented.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - "Agribusiness 2030" conference report
    • Abstract: Tan, Daniel; Velthuis, Rob
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Seen at the South Australia conference
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Report on the AIA national conference: The
           government's innovation policy: How can agriculture and our profession
           make it happen and benefit'
    • Abstract: Thomas, Geoff; Plowman, Don
      The AIA South Australian Division organised and ran a very successful national conference on Friday 27 May in Adelaide, following the National Students Awards presentations, AIA AGM and dinner on the previous day. The students' presentations and conference papers are available on the Ag Institute website.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Thoughts on accelerating innovation and adoption in
           Australian agriculture
    • Abstract: Lloyd, David; George, David
      Working within an innovative environment seems to have become the new decadal paradigm. As scientists, we see this as symbolic in an attempt to focus our population on the new 'climate changed' economies of the future. In reality, the natural world, and particularly humankind, has always been innovative, with innovative processes and practices evolving at an ever increasing and a faster pace. Agriculture has traditionally been at the forefront of innovative change, as highlighted by Bradburn and Kauter (2013), Campbell (2013), Neale (2013), Hammer (2013), Roberts (2013), Toms-Morgan (2013), and Trotter (2013), attributable to past conditions that were conducive to innovation. This paper will highlight the need for, and how this can be maintained or improved now and into the future.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Reaping the benefits of innovation - the Australian
           cotton story
    • Abstract: Hamilton, David
      Australian cotton crops now produce yields of around two and a half to three times world average and Australian cotton yields are the highest in the world. This is largely because of the rapid adoption of new technologies, but also because much of the crop is irrigated compared with many overseas countries where extensive areas of raingrown cotton are produced.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Smart farming: Comment on the report of the
           parliamentary inquiry into agricultural innovation
    • Abstract: Fischer, Tony
      The Standing Committee on Agricultural and Industry of the House of Representatives of the Parliament of Australia released in early May the report of its 9 month inquiry into the Agricultural Innovation and barriers in this process of innovation. The committee was chaired by Rowan Ramsey MP and comprised 8 MPs from the coalition, 2 from Labour and 1 independent. There was a good representation from Universities, RDCs, CSIRO, State Departments, relevant industry and farmer bodies, including AIA, along with some private input, amongst the 116 submissions to the Committee, supported by public meetings in Canberra, Melbourne, Wodonga, Sydney and Armidale, and by three field visits.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - New SA division fellows
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - NSW division president's report
    • Abstract: Wells, Brad
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Issue 1 - Young professionals in agriculture forum in March, WA
    • Abstract: Grubb, Laura; Corlett, Maddison
      This study evaluated the impact of mycotoxins on the incidence of dark cutting. Data were obtained from 66 lots (3,185 head) of cattle originating from King Island, Tasmania between March and June 2015. Pastures were collected from the paddock being grazed by each lot prior to slaughter and analysed for mycotoxin concentration, available pasture and multiple measures of feed quality. Other production factors and traits that may have impacted on glycogen metabolism or the incidence of dark cutting were also recorded. The incidence of dark cutting per lot was analysed using general linear models. Increasing concentrations of ochratoxin A from 0.4ppb to 0.8ppb increased the incidence of dark cutting by 25.37% (P < 0.05). The incidence of dark cutting was also significantly different between kill dates (P < 0.05) plus the concentrations of ochratoxin A, fumonisins, aflatoxins, and β-trichothecenes also significantly differed between kill dates (P < 0.05). Increasing in-vitro digestible matter % of the pastures also decreased the incidence of dark cutting (P < 0.05). The concentrations of ochratoxin A measured in this experiment are far lower than what is reported to have an impact on animal production measures in literature. However, these results suggest that decreasing the consumption of ochratoxin A will minimise dark cutting beef in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Innovation in agriculture - opportunities and
           constraints
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - From the Chairman's desk
    • Abstract: Hamilton, David
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Finlayson, Peter
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Humic products - potential or presumption for
           agriculture [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Loch, Donald S; Fujinuma, Ryosuke; Menzies, Neal W
      Review(s) of: Humic products - potential or presumption for agriculture, by Kim Billingham, NSW Department of Primary Industries, Sydney, 2012, Paperback, viii + 106 pp. ISBN 978 174256 257 5.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - A crop productivity research protocol for long wall
           mining
    • Abstract: Spackman, Graham; Neale, Tim; Reid, David; Hammer, Graeme
      Springsure Creek Coal (SCC) intends to develop a coal mine using the long wall mining process under grain farming land near Emerald in Central Queensland (CQ). While this technology will result in some subsidence of the land surface, SCC wishes to maintain productivity of the grain cropping land in the precinct after coal mining. However, the impact of the surface subsidence resulting from that mining process on productivity of cropping land in any Australian landscape is currently unclear.

      A research protocol to investigate the impacts of subsidence on grain productivity for when the SCC project becomes operational is proposed. The protocol has wider application for other similar mining projects throughout the country. A copy of the full report is accessible on www.aginstitute.com.au.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Crop nutrient performance indicators
    • Abstract: Norton, Rob; Bruulsema, Tom; Roberts, Terry; Snyder, Cliff
      The use of fertilizers is fundamental to feeding the global population, with around half of current food production made possible by balanced crop nutrient input. At the same time, there are parts of the world where fertilizers are underused so that food security is threatened, or where they are overused to the point of contributing to environmental pollution. In order to bring balance to these two situations, it is useful to distinguish between effectiveness and efficiency of nutrient use. Efficient (e.g., increasing output per unit of fertilizer applied) and effective (e.g., increasing farmer productivity) nutrient use will balance environmental, economic and social issues, as the improvements in all three are not mutually exclusive.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Agronomists use of PGR - a survey
    • Abstract: Merry, Angela M; Carew, Anna L; Leith, Peat; Nelson, Rohan; Acuna, Tina Botwright
      The objective of this research was to improve our understanding of perceptions and use of plant growth regulators (PGRs) in cereal production in Australia and to develop relevant research priorities. PGRs applied at the appropriate rate reduce plant height when applied at early stem elongation in cereals. Information was collated from a telephone survey of 142 Australian agronomists and a 12-person focus group on current PGR use. Lodging was identified by survey respondents as the main reason for recommending PGR use in grain crop management. The effect of PGRs on grain yield was reported to be inconsistent, which reflects the complex interactions between crop species and variety, the type, rate and timing of PGR application, plant phenology, and the impact of diverse environmental conditions.

      Only 20% of agronomists surveyed indicated that they have recommended PGR use, because they were perceived as unsuited to specific growing regions and there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding their efficacy in crop production. Economic analysis showed that application of PGR with no yield response from 2.38 Mha would cost the industry around $70M. In contrast, relatively small 5 and 10% yield responses would result in a net profit of between $35M and $138M. Coordinated field experiments are required across a range of environments and treatment combinations to clarify the potential benefit of PGRs, and an analysis of the costs versus benefits of PGR use for a range of scenarios.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Organic grower crowned at AUSVEG
    • Abstract: Watson, Erika
      "Erika's company, Epicurian Harvest, has led the way in providing high quality produce to some of the most high-end restaurants in Sydney and the Blue Mountains, growing and supplying quality, certified organic, speciality vegetables and fruits direct to some of the most exclusive names in the restaurant and hotel game," said AUSVEG CEO, Richard Mulcahy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Agricultural innovations inquiry 2015 submission
    • Abstract:
      Ag Institute Australia (AIA) is pleased to make this submission to the House of Representatives' Standing Committee on Agriculture and Industry's Inquiry into Agricultural Innovation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - AIA Tasmania division
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Innovation and productivity high in horticulture
    • Abstract: Braddon, Amy
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Export to Asia and the world - a forum TAS div.
    • Abstract: Bishop, Andrew; Chung, Konrad
      It is an understatement to say that food is important to life; rather food is crucial to all life on this planet. With the population of Planet Earth steadily increasing and expected to reach over nine billion people by 2050, along with shifts in dietary demands and bourgeoning wealth in parts of Asia, the demand for agricultural products will steadily increase, generating market opportunities right now and into the future. But tapping into those opportunities is no easy task: it requires knowledge, experience, and a strong strategic focus. And so the scene was set for the 2015 AIA Tasmanian Division Autumn Forum held at Deloraine in the beautiful north-west Tasmania on 23rd April.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Deep and misunderstood: Can we solve the underlying
           problems with our groundwater'
    • Abstract: Guerin, Turlough
      As deliberations over the governance of water continues at the national level in Australia, the fate of the most vulnerable of our water sources remains buried deep in the machinations of "reform in progress". In the wake of Australia's coal seam gas boom, the rise of people power through social media and the divestment movement, and Australia's mandate to increase agricultural and resource productivity, the relative paucity of practical governance stands in stark contrast to the importance this hidden resource plays in society. Out of sight, out of mind couldn't be more relevant. Australia will need to better regulate and manage this resource so that national priorities (the triple bottom line, social, environmental and economic objectives) can be achieved. Efforts will need to be coordinated, cost effective, and streamlined. The crux of the matter is to share it fairly: for production, agricultural and environmental purposes, while also providing amenity for the many Australians who rely on it for life-sustaining, recreational and other societal purposes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Selling the "unsellable": Convincing producers to
           reduce greenhouse gas emissions with farm-specific management options
    • Abstract: Hobbins, Ashley
      Industry-wide general messages about reducing greenhouse gas emissions have typically led to farmer disengagement. The 'Tas Farming Futures' project is supporting producers across all agricultural industries in Tasmania to reduce their emissions through providing information and management options in the context of their own farm. The project is part of the wider Carbon Farming Futures Extension and Outreach program funded by the Australian Government. Highlighting the strong link between reducing greenhouse gas emissions intensity (measured as tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent per unit of product, hectare or dry sheep equivalent) and improving resource use efficiency, productivity and profitability is beginning to sway producer's opinions from indifference to interested and engaged. A farm Emissions Reduction Planning approach was developed to suit individual farmer's specific circumstances.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Thoughts from the 9th International Wheat Conference
    • Abstract: Fischer, Tony
      As a wheat scientist for all of my working life, but on the sidelines these days, the 9th International Wheat Conference (IWC) in Sydney, 21-25 September 2015, provided a great opportunity to catch up. Besides, I had previously participated in the 1st IWC conference in Zagreb, former Yugoslavia, in 1975. Forty years of wheat research should have made a difference, and indeed in this period world wheat yield has doubled from 1.6 t/ha to 3.2 t/ha while area harvested remained unchanged at around 220 Mha (source FAOSTAT). Over the period real US$ wheat prices fell about 50% to a bottom in around 2000, a clear impact of new technology and innovation in world wheat cropping, but since then prices have fluctuated wildly due to other factors coming into play, and currently (2014) real prices sit around twice the 2000 values (source World Bank Commodity prices), adding urgency to this IWC.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Bad economics: Pestilent economists, profligate
           governments, debt, dependency and despair [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lines, George
      Review(s) of: Bad economics: Pestilent economists, profligate governments, debt, dependency and despair, by Peter Smith, Connor Court Publishing, Ballarat, Vic. 2012, ISBN 978-1-921421-59-4, Paperback, 232 pages, $29.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Guide to the provision of professsional advice
    • Abstract: Gordon, Paul
      The provision of advice is regulated by the Australian Consumer Law (ACL). The provisions in the ACL apply a very simple concept: the obligation not to engage in misleading or deceptive conduct. That is, any conduct that may mislead or deceive its recipient as to its accuracy, the truth of the statements made, or any inferences that are reasonably drawn from those statements may be seen to be misleading or deceptive.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 2 - Ethics and the AIA agricultural professional
    • Abstract: Thomas, Geoff
      The world becomes a more complex and tougher place in which to do business, with a greater diversity of clients and working relationships. Consequently the quality of work performed by agriculturists depends even more on their competence and the values they hold with respect to the community and environment in which they operate.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Farmageddon: The true cost of cheap meat [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Moran, John
      Review(s) of: Farmageddon: The true cost of cheap meat, by Philip Lymbery and Isabel Oakeshott, Bloomsbury USA, May 2014, ISBN 20141408846446, 9781408846445, 448 pages, Amazon US$14.52 paperback.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Improving livestock welfare in developing countries:
           Bringing Australian export dairy heifers into the 'welfare tent'
    • Abstract: Moran, John
      The welfare of an animal relates primarily to its ability to cope, firstly with its external environment, such as housing, handing by humans, weather and the presence of other animals, and secondly with its internal environment, such as specific injuries or illnesses and nutritional status. A series of reports have been commissioned by the Australian government to oversee the development of suitable animal welfare guidelines for exported cattle. For feeder and slaughter cattle the Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) was recently instigated. However, this does not cover breeding cattle that have a productive life of ten years or more and could change hands a number of times. The report authors believe that Australia is better placed continuing its policy advocacy role for these animals and, where possible, to support implementation of improvements to animal welfare in importing countries through strengthening of training, development and capacity building programs.

      However, as the article discusses, this approach is currently not working as is apparent from the author's many observations on dairy farms around SE Asia. Many imported Australian dairy heifers are clearly suffering from poor feeding and management practices in chronically stressful conditions and are not producing anywhere near their genetic potential as a consequence. All too often stock are in poor body condition and had excessively dirty hind legs, hind quarters and udders, and are undernourished. Some other more effective approach to improving their welfare and productivity is required. This could include more serious efforts by Australian exporters to highlight the detrimental effects of poor welfare on the longevity and productivity of such imported dairy stock, as well as concerted efforts by relevant aid agencies to transfer appropriate technology to producers through training programs to the livestock support networks.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Agricultural education and damn statistics I: Graduate
           completions
    • Abstract: Pratley, Jim
      This paper describes the confusion surrounding the use of the official Field of Education (FoE) categories to describe the graduate completion levels of recent graduates in agriculture. Official FoE categories have agriculture and environment in the same category which, when used as a whole, results in a misrepresentation of agriculture by up to 9x. The importance of asking the right question in order to obtain the answer needed is demonstrated. This remains an ongoing issue for the industy sector if the public is to be correctly informed about key educational matters in agriculture.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Agricultural competitiveness green paper response
    • Abstract: Hamilton, David; Thomas, Geoff
      While AIA agrees with a number of the policy options raised in the Green Paper, we have some additional suggestions and some ideas on the policies proposed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Finlayson, Peter
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - NSW division - 2015 annual report
    • Abstract: Tan, Daniel
      The Association Specialists continued to perform well as the National Secretariat in 2014. The Weekly Alert continued to be compiled by David Cussons of Cussons Media in Queensland. We also welcomed a new board member, Ben Thomas from South Australia. The board oversaw a submission to the Agricultural Competitiveness Green Paper on 11th December 2014 - see separate paper this issue. The board is also developing a new accreditation platform, the Chartered Agricultural Professional (CAP) program, and a new special interest group for developing advocacy policies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Beijing market delegation report, NSW Div.
    • Abstract: Fozzard, Bob
      On the 11 December 2014, Ag Institute Australia, in conjunction with the Australian China Cultural and Professional Exchange, Sydney Markets NSW, and Freshcare Limited, hosted a small senior management delegation from PRC Beijing's major markets. These markets supply horticulture produce to some three hundred million people many of whom are middle class.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - AEV Richardson Memorial National Student Award 2015
    • Abstract: Todd, Liz
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - From the chairman's desk
    • Abstract: Hamilton, David
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - AIA fellow awards 2015
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - 2015 national conference report
    • Abstract: Todd, Liz
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - SA division annual report 2015
    • Abstract: Dickson, Hamish
      The South Australian Division of Ag Institute Australia has been active providing events, information and awards for our South Australian members. Our aim has been to help build value in the membership beyond the activities of National Office such as the weekly alert, the Journal, accreditation, professional representation and national events.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - AIA WA division AM report 2015
    • Abstract: Abbott, Lyn
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - AIA WA division young professionals in agriculture
           forum
    • Abstract: Moir, BenitaWA Division
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - The QLD division Alan Rixon memorial prize and medal
    • Abstract: Lloyd, David
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - AIA SA division recognition awards 2015
    • Abstract: Jervois, Kym
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - 2015 NSW AIA Chris Russell medal of excellence award
    • Abstract: Wells, Brad
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - New standards to align agriculture education with
           industry expectations
    • Abstract: Acuna, Tina Botwright; Able, Amanda J; Bobbi, Phoebe
      Tertiary education in agriculture is at a crossroads. There are a lot of proposed changes in university regulations about the design of courses and learning outcomes (Australian Government, 2014) that can lead to tensions between universities and employers.

      Our viewpoint article The AgLTAS Project Submission published in the May 2014 edition of Agricultural Science outlined progress towards the development of national tertiary-level education standards for agriculture to align the expectations of graduates, employers and universities (Acuna, 2014). The standards aim to help universities design and deliver programs that attract more students and produce graduates skilled in the requirements of industry. They have been endorsed by the Australian Council of Deans of Agriculture.

      Here we report on the now-published standards (Botwright Acu a et al, 2014) and provide an update on how two of the partner universities, the University of Tasmania and the University of Adelaide, are implementing the standards in their teaching programs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Australia's agricultural future: Opportunities and
           constraints
    • Abstract: Fischer, Tony
      While the workshop organizers urge bold insight, challenges to conventional wisdom and moving beyond traditional thinking, we cannot ignore the agricultural lessons of the past nor the successes of the present. For the major crops globally, these I have tried to cover in my recent book on progress and prospects for crop yields around the globe (Fischer et al 2014, free at http://aciar.gov. au/publication/mn158 ). Outside observers deplore "more of the same" but agriculture is still going to be the dominant world food source in 2050, not to mention its likely ongoing role in supplying fibre, industrial products and probably biofuel. Also, except for the industrial products, the commodities involved are unlikely to change greatly. Animal products will continue to rise relative to plant food; amongst the latter, fruit and vegetables, sugar and oils will continue to grow relative to starchy grains and roots; fish and sea food will be mostly produced under managed culture with crop-based feed; biofuel from food stuffs may have given way to biofuel from cellulose, for most forecasters don't see much further expansion of the former, and at least one company (Dupont) reports recent progress in the latter using GM yeast.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Phosphorus use and future supply
    • Abstract: Norton, Rob M
      A reliable supply of high quality phosphorus (P) has been a cornerstone of agricultural development across the globe. In Australia P has been recognised as a key agricultural input since the founding work by Professor J.D. Custance at Roseworthy, South Australia in the 1880's. As most farmers and advisors now clearly recognise, P is an essential nutrient for successful crop and pasture growth that has no substitutes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Agricultural education and damn stats II: Graduate
           employment and salaries
    • Abstract: Pratley, Jim
      Careers advice to students regarding opportunities in agriculture is commonly reported as negative despite employment prospects for graduates being significant in recent years. Given the confusion in the use of data about graduate completions, the Australian Council of Deans of Agriculture explored whether such confusion extended to graduate careers advice through the Graduate Destination Survey. In cooperation with Graduate Careers Australia, ACDA has undertaken an analysis which shows that there is a significant discrepency in the employment outcomes when agriculture and environment graduates are considered independently. Such data are usually combined and show employment levels much lower than actual for agriculture.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - The SA division's 2015 annual meeting and awards night
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Food politics. What everyone needs to know [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Fischer, Tony
      Review(s) of: Food politics. What everyone needs to know, Second edition, by Robert Paarlberg, Oxford University Press, New York, 2013, ISBN 978-0-19-932238-1.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 27 Issue 1 - Cow talk: Understanding dairy cow behaviour to improve
           their welfare on Asian farms [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lines, George
      Review(s) of: Cow talk: Understanding dairy cow behaviour to improve their welfare on Asian farms, by John Moran and Rebecca Doyle, CSIRO Publishing, 256pps, ISBN 9781486301614, $AU49.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Biofortifed vegetables could increase life expectancy
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - 2014 annual report SA AIA Div.
    • Abstract: Dickson, Hamish
      The last 12 months has been relatively busy to the South Australian division of the Ag Institute Australia with significant time and planning invested in building value in membership.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - From the Chairman's desk
    • Abstract: Hamilton, David
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Finlayson, Peter
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Vale Colin Hale Williams, FAIAST, 1918 - 2014
    • Abstract: Williams, Neil
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Australian agriculture: A sunset or flagship industry
           - the challenges ahead
    • Abstract: Kerin, John
      This is an abbreviated text of a address to the Victorian Division of AIA at its September luncheon by the Hon John Kerin AM. It was an address aimed at informing and entertaining the attendees, most of whom have been around the traps for a while and enjoy a bit of humour while getting the good oil, with a good lunch. The meeting was well attended - a record turnout - and John's address provoked plenty of intelligent discussion and lots of questions. We thank John for giving us his valuable time and for journeying from Canberra specifically for this event. We also thank the Crawford Fund for making it possible for John to attend - Ted Hayes, Sec, Vic. Division.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Occurrence of a phytoplasma associated with bogia
           coconut syndrome in Papua New Guinea
    • Abstract: Pilotti, Carmel A; Saul, Josephine; Liefting, Lia W; Kembu, Alfred; Kokoa, Pere
      Cocos nucifera (coconut) displaying symptoms of Bogia Coconut Syndrome (BCS) and Areca catechu (betel nut) and Musa sp. (banana) with pronounced leaf yellowing collected from the Madang Province of Papua New Guinea have been found to contain Banana wiltassociated phytoplasma (BWAP). This is the first report of a phytoplasma being detected in betel nut palms. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis confirmed findings from earlier research that this phytoplasma forms a clade separate to, but most closely related to the group 16SrIV phytoplasmas that are associated with a lethal yellowing disease of coconut and other palm species. Symptoms in coconut were confounded by damage to standing palms inflicted by Oryctes centaurus (rhinoceros beetle). Phytoplasma was not detected in coconuts displaying yellowing symptoms in other coastal provinces of PNG.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - USC scientist tackles rogue ladybirds and tree-killing
           wasps
    • Abstract: Nahrung, Helen
      The University of the Sunshine Coast's researcher Dr Helen Nahrung just loves creepy crawlies. Whether they are in their natural habitat or under a microscope, she spends her days studying insects of all shapes and sizes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Senate RD and E Levies inquiry submission
    • Abstract: Thomas, Geoff; Hamilton, David
      The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (AIAST) as the peak body representing agricultural professionals and natural resource managers in Australia strongly supports the current Research Corporation Model and the joint industry/Commonwealth funding formula. This view is based on the strength of joint contributions to generate both private and public good outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - What happens when we remain silent'
    • Abstract: Coffey, Shaun
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Ethics and the agricultural professional
    • Abstract: Thomas, Geoff
      The world becomes a more complex and tougher place in which to do business, with a greater diversity of clients and working relationships.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Stepping out with fresh ideas conference
    • Abstract: Fozzard, Bob
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - What teachers want from professional development
    • Abstract: Lembo, Kay
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - RDSI project ties research communities into data
           network
    • Abstract:
      Imagine the discoveries that would be possible if Australia's many nationally significant research data collections could be tied together into a single collaborative environment available to the nation's research communities. The announcement from local company, Arcitecta, that its Mediaflux data management platform has been selected as a key data management engine for Australia's Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) project means that vision is one step closer to reality as each of the RDSI-funded data stores goes live with Mediaflux.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Joint winners awarded ausveg researcher of the year
    • Abstract: Terminelli, Sam; Key, Carolyn
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Demand for agri-professionals continues to grow
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - The new horizons project - a step change for dryland
           agriculture
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Recycled plastic beehives stack up for pitch prize
    • Abstract: Cameron, Jane; Walsh, Terry
      Most 17 year old boys love food, A planned business based on beehives made from recycled plastic created a buzz at the recent final of the Innovation Centre Sunshine Coast's annual Business Pitch competition.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Pathways into agricultural science in Tasmania: How
           did students find the way'
    • Abstract: Turner, Lydia; Spence, Kelly
      Agricultural education is an essential investment that creates graduates capable of improving the food and fibre sectors so that they can continue meeting the needs of the world's rapidly growing population. The low awareness of agricultural science among the Australian public is an important factor limiting student enrolment in tertiary level agricultural science courses. In 2012, a roundtable of young scientists from around Australia identified common misperceptions about a career in the agricultural industry, which included limited career options, low career status and the unfavourable stereotype that only uneducated individuals are involved in agriculture. In light of this intelligence, a recent qualitative study explored the pathways of young students currently enrolled in the University of Tasmania Agricultural Science degree. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were carried out with the 11 participants in August 2012. The interviews were recorded for subsequent transcription, and then a thematic analysis of the data was carried out using NVivo 10. The study revealed that interventions in the key decision making years (Grades 11 and 12) exposed students to information and experiences that overcame their initial misperceptions about agriculture1. Students were flexible in their career pathway choices and responded positively to the new experiences and information when it connected with their interests, goals and skills. This paper provides insight into the career decision making process of young people as it describes how students discovered and chose their pathway into agricultural science in Tasmania, and submits three recommendations that could alleviate the major constraints.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Seedling emergence and early growth of Maireana
           Brevifolia as affected by seed treatment
    • Abstract: Bennett, Tiffany C; Collins, DA; Pritchard, DL
      Small leaf bluebush (Maireana brevifolia) is an Australian native halophyte of potential value in agricultural systems, given its ability to grow and persist on sites negatively affected by soil constraints, such as salinity. Its adoption in farming systems is limited because seed germination and establishment is poorly understood. This study investigated the effect of three seed treatments; oven drying, cool storage and gibberellic acid on seedling emergence and early growth of Maireana brevifolia. The emergence of Maireana brevifolia was not improved by any combination of the seed treatments investigated. The fill of seeds as measured by x-ray ranged from 49% - 64% with an average of 54.7 +/- 1.42% (n = 10), indicating that germination was constrained by seed fill, rather than seed dormancy. Seed treatments did not increase seedling growth of Maireana brevifolia. Further research is required to better understand the factors affecting Maireana brevifolia seed viability to improve the adoption of large scale plantings on unproductive agricultural land.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Vale Jack Lewis FAIAST, 1921 - 2014
    • Abstract: Butler, Julian
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Designing water extraction regimes for an
           ever-changing future
    • Abstract: Young, Mike
      Most of the world's water entitlement and allocation regimes evolved during periods of abundance and, hence, are not well suited to the management of water scarcity. Development of the institutional arrangements necessary to manage changing demands and supplies is in its infancy Design criteria for the development of a set of institutional arrangements for the robust management of scarce water resources is offered and then used to develop a generic framework for the allocation and use of water. Variations to account for differences in ground, regulated and unregulated water resources are offered. The question of how best to sequence reform of existing water entitlement and allocation regimes is also addressed. The result is a recommendation for the use of water sharing plans to determine how much water may be used at any point in time and an unbundled suite of arrangements that enable efficient but separated management of long term and short term considerations and, also, the control of externalities. System-wide adjustment is facilitated through the periodic revision of water sharing plans. Individual adjustment to changing circumstances is facilitated through trade in entitlements and allocations. Before the introduction of institutional arrangements that encourage adjustment through trade it is recommended that the abstraction regime used be converted into one that accounts for return flows and allocates water according to shareholder entitlement. Seniority, beneficial-use criteria and opportunities to third parties to prevent adjustment according to pre-specified rules should be repealed. Well-designed regimes can be extended to include dam-capacity shares and allow the use of market-based instruments in delivery of water-quality objectives. Pooling can be used to lower the costs of risk management.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Unintended consequences: The net negative impact of
           government policy on grain sector margins
    • Abstract: McKenzie, Paul
      Grain sector financial returns (net profit after tax and personal costs) have been eroded significantly in the past twenty years to 5% of turnover.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 2 - Market intelligence is a must - the era of rapid
           discontinuous change
    • Abstract: Wells, David
      Being an industry leader in today's business culture is not always easy. There is an ever increasing need for our industry leaders to understand the landscape of both the growers they influence and the customers they are trying to impact. If our vegetable industry leaders are not reflecting these rhythms to the domestic and global markets then our agricultural industry will continue to be left behind.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Stepping out with fresh ideas conference
    • Abstract: Fozzard, Bob
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - Reducing food waste NSW div.
    • Abstract: Watson, Erika
      While highly politicised terms such as "food security", "climate change" and "Asian Century" are the buzzwords for the twenty-teens; the implications of these terms for the food system are great. The rising global population results in the food supply chain (and the human power and natural resources that go into it) being subjected to immense pressure to increase output and distribution of nutrient-dense food with decreasing resources. Food security is on the current agenda for governments across the globe with a message to food producers to increase their production, not only to better address the impoverished or malnourished populations, but to meet the predicted demand from the growing middle-class population across the globe.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
  • Volume 26 Issue 1 - From the national president's desk
    • Abstract: Hamilton, David
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:42 GMT
       
 
 
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