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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
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Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
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Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
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Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
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Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
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Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
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Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
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Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
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Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
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Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
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Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
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Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
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Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
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Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
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Journal Cover Agenda: A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Editor and Editorial Committee
    • PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2017 04:09:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Section 18C, Human Rights, and Media Reform: An
           Institutional Analysis of the 2011-13 Australian Free Speech Debate
    • Abstract: Berg, Chris; Davidson, Sinclair
      The paper examines two Australian freedom-of-speech controversies between 2011 and 2013 - the debate over section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act, and the debate over the Gillard Government's print media laws. These controversies featured rhetorical and ideological debate about the limits of free speech and the nature of human rights. The paper applies a 'subjective political economy' framework to these debates in order to trace the effect of increased perceived 'disorder costs' and 'dictatorship costs' of freedomof- speech restrictions. The paper concludes that policy change is driven by exogenous changes in perceived institutional costs. In the case of the Gillard Government's media laws, those costs were borne by the Gillard Government, and one would not expect print media laws to be a major political issue in the absence of a further exogenous shock. In the case of section 18C the revealed dictatorship costs of legislation, which includes the words 'offend' and 'insult', suggest the section 18C controversy will endure.

      PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2017 04:09:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - The optimal size of local government, with special
           reference to New South Wales
    • Abstract: Abelson, Peter
      The paper discusses the major criteria for determining the optimal size of local government, and advances an evidence-based critique of the New South Wales Government's program to reduce the number of local councils.

      PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2017 04:09:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Reallocating Australia's Scarce Mental Health
           Resources
    • Abstract: Williams, Ruth FG; Doessel, DP
      This paper applies some simple analytical tools from the economists' toolbox to shed some light on a sleeper issue in Australia's mental health sector. The problem is that there are large numbers of people with no diagnosed mental health condition who consume mental health services. imultaneously, there are large numbers of people who have very serious mental health problems who receive no mental health services. This untreated group is often referred to as those with 'unmet need', a much-heard term. We refer to the first group as people with 'met non-need', a term hardly ever heard. Although the solution to the unmet-need problem is the oft-heard call for increased government expenditure, no attention is directed to the wasted expenditure associated with the 'met non-need' group: the met non-need issue is 'the elephant in the room'. We point to an alternative policy response; that is, a reallocation of resources from the met non-need group to the unmet need group. To achieve this, we direct focus upon a structural reform in the processes of supplying mental health services.

      PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2017 04:09:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - China and the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement:
           Misfit or missed opportunity?
    • Abstract: Ramasamy, Bala; Yeung, Matthew CH
      If it eventuates the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement (TPP) will include major economic powerhouses like the US and Japan, but China - the elephant in the room - has been excluded. Our evaluation of how China might fare in the TPP finds that the agreement would be a poor fit at the current stage of China's economic development. Although China would gain both in terms of trade and a reform timetable, some features of this 21st‑century agreement - the assistance given to state-owned enterprises, the standards for labour rights, protection of multinationals against the state and competition laws - would be stumbling blocks in the negotiation process. Thus, being left out of the TPP is no big loss for China.

      PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2017 04:09:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Real-World Economic Policy: Insights from Leading
           Australian Economists [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Majeed, Omer
      Review(s) of: Real-World Economic Policy: Insights from Leading Australian Economists, edited by Jan Libich.

      PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2017 04:09:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of
           Inequality, The [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Palmer, Michael
      Review(s) of: The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality, by Angus Deaton,

      PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2017 04:09:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 23 Issue 1 - Few Hares to Chase: The Life and Economics of Bill
           Phillips, A [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cornish, Selwyn
      Review(s) of: A Few Hares to Chase: The Life and Economics of Bill Phillips, by Alan Bollard.

      PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2017 04:09:34 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Paved with good intentions: The road home and the
           irreducible minimum of homelessness in Australia
    • Abstract: Johns, Gary
      Despite public interest and public inquiries as long ago as the 1989 Human Rights Commission and the consequent increase in funding by the Hawke and subsequent governments, the 2006 rate of homelessness in Australia was 32 per 10 000, only marginally better than the 34.8 per 10 000 of 2001. This article explores the reasons for the apparent failure to fulfil past promises and the weaknesses in current strategy. It argues for an explicit policy framework containing the assumption that there is an irreducible level of homelessness, and that there should be an assessment of the cost-effectiveness, probability of success and timeliness of each known remedy, in order to achieve the irreducible level.

      PubDate: Wed, 8 Aug 2012 09:23:03 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Editor and editorial committee
    • PubDate: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 09:38:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Keynes Hayek. The clash that defined modern economics
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cornish, Selwyn
      Review(s) of: Keynes Hayek. The clash that defined modern economics, by Nicholas Wapshott, (Scribe, 2011)

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 09:38:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Australia's defence: A review of the 'reviews'
    • Abstract: Ergas, Henry
      The Australian Defence Force is held in high regard; the Department of Defence is not. Longstanding concerns about inefficiency, compounded by a succession of fiascos and bungles, have entrenched the perception that Defence is poorly managed. Earlier attempts at reform have yielded mixed, often disappointing, results (see Ergas and Thomson 2011), and the years since 2009 have seen a series of reviews aimed at improving performance, culminating in 22 defence-related reviews in 2011-12 alone.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 09:38:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Citations as a measure of the research outputs of New
           Zealand's economics departments: The problem of 'long and variable lags'
    • Abstract: Tressler, John; Anderson, David L
      The paper explores the merits of utilising citation counts to measure research output in economics in the context of a nationwide research evaluation scheme: the New Zealand Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF). Citations were collected for all refereed papers produced by New Zealand's academic economists over the period 2000 to 2008, and used to estimate the time-lags in between publication and the flow of citations; to demonstrate the impact of alternative definitions of 'economics-relevant' journals on citation counts; and to assess the impact of citation measures on departmental and individual performance. We conclude that under certain scenarios around 60 per cent of papers received no citations over the period. Our findings suggest that the time-lags between publication and citation make it difficult to rely on citation counts to produce a meaningful measure of output in a PBRF-like research-evaluation framework, especially one based on the assessment of individual academics.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 09:38:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 19 Issue 1 - Australia's 2009 ATM reforms: Transparency for
           transparency's sake
    • Abstract: Green, Hugh
      This paper reviews the effectiveness of the reforms to the Australian ATM of early 2009. Data indicate that consumers have acted on the more transparent display of fees by shifting their transactions towards fee-free ATMs provided by their own financial institution, thereby reducing the fees they pay, at the cost of added travel costs. But although consumer surplus has increased, the overall result has been a less-efficient use of the ATM network: banks have lost the whole fall in fee revenue, while consumers have gained only the fee saving, less the extra travel costs. Further, the promise of lower fees did not eventuate, and there was no significant increase in availability of ATMs. Nonetheless, the reforms have been hailed as a success because of the increased pricing transparency in the market. This paper questions the worth of increased transparency when prices are inefficient and welfare loss is the consequence.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Aug 2012 09:38:58 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Editor and Editorial Committee
    • PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:59:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Famous figures and diagrams in economics [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Breunig, Robert
      Review(s) of: Famous figures and diagrams in economics, by Mark Blaug and Peter Lloyd (eds), (Edward Elgar, 2010)

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:59:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - A three-cornered life: The historian W. K. Hancock
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cornish, Selwyn
      Review(s) of: A three-cornered life: The historian W. K. Hancock, by Jim Davidson, (University of New South Wales press, 2010)

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:59:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - The Australian conference of economists at 40: The
           state it's in
    • Abstract: Millmow, Alex
      It was 1970. It was the Age of Aquarius. The Boeing 747 was introduced into intercontinental service. In Australia, the Federal Treasurer, Les Bury, began to notice that inflation and unemployment were rising simultaneously. And Australian students began studying economics using a localised adaptation of Samuelson's classic textbook.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:59:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - A defence of contemporary economics: 'Zombie
           economics' in review
    • Abstract: Williamson, Stephen D
      John Quiggin wants what fundamentally all economists want. He would like to make society better off. Of course, economists differ over how that goal should be accomplished. Quiggin thinks that society would be better off if income and wealth were redistributed from the currently rich to the currently poor, if there were a larger role for the government, and if fluctuations in aggregate employment were mitigated or eliminated entirely.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:59:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - More guns without less butter: improving Australian
           defence efficiency
    • Abstract: Ergas, Henry; Thomson, Mark
      Defence outlays amount to 1.8 per cent of Australia's GDP. Nonetheless, the processes by which those amounts are allocated, and the efficiency with which they are used, have received very little attention outside of the defence sector itself. This paper identifies the major issues involved in securing efficiency in defence expenditure and surveys efforts to ensure that the Australian defence establishment makes good use of public resources. Recommendations are made regarding the operation of the Department of Defence and the scrutiny of crucial defence decisions.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:59:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Economics, economists and public policy in Australia
    • Abstract: Banks, Gary
      The topic for this Symposium, 'Does Australian public policy get the economics it deserves'' has been partitioned into two questions. One asks whether public policy gets the economics it needs. The other, no doubt inspired by Alexis de Tocqueville's famous observation about people and their elected governments, is whether Australian economics gets the public policy it deserves.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:59:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 3 - Appraising the ACCC's Caltex-Mobil decision: An
           alternative measure of competition based on networks
    • Abstract: Bloch, Harry; Wills-Johnson, Nick
      On 2nd December 2009, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) announced its intention to oppose the acquisition of Mobil's Australian retail assets by Caltex, based in part on an assessment of the adverse competition effects in some local markets. The proposed merger was subsequently abandoned. The ACCC assessment was based on a standard structural measure of competition, the proportion of petrol stations within each local market that would become controlled by Caltex following such a merger. This paper applies an alternative concept of competition based on the position of each station within a network. Application of the alternative concept to the Perth market, which was excluded from the ACCC analysis, suggests a greater anti-competitive effect from the Caltex-Mobil merger than indicated by application of the standard structural measure of competition.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:59:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Editor and Editorial Committee
    • PubDate: Tue, 3 Jan 2012 16:04:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - The introduction of ex-ante risk equalisation in the
           Australian private health insurance market: A first step
    • Abstract: Paolucci, Francesco; Shmueli, Amir
      In April 2007, the 'Reinsurance' arrangements in place since 1956 were replaced by a 'Risk Equalisation' scheme in the Australian private health insurance market. However, the new arrangements maintained a de facto ex-post (retrospective) claims-equalisation scheme. Equalisation transfers across competing health insurers could instead be achieved by means of a system of ex-ante prospective risk-adjusted subsidies with higher incentives for efficiency and lower incentives for selection compared to ex-post claims equalisation. This paper examines the option of introducing demographic scales for ex-ante (prospective) risk equalisation and its implications on the actual financial transfers (that is, risk-adjusted subsidies flows) across funds. The findings of this paper serve as an information basis for future policies aiming at improving efficiency and preventing selection in the Australian private health insurance market.

      PubDate: Tue, 3 Jan 2012 16:04:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Removing duplication in public/private health
           insurance in Australia: Opting out with risk-adjusted subsidies'
    • Abstract: Paolucci, Francesco; Butler, James RG; van de Ven, Wynand PMM
      Australia's existing health-financing arrangements lead to partial duplication in coverage for private health insurance (PHI) holders. The two options to remove duplication are: 1) allowing individuals to 'opt out' from Medicare either (a) by purchasing PHI or (b) by self-insuring via medical savings accounts or other pre-payment arrangements; 2) confining PHI to the coverage of supplementary services. This paper argues in favour of Option 1(a), and argues that from an efficiency perspective PHI should be fully substitutive of Medicare coverage (that is, 'opting out' should be allowed); community rating should be replaced by premium bands; and the 30-40 per cent ad valorem subsidy for PHI should be replaced by ex-ante risk-adjusted subsidies.

      PubDate: Tue, 3 Jan 2012 16:04:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - The analytics of the Australian private health
           insurance rebate and the Medicare levy surcharge
    • Abstract: Robson, Alex; Ergas, Henry; Paolucci, Francesco
      This paper presents an analytical framework for examining changes in the Private Health Insurance rebate (PHIR) and the Medicare Levy Surcharge (MLS), and uses it to establish three key propositions. First, increases in the MLS rate tend to reduce the elasticity of demand for private health insurance. Second, simultaneously increasing MLS rates and thresholds has a theoretically ambiguous effect on PHI take-up rates. Third, means testing the PHIR can never increase PHI take-up, and will reduce it in some circumstances. The paper concludes with a discussion of the possible consequences of recently proposed policy changes to private health insurance in Australia.

      PubDate: Tue, 3 Jan 2012 16:04:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - Prevention no cure: A critique of the report of
           Australia's national preventative health Taskforce
    • Abstract: Harrison, Mark; Robson, Alex
      Australia's National Preventative Health Taskforce baulks at the economic approach to public policy that weighs up costs and benefits, and instead adopts a 'healthist' perspective, with an open-ended and unconditional commitment to maximising health and a jumbling of private and external costs. The result is to overstate the benefits, and ignore the costs, of proposed policies. While this is predictable given the interests and agenda of preventative health advocates, it is not desirable. Not only is the economic approach mandated for regulatory reform, it has a number of advantages in determining the likely effects of policies and identifying unintended consequences. Although the Taskforce emphasises the irrationality of consumers, it is not clear whether a preventative health bureaucracy will improve the efficiency of health spending.

      PubDate: Tue, 3 Jan 2012 16:04:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 2 - The platypus economist
    • Abstract: Crampton, Eric
      A good health economist is a bit like a platypus, or at least so-says a health economist colleague of mine. The friendly beast must combine a clinician's medical knowledge with an economist's techniques, both theoretical and empirical, and a bureaucrat's understanding of the administrative structures within which policy operates. Perhaps the health economist's empirical techniques are not as refined as the theoretical econometrician's, just as the platypus's fur is perhaps not quite as soft as that of a kitten, but it does a good job of combining a set of characteristics that are normally not found in one place. Unfortunately, health policy instead seems set by a chimera that rather seems to have taken the design specifications for the platypus and decided that the kitten should in fact provide the beak and the duck provide the fur: we too often find combined the clinician's goal of health care, as maximand; the economics undergraduate's captivation by partial equilibrium and neglect of general equilibrium; and the bureaucrat's inadequate respect for methodological individualism. The papers in this Agenda Special Issue on health economics work to bring more standard economic method back into health policy analysis.

      PubDate: Tue, 3 Jan 2012 16:04:07 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Editor and Editorial Committee
    • PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2011 11:31:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Editor and Editorial Committee
    • PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2011 11:31:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Quiet Alf
    • Abstract: Wells, Graeme
      The life, works and contributions of the well-known economist, Alf Hagger, are discussed. He is known to be one of the most significant people, responsible for the start of the post-war quantitative revolution in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - The Peculiar Economics of Government Policy Towards
           Sport
    • Abstract: Pomfret, Richard; Wilson, John K
      Professional team sports enjoy subsidies from government, as well as regulatory exemption from standards that apply to other sectors of the economy. The Australian sports economics literature has, however, focused on competitive balance, with few studies examining government policies. This paper examines government policies such as subsidies, mega-event bidding, salary caps and player draft systems. We argue that the peculiar nature of professional sports provides some justification for such distinctive government policies. However, there is need for greater transparency, better-directed funding, and genuine public debate on some of these policies to enable considered evaluation of their benefits and costs.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - New Technologies in Higher Education: Lower Attendance
           and Worse Learning Outcomes'
    • Abstract: Gomis-Porqueras, Pedro; Meinecke, Jurgen; Rodrigues-Neto, Jose A
      This paper explores the incentives offered to students and instructors by new technologies that grant access to online class materials. We examine the consequences for attendance and composition of live lectures and argue that new technologies reduce attendance, and very likely reduce it differentially.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Trends in Emissions across the States of Australia
           1998-99 to 2007-08: A Shift-share Analysis
    • Abstract: Jayanthakumaran, Kankesu; Liu, Ying
      This paper reviews structural changes in emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM) in eight Australian states and territories over the period 1998-99 to 2007-08. A shift-share analysis decomposes the changes of an emission between these two periods into parts ( a national-share component, an industry-mix component and a state-shift component) in order to account for the ecological competitiveness of the states and territories. The results suggest that the changes in state emissions have been substantial, and tend to reflect national, industry and regional policy changes.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - The Benefits (and Costs) of Foresight and Hindsight in
           Macro Policy Formulation
    • Abstract: Stapledon, Nigel
      This paper looks at the difficulties for fiscal and monetary policy posed by the inherent uncertainty of the economic outlook. It contrasts the excessive optimism of policymakers in the approach to the 1989-91 recession with the excessive pessimism of the outlook in Australia in 2008.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - An Accelerator Tied to a Brake: Fiscal Stimulus under
           a Floating Exchange Rate
    • Abstract: Valentine, Tom
      This paper examines the widely accepted proposition that the fiscal stimulus saved Australia from the worst effects of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC). It presents theoretical and empirical arguments supporting the view that fiscal stimulus is ineffective in a floating exchange-rate regime. It underlines this by comparing Australia's experiences in the East Asian Crisis of 1997 and the GFC of 2008-09. It concludes that a depreciating exchange rate protected the Australian economy in the 1997 crisis, but was prevented from doing so in the 2008-09 crisis by the fiscal stimulus.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - China's Fiscal Stimulus and the Recession Australia
           Never Had: Is a Growth Slowdown Now Inevitable'
    • Abstract: Day, Creina
      China's timely and well-targeted two-year fiscal stimulus was particularly effective in stimulating growth in Australia's commodity exports. Using a constructed series of export volumes to China, this paper finds that the post-stimulus GDP growth contribution from export volumes to China is significant. Had growth in export volumes to China been commensurate with pre-stimulus rates, Australia would have experienced three consecutive quarters of negative real GDP growth - a technical recession. China's gradual and uniquely revenue-based unwinding of fiscal stimulus reduces the risk to Australia of an imminent growth slowdown.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - In the Long Run, the Multiplier Is Dead: Lessons from
           a Simulation
    • Abstract: Guest, Ross; Makin, Anthony J
      This paper re-examines the significance of the fiscal multiplier from an inter-temporal perspective using simulation results derived from a standard overlapping-generations framework. It reveals that even if fiscal stimulus in the form of extra public consumption spending is assumed to increased output and employment in the short run, the negative medium to long-term consequences of the stimulus will ultimately exceed, in present-value terms, the short-term macroeconomic benefits of that stimulus. This is due to the interest rate and tax effects of the stimulus-induced budget deficit which lowers future private investment, household consumption, and labour supply.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 18 Issue 1 - Stimulusgate
    • Abstract: Davidson, Sinclair
      The Australian government's 2010 Budget Papers present econometric evidence that purports to show a positive and 'highly statistically significant' relationship between the size of stimulus spending and subsequent economic growth in a sub-set of G20 countries. The analysis concluded that those countries, such as Australia, that adopted early and large fiscal stimulus packages had subsequently outperformed those that had not done so. This analysis, however, turns on an untenable and substantial truncation of the available sample, and suggests a failure of quality-control processes with Treasury.

      PubDate: Thu, 5 May 2011 09:44:23 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Life and LSE [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cornish, Selwyn
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Keynes on the Wireless [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cornish, Selwyn
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - An Economic Unravelling of the Precautionary
           Principle: The Queensland Wild Rivers Act 2005
    • Abstract: Iles, Stephen; Johns, Gary
      The paper assesses the application of the precautionary principle in the Queensland Wild Rivers Act 2005. It finds that the Act is more restrictive than the ecologically sustainable development principles as conceived, and deployed, by the Queensland Government elsewhere. At the same time the Act is injurious to property rights, unnecessarily restricts future development options, and does not allow for assessments of non-environmental values or the cost of options forgone. As a result the Act has severe consequences for the Cape York economy and increases the risk of perverse consequences for the environment.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - The High Cost of Taxi Regulation, with Special
           Reference to Sydney
    • Abstract: Abelson, Peter
      Numerous regulations govern entry, industry structure, service quality and prices for the Sydney taxi industry. The paper finds few efficiency or social reasons for these regulations and taxi performance is poor. On plausible assumptions, the net benefits from unrestricted entry into the Sydney taxi industry are in the order of $265 million per annum. The productivity and service benefits of reforming entry would be greater if accompanied by reform of the anti-competitive control of the taxi radio networks over all taxi operators.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - How to Increase the Cost-effectiveness of Water Reform
           and Environmental Flows in the Murray-Darling Basin
    • Abstract: Grafton, RQuentin
      The paper reviews the $12.9 billion Water for the Future package in the Murray-Darling Basin from the perspective of cost-effectiveness and assesses the possible losses to irrigators from reduced diversions to achieve desired environmental-flow regimes. It argues that combining the $3.1 billion allocated to buying water entitlements with the $5.8 billion targeted by Water for the Future for water infrastructure subsidies into a purchase of water entitlements from willing sellers would maximise the water acquired for the environment per dollar of expenditure, provide greater assistance to holders of water entitlements, and reduce the expected gap between average water diversions for agriculture and sustainable diversion limits.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 2 - Did Australia's Fiscal Stimulus Counter
           Recession': Evidence from the National Accounts
    • Abstract: Makin, Anthony J
      A close scrutiny of the pattern of aggregate expenditure recorded in the Australian national accounts reveals it was the behaviour of exports and imports, and not increased fiscal activity, that was primarily responsible for offsetting the fall in private investment due to the Global Financial Crisis. The examination of a broad set of national income and employment indicators suggests that the Australian economy most likely did not avoid a recession, even though it was a relatively mild one by past standards.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Immigrants: Your Country Needs Them [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pollock, Matthew
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - A History of Central Banking in Great Britain and the
           United States [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cornish, Selwyn
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Educating for Business, Public Service and the Social
           Sciences: A History of Economics at the University of Sydney 1920-1999
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cornish, Selwyn
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Yegor Gaidar: Pragmatic Economist or Romantic
           Revolutionary'
    • Abstract: Kazakevitch, Gennadi
      The divided public opinion with regards to renowned Russian economist Yegor Gaidar, on his life and influence is discussed. Gaidar's role in contemporary Russia beyond partisan debate is highlighted.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Beauty ≠ Truth': Thoughts on Krugman's 'How
           Did Economists Get It So Wrong''
    • Abstract: Quiggin, John
      Some of the different views and opinions regarding Paul Krugman's 'How did economists get it so wrong'' are discussed. The changes that need to be incorporated into the dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models to ensure better predictive capacity are highlighted.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - What Keynes Missed and Krugman Is Missing: The
           Short/Long Choice
    • Abstract: Vines, David
      The review and analysis of Paul Krugman's question 'How did economists get it so wrong'' is discussed and it is seen that Krugman's answer is actually too optimistic, and that things are worse than he suggests. Krugman's suggestion that the Keynesian framework is the best option also appears to be debatable as something appears to be lacking in Keynesian economics.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Krugman on the Malaise of Modern Macro: Critique
           without Alternative
    • Abstract: Rankin, Keith
      The views of Paul Krugman on modern macro in terms of the global financial crisis representing a collective failure of an economics profession which had become complacent, believing that financial markets could not, in themselves, cause non-trivial recessions is discussed. Krugman is right to question the capability of economics developed under the auspices of the dominant neoclassical paradigm to predict business cycle events; however, a more constructive critique is required.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Beyond Krugman to Behavioural Keynes
    • Abstract: McDonald, Ian M
      John Cochrane appears to concede that Paul Krugman's critique does have some important pillars to be paid attention to. Krugman views Keynesian economics as the best framework for macroeconomics that advocates that it is inadequate aggregate demand that drives recessions, not confusion about relative prices, nor lapses in technical progress, nor voluntary shifts to leisure during times of low real wages.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - Froth and Bubble: The Inconsistency of Paul Krugman's
           Macroeconomic Analysis
    • Abstract: Harding, Don; Libich, Jan
      The review and evaluation of some of Paul Krugman's macroeconomic analysis is discussed. Krugman's macroeconomic analysis has been quite inconsistent and his policy recommendations have been found to lack the required consistency and coherency.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
  • Volume 17 Issue 1 - How US Economists Got It So Wrong
    • Abstract: McLeod, Ross
      The author debates the claim of renowned economist Paul Krugman of the question 'How did economists get it so wrong'' Krugman feels that the US economics fraternity needs to adopt a system whose central figure would be a bank regulatory authority to regulate the operations of all banks across the US and exercise powers as and when needed.

      PubDate: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:34:51 GMT
       
 
 
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