Publisher: Project MUSE   (Total: 306 journals)

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Showing 201 - 306 of 306 Journals sorted alphabetically
Oceanic Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 0)
Ohio History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ohio Valley History     Full-text available via subscription  
Oral Tradition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Palimpsest : A J. on Women, Gender, and the Black Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Parergon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Partial Answers: J. of Literature and the History of Ideas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.166, CiteScore: 0)
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 0)
Philip Roth Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Philippine Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
philoSOPHIA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Philosophy and Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Philosophy East and West     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.249, CiteScore: 0)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Ploughshares     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Population Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
portal: Libraries and the Academy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 242, SJR: 1.182, CiteScore: 1)
Postmodern Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.427, CiteScore: 1)
Pushkin Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaker History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Red Cedar Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Region : Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Register of the Kentucky Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Review of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.601, CiteScore: 2)
Review of Japanese Culture and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Reviews in American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Estudios Hispánicos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Revista Hispánica Moderna     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Rhetoric & Public Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.556, CiteScore: 1)
River Teeth: A J. of Nonfiction Narrative     Full-text available via subscription  
Rocky Mountain Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Romance Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.107, CiteScore: 0)
RSF : The Russell Sage Foundation J. of the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SAIS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Scottish Literary Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Seoul J. of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Serbian Studies: J. of the North American Society for Serbian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sewanee Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Shakespeare Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Shakespeare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Shofar : An Interdisciplinary J. of Jewish Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.554, CiteScore: 1)
Sirena: poesia, arte y critica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Research : An Intl. Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Sojourn: J. of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.294, CiteScore: 0)
South Central Review     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Southeast Asian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Southeastern Geographer     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 0)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Southern Literary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Southern Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Southern Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Spiritus: A J. of Christian Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.125, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Fiction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Philology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Romanticism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Studies in the Literary Imagination     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in the Novel     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Syllecta Classica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tampa Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.284, CiteScore: 0)
Tenso     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Texas Studies in Literature and Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Comparatist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Jurist : Studies in Church Law and Ministry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Lion and the Unicorn     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
The Massachusetts Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
The Moving Image     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats     Full-text available via subscription  
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.169, CiteScore: 0)
The Velvet Light Trap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Theatre J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Theatre Notebook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Theatre Symposium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Theatre Topics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Theory & Event     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Toronto J. of Theology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Transactions of the American Philological Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, CiteScore: 0)
Transformation: Critical Perspectives on Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
U.S.-Japan Women's J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
US Latino & Latina Oral History J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.338, CiteScore: 0)
Victorian Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.166, CiteScore: 0)
Wallace Stevens J.     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
West Virginia History: A J. of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Women in French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Yearbook of Comparative Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0023-0243 - ISSN (Online) 2161-0355
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [306 journals]
  • They Will Have Their Game: Sporting Culture and the Making of the Early
           American Republic by Kenneth Cohen (review)
    • Abstract: Like much of American culture, sports have often become overtly politicized terrain in recent years. But as Curator of Early American Culture at the Smithsonian Museum of American History, Kenneth Cohen, shows, the American sporting realm was a site of cultural, social, and political tension long before the National Football League, or even the national anthem, existed.Interspersing the experiences of individual sportsmen into his examination of early American sporting venues (broadly defined to include taverns, billiard rooms, theatres, and racetracks), Cohen argues that these sites provided opportunities "for contesting and limiting elites' social authority while ultimately supporting their economic and political ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Bloodless Victory: The Battle of New Orleans in History and Memory by
           Joseph F. Stoltz III (review)
    • Abstract: One of the shortest battles in American history has provided material for more than two centuries of historical inquiry. The Battle of New Orleans gave Americans one of the few positive memories from a disastrous war, helped catapult Andrew Jackson to national prominence, inspired countless works of art, and served as inspiration for innumerable political events. Historians wrote about the battle shortly after it ended and Joseph F. Stoltz III adds a new intriguing volume to further our understanding of the place it holds in our collective memory.Stoltz begins his slender volume with a solid recounting of the campaign leading up to the battle, followed by an excellent summary of the critical January 8 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bound to the Fire: How Virginia's Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American
           Cuisine by Kelley Fanto Deetz (review)
    • Abstract: Deetz builds this examination of Virginia plantation cultural history around a metaphor that emphasizes the importance of the enslaved cook in both the domestic life of a slaveholding family and the public life of the Virginia planter society. In Bound to the Fire, Deetz describes the plantation home as a public theatre where performances of wealth, race, gender, and regional identity were displayed front and center. The wealthy white host, hostess, and guests used the opportunities of commensality and the props of the dining room to play out their own narratives of white supremacy, financial security, gender ideologies, and a particularly Virginian brand of hospitality. All this work on the "front stage," Deetz ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Log Cabin: An American Icon by Alison K. Hoagland (review)
    • Abstract: In her new book, Alison K. Hoagland, 2018 winner of the Vernacular Architecture forum's prestigious Henry Glassie Award, tackles what many consider the archetypal American building form—the log cabin. A long history of scholarly interest in American log architecture has resulted in a plethora of books and articles on the subject. Much of the historiography concentrated on a dispute over the origin and diffusion of log architecture in the United States. While many of these scholars have conducted extensive field documentation and careful historical research, revealing essential aspects of construction, regional patterns, change, and persistence, readers interested in the broader cultural analysis have often been ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Jim Crow North: The Struggle for Equal Rights in Antebellum New England by
           Richard Archer (review)
    • Abstract: Persons of African descent in New England endured segregation, discrimination, and the loss of civil liberties in the decades after the American Revolution. By 1861, however, they and their white supporters eradicated some forms of Jim Crowism. Richard Archer, the author of Jim Crown North, concludes that, "New Englanders were no more inherently virtuous than any other people," they just encountered African Americans less often (p. 131). Consequently, "equal rights for people of color often were more an abstraction than an intimate part of life" (p. 131).Jim Crow North distinguishes itself from Leonard Litwack's North of Slavery (1961) and James and Lois Horton's In Hope of Liberty (1997). Narrower in scope ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Denmark Vesey's Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the
           Confederacy by Ethan J. Kytle and Blain Roberts (review)
    • Abstract: On the evening of June 17, 2015, I left the Addlestone Library at the College of Charleston and paused at the intersection of Calhoun and Coming Streets. Situated between that intersection and an armada of blue lights in front of Emanuel A. M. E. Church was Marion Square: a park still owned by a militia that helped conservative white men "redeem" South Carolina in 1876; the location of a John C. Calhoun monument; and the proposed (but ultimately rejected) site of a monument to Denmark Vesey (p. 332). In 1822, white Charlestonians executed Vesey for trying to organize an uprising against slaveholders. His legacy—including a twenty-year campaign that ultimately placed a statue of him in a park named after the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Women of Empire: Nineteenth-Century Army Officers' Wives in India and the
           U.S. West by Verity McInnis (review)
    • Abstract: As the title of the book suggests, Verity McInnis's Women of Empire: Nineteenth-Century Army Officers' Wives in India and the U.S. West, published by University of Oklahoma Press in 2017, focuses on nineteenth-century army officers' wives in the imperial contexts of British India and the U.S. West. Specifically, it is a comparative survey of wives of officers in the British Army, the army of the Honorable East India Trading Company, and the United States Army. As McInnis rightly argues, and in contrast to their American sisters, British officers' wives remain "on the fringe of historical analysis" (pp. 211–12). This book represents the first definitive attempt to rectify this.The author addresses the topics of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • This Grand Experiment: When Women Entered the Federal Workforce in Civil
           War-Era Washington, D.C. by Jessica Ziparo (review)
    • Abstract: In 1859, as noted in This Grand Experiment, the federal government's official register listed eighteen female employees, all at the Government Hospital for the Insane. By 1871, the register listed 900 women, an increase of 5,000 percent (p. 1). What happened during that time, in which women made inroads into federal government service during and after the Civil War, is the subject of this interesting study by Jessica Ziparo. The "grand experiment" (a term coined by journalist and short-term War Department clerk Jane Swisshelm) had its ups and downs in both collective and individual contexts.Using federal records, newspapers, diaries, and other sources, Ziparo found information on more than 3,000 women who worked ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Uncivil Warriors: The Lawyers' Civil War by Peter Charles Hoffer (review)
    • Abstract: On September 25, 1860, lawyer and Republican presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln wrote back to John M. Brockman who had asked him about the best method to becoming a lawyer. Lincoln warned Brockman that the study of the law was "laborious, and tedious" and that he should immerse himself in the study of the legal treatises such as William Blackstone's Commentaries and Joseph Chitty's Pleadings. Lincoln then warned that "work, work, work, is the main thing." Lincoln, as the Attorney-in-Chief, as well as the nation's 101,000 lawyers lent their specialized skills to the war effort for both sides of the United States Civil War. In Uncivil Warriors: The Lawyers' Civil War, Charles Peter Hoffer identifies and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War's Slave Refugee Camps by
           Amy Murrell Taylor (review)
    • Abstract: For quite some time the two dominant approaches to the history of emancipation have been, first, studies of Abraham Lincoln's gradual course toward a radical antislavery policy and, second, studies of the emancipation process on the ground. The Lincoln studies tend to be similar if not downright repetitive, but there have been various approaches to the study of emancipation "from the bottom up" during the Civil War—the "rehearsals" for reconstruction; the struggles over the developing contract labor system; state studies; disorder on the plantations; the response of Union soldiers to fugitives; the experiences of black soldiers; the experiences of women; and recently the contraband camps through which thousands of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Oliver P. Morton and the Politics of the Civil War and Reconstruction by
           A. James Fuller (review)
    • Abstract: A. James Fuller's biography succeeds admirably in resurrecting the leading role played by Indiana's Oliver P. Morton in the politics of the Civil War and Reconstruction. In the process, he provides the balanced and insightful appraisal that has largely eluded earlier historians who have often cast Morton as either hero or villain. Fuller recognizes but contextualizes Morton's failings and ultimately paints a favorable portrait of the Hoosier as "remarkably consistent" in adhering to an ideology of "freedom, Union, power, and party" (p. xxiv). Fuller's core historiographical purpose is to reinterpret Morton but, along the way, he also builds on Michael S. Green's interpretation of Republican Party ideology and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Capital and Convict: Race, Region, and Punishment in Post-Civil War
           America by Henry Kamerling (review)
    • Abstract: In Capital and Convict, Henry Kamerling adds his voice to the debate concerning whether southern prison practices were distinct from those in other regions. Drawing on a comparative analysis of state penitentiaries in late-nineteenth century South Carolina and Illinois, Kamerling's answer is mixed. While he notes the "politics of race" led "politicians, reformers, and prison officials to think about the project of punishment differently in each region," he suggests "the reality of prisoners' lives … proved remarkably similar" in both places. The similarities between the two states, he argues, rested on state leaders' use of imprisonment as a tool to further the "ascendant industrial capitalist order" (p. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Chinese Must Go: Violence, Exclusion, and the Making of the Alien in
           America by Beth Lew-Williams (review)
    • Abstract: Beth Lew-Williams' groundbreaking work The Chinese Must Go: Violence, Exclusion, and the Making of the Alien in America has received well-earned media attention for its ability to sketch an engaging history of Chinese migration, violence, and resulting legal and extralegal measures. It would be a disservice to Lew-Williams' innovative intervention in the fields of immigration, Asian American and legal history, however, to focus solely on the book's appeal to contemporary issues and the more recent construction of the "alien" in America. Historians should take note of Lew- Williams' brilliant reworking of the chronology and scope of Chinese restriction and Chinese exclusion (which Lew-Williams reminds us are two ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Athens of the New South: College Life and the Making of Modern Nashville
           by Mary Ellen Pethel (review)
    • Abstract: The postbellum South underwent both educational growth and urban modernization. In Athens of the New South, Mary Ellen Pethel argues that these went hand in hand. Southerners used higher education to enact their "own version of modernity," one that accommodated their regional identity and history (p. 3). Colleges, conversely, shaped the economic and cultural growth of cities. Following nine educational institutions in Nashville between 1865 and 1930, Pethel contends that higher education "was what marked cities like Nashville as 'progressive' and 'New South'" (p. 31).Nashvillians believed higher education was central to their city's success. Marketing it as "the ideal New South urban center," business leaders ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Pricing of Progress: Economic Indicators and the Capitalization of
           American Life by Eli Cook (review)
    • Abstract: These days, Americans constantly measure their lives. They track their steps and calories, college board scores, frequent flyer miles, credit card awards points, and days until retirement. In economic terms, Americans swim in an even deeper sea of statistics. Credit ratings, income tax brackets, financial goals, insurance metrics, and student loans all take the quantitative assessment of humanity for granted. How did we get here' Eli Cook attempts to answer this very important question in his fascinating book, The Pricing of Progress: Economic Indicators and the Capitalization of American Life. As it turns out, we were not always sized up by statistics; the process evolved slowly, and with fits and starts, from the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Landscapes of Hope: Nature and the Great Migration in Chicago by Brian
           McCammack (review)
    • Abstract: Environmental historians have long made the case that nature is central to understanding historical changes. In Landscapes of Hope: Nature and the Great Migration in Chicago, Brian McCammack invites readers to reconsider the Great Migration as not only a social, economic, and cultural movement of people, but also as an environmental experience. Through a well-researched history, McCammack successfully makes the case that "nature was never merely a political proxy for racial inequalities: it was a good in and of itself, freighted with multifaceted cultural significance that reveals black Chicagoans' modern urban lives to be more varied—and more complex—than is typically understood" (p. 7). By looking for nature and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Shortfall: Family Secrets, Financial Collapse, and a Hidden History of
           American Banking by Alice Echols (review)
    • Abstract: To some extent, the benign picture of thrift institutions—enabling working classes to fulfil their American dream of homeownership—has endured. Indeed, these cooperative institutions' positive image, first conveyed in the 1946 movie It's a Wonderful Life and then spread in numerous accounts (see for example, David Lawrence Mason, From Buildings and Loans to Bail-outs: A History of the American Savings and Loan Industry, 1831–1995), seems to have survived even the Savings and Loans crisis. Their model of mutual cooperation dating back to the late nineteenth century, whereby shareholders contribute to each other's access to credit and are at the same time somewhat liable for others' repayment errors, remains ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ku Klux Kulture: America and the Klan in the 1920s by Felix Harcourt
           (review)
    • Abstract: Historians have long argued over the nature of the 1920s Ku Klux Klan. Was it a white terrorist organization, hiding its right-wing violence behind a mask of chivalry' Or was it rather a sort of masked Rotary Club, a main-street organization of citizen Klansmen' Felix Harcourt's Ku Klux Kulture gives us our best understanding yet of the complex nature of the 1920s Klan. Dedicated at the same time to racial violence and moral uplift, to sinister rituals and wholesome family barbecues, the 1920s Klan defies any attempt at easy categorization. Its millions of members and admirers, Harcourt notes, never had to choose between mainstream culture and "Klannish" attitudes.Avoiding the trap of examining the nebulous ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South by Karen
           L. Cox (review)
    • Abstract: Karen Cox's newest book, Goat Castle, demonstrates the author's versatility and virtuosity as a writer. Cox, a history professor at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, stepped out of the academic monograph and into the world of true crime. Goat Castle is the strange story of the 1932 murder of Jennie Merrill of Natchez instigated by her eccentric neighbors, Dick Dana and Octavia Dockery and carried out by George Pearls, an African American drifter. It is also the story of Emily Burns, an African American woman wrongly sent to prison for a crime she did not commit. However, this is more than just a murder story. What makes it all the more interesting is that Cox keeps the best elements of the genre and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Takeover: Chicken Farming and the Roots of American Agribusiness by
           Monica R. Gisolfi (review)
    • Abstract: According to Monica Gisolfi, chicken McNuggets are full of irony and exploitation. They emerged out of a system created by poultry processors whose goal in pursing vertical integration during the twentieth century was to maximize profits for themselves. It began when Upcountry Georgia, cotton farmers in the early-twentieth century began to assume significant debt to merchants and landlords when the cost to produce it outweighed the market price of cotton. Cotton farmers in four counties—Cherokee, Forsyth, Hall, and Jackson—gradually adapted the crop lien system used in cotton production to chicken. As the New Deal placed restrictions on cotton, farmers faced pressure from local businesspeople, national feed ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Cincinnati Human Relations Commission: A History, 1943–2013 by
           Phillip J. Obermiller and Thomas E. Wagner (review)
    • Abstract: In the wake of the Detroit race riot of 1943, cities and states throughout the nation rushed to create race relations or "intergroup" relations commissions for the purpose of mitigating racial, religious, and ethnic conflict and for promoting tolerance for diversity. Though a broad-based movement of some significance, this phenomenon remains a subject that has not been fully explored by historians. For this reason alone, Phillip J. Obermiller and Thomas E. Wagner make an important contribution with their book-length study of the Cincinnati Human Relations Commission (CHRC).Do not expect a conventional academic history. The current executive director of the CHRC initiated the study, giving it the quality of a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • James Still: A Life by Carol Boggess (review)
    • Abstract: For scholars, writers, and readers of Appalachian literature, James Still has been a defining but often enigmatic presence. Carol Boggess's James Still: A Life clarifies Still's path and helps us know the person behind his later public persona. The book joins biographies of and scholarship about his contemporaries, such as Don West, Jesse Stuart, and Harriette Simpson Arnow, to help sketch out their varied but interconnected cultural and literary landscapes.Broken into six parts, Boggess looks carefully into Still's boyhood in eastern Alabama; his college years and nascent writing at Lincoln Memorial University; his search for work, connection to Hindman Settlement School, and the national publication of his first ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Different Shade of Justice: Asian American Civil Rights in the South by
           Stephanie Hinnershitz (review)
    • Abstract: Stephanie Hinnershitz's new book looks to the growth of Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Indian American communities in the American south from the 1870s to the 1990s. Arranged thematically and chronologically over five chapters and a conclusion, Hinnershitz provides a close examination of state and federal court cases, newspapers, and oral histories, to test the notion that Asian Americans had little impact on battles for racial justice and equality in the southern civil rights movement.The first three chapters explore the formation of Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino communities in the pre–1965 south and the efforts of individuals to challenge discriminatory laws in court. Following the Civil War ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White
           Supremacy by Elizabeth Gillespie McRae (review)
    • Abstract: Adding to the growing scholarship on the influence of right-wing women in twentieth-century America is Elizabeth Gillespie McRae's study of white women's resistance to racial equality, dating from the 1920s through the 1970s. In Mothers of Massive Resistance, she argues that white segregationist women were at the center of the history of white supremacist politics, largely due to their ability to capitalize on their roles in public education, social welfare institutions, partisan politics, and popular culture. With evidence gleaned from multitudes of primary as well as secondary sources, she expands on recent scholarship that explores how white women from the grassroots were able to influence the history of race ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Most of 14th Street Is Gone: The Washington, D.C. Riots of 1968 by J.
           Samuel Walker (review)
    • Abstract: In March 1968, the director of public safety in Washington was optimistic that the nation's capital would not suffer a major outbreak of urban violence, unlike Newark and Detroit the previous summer. "I am completely confident we will be able to prevent any disorder, or shall we say serious disorder, in this city," declared Patrick V. Murphy (p. 47). Then, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed in Memphis on April 4. In the days that followed, more than one hundred American cities endured large-scale unrest. But Washington was the hardest hit, with 13 deaths (none due to actions by the National Guard or U.S. Army) and $27 million in property damage (p. 98).In this clear and concise account, J. Samuel ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • History Comes Alive: Public History and Popular Culture in the 1970s by M.
           J. Rymsza-Pawlowska (review)
    • Abstract: History Comes Alive offers the most comprehensive study to date of the relationship between Americans and history during the decade of the 1970s. Adding to the rapidly growing historiography of the 1976 bicentennial, and framing contemporary public engagement with the past within a new interpretation that clarifies how and why the seventies represent a watershed moment for public history, the book is essential reading for serious scholars of intellectual, cultural, and public history.The heart of the book consists of the five chapters (two through six) that creatively analyze the popular engagements with history during the bicentennial years from multiple angles. Chapter two closely follows the national commissions ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fear City: New York's Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by
           Kim Phillips-Fein (review)
    • Abstract: In Fear City: New York's Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics, Kim Phillips-Fein opens the lid on one of the iconic moments in the postwar history of the American city: New York City's near default in 1975. The city approached bankruptcy as a series of massive debt obligations came due. President Gerald Ford, quite famously, refused to provide the funding that the city needed, a moment encapsulated in the famous New York Daily News headline of October 1975: "Ford to City: Drop Dead." As the common story goes, the city borrowed profligately for decades to fund social programs it could not afford, bankruptcy was not an option, and restructuring the city in the aftermath was inevitable. New York had no ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Clashing Over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy by Douglas A. Irwin
           (review)
    • Abstract: In Clashing over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy, Douglas A. Irwin offers the first comprehensive study of American tariffs and trade policies in over a century. Irwin's text examines commercial restrictions from the Navigation Acts of the 1640s up to President Donald Trump's inaugural address of 2017. He focuses on the three principal goals of tariffs, which he dubs the three "R's." According to Irwin, revenue, restriction, and reciprocity have been the goals of American trade policy.The book is divided into three parts. During the first part, which covers the colonial period through the Civil War, the national government used tariffs to fill its coffers. Irwin examines the Navigation Acts, the Tariff of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • American Empire: A Global History by A. G. Hopkins (review)
    • Abstract: Even disagreeing with the premise of American Empire and gnashing my teeth at its indulgences, I was dazzled by its sweep, learned an enormous amount of history I thought I already knew, and sharpened my own thinking about American power by confronting Hopkins' ideas. In important ways, this book parallels with economic history, the political philosophy arc of Francis Fukuyama's The End of History and the Last Man, and the cultural arc of Walter Russel Mead's God and Gold. All three tell the story of "conversion of military-fiscal states to liberal constitutions and modern economies," as Hopkins describes it (p. 36).Hopkins traces a storyline across American history, with the U.S. as colony, colonizer, agent of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Supporting the Troops, Debating the War: The Persian Gulf War in Kentucky
    • Abstract: In November 1990, students at the Millersburg Military Institute, Kentucky's only military academy, marked Veterans Day with a ceremony that was overshadowed by the prospect of war in the Persian Gulf.1 Speaking to reporters at the event, Jeffrey Foley, a senior at the academy and a private in the U.S. Army Reserve, noted that he could be called up to combat once he completed his training the following summer. "The last few weeks have been kind of rough," he said. "I've been preparing myself, and I'm ready. … I just hope the country supports us more than they did in Vietnam." Retired Lieutenant General Willard Scott, former superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and the event's keynote speaker ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Introduction: Debating War in Kentucky
    • Abstract: The four articles in this issue of the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society illustrate the ways in which Kentuckians have engaged with the complexities of war and peace with as much intensity as any other in the nation. The wide-ranging scholarship in this issue touches on a variety of nineteenth- and twentieth-century theaters of war and how various Kentuckians responded to them. The results of this compelling research are sometimes surprising, but in all cases engaging. Taken as a whole, the articles provide a model of local and regional history illuminating and nuancing important national and international themes.Immigrant communities typically record unique experiences during wartime, as Joseph Reinhart ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "A nurse's duty": Mary Curry Desha Breckinridge and the Feminine
           Professional Ethic of Self-Sacrifice in Progressive-Era America and World
           War I France
    • Abstract: When Kentucky native Mary Curry Desha Breckinridge, known as "Curry," graduated from the Chicago Presbyterian Hospital's nurse training program in 1908, a classmate presented her with this untitled but probably original poem celebrating nursing as a sacred duty. Ten years later, after working in a mental hospital in Illinois, spearheading an anti-tuberculosis campaign in Michigan, and serving with the Red Cross in wartime France, Curry was dead. Accounts of Curry's death variously attributed it to pneumonia, influenza ("grippe"), or a heart condition—"myocarditis" according to the Chicago Tribune and "endocarditis" according to the Public Health Nurse Quarterly—but all agreed that her death was "directly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Louisville's Germans in the Civil War Era
    • Abstract: Despite the fact that almost one-third of Louisville's 1860 population of 89,400 comprised persons born outside the United States, published histories of Louisville during the American Civil War have virtually ignored its large foreign-born population and their attitudes about and participation in this bloody conflict. Although Louisville historian Robert Emmet McDowell noted Louisville had a "large foreign population" and Bryan Bush and Charles Messmer each mention the city was home to 26,120 foreign-born residents, half of whom came from Germany, little else is revealed in their works about this sizable component of Louisville's 1860 population.1As historian John David Smith argued, "more work on the Germans and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mobilization and Its Discontents: Desertion, Crawfishing, and Feigned
           Illnesses in Kentucky during the Spanish-American War
    • Abstract: In late April 1898, as the United States headed into a war against Spain, the Winchester Democrat boasted that "Kentucky could furnish one hundred thousand volunteers, if necessary." Such estimates were not uncommon in the South in the days following the congressional declaration of war. Throughout the nineteenth century, white southerners had often remarked upon their region's alleged superiority in military affairs.1 Yet, despite such blustering, over the next two months, commentators throughout the commonwealth would often remark about the dearth of men willing to volunteer for the war. In fact, Kentucky's newspapers noted a particular problem that occurred during the mobilization period: desertion. A reporter ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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