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Philippine Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
philoSOPHIA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Philosophy and Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Philosophy East and West     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.249, CiteScore: 0)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Ploughshares     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Population Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
portal: Libraries and the Academy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 234, SJR: 1.182, CiteScore: 1)
Postmodern Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.427, CiteScore: 1)
Pushkin Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaker History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Red Cedar Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Region : Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Register of the Kentucky Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Review of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.601, CiteScore: 2)
Review of Japanese Culture and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Reviews in American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Estudios Hispánicos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Revista Hispánica Moderna     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Rhetoric & Public Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.556, CiteScore: 1)
River Teeth: A J. of Nonfiction Narrative     Full-text available via subscription  
Rocky Mountain Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Romance Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, CiteScore: 0)
RSF : The Russell Sage Foundation J. of the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SAIS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Scottish Literary Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Seoul J. of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Serbian Studies: J. of the North American Society for Serbian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sewanee Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Shakespeare Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Shakespeare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Shofar: An Interdisciplinary J. of Jewish Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.554, CiteScore: 1)
Sirena: poesia, arte y critica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Research : An Intl. Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Sojourn: J. of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.294, CiteScore: 0)
South Central Review     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Southeast Asian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Southeastern Geographer     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 0)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Southern Literary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Southern Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Spiritus: A J. of Christian Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.125, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Fiction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Philology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Studies in the Literary Imagination     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in the Novel     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Syllecta Classica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tampa Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.284, CiteScore: 0)
Tenso     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Texas Studies in Literature and Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Comparatist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Jurist : Studies in Church Law and Ministry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Lion and the Unicorn     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
The Massachusetts Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
The Moving Image     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats     Full-text available via subscription  
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.169, CiteScore: 0)
The Velvet Light Trap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Theatre J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Theatre Notebook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Theatre Symposium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Theatre Topics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Theory & Event     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Toronto J. of Theology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Transactions of the American Philological Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, CiteScore: 0)
Transformation: Critical Perspectives on Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
U.S.-Japan Women's J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.338, CiteScore: 0)
Victorian Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.166, CiteScore: 0)
Wallace Stevens J.     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
West Virginia History: A J. of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Women in French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Yearbook of Comparative Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
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Studies in the Age of Chaucer
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.24
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0190-2407 - ISSN (Online) 1949-0755
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [295 journals]
  • "The lytel erthe that here is": Environmental Thought in Chaucer's
           Parliament of Fowls
    • Abstract: WHAT CONNECTION COULD CHAUCER possibly have with our own environmental moment' Many of us today feel that we are facing an unprecedented earthly crisis. Setting Chaucer's environmental thought and contemporary thought in dialogue looks wrong, on its face, because our "earth" has so radically changed. An earth that now appears depleted, fragile, and at risk, back then appeared dense and vast, stretching well beyond human reach. And our responses to the earth feel unprecedented to us: environmental theorists call for ruptures from past conceptions of life, seeking new theories of being—new ontologies—that will better integrate human and nonhuman interests. Yet I propose that Chaucer's Parliament of Fowls is pertinent ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chaucer's Silent Discourse
    • Abstract: HOW DO WE KNOW what the face is saying' It has long been regarded as one of the most expressive parts of the human body. We look to the face to disclose identity and personality, as well as more fleeting affects, emotions, and expressions. We read its shapes, colors, and aspects, and its conscious and unconscious movements and gestures. Normally, we expect these forms of recognition to be almost instantaneous, although factors such as cultural alterity, cognitive disability, and variable levels of empathy can affect our capacity to read other faces.In western culture Cicero was one of the first to formulate the idea of the face as the index of the mind ("imago est animi voltus").1 More evocatively, the eyes are ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ripples on the Water': The Acoustics of Geoffrey Chaucer's House of
           Fame and the Influence of Robert Holcot
    • Abstract: The second book of Chaucer's dream-vision poem The House of Fame begins with the arrival of a huge golden eagle, who swoops down, seizes the dreaming poet in his claws, and carries him off skyward.1 The bird eventually introduces himself as the envoy of "the god of thonder / Which that men callen Jupiter" (lines 608–9); and he explains he has been sent by Jupiter to take Chaucer to a place called "the House of Fame," where the poet will be able to overhear a marvelous profusion of all the various things ever spoken by or about lovers (lines 661–98). The Eagle clearly expects the poet to be delighted by this prospect of so privileged an insight into the experiences of "Loves folke" (675). However, as it turns out ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Loving Confession in the Confessio Amantis
    • Abstract: There are two threads running throughout the Confessio Amantis: there is confession, and there is love. Gower's Amans begins the poem as a passive (if not pacified) victim, struck with love's dart, and ends as an active producer of narratives in which he can no longer participate. At the same time he is, of course, also a confessant, responding to narratives in a penitential register and willfully transforming himself into a legible, confessional subject. The challenge for readers who approach the poem with an eye to taking its use of confessional discourse seriously is to determine the way in which one of these threads might speak to another. Inevitably, frustration emerges when we find that whatever relationship ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Seek, Suffer, and Trust: "Ese" and "Disese" in Julian of Norwich
    • Abstract: Illness strips you back to an authentic self, but not one you need to meet. Too much is claimed for authenticity. Painfully we learn to live in the world, and to be false. Then all our defences are knocked down in one sweep. In sickness we can't avoid knowing about our body and what it does, its animal aspect, its demands.Hilary Mantel1Illness makes us disinclined for the long campaigns that prose exacts … In illness words seem to possess a mystic quality. We grasp what is beyond their surface meaning, gather instinctively this, that, and the other—a sound, a colour, here a stress, there a pause—which the poet, knowing words to be meagre in comparison with ideas, has strewn about his page to evoke, when collected ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "O sweete and wel biloved spouse deere": A Pastoral Reading of Cecilia's
           Post-Nuptial Persuasion in The Second Nun's Tale
    • Abstract: Chaucer's splicing together of Dominican and Franciscan source texts in The Second Nun's Tale gives us Cecilia's authoritative voice in what seem like two very different registers: as a sweetly persuasive wife to Valerian, and as a fierce, insulting preacher in her confrontation with Almachius.1 Previous readings leave unexplained this shift in Cecilia's social and rhetorical roles from wife to widowed martyr within the text, as well as the seemingly jarring juxtaposition of the Second Nun as teller with the married, defiant Cecilia as subject. Cecilia's combative speech with Almachius attracts disproportionate attention from scholars, as does her preaching, largely because both have been read as such a contrast to ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sleep and the Transformation of Sense in Late Medieval Literature
    • Abstract: Near the end of the Purgatorio, the Dante pilgrim falls asleep while listening to a hymn of unbearable beauty. He struggles to depict the moment of his nodding off:  S'io potessi ritrar come assonnaroli occhi spietati udendo di Siringa—li occhi a cui pur vegghiar costò sì caro—  come pintor che con essempro pingadisegnerei com' io m'addormentai,ma qual vuol sia che l'assonnar ben finga.  Però trascorro a quando mi svegliai,e dico ch'un splendor mi squarciò 'l velodel sonno, e un chiamar: "Surgi: che fai'"1[If I could portray how the cruel eyes fell asleep when they heard of Syrinx—those eyes whose wakefulness cost so dear—like a painter painting from a model, I would depict how I fell asleep; but he ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sir Thopas: A Story for Young Children
    • Abstract: "There were," wrote F. J. Harvey Darton in his classic 1932 study, Children's Books in England: Five Centuries of Social Life, "no children's books in England before the seventeenth century, and very few even then." By "children's books," Darton explained, he meant "works produced ostensibly to give children spontaneous pleasure, and not primarily to teach them, nor solely to make them good, nor to keep them profitably quiet." To be sure, there were "plenty of schoolbooks and guides to conduct, but none which would openly allow a child to enjoy himself with no thought of duty nor fear of wrong."1 The earliest English works containing "elements of later children's books" mentioned in Darton's volume are a ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "A suffisant Astrolabie": Childish Desire, Fatherly Affection, and English
           Devotion in The Treatise on the Astrolabe
    • Abstract: Chaucer dedicates his Treatise on the Astrolabe to his ten-year-old son Lewis, giving him an astrolabe and an instruction manual so he can learn the complexities of astral sciences. He gives these gifts to Lewis as much to express fatherly love and friendship as to ensure his son can calculate planetary movements. "That for as moche as a philosofre said, 'he wrappith him in his frend, that condescendith to the rightfulle praiers of his frend,'" Chaucer explains, "'therfore have I yeven the a suffisant Astrolabie as for oure orizonte, compowned after the latitude of Oxenforde" (Astr, 5–10).1 As "suffisant" as Lewis's astrolabe is to support complex scientific calculations, its manual will meet Lewis at his inchoate ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Materials of Wonder: Miraculous Objects and Poetic Form in Saint Erkenwald
    • Abstract: At the climax of the Middle English poem Saint Erkenwald, a talking corpse reports the miraculous transport of his soul from limbo to heaven. There was a bright flash of light in the darkness of hell, announces the body, followed by his arrival in the celestial dining hall, where his hunger will be satisfied at last (336).1 At this, the perfectly preserved body dissolves into a heap of black dust (344), and the poem concludes with the joyful sound of bells ringing throughout the city in celebration (350–52). These remarkable sights and sounds form an appropriate ending to a poem rich in description of material and sensory objects, a poem that is very much concerned with the relation of material to spiritual ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Medieval Women and Their Objects ed. by Jenny Adams, Nancy Mason Bradbury
           (review)
    • Abstract: Material Women and Their Objects, edited by Jenny Adams and Nancy Mason Bradbury, is a rich volume of essays dedicated to Carolyn P. Collette, who has contributed enormously to medieval literary scholarship. The essays in this collection investigate the complicated relationships between gender and materiality in the culture of later medieval England and France. The contributions are varied and multifaceted, using the tools of literary, historical, art-historical, and legal scholarship. While some of the authors reexamine the objectification of historical or fictional women, others consider how medieval women used objects to negotiate or even to subvert gender roles. Still others view the idea of the "object" more ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Learning to Die in London, 1380–1540 by Amy Appleford (review)
    • Abstract: This assessment of a group of texts that surprisingly have received relatively little scholastic attention is a valuable contribution to the growing interest in the long fifteenth century. Interdisciplinary studies are especially important because literature scholars are generally particularly adept at "reading" texts, while the development of ideas surrounding reception, in addition to authorship, has done considerable service to our understanding of late medieval and early modern culture. One of the consequences of such approaches has been the realization of the significance of regional and local differences, but also paradoxically the importance of networks that crossed and recrossed these boundaries, spreading ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Critics and the Prioress: Antisemitism, Criticism, and Chaucer's
           "Prioress's Tale" by Heather Blurton and Hannah Johnson (review)
    • Abstract: There are few books that place the literary critic, rather than the text, beneath the analytical lens as cogently and delightfully as Heather Blur-ton and Hannah Johnson's excellent new account of the scholarship on Chaucer's Prioress's Tale. Following in the footsteps of Florence Ridley's The Prioress and the Critics (1965), Blurton and Johnson document how a range of debates about the tale's anti-Semitic content, highly gendered narrator, and investment in Marian theology have revealed almost as much about the historical and theoretical affinities of the critic as they have about the text itself. Moreover, as they argue, the discipline of medieval literary studies has itself been shaped by the controversies at ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Introduction to "Piers Plowman" by Michael Calabrese (review)
    • Abstract: Michael Calabrese's Introduction to "Piers Plowman" stands as a welcome addition to the previously available handbooks, guidebooks, and companions. The volume provides what no aid to Piers has offered before: a "navigational summary" (xiii) of the A-, B-, and C-texts that proceeds not from A to B to C but simultaneously across the three main versions of Langland's poem, "one parallel set of passūs at a time" (xv). Scholars braving their first adventures with A. V. C. Schmidt's parallel-text edition now have a handy road map that introduces the varying movements of these three versions. Even seasoned readers of Langland's poem know how challenging it can be to hold a view of multiple versions of the text in the mind ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Yee' Baw for Bokes": Essays on Medieval Manuscripts and Poetics in
           Honor of Hoyt N. Duggan ed. by Michael Calabrese and Stephen H. A.
           Shepherd (review)
    • Abstract: It is a real accomplishment for a festschrift to achieve an impressive methodological range while retaining an equally impressive thematic unity. Hoyt Duggan's friends, colleagues, and students speak to the full range of this scholar's influence on Langland studies, the digital humanities, metrical analysis, manuscript studies, and medieval literary scholarship more generally. The contributors' exemplary essays simultaneously express the interrelationships among these subjects as they examine, for example, the value of digital editions for understanding the history of meter, or the importance of codicological study for reconstructing Langland's early reception—questions of immediate relevance to ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Literacy to Literature: England, 1300–1400 by Christopher
           Cannon (review)
    • Abstract: In this handsome volume from Oxford, Christopher Cannon works into book form material from six of his previous publications in such journals as The Yearbook of Langland Studies, Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, New Medieval Literature, and ELH: English Literary History, now molded together with new material and a new rhetorical framework appropriate to a monograph, convenient for those wanting a "greatest hits" compilation of Cannon's engaging work (with bonus tracks) in the field of grammar and learning. Unifying the current volume, Cannon shows throughout how the various exercises learned at school equipped the major Ricardian poets for poetic creation in English. The book will mainly ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Comic Medievalism: Laughing at the Middle Ages by Louise D'Arcens (review)
    • Abstract: It is a truism that nothing kills a joke faster than explanation. This situation becomes dire when the joke crosses national boundaries, languages, generations, occasions, speakers, all of those things that target jokes to their intended and knowing audience. We've all had this experience and yet, somehow, in the decade since its uploading to YouTube, the Norwegian skit Øystein og jeg (Medieval Help-Desk), with English subtitles alone, has had 5,124,763 (and counting) views. How' Why' Comic Medievalism: Laughing at the Middle Ages gamely rides into this anarchy and sets about bringing some analytic rigor to its examination.Comic Medievalism has four main parts, each with two chapters. The introduction provides a ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Piers Plowman" and the Books of Nature by Rebecca Davis (review)
    • Abstract: "Piers Plowman" and the Books of Nature offers a rare thing: an "optimistic" reading of Piers Plowman. Rebecca Davis presents her monograph, which argues that Langland finds divine presence in the created world, as an answer to the more common "pessimistic" sense of Langland as a poet of failure and privation. That optimism is hedged and complicated over the course of the book, and the advocates of more pessimistic readings—notably, Nicolette Zeeman—prove productive interlocutors throughout. But Davis's argument is a convincing challenge to read Piers Plowman anew, alongside discourses that call forward the poem's reparative and generative qualities rather than its negations and discontinuities.Specifically, the ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Quest for the Christ Child in the Later Middle Ages by Mary Dzon
           (review)
    • Abstract: What happened between Christ's Nativity and his first documented public appearance in Jerusalem at age twelve, in which he went missing and was eventually found—to his parents' relief and astonishment—in the temple arguing with Jewish doctors' Of the gospel writers, only Luke recounts this episode; chronologically, the next canonical incident from Jesus's life appears to be his baptism by John, which occurred when both were already grown men.In this fascinating and thought-provoking study, Mary Dzon tackles the "hidden years," as she terms them, of Jesus' childhood—particularly the time between his birth and the episode with the temple doctors in Jerusalem.The book focuses on the later Middle Ages and places ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The French of Medieval England: Essays in Honour of Jocelyn Wogan-Browne
           by Thelma Fenster and Carolyn P. Collette (review)
    • Abstract: The theme of this festschrift in honor of Jocelyn Wogan-Browne must have picked itself. The French of Medieval England is the subtitle of the influential collection Language and Culture in Medieval England, which she edited, and is also firmly embedded in the French of England Translation Series, which she founded. As the editors write in their introduction (and Felicity Riddy in her foreword), Jocelyn's work has been trail-blazing, and this collection shows the richness of the vistas that she has opened up.The first essay deals with the Comput by Philippe de Thaon, the earliest named vernacular French author. Thomas O'Donnell examines the Latin glosses to the Anglo-Norman text in one of the manuscripts (Cambridge ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Making Chaucer's "Book of the Duchess": Textuality and Reception by Jamie
           C. Fumo (review)
    • Abstract: This is the first comprehensive study of Chaucer's first major work, The Book of the Duchess. Until now, the poem has been the subject of only one major scholarly study, James Wimsatt's 1968 Chaucer and the French Love Poets: The Literary Background of the "Book of the Duchess," which focuses on its literary sources. The Book of the Duchess may be the least examined of Chaucer's dream visions because of its roots in submission and service, both personal and literary. Not only is this narrative dream vision heavily invested in its French sources, it is also rooted in historical events and figures, with the Man in Black, whom the melancholy dreamer encounters after falling asleep over a volume of Ovid, identified as ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chaucer on Screen: Absence, Presence, and Adapting the "Canterbury Tales."
           ed. by Kathleen Coyne Kelly and Tison Pugh (review)
    • Abstract: According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the concept of "fun" postdates the life of Geoffrey Chaucer. But he persistently uses variants of "play" and other related terms in his writing, and he famously establishes "earnest" versus "game" as a central paradigm for the understanding of the Canterbury Tales. Chaucer, it seems, took great joy in telling his stories, and many readers have delighted in his writing because it is humorous and indeed fun. The same cannot always be said of Chaucerian scholarship, which is sometimes so very "earnest" that it can seem dry and lifeless.To the contrary, one of the greatest virtues of Chaucer on Screen: Absence, Presence, and Adapting the "Canterbury Tales" is that it is an ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • New Directions in Medieval Manuscript Studies and Reading Practices:
           Essays in Honor of Derek Pearsall ed. by Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, John J.
           Thompson, and Sarah Baechle (review)
    • Abstract: This volume of twenty-four essays is the latest and also grandest example of commemorative essay collections, deservedly dedicated to Derek Pearsall. The collection builds upon Pearsall's own work establishing the York Manuscripts Conference in the early 1980s. This conference and its successor at Harvard gave birth to some of the most acclaimed contemporary scholarship on medieval manuscripts and literature: including volumes such as Manuscripts and Texts: Editorial Problems in Later Middle English Literature (D. S. Brewer, 1987) and New Directions in Later Medieval Manuscript Studies (York Medieval Press, 2000)—both edited by Pearsall—and several collections of essays dedicated to Pearsall, such as Medieval ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Margery Kempe and the Lonely Reader by Rebecca Krug (review)
    • Abstract: Rebecca Krug begins Margery Kempe and the Lonely Reader by asking "Why did Margery Kempe write her Book'" (vii). In answering this question, Krug focuses on the Book's language to argue that Kempe, an avid reader, turned to writing because the books that she read failed to provide her with adequate strategies for wrestling with negative emotions. Krug suggests that Kempe's reading and writing processes were both consolatory and collaborative, enabling her to connect with others who shared her emotional experiences and providing solutions for grappling productively with despair, shame, fear, and loneliness. While grounding her analysis in precise historical details from Kempe's biography, Krug approaches the Book ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Accommodated Jew: English Antisemitism from Bede to Milton by Kathy
           Lavezzo (review)
    • Abstract: Kathy Lavezzo's fresh reading of English medieval literary, geographic, and architectural texts, The Accommodated Jew (no relation to Laurie Shannon's also excellent The Accommodated Animal), examines not the itinerant Jew but the stably housed one, proposing a "poetics of accommodation" (4) in which Jewish buildings figure as both embodied sites of anti-Christian activity and metonymic signs of Jewish spiritual "stoniness" and material hoarding. In Lavezzo's readings of medieval English anti-Semitic texts, these buildings also undermine anti-Jewish tropes by revealing identifications and permeable borders between Jews and Christians. The title refers also to the temporal mutability of the sign "Jew," for Lavezzo ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nowhere in the Middle Ages by Karma Lochrie (review)
    • Abstract: This book considers "utopia" and utopian thought as "word, literary genre, and concept" (2), not as a product of sixteenth-century geopolitical consciousness, but rather as a rich and nuanced presence that animates medieval writing across several genres. Citing the creation myth of the island of Utopia, related by Raphael Hythloday in Thomas More's Utopia (1516), Lochrie writes "Utopus-like, scholars of More's Utopia likewise sever his narrative utopia from his historical past, too, creating of it a conceptual and generic enclave alongside that other coeval birth, 'nascent modernity'" (6). Eschewing textual genealogies that look back reflexively (indeed, tautologically) to More's supposedly inaugural Utopia ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • In the Skin of a Beast: Sovereignty and Animality in Medieval France by
           Peggy McCracken (review)
    • Abstract: Peggy McCracken's newest book is about how "literary texts use human–animal encounters to explore the legitimacy of authority and dominion over others" (1). Over the course of In the Skin of a Beast, McCracken convincingly argues that medieval literature stages encounters between humans and animals to think about power dynamics among people. Yet, while animals provide a forum for thinking about relations of sovereignty among humans, this book is nonetheless careful not to overlook the specificity of the animal; indeed, it is particularly concerned with animal bodies. Furthermore, because she is concerned both with the reciprocity of encounters and with the process of asserting authority, which is never ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Narrating the Crusades: Loss and Recovery in Medieval and Early Modern
           English Literature by Lee Manion (review)
    • Abstract: In his 1395 Epistre au Roi Richart, Philippe de Mézières urges the English and the French to cooperate in order to recover the Holy Land and spread the teachings of Christianity in the East. In making his appeal, Philippe turns to figures made famous by romance, telling Richard II and Charles VI "one of you [will] be the noble Roland and the other the very perfect Oliver … one of you may imitate the very valiant … Charlemagne and the other that very bold … King Arthur, when you fight against the enemies of the Faith" (116). In Philippe's letter, the discourses of chivalric fiction bleed into the political and religious concerns of the contemporary world.Throughout Narrating the Crusades, Lee Manion traces similar ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Lyric Tactics: Poetry, Genre, and Practice in Later Medieval England by
           Ingrid Nelson (review)
    • Abstract: In Lyric Tactics, Ingrid Nelson sets out to define the lyric genre as much by "what it does (its cultural work) as by what it is (its formal features)" (6). Medieval lyric—and especially insular lyric—is famously undertheorized and understudied, in part because of its divergence from post-Romantic notions of lyric form. Here Nelson proposes a new approach to lyric studies wherein form is subordinated to practice. This adjustment of emphasis, she contends, would provide a historical account of lyric in which medieval lyric is "paradigmatic rather than marginal" (6). Central to Nelson's analysis throughout are the terms tactics and strategy. The distinction from which the book takes its title is borrowed from Michel ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Shaping the Archive in Late Medieval England: History, Poetry, and
           Performance by Sarah Elliott Novacich (review)
    • Abstract: For medievalists, the archive can be a site of fascination and frustration in equal measure, the closest we can come to a point of unmediated contact with the past as an object of study. As Sarah Elliott Novacich's important new book shows, however, the "archival desire" both to access and control the past is as much a medieval preoccupation as a modern one, and is not limited to the handling of books and artifacts. Other scholars have done much to explore the formation and dissolution of specific collections, as well as the broader ramifications of medieval documentary and book cultures, but Novacich's concern is with the idea of the archive and the many forms of desire it represents rather than with material ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chaucer, Gower, and the Affect of Invention by Steele Nowlin (review)
    • Abstract: Steele Nowlin's discussion of invention through a reconceptualization of affect is a groundbreaking study that marks a shift in our understanding of and approach to two of the most important authors in Middle English: Geoffrey Chaucer and John Gower. Nowlin examines how Chaucer and Gower "present invention as an affective force, a process characterized by emergence and potentiality" (1). Nowlin's affect is not one of emotion. It is "an intensity … typically described in a critical vocabulary of movement, emergence, and becoming" (1). He also broadens the definition of invention to one "that includes the dynamism and sense of potential that characterize inventional activity" (2). He clearly illustrates this ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nature Speaks: Medieval Literature and Aristotelian Philosophy by Kellie
           Robertson (review)
    • Abstract: A. O. Lovejoy once wrote that the task of the historian of ideas is to "trace connectedly" the "working of a given conception, of an explicit or tacit presupposition, of a type of mental habit, or of a specific thesis or argument" across a range of discourses and historical periods—all in the attempt to "put gates through the fences" that separate these discourses and periods from each other.7 In Nature Speaks, Kellie Robertson has given medievalists an ambitious and often dazzling work of premodern intellectual history cast in precisely this mold. Over the course of eight chapters, Robertson broadly outlines different models of nature in both contemporary theory and medieval literature and philosophy by tracking ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Indecent Exposure: Gender, Politics, and Obscene Comedy in Middle English
           Literature by Nicole Nolan Sidhu (review)
    • Abstract: Indecent Exposure offers a field-changing and astute discussion of literary engagements with obscenity in Middle English literature. Although Nicole Sidhu's monograph focuses on fourteenth- and fifteenth-century obscene comedy in Middle English, it also provides a contextualization of this discourse in other European vernaculars and in a variety of literary and visual contexts, such as manuscript illuminations and devotional texts, sermons in particular.Sidhu's sustained usage of "obscene comedy" as a serviceable way of categorizing the breadth of texts with which she engages is one of the most original and helpful contributions to the study of medieval comic literature. Still "in a nascent stage" (2), this ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Geoffrey Chaucer: A New Introduction by David Wallace (review)
    • Abstract: David Wallace's Geoffrey Chaucer: A New Introduction lives up to its name in inviting its readers to look anew at Chaucer, seeing in him not the founding father of English letters but "the poet of an unfinished Englishness" (142). Wallace shows how Chaucer's Middle English absorbs influences ranging from scientific treatises to "urban noise" (44) to become a capacious and flexible poetic medium. The experimental quality of Chaucer's language is, Wallace proposes, a reason why his works are enjoying a far-reaching appeal now, in a world where English has become dominant. Wallace's dual focus on language and global reception makes his book a thought-provoking read that not only introduces its audience to Chaucer's ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Annotated Chaucer Bibliography, 2015
    • Abstract: Mark Allen, University of Texas at San AntonioMichelle Allen, Grand Rapids Community College (Michigan)Stephanie Amsel, Southern Methodist University (Texas)Brother Anthony (Sonjae An), Sogang University (South Korea)Tim Arner, Grinnell College (Iowa)Rebecca Beal, University of Scranton (Pennsylvania)Debra Best, California State University at Dominguez HillsThomas H. Blake, Austin College, TexasMatthew Brumit, University of Mary (North Dakota)Margaret Connolly, University of St. Andrews (Scotland)John Michael Crafton, West Georgia CollegeStefania D’Agata D’Ottavi, Universitaper Stranieri di Siena (Italy)Geoffrey B. Elliott, Oklahoma State UniversityThomas J. Farrell, Stetson University (Florida)Jon-Mark ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The New Chaucer Society Twentieth International Congress July 10–15,
           2016Queen Mary University of London, Mile End
    • Abstract: 9:30–5:15: Teachers' Workshop (Arts 2, Rms. 316, 317, 320)9:30–10:00: Morning Coffee10:00–11:30: Round Table (Susanna Fein, David Raybin, John Fyler, Candace Barrington, Isabel Davis, David Wallace, Kara McShane, Leah Haught)11:30–12:45: Business Meeting12:45–1:45: Lunch2:00–3:30: Relevance/Difference—Both' (Sally Frostic, Mary Kay Waterman, Mark Randolph, Cristin VanderPlas, Timothy Cox, Jaclyn Silvestri)3:30–3:45: Coffee3:45–5:15: Reading Medieval Today (Ruth Lexton, Karen Patton-McShane, Lori Ayotte, Lisa Warman)10:00–4:00: Graduate Student Workshop (by application only) (Bancroft, David Sizer)10:00–10:45: London Scribes and Scripts (Simon Horobin)10:45–11:00: Coffee11:00–11:45: Correcting (Daniel ... Read More
      Keywords: Holkot, Robertus,; Jesus Christ; Chaucer, Geoffrey,; Death; Literacy; Literature, Medieval; Utopias; French literature; English literature; English poetry; Aristotle; New Chaucer Society Congress (20th :
      PubDate: 2018-12-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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