Publisher: Project MUSE   (Total: 306 journals)

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Showing 201 - 306 of 306 Journals sorted alphabetically
Oceanic Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 0)
Ohio History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ohio Valley History     Full-text available via subscription  
Oral Tradition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Palimpsest : A J. on Women, Gender, and the Black Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Parergon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Partial Answers: J. of Literature and the History of Ideas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.166, CiteScore: 0)
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 0)
Philip Roth Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Philippine Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
philoSOPHIA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Philosophy and Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Philosophy East and West     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.249, CiteScore: 0)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Ploughshares     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Population Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
portal: Libraries and the Academy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 248, SJR: 1.182, CiteScore: 1)
Postmodern Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.427, CiteScore: 1)
Pushkin Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaker History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Red Cedar Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Region : Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Register of the Kentucky Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Review of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.601, CiteScore: 2)
Review of Japanese Culture and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Reviews in American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Estudios Hisp├ínicos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Revista Hisp├ínica Moderna     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Rhetoric & Public Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.556, CiteScore: 1)
River Teeth: A J. of Nonfiction Narrative     Full-text available via subscription  
Rocky Mountain Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Romance Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.107, CiteScore: 0)
RSF : The Russell Sage Foundation J. of the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SAIS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Scottish Literary Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Seoul J. of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Serbian Studies: J. of the North American Society for Serbian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sewanee Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Shakespeare Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Shakespeare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Shofar : An Interdisciplinary J. of Jewish Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.554, CiteScore: 1)
Sirena: poesia, arte y critica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Research : An Intl. Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Sojourn: J. of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.294, CiteScore: 0)
South Central Review     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Southeast Asian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Southeastern Geographer     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 0)
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Southern Literary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Southern Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Southern Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Spiritus: A J. of Christian Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.125, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Fiction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Philology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in Romanticism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Studies in the Literary Imagination     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in the Novel     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Syllecta Classica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tampa Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.284, CiteScore: 0)
Tenso     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Texas Studies in Literature and Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Comparatist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Jurist : Studies in Church Law and Ministry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Lion and the Unicorn     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
The Massachusetts Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
The Moving Image     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats     Full-text available via subscription  
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.169, CiteScore: 0)
The Velvet Light Trap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Theatre J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Theatre Notebook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Theatre Symposium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Theatre Topics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Theory & Event     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Toronto J. of Theology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Transactions of the American Philological Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, CiteScore: 0)
Transformation: Critical Perspectives on Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
U.S.-Japan Women's J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
US Latino & Latina Oral History J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.338, CiteScore: 0)
Victorian Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.166, CiteScore: 0)
Wallace Stevens J.     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
West Virginia History: A J. of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
William Carlos Williams Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Women in French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Yearbook of Comparative Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.101
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0360-2370 - ISSN (Online) 1938-6133
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [306 journals]
  • Contributors to Volume 48
    • Abstract: Jennifer L. Airey is associate professor of English at the University of Tulsa, specializing in literature of the long eighteenth century. She is the author of The Politics of Rape: Sexual Atrocity, Propaganda Wars, and the Restoration Stage (2012) and has published articles on authors such as Wycherley, Dryden, Centlivre, Robinson, Dacre, and Haywood. She is the editor of Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, the first scholarly journal devoted solely to the study of women's literature.Michael C. Amrozowicz is an instructor at the State University of New York at Albany in the Department of English. Currently, he is working on a book manuscript titled "The Great Ferment:" Histories of Social Organization and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-04-30T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Editors' Introduction
    • Abstract: We are happy to announce that with David Shields's Clifford Lecture. … Dena Goodman's Presidential Address, and its combination of panels, forums (roundtables), and individual essays, SECC has finally attained the new format that we envisioned. SECC's previous editor, Michelle Burnham, had noticed that the journal unaccountably had ceased to publish the Presidential Address and Clifford Lecture, and she took the first steps to restore them. Our aim in reintroducing these lectures, and in including a selection of panels and forums, has been to fulfill the journal's mission of reflecting the work done at the ASECS's annual conference by more closely approximating the intellectual experience of the meeting and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Editorial Readers for Volume 48
    • Abstract: KATHERINE BINHAMMER / English and Film Studies / University of AlbertaDAVID BREWER / English / Ohio State UniversityPAMELA CHEEK / Foreign Languages and Literatures / University of New MexicoTILI BOON CUILLÉ / Romance Languages and Literatures / Washington University in St. LouisKAREN GEVIRTZ / English / Seton Hall UniversityROBERT GRIFFIN / English / Texas A&M UniversityMICHAEL GUENTHER / Technology Studies / Grinnell UniversityBRUCE HINDMARSH / Spiritual Theology / Regent CollegeROBERT D. HUME / English / Penn State UniversityCATHERINE JAFFE / Modern Languages / Texas State University, San MarcosBETTY JOSEPH / English / Rice UniversityMATT KADANE / History / Hobart and William Smith CollegesMI GYUNG KIM / History ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Secret History of Learned Societies
    • Abstract: On 14 November 1979, Ron Rosbottom, Executive Secretary of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, wrote a long letter to the ASECS Steering Committee. "The Society is at a transitional point in its history," he wrote. "Despite Don Greene's repeated reminders that he handled everything with a few boxes of files and a mimeograph machine, ASECS has grown considerably in the past few years. … We cannot continue to fly by the seat of our pants." Ten years after a constitution was drafted, the first officers were elected, and the first annual meeting was held, ASECS required more administration than a single secretary could handle. "We are no longer a small group of devotees to the eighteenth century," ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Richard Whitworth, Benjamin Franklin, and Political Electricity
    • Abstract: In their multivolume Catalogue of Prints and Drawings in the British Museum (1883), Frederic George Stephens and Edward Hawkins characterized Richard Whitworth's 1770 broadside satire, Political Electricity, as (with just one exception) "the most complex and difficult of all the satirical prints yet catalogued in these volumes." This "extraordinary" sheet "advisedly styled a 'Prophetical Print,'" created, they wrote, "a very remarkable reference to the then recent researches of Benjamin Franklin in electrical science."1 Given their knowledge of the collections of prints in the British Museum, the comparative analysis offered by Stephens and Hawkins is striking. As they introduce their discussion of the broadside ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Panel Introduction: Learned and Sociable Manuscript Circulation
    • Abstract: Early in his Autobiography, Benjamin Franklin remarks that "prose writing has been of great Use to me in the Course of my Life, and was a principal Means of my Advancement."1 Consistent with this claim, the modern literary study of Franklin overwhelmingly focuses on his prose, beginning with the teenaged satirical essays he published in the New England Courant under the pseudonym "Silence Dogood" and continuing all the way to the above referenced Autobiography, a text that was only printed posthumously but which is now Franklin's most widely anthologized work.2Notably, the earliest writing by Franklin for which we have any record is poetry, not prose. In the Autobiography, Franklin describes writing some doggerel ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Exhibitions of Manuscript Verse in the Salon du Louvre
    • Abstract: In the eighteenth century, spectators placed hand-written poems on or beside artworks in the Paris Salon du Louvre. Overlooked in the history of exhibition practice, this unofficial spectatorial response to art physically intruded on a space where only members of the Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture were allowed to exhibit their work. The jurisdiction of the Académie over every aspect of the Salon, including the policing of its space by the Bourbon monarch's Swiss guards, is a precedent for the top-down model of curatorial control, channeling of spectatorial movement, and regulation of spectatorial behavior that characterizes modern exhibition practice. Yet, manuscript verse reveals how art exhibitions ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scribal Publication of Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson's Commonplace Books
    • Abstract: According to scholars of book history, print did not replace the production of manuscript writing during the early modern period. On the contrary, it encouraged an increase in writing by hand.1 The manuscript books of Philadelphia poet Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson contain ample evidence of how print inspired the continuous production of handwritten material. The remaining six manuscript copy books that Fergusson composed from the early 1770s to the late 1790s have a miscellaneous content. They include Fergusson's poetic compositions, those of other poets, personal letters, as well as newspaper articles and extracts from printed books.2 The volumes that Fergusson designed and revised during the last three decades of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Correspondence between Benjamin Franklin and Johann Karl Philipp Spener on
           the American Revolution
    • Abstract: Benjamin Franklin was, as his biographer Carl van Doren once famously put it, "a harmonious human multitude:" he was a public-minded citizen, a self-taught scientist, inventor of the lightning rod, a gifted educator, and prominent founder of the University of Pennsylvania.1 Yet, until the end of his long life, Franklin was particularly proud to call himself a printer.2 The printing business was his profession since he was a twelve-year old boy. Printing usually meant publishing news and exciting innovative ideas as quickly as possible. Sometimes, however, Franklin decided to take his time before setting something into print. He then circulated his ideas—spelled out in letters and manuscripts—among trustworthy ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • What Remains of the Flavors of the Eighteenth Century'
    • Abstract: Mine is a culinary and an agricultural inquiry. I approach the question avoiding the narrowest way of construing what remains of the flavors of the eighteenth century' I can imagine a foodie magazine (Lucky Peach before its demise) commissioning an epicurean writer to secure fruit from the oldest bearing fruit trees in the world—from the Zenji-Muro Persimmon Tree at Ozengi Temple in Japan; the Pizzaro Fig planted at the Governor's Palace in Lima in 1540; the Breadfruit Tree at Galle, Sri Lanka; the Muso di Bui Apple growing in a seventeenth-century homestead outside of Foligno, Italy; the John Endicott Pear Tree in Danvers, Massachusetts planted in the 1640s; the Olive Tree of Vouves in Chania, Greece, reckoned to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Aerostatic Bodies and the View from Above in Late Eighteenth-Century
           Britain
    • Abstract: The first balloonists risked life and limb, sometimes losing both, ascending in machines that were impossible to steer and impotent against the elements.1 The envelopes above them, buoyed by smoke or hydrogen, caught fire and exploded, often failing to lift, which could incite violent riots.2 Indeed, many of the earliest aeronauts were doctors studying the still-unknown effects of the thinner air on the human body.3 Jean François Pilâtre de Rozier, trained as a surgeon, piloted the first manned launch in 1783 with the Marquis d'Arlandes; de Rozier died two years later, with Pierre Romain, in an attempt to cross the English Channel.4 Taking that honor was John Jeffries, a doctor himself, and Jean-Pierre Blanchard ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Administrative Fictions of Domestic Manufacture: Eighteenth-Century Excise
           Guides
    • Abstract: An official publication of the Board of Excise, printed in 1729, offers a series of Instructions to be Observed by the Officers Employ'd in the duties on Paper.1 It begins with a short "Description of the Way and Manner of Making Paper." This explains how the "Rags, Ropes, Cables, &c" are "sorted and wash'd," beaten into "Half-stuff" in large mortars using "four or five Hammers," laid to "mellow" before being beaten again into "fine Stuff," and then soaked in luke-warm water in "a Vessel call'd a Fatt." A sheet of paper is produced by drawing a "Mould" comprising a fine sieve through the mixture. By the "Dexterity and Skill of the Workman," the stuff gathered is laid between two felt sheets. A second layer of stuff ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scottish Enlightenment Histories of Social Organization
    • Abstract: Arecent report in the journal Science observes that bees "possess complex navigational skills, rudimentary culture, and emotions. They can even use tools: scientists have shown that the insects can learn to pull a string—and so get a sugary reward—by watching another bee perform the task."1 The bees participating in the study were trained to move a ball to a target by watching previously-trained sister bees or by watching a bee-shaped magnet move the ball, which shows that they adapt their behavior by collectively learning from each other. But scientists still don't understand the communicative mechanisms bees use to coordinate individual actions into the collective behavior of the swarm. This coordination problem ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Buffon's Language of Heat and the Science of Natural History
    • Abstract: 'I will burn it in a golden crucible,' said Guyton de Morveau, in order to be certain that diamonds contain oxides. 'The best crucible is the mind,' replied Buffon.1In a short, unpublished text, On the Art of Writing, the French Enlightenment natural historian Buffon described the process of translating observations into language and transmitting them to readers.2 In these notes for the famous Discourse on Style, he wrote that natural phenomena were best depicted through painting, which not only represented their order and structure but also made them flow together in such a way that they resembled and transmitted life itself:Painting and description are two very different things. The latter considers only the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Silence and the Passions in Rousseau's Julie
    • Abstract: As a remote haven of shared harmonious coexistence and transparency, the Clarens, Switzerland community of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Julie, ou la Nouvelle Héloïse (1761) has been interpreted by some as representing an ideal form of society, while others deem it a dystopia. Lettres de deux amans, habitans d'une petite ville au pied des Alpes, the second portion of the title of Julie (and the title of the original edition), evokes the alpine setting of Clarens, a village on the shores of Lake Geneva, near where Rousseau himself spent his youth. This title emphasizes the passionate love between Julie and her former tutor St. Preux, around which the initial half of the story revolves, preceding Julie's marriage to the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Convulsionnaires, Palissot, and the Philosophical Battles of 1760
    • Abstract: The year 1760 was exceptionally difficult for the intellectuals affiliated with the French philosophic movement. Coming right after such ugly events as Jean-Jacques Rousseau's noisy defection from the circle of philosophes, the condemnation and burning of Claude Adrien Helvétius's De l'Esprit (1758), and the revocation of the privilège of the Encyclopédie, this was when Charles Palissot de Montenoy's satirical comedy Les Philosophes skewered Rousseau, Helvétius and Denis Diderot on stage by painting them as Tartuffe-like scoundrels.1 It was also a year when spectacles of a more violent sort captured the attention of Parisian witnesses and readers around Europe: scenes of ritualized self-mortification that were ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Forum Introduction: Devotion in the Enlightenment
    • Abstract: What does it mean to be devoted' What does devotion feel and look like, where do we find it, and what are its objects' What can devotion tell us about the Enlightenment'The answers to these questions may appear simple, but the history of the word devotion shows that they are not. The Oxford English Dictionary notes the earliest appearance of this word in the thirteenth-century Ancrene Riwle, a guide for the Anchorites and Anchoresses who took a vow to live their lives in a single room, focusing on prayer. This usage connects the word to the Latin verb from which it derives, devovere, meaning to dedicate by a vow. Accompanying the absorption of this word into Middle English was a narrowing of its scope to what is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Contemplation: John Norris on Reason and Devotion
    • Abstract: The term devotion implicitly confronts questions about the mind's cerebral dedication to the love and worship of God. This investigation considers the epistemological context for exegesis of early modern devotion, taking the writings and intellectual legacy of Church of England clergyman and philosopher John Norris as a case in point.1Norris's reputation among his contemporaries is complex. He is principally remembered now as the recipient of sometimes quite pointed critiques from contemporaries including John Locke, Lady Damaris Masham, and (to a lesser extent) Mary Astell.2 Indisputably the most assiduous English follower of French philosopher Nicolas Malebranche, Norris offers readers a rich body of religious ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cult: The Case of Mary-Catherine Cadière
    • Abstract: The Oxford English Dictionary provides two primary definitions of the word cult, one religious in nature, the other secular. A cult may be defined as a "relatively small group of people having (esp. religious) beliefs or practices regarded by others as strange or sinister," or as "a collective obsession with or intense admiration for a particular person, thing, or idea" that is not inherently sacred.1 This essay examines the case of Mary-Catherine Cadière, who attracted cults in both senses of the term during the long eighteenth century.In 1728, eighteen-year-old Mary-Catherine Cadière chose as her primary spiritual advisor Father Jean-Baptiste Girard, a forty-seven-year-old Jesuit priest in great demand as a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Image
    • Abstract: The word image had a double meaning in eighteenth-century Britain. It could indicate a representation of something or an idol. This connotation was apt because art was frequently shadowed by the specter, in Christian terms, of its mis-use. This essay contributes to the discussion of devotion by offering some observations on the ways in which portraiture and religious imagery supported devotion whilst also giving rise to anxieties over idolatry, which can be defined as mis-directed or inappropriate devotion.1Over the course of the century, there was something of a revolution in the production of portraiture. Elite patrons still commissioned large, grand-manner portraits, but an array of smaller forms proliferated ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Catholic/Protestant: The Tensions of Transdenominational Prayer
    • Abstract: Significant aspects of the theory and practice of devotion in the sense of prayer and divine worship can be agreed on among Christian denominations, as numerous translations and adaptations of popular devotional literature prove. There are, however, also crucial differences in the modes of prayer and the types of rituals that depend on the worshiper's denomination. Both the similarities and the differences can be traced in the international reception of one of the most successful devotional manuals of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Catholic bishop François de Sales's Introduction à la vie dévote (1609). It was designed for the French Catholic female lay reader. Its training program was supposed to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fandom: Enthusiastic Devotion, Religious and Theatrical Celebrity
    • Abstract: In a review of the "Progress of Religion" in Britain, one Public Advertiser author condemns "Clergymen, who thus attempt to win proselytes by moving the passions, instead of convincing the judgment, or awakening the conscience."1 He goes on to argue, "Were such arts necessary in preaching the Gospel, the office of the ministry ought to be performed by the women, whose voices are in general far more pathetic and persuasive than those of men, and Mrs. Siddons would then gain more hearers than the whole clergy of England put together."2 Meant as an insult to Methodist preachers and their enthusiastic followers, the pathos performed by both Whitefield and Siddons, along with the enthusiastic reactions of their ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mimesis: Individual Experience and the Devotional Culture of Early
           Methodism
    • Abstract: Rachel Fulton has written persuasively that "If one accepts reading as a devotional activity, as an experience of intimacy with the divine, then the act of writing, of transforming experience of text into text and of concretizing understanding in verbal depiction, may also be interpreted as a devotional performance."1 The implications of this idea for our understanding of the life writing of eighteenth-century Methodism are explored here in relation to the concept of mimesis, with a view to reframing the questions that we might ask of the relationship between the textual features of such writing and the culture within which it was produced and disseminated.Bruce Hindmarsh, Joyce Quiring Erickson, and Phyllis Mack ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Knowledge: The British Virtuoso
    • Abstract: In the long eighteenth century, the New Science, its objects and practices, seemed to demand a form of commitment from the naturalist community that many Britons felt to rival and, essentially, to endanger a Christian's devotion to God. Naturalists' observation of nature, as Lorraine Daston has shown, could indeed become "too absorbing to be easily compatible with other social, professional, and religious commitments."1 Although naturalists like Robert Boyle claimed that experimental philosophy represents a form of religious worship—a concept that Courtney Weiss Smith has called "meditative empiricism"—criticism persisted throughout the long eighteenth century.2 Enlightenment moralists condemned contemporary ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Devotion: Afterword
    • Abstract: Thinking about devotion in its slippery religious and secular senses requires us to take a stance on to what extent beliefs, habits, behaviours, and rituals may acquire special significance in a range of performative contexts—on the stage, in the public sphere, as a performance of personal identity, as texts, and as acts of worship, whether liturgical or private. There are two related features that emerged from the forum's conversation. The first is that the call to focus on devotion encourages us as scholars to attach significance to the practices of adherents (whether religious believers or devotees of more secular objects) and, at least in part, to direct our attention away from doctrinal and political questions ... Read More
      PubDate: 2020-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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