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Publisher: Project MUSE   (Total: 294 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 294 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ab Imperio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.405, h-index: 4)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
African Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Alabama Review     Full-text available via subscription  
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.404, h-index: 31)
American Book Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 1)
American Catholic Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
American Periodicals : A J. of History, Criticism, and Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 2)
American Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Anales Galdosianos     Full-text available via subscription  
Anthropologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 12)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61, SJR: 0.995, h-index: 30)
Appalachian Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Asian Art     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 3)
Arizona J. of Hispanic Cultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Arizona Quarterly: A J. of American Literature, Culture, and Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Arthuriana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
ASEAN Economic Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asian Bioethics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Asian Music     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Asian Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 21)
Asian Theatre J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
AUDEM : The Intl. J. of Higher Education and Democracy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Azalea: J. of Korean Literature & Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.23, h-index: 14)
Brookings Trade Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Buddhist-Christian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
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Bulletin of Medieval Canon Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin of the Comediantes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 4)
Calíope : J. of the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Canadian J. of Information and Library Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 250, SJR: 0.197, h-index: 12)
Canadian J. of Linguistics / La revue canadienne de linguistique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.139, h-index: 14)
Canadian J. of Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.265, h-index: 14)
Canadian Review of Comparative Literature / Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 1)
Canadian Theatre Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 3)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Catholic Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Cervantes : Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
China : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.181, h-index: 7)
China Review Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cinema J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Civil War History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.176, h-index: 10)
Colorado Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Comitatus : A J. of Medieval and Renaissance Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Comparative Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, h-index: 5)
Comparative Technology Transfer and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Conradiana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 3)
Conservative Judaism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : J. of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 25)
Contemporary Southeast Asia: A J. of Intl. and Strategic Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 4)
CR : The New Centennial Review     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.15, h-index: 12)
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Cross-Currents : East Asian History and Culture Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Cultural Critique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 16)
Demokratizatsiya: The J. of Post-Soviet Democratization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.414, h-index: 15)
Diaspora: A J. of Transnational Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dickens Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 4)
Dictionaries : J. of the Dictionary Society of North America     Full-text available via subscription  
Digital Philology : A J. of Medieval Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Discourse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dublin James Joyce J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Early American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.139, h-index: 10)
Economía     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Ecotone     Full-text available via subscription  
Education and Treatment of Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 25)
Éire-Ireland     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 8)
ELH     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.168, h-index: 14)
Emily Dickinson J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 4)
English Literature in Transition 1880-1920     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 5)
ESC: English Studies in Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 6)
ESQ: A J. of the American Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 6)
Essays in Medieval Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Eudora Welty Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Feminist Formations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Film & History: An Interdisciplinary J. of Film and Television Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Forum J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Fourth Genre: Explorations in Nonfiction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 1)
Framework : The J. of Cinema and Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Franciscan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 1)
French Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 3)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Future of Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.68, h-index: 62)
George Herbert J.     Full-text available via subscription  
German Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.116, h-index: 9)
Ghana Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Goethe Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Harvard J. of Asiatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Hebrew Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Helios     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 8)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Henry James Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 8)
High School J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hispania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 5)
Hispanic Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 5)
Hispanófila     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 3)
Histoire sociale/Social history     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 8)
Historically Speaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hopscotch: A Cultural Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Human Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 45)
Human Rights Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61, SJR: 0.428, h-index: 46)
Humanity : An Intl. J. of Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Information & Culture : A J. of History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Intertexts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Islamic Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.137, h-index: 3)
J. of American Folklore     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.198, h-index: 15)
J. of Asian American Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Burma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.175, h-index: 3)
J. of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.175, h-index: 10)
J. of College Student Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 47)
J. of Colonialism and Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
J. of Democracy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.815, h-index: 56)
J. of Developing Areas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
J. of Dramatic Theory and Criticism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of Early Christian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 15)
J. of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.569, h-index: 42)
J. of Higher Education, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.189, h-index: 57)
J. of Individual Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of Japanese Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 13)
J. of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
J. of Korean Religions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 1)
J. of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 3)
J. of Late Antiquity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of Latin American Geography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 15)
J. of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
J. of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 11)
J. of Narrative Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.11, h-index: 7)
J. of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.116, h-index: 2)
J. of Shi'a Islamic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, h-index: 2)
J. of Slavic Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Song-Yuan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 1)
J. of the Civil War Era     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
J. of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 11)
J. of the History of Childhood and Youth     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of the History of Ideas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 120, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 24)
J. of the History of Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.482, h-index: 15)
J. of the History of Sexuality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 21)
J. of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of the Society of Christian Ethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.108, h-index: 6)
J. of the Southwest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
J. of Women's History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.119, h-index: 15)
J. of World History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.137, h-index: 25)
J19 : The J. of Nineteenth-Century Americanists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
James Joyce Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 3)
Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Joyce Studies Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Kennedy Institute of Ethics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.473, h-index: 32)
Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.432, h-index: 16)
L'Esprit Créateur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 5)
La corónica : A J. of Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Language     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.678, h-index: 54)
Late Imperial China     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.104, h-index: 8)
Latin American Music Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Latin American Theatre Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Le mouvement social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 7)
Leviathan : A J. of Melville Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Library Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 374, SJR: 0.357, h-index: 34)
Literature and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.117, h-index: 12)
Logos: A J. of Catholic Thought and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 4)
Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Manoa     Full-text available via subscription  
Marvels & Tales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Mechademia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediaevalia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.79, h-index: 52)
MFS Modern Fiction Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 15)
Milton Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.12, h-index: 7)
Missouri Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
MLN     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.139, h-index: 9)
Modernism/modernity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 14)
Monumenta Nipponica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 8)
Mosaic : a journal for the interdisciplinary study of literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.126, h-index: 9)
Mouseion: J. of the Classical Association of Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Nabokov Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Narrative     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 17)
Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New England Review     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 2)
New Hibernia Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Literary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.84, h-index: 21)
Northeast African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 4)
Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 6)
Nuevo Texto Crítico     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Ohio History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ohio Valley History     Full-text available via subscription  
Oral Tradition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Palimpsest : A J. on Women, Gender, and the Black Intl.     Full-text available via subscription  
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Partial Answers: J. of Literature and the History of Ideas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 7)
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 38)
Philip Roth Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Philippine Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 5)

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Journal Cover Journal of Military History
  [27 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal  (Not entitled to full-text)
   ISSN (Print) 0899-3718 - ISSN (Online) 1543-7795
   Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [294 journals]
  • The British War Chariot: A Case for Indirect Warfare
    • Abstract: Julius Caesar’s commentaries on his invasions of Britain in 55 and 54 B.C. describe successful tactics in response to this particular Roman invasion that stand at a time when the tribal armies of Gaul fell before the Roman military juggernaut. The tribes in southern Britain executed a style of war characterised by hit-and-run tactics, conducted from the highly mobile war chariot, which enabled the Britons to avoid a decisive battle. This article will discuss how the Britons responded to Caesar’s invasions, and assess their tactics in 54 B.C. It will focus on four points. First, it will survey the classical sources and the archaeological evidence about the chariot. Second, it will examine the chariot, the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Too Grievous for a People to Bear”: Impressment and Conscription in
           Revolutionary North Carolina
    • Abstract: The War of American Independence (1775–83) created an incessant demand for troops, weapons, provisions, and supplies in quantities most states could not readily provide. A relentless need to bring soldiers into the field, keep them in the ranks, and provide them with necessities to fight the enemy and prevail in the struggle for liberty were constant challenges for all of the nascent state governments, all of which lacked a sufficient financial foundation, manufacturing base, and logistical network to sustain a concerted war effort. North Carolina was particularly beset by these challenges. War with the Cherokees on the western frontier, persistent Loyalist hostility, and several British incursions ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Question of Authority: Reassessing the March-Pershing “Feud”
           in the First World War
    • Abstract: The United States entered the First World War with an army transforming itself into a modern military force capable of meeting the challenges brought on by the nation’s rise to world power status. Echoing the pattern of consolidation and centralization in the American business community, the War Department was struggling with its organizational framework and command and control structure. The turn-of-the-century reforms of Secretary of War Elihu Root sought to correct the army’s operational and administrative difficulties during the Spanish-American War in 1898, and reflected the larger movement of Progressive reform sweeping the nation. The creation of a General Staff and a chief of staff in 1903 ostensibly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cold War Pressures, Regional Strategies, and Relative Decline: British
           Military and Strategic Planning for Cyprus, 1950–1960
    • Abstract: This article attempts to place Whitehall’s post–World War II military requirements in Cyprus within the wider context of British security policy in the Eastern Mediterranean. The analysis starts in the early 1950s, when mounting regional crises pointed to the potential of Cyprus as a British base in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East, and ends in 1960, when the Cyprus Republic was established and the British retained two large sovereign bases in the island. The extensive bibliography on Cypriot decolonization has focused mostly on the political aspects of the problem. During an early phase scholars studied the Greek Cypriot struggle for Enosis (union with Greece) or the United Nations ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Bad Boys”: Infiltration and Sedition in the African Military Units of
           the Central African Federation (Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe) 1953–63
    • Abstract: At one time historians and others tended to view African soldiers who served in colonial armies as either naïve fools mesmerized by Europeans or opportunistic mercenaries who had sold out their own people. Usually saying little about the African men in the ranks, regimental histories of specific colonial units tend towards the celebratory and do not to go much beyond campaigns and nostalgic reminiscences of former European officers.2 However, over the past twenty years a fairly rich literature has emerged on the often ambiguous experience of African soldiers within racially hierarchical colonial society. A number of studies have been produced on French West Africa including Myron Echenberg’s book on the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Red Queen’s Race: Operation Washington Green and Pacification in
           Binh Dinh Province, 1969–70
    • Abstract: Alice looked round her in great surprise. “Why, I do believe we’ve been under this tree the whole time! Everything’s just as it was!” “Of course it is,” said the Queen, “what would you have it?” “Well, in OUR country,” said Alice, still panting a little, “you’d generally get to somewhere else—if you ran very fast for a long time, as we’ve been doing.” “A slow sort of country!” said the Queen. “Now, HERE, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place.” On 15 April 1969, the U.S. 173rd Airborne Brigade launched Operation Washington Green in Binh Dinh province, South Vietnam. The operation was almost unprecedented since it committed large numbers of American troops “in direct ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Eritrean Long March: The Strategic Withdrawal of the Eritrean
           People’s Liberation Front (EPLF), 1978–1979
    • Abstract: When guerrillas engage a stronger enemy, they withdraw when he advances; harass him when he stops; strike him when he is weary; pursue him when he withdraws. In guerrilla strategy, the enemy’s rear, flanks, and other vulnerable spots are his vital points, and there he must be harassed, attacked, dispersed, exhausted and annihilated. In 1978 the Ethiopian government prepared an elaborate military strategy and allocated a significant portion of its resources and personnel to the ongoing counterinsurgency war in Eritrea. Confident of victory, Addis Ababa declared the Eritrean independence war at an end. Many foreigners suggested that the setbacks Eritrean insurgents began to experience signaled the start ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Confederate Military Strategy in the U.S. Civil War Revisited
    • Abstract: Editor’s Note: The April 2009 number of The Journal of Military History saw the introduction of what we hope will be a regular feature of our publication, Forum, an arena for formal exchanges of views between scholars on issues of importance to military history. The first Forum had professors Donald Stoker of the U.S. Naval Naval War College’s Monterey Program and Joseph G. Dawson III of Texas A&M University squaring off on the question of Confederate strategy in the U.S. Civil War. Forum II narrows the focus of discussion on that topic to the doctrinal basis for not only Confederate strategy in the 1861–65 conflict, but also that of the South’s opponents, since both sides in the war drew heavily on the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Annales School and the History of War
    • Abstract: Among the hard knocks military history in this country suffered in the late 1950s and ’60s was the criticism by American historians who had come under the influence of the Annales School. The sophisticated, powerful theses of French academics, who had created a quasi-institutional movement under a common label borrowed from the title of the review originally named Annales d’histoire économique et sociale, were soon imported into the United States, where their new adherents, linking up somewhat haphazardly with Marxist and other scholars pursuing the new interest in social history, criticized accepted historical approaches and proposed new ones. In an academic climate poisoned by the war in Vietnam, military ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • If Mahan Ran the Great Pacific War: An Analysis of World War II Naval
           Strategy (review)
    • Abstract: The author of this monograph selects what he regards as the salient strategic principles of the American naval strategic theorist and historian Alfred Thayer Mahan, and then uses these principles to assess the rightness or wrongness of American and Japanese strategic and operational behavior in the Second World War. Adams divides Mahan’s thought into two grand postulates and five subordinate propositions. The two grand postulates are “No nation can become a great world power without a great navy. Overseas colonies are required to support naval bases on which to project a globe-girdling navy” and naval warfare is characterized by a rapid stream of events presenting incomplete and conflicting information about ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Worth a Second Look (review)
    • Abstract: The central reality of the Pacific War, on which any realistic analysis of its conduct must rest, is that it was not possible for Japan to defeat the United States unaided. There was nothing the Imperial Japanese Navy could have done—nothing it could have seized or sunk—to alter the overwhelming imbalance of power and resources that, left undisturbed, would insure Japan’s defeat. As H.P. Willmott calculated long ago, if on December 7, 1941, the Japanese had contrived to sink not just the entirety of the Pacific Fleet, carriers and all, but in addition every other vessel in the United States Navy on that day, the American navy would still have been larger than Japan’s at the start of 1944; which is in fact ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Eye of Command (review)
    • Abstract: This book attempts to challenge John Keegan’s “face of battle” approach to the study of war, perhaps the most important contribution to the (not so) “New Military History.” This attempt must be seen as ultimately unsuccessful. A truism for most who study battle, and those who actually fight them, but evidently not Kagan, is that attributed to the Elder Moltke, namely that no battle plan survives contact with the enemy (a maxim lost not only on his nephew, but most of those in command in 1914–18). Any number of engagements confirms this, from Plataea (479 BC) to Gettysburg or the Ia Drang, as commanders lead their troops looking for a fight but not always ready for one. In analyzing such events ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Making of Peace: Rulers, States, and the Aftermath of War (review)
    • Abstract: This is the latest volume of essays Williamson Murray has co-edited with an eye to helping military officers, historians, and anyone else interested in defense matters develop a historical perspective that will facilitate their efforts to wrestle with contemporary problems. Previous volumes looked at such topics as military innovation between the First and Second World Wars and the use of history by the military profession. Here, Murray offers eleven case studies of the challenges statesmen have faced making peace once the verdict of Mars had been rendered. Once again, Murray has assembled a stellar cast of contributors. Sir Michael Howard’s preface and Murray’s introduction effectively summarize ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Military Culture in Imperial China (review)
    • Abstract: Military Culture in Imperial China joins the steadily growing list of books in Western languages, Chinese, and Japanese that seek to revise our understanding of the relationship between the military (wu) and civil (wen) spheres in Chinese society. As is well known, the Confucian-minded class of literati that governed China for most of the 2000-year imperial era systematically promoted civil over military values and modes of behavior. Until recently their perspective has been adopted by modern historians of China, who have consistently underplayed the role of war and the military in Chinese history and society. But as Nicola di Cosmo argues in his well-crafted Introduction, this “undermilitarized” view of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Jerusalem’s Traitor: Josephus, Masada, and the Fall of Judea
           (review)
    • Abstract: Desmond Seward is a well-known popularizer who has produced lively narratives with vivid characterizations in more than a dozen books on medieval and early modern European history. This latest attempt to explain Josephus to the general reader, however, puts him far outside his area of expertise. Retelling the story of the Great Jewish War of 66–70 CE is a laudable goal only if the general reader is not misled. Unfortunately, Seward does not analyze the political, military or social aspects of this complicated war, and he has forsaken any analysis of the problems of Josephus’s reliability. Seward’s melodramatic flair causes him to include lurid passages that he himself admits are probably not ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Belisarius, The Last Roman General (review)
    • Abstract: Flavius Belisarius was the commander of the East Roman (Byzantine) expeditionary forces sent west by the Emperor Justinian with the objective being the recovery of the western provinces lost to the empire during the preceding two centuries. The book being reviewed is a biographical study which investigates the circumstances of the effort from the perspective of the commanding general of the expedition(s). The effort failed in the long run, but did enjoy enough initial success to be regarded as spectacular. The author, Ian Hughes, has written a concisely comprehensive account of the wars which were part of the attempt, using as the central figure Flavius Belisarius, who by his early thirties had ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Battlefronts Real and Imagined: War, Border, and Identity in the Chinese
           Middle Period (review)
    • Abstract: This collection does more than it says on the tin. The jacket copy claims that the book is about turf and ethnicity, but this tendentiously oversimplifies the interest, sophistication and interconnectedness of the approaches taken by the authors themselves, which I can only hint at here. Don Wyatt explains in his brief introduction that each chapter examines intersections between borders, war and identity, where these form a matrix in which, among other things, physical borders and conceptual boundaries are things that people may fight over (in both senses), and fighting generates identity issues because of the need to choose sides. Identity here is more than mere ethnicity, as set out with ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Serf, the Knight, and the Historian (review)
    • Abstract: Every national historiography has its demons and for many French medievalists it is the conditions which for several centuries thwarted the creation of a centralized nation state ruled by a legitimate king with Paris as its capital. This period of “disruption” traditionally was seen to begin sometime after the death in 877 of Charles the Bald, Charlemagne’s grandson, and to end with the process of reconstituting royal power, which generally is thought to have begun in the reign of Philip Augustus (1179–1220). The French label this period of royal weakness a “feudal” age. The institutions which flourished during this period are considered “feudal” and particular attention is given to “feudal” warfare ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Crusaders and Settlers in the Latin East (review)
    • Abstract: The Variorum Collected Studies Series bring together in one volume the seminal essays of eminent historians. It is of real value that the key crusading essays of Jonathan Riley-Smith have been published in this series, for when it comes to scholarly writing about the crusades there is no single figure more prominent in the field. Here are gathered a selection of his articles from 1972 onwards, with a definite preponderance of works written after 2000. What Jonathan Riley-Smith is best known for is for leading a paradigmatic shift in the conception of the crusades, at least for a generation of Anglo-American historians. Formerly, the dominant view of crusading activity was a negative one, shaped by ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Calais: An English Town in France, 1347–1558, and: The Calais Garrison:
           War and Military Service in England, 1436–1558 (review)
    • Abstract: Like the proverbial bus, we have waited many years for a decent book on English-held Calais, only to find two arriving at almost precisely the same moment. Unlike buses, however, it is a fortunate rather than unhappy co-incidence that two volumes on the subject have been published almost simultaneously by Boydell and Brewer. It is, in particular, our good fortune that both books offer historical accounts of the highest quality, whilst approaching the subject from very different methodological perspectives. Susan Rose offers a beautifully written and thoroughly researched academic narrative of the history of the town of Calais from its capture by Edward III in 1347 to its surrender to the forces of the French ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Renaissance France at War: Armies, Culture and Society, c. 1480–1560
           (review)
    • Abstract: Renaissance France at War brings to life the powerful French royal army that fought in the Italian Wars and the Habsburg-Valois wars of the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. David Potter crafts a highly detailed and well-documented description of all facets of the French royal army: command, infantry, cavalry, artillery, garrisons, and support personnel. Potter has exploited massive and disparate manuscript collections in numerous French archives to assemble documentation for this impressive study. This methodology demonstrates the vital importance of avoiding a strictly institutional approach to war and society in early modern France, especially when studying periods prior to the creation of war ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Road to Rocroi: Class, Culture and Command in the Spanish Army of
           Flanders, 1567–1659 (review)
    • Abstract: This book starts by asking a logical question: how is it that the Spanish army, especially its legendary tercios, fell apart over the course of the Eighty Years War? Choosing to include the word “road” in the title of a book about Spain and the Dutch is an obvious gesture of homage toward the historian Geoffrey Parker. But González de León’s road is more figurative than Parker’s. It traces the distance between the Duke of Alba and the Count-Duke of Olivares, and between their respective kings, Philip II and Philip IV, measured in terms of errors and misjudgments. The author also distinguishes himself from his predecessors by stressing men, specifically officers, over money or structures. In so doing, he is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Thirty Years War: A Documentary History (review)
    • Abstract: The Thirty Years War (1618–48), Europe’s most destructive conflict prior to the twentieth century, is poorly served by English-speaking historians. This is all-too apparent to anyone who has tried to teach it to undergraduates who now rarely come equipped with the requisite language skills to read primary sources in the original. The last (and only) general collection of documents in English was a slim volume published in 1978 and long out of print. It is thus especially welcome that Tryntje Helfferich has taken on the daunting task of translating and editing a well-chosen set of 38 documents in an attractively priced volume. She rightly eschews the interpretation of the war as a general European ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How Taiwan Became Chinese: Dutch, Spanish, and Han Colonization in the
           Seventeenth Century (review)
    • Abstract: This elegantly written book offers one of the best available syntheses of the history of Taiwan in early modern times. It uses a large number of Chinese secondary sources not usually available to Western readers. As the title suggests, Andrade’s purpose in this study is to explain how Taiwan became part of China. This is not, however, as might be expected, another account of Chinese encroachment upon the aboriginal population of Taiwan, but rather concerns the Chinese response to the Dutch colonization of Taiwan (1624–1662), whose success, despite many difficulties, attracted a steady stream of peasants and entrepreneurs from China, a process Andrade calls “co-colonization.” This term is not meant ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Rabble in Arms: Massachusetts Towns and Militiamen during King
           Philip’s War (review)
    • Abstract: In common mythology, men in colonial Massachusetts Bay towns voted, prayed, and fought wars together as a community. However, New England was not a static society, and in the decades following settlement towns became increasingly stratified socially, politically, and economically. King Philip’s War (1675–1676), arguably the bloodiest war Americans have fought in terms of percentage of the population involved or killed, came at a time when many areas, particularly along the coast, had lost much of their frontier egalitarianism. Kyle F. Zelner’s book provides a well-researched social history and community study of Essex County, on the north shore of Massachusetts Bay, during the war, showing that the forces ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Propaganda e información en tiempos de guerra: España y América
           (1700–1714) (review)
    • Abstract: The importance of winning the hearts and minds of friend and foe, combatant and non-combatant, has long been recognised, and has given rise to admirable studies of propaganda in past as well as present conflicts. In the volume under review David González Cruz looks at the propaganda war waged in Spain and Spanish America, and–though less fully–in Spanish Italy during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14), when the first Bourbon king of Spain, Philip V, in alliance with his grandfather, Louis XIV of France, fought–largely successfully, although he lost Spain’s non-Iberian European territories–to retain the throne of what was still the largest empire the world had seen–against a coalition, comprising ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Shipping and Military Power in the Seven Years War: The Sails of Victory
           (review)
    • Abstract: This detailed study of the organization and administration of the British maritime transportation system goes a long way towards answering the question why the Seven Years' War was the most successful British war during the eighteenth century. This is the second posthumous publication by the late David Syrett, Distinguished Professor of History at Queens College CUNY. His death in 2004 cut short the career of a naval historian of the first rank. In this last of twelve books that he either wrote or edited on the British navy during the eighteenth century and on the defeat of the German U-boats during the battle of the Atlantic in the twentieth, Syrett has come full circle back to the subject of his Ph.D. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Rise and Fight Again: The Life of Nathanael Greene (review)
    • Abstract: Competent in battle, master of logistics, brilliant strategist, Major General Nathanael Greene was Washington’s greatest lieutenant and one of the great generals of American history. Yet he is the least known of Washington’s senior commanders. A minor player like Ethan Allen has greater name recognition. There are two reasons for his obscurity. It was in the South that Greene became famous in his time, but the Revolutionary War in the South has been a terra incognita since the Civil War and remains unknown to the general public. He also died young, three years after the war, one month before his 44th birthday. Greene was a founder, but his early death deprived him of the chance to play a role with his fellow ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Press Gang: Naval Impressment and its Opponents in Georgian Britain
           (review)
    • Abstract: The Press Gang is based on evidence drawn from an extensive range of primary sources, the most important being the correspondence and papers of the Admiralty (The National Archives, Kew, London: ADM 1) and an array of contemporary newspapers and pamphlets. In analysing such material, Professor Rogers provides a comprehensive, engaging account of the deployment of the Impress Service to address the “manning problem” experienced by the Royal Navy, especially during the frequent wars of the era. Particular attention is afforded to the efforts of seafarers, maritime communities and local administrators to resist the press gangs, a facet of the subject that has hitherto lacked a rigorous appraisal. There is also ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Long Ride of Major von Schill: A Journey through German History and
           Memory (review)
    • Abstract: In the spring of 1809, a renegade Prussian major and his soldiers invaded the Napoleonic satellite Kingdom of Westphalia under the pretense of liberating its German subjects from foreign occupation. Though Ferdinand von Schill’s expedition lasted only a few months and ended in utter failure, disgruntled German patriots and nationalists quickly seized upon news of the affair and began to mythologize Schill as a hero who had sacrificed his life not only for Prussia, but also for the cause of German unity. Over the course of the next 200 years, the Schill legend was used and misused by generations of Germans in a variety of politicized ways. In recognition of the bicentennial of Schill’s escapade ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Mexican Wars of Independence (review)
    • Abstract: Spurred on by the upcoming bicentennial of Latin America’s struggle to free itself from Spanish control, scholars have in recent years explored neglected aspects of that process. For example, both Marixa Lasso’s Myths of Harmony: Race and Republicanism in the Age of Revolution, Colombia 1795–1831 (2007), and Peter Blanchard’s Under the Flags of Freedom: Slave Soldiers and the Wars of Independence in Spanish South America (2008) have shed light on the contributions of pardos (free people of African descent) and slaves to the cause of independence and early nation-building. Historians have also drawn on the latest research to elaborate new syntheses of these conflicts for the benefit of non-specialist readers ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Black Hawk War of 1832, and: Inkpaduta: Dakota Leader (review)
    • Abstract: Anglo-Americans have commonly admired the tragic-romantic figure of the Indian resistance movement leader. Paradigmatic is Tecumseh, who enjoyed the empathy of some Americans even while at war with the United States. By their conduct or circumstances, other Indian resistance leaders have left more ambiguous legacies. In two recent works, historians Patrick J. Jung and Paul N. Beck revisit the defining moments of Indian leaders on opposite ends of this spectrum: the Sauk war captain Black Hawk and the Dakota headman Inkpaduta, respectively. Whereas Jung seeks to solidify Black Hawk’s place in a significant tradition of pan-Indian resistance, Beck aims to lend humanity to a man remembered almost exclusively as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Development of British Naval Thinking: Essays in Memory of Bryan Ranft
           (review)
    • Abstract: In this valuable volume, Geoffrey Till has gathered together an excellent collection of essays by nine leading British experts on the history of British naval strategic thought. The volume is a Gedenkschrift in honor of Bryan Ranft, a long-serving member of the faculty of the Royal Navy College, Greenwich, who served as its Professor of Naval History in 1967–77 and also taught in the War Studies Department at King’s College, London. Ranft’s teaching touched generations of naval officers as well as generations of graduate students in naval history at King’s, influencing directly all of the contributors to this volume. In addition, Ranft played a key behind-the-scenes role in the work of the Navy Records ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Grant’s Lieutenants: From Cairo to Vicksburg, and: Grant’s
           Lieutenants: From Chattanooga to Appomattox (review)
    • Abstract: In 1989 Kent State University Press published a collection of essays edited by Gary Gallagher, each of which addressed a narrow aspect of the Antietam Campaign. With this Gallagher injected new life into what arguably seemed a somewhat stale Civil War historiography and, over the next two decades, he published more than one dozen similar volumes addressing the conflict’s eastern campaigns. Steven E. Woodworth and the University Press of Kansas recently entered into this realm, producing two volumes on Ulysses S. Grant and the subordinates who served under him during the war. There is not a mediocre essay in either collection, several break new ground, and some are quite provocative. Woodworth’s ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The H. L. Hunley: The Secret Hope of the Confederacy (review)
    • Abstract: In the hands of three different crews, the Civil War era submarine H. L. Hunley sank on three separate occasions, taking twenty-one out of a possible twenty-four crew members to their demise. One could certainly say the underwater craft was something of a maritime failure. Until it was recovered from the sea in August of 2000, the sub was the object of much speculation and mythologizing. The story of this “secret weapon,” from its conception in the depths of the Confederacy through its tragedy-plagued career and single “successful” mission, to its eventual discovery and display, is handled more adroitly by Tom Chaffin. His narrative is a synthesis of biographies, faded memories, myths, and tale-telling ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Commanding Lincoln’s Navy: Union Naval Leadership During the Civil
           War (review)
    • Abstract: Stephen R. Taaffe’s Commanding Lincoln’s Navy addresses both the men who achieved squadron command in the Civil War U.S. Navy and the evolution of the philosophy that Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles used to select them. In 1861, U.S. Navy promotion and assignment was controlled by a system of strict seniority that was inefficient and ineffective even in peacetime. When war broke out, Welles found it as difficult to find commanders as he did to find ships. Throughout the war, Welles was able to choose his senior commanders from a small pool of Regular Navy officers—the unattractiveness of seagoing life and the lure of high rank in the Army spared the Navy from “political admirals.” The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Our Trust is in the God of Battles: The Civil War Letters of Robert
           Franklin Bunting, Chaplain, Terry’s Texas Rangers, C. S. A (review)
    • Abstract: This book tells the story of Terry’s Texas Rangers, officially known as the Eighth Texas Cavalry Regiment, an all-volunteer group of horsemen who served with Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston’s Army of Tennessee, as seen through the eyes of their chaplain, Rev. R. F. Bunting. The editor, Thomas W. Cutrer, is a professor of American Studies at Arizona State University and an expert on the history of the western frontier. The tale that emerges from this collection of letters is all the more interesting in that their author, Chaplain Bunting, was born in Pennsylvania, possessed of a degree in theology from Princeton University, and married into a deeply abolitionist Ohio family. It would appear that Bunting fell ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Custer and the Front Royal Executions of 1864 (review)
    • Abstract: Journalist Jay Simson gets it mostly right about a third of the way through the narrative of this book when he writes, “Without Lt. Col. John S. Mosby the atrocity at Front Royal probably would have become nothing more than a rather obscure American Civil War incident” (p. 53). In fact, that is exactly what this slim (153 pp. of narrative) book does relate, a small and rather obscure event. The basic story is direct and simple: On 23 September 1864, a detachment of Confederate raiders, Mosby’s famous “Rangers,” blundered when they attacked a Union supply train that was closely followed by an entire Union cavalry division near Front Royal, Virginia. Some of the partisans died in the ensuing fight ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Class and Race in the Frontier Army: Military Life in the West,
           1870–1890 (review)
    • Abstract: Kevin Adams seeks to produce what he calls “a sociocultural history that situates members of the frontier army within post-Civil War American society” (p. 4). He examines the roles and status of white officers, and white and black enlisted men, as well as the army’s missions, which he notes, following Francis Paul Prucha, Michael Tate, and others, emphasized “nation-building” and drudgery over combat. He concludes that each group showed significant common characteristics, and that their status had two main sources, eighteenth century tradition and the values of post-Civil War society. Officers, according to Adams, were a well-educated, self-conscious elite. White enlisted men existed somewhere between ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Occupation of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1878 (review)
    • Abstract: László Bencze was a senior researcher and historian at the Hungarian Military History Institute and Museum of Military History in Budapest (Hungary), from his graduation with degrees in the fields of history, literature and philosophy, until his retirement from the institute and the Hungarian army as a lieutenant colonel. His main field of research remains the effectiveness of the military elite of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy in the wars that were turning points in European history. All of his books deal with the gap between the unrealistic goals of imperial political leaders and the abilities of officers and men to implement the politicians’ programs. Frank N. Schubert, a historian at the U.S. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Andean Tragedy: Fighting the War of the Pacific, 1879–1884 (review)
    • Abstract: The War of the Pacific (1879–1884) between Chile and an alliance of Peru and Bolivia is best known by military and naval historians as a conflict fought at the cusp of technological change that foreshadowed modern warfare. At sea, the Chileans and Peruvians fought battles using modern armored steam-driven warships, mines, torpedoes, and rams. On land, the belligerents employed the telegraph and railroads where practicable, breech-loading rifles of different designs, Krupp steel artillery, and Gatling guns. The war was fought over the possession of valuable resources of nitrates and guano situated in the arid Atacama Desert. In the 1870s, Chilean mining companies entered Bolivian territory under legal ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Doctrine and Reform in the British Cavalry, 1880–1918 (review)
    • Abstract: The Cavalry Debate in the British Army began in the nineteenth century and crested in the early years of the twentieth, with the most heated exchanges taking place in the context of the First World War. Put briefly, the debate concerned what some saw as the ill effects of the supposed domination of the army officer corps by cavalry generals, who were deemed to be particularly opposed to any modernization of the army that would reduce the role of the traditional horse cavalry. This debate is at the root of the famous image of the British Army of the Great War as “lions led by donkeys.” The controversial commander of British forces on the Continent during the war was, after all, Gen. Sir Douglas Haig, a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Restaging War in the Western World: Noncombatant Experiences,
           1890–Today (review)
    • Abstract: Thoughts of war typically conjure images of soldiers in battle, but this collection of essays edited by Maartje Abbenhuis and Sara Buttsworth provides an alternative vantage point from which to view war. The essays focus on the experiences of noncombatants in Australia, Europe, New Zealand, and the United States since the 1890s and seek to determine what those experiences reveal about war and military culture in times of both strife and peace. The collection’s central argument is that the effects of war often linger on in the lives of noncombatants long after the battles have ceased, and thus the perspectives of the men, women, and children who did not fight help explain not only the immediate consequences ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Manila and Santiago: The New Steel Navy in the Spanish-American War
           (review)
    • Abstract: The author of this book served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War and later studied journalisn at Ohio State University. His career in journalism included service as a police reporter, life style columnist, sportswriter, and the author of articles on business and technology in national magazines. In addition he edited three books on the Civil War and is the author of a work on President Kennedy’s funeral and a mystery novel. This background has taught Leeke how to engage and hold a reader. Drawing upon a wide variety of books and published sources he has presented a short and fast paced narrative that describes the circumstances and personalities associated with the naval battles of Manila and Santiago ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • War and Disease: Biomedical Research on Malaria in the Twentieth Century
           (review)
    • Abstract: Malaria, a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by various parasites within the Plasmodium family, has proved a scourge to human populations for centuries. Even today in the early twenty-first century, millions of people in developing and tropical regions of the world suffer the ravages of the disease on a yearly basis. Military forces across the ages have been particularly susceptible to the disease as a force destroyer. World War II has proved to be a burgeoning field of research for a few historians exploring the debilitating effects of the disease on military forces and operations, beyond those of bombs and bullets. However, the role and accomplishments of the U.S. antimalarial research program in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Military Intelligence and the Arab Revolt: The First Modern Intelligence
           War (review)
    • Abstract: Film and television in recent years has conditioned scholars and the general public alike into thinking about “ghost wars” in the greater Middle East. Stories of lone British, American, or French officers fighting clandestine battles in desperate and exotic lands now abound in both fiction and non-fiction. This trend, as exemplified by the TV series 24 or Steve Coll’s study of the CIA in Afghanistan (Ghost Wars), seems to confirm that this kind of highly specialized and seemingly precise manner of warfare represents the mainstream of present and future Western armies. If shadowy “intelligence wars” are to be understood as a vital part of our contemporary reality, what is their history? Polly Mohs ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Ottoman Road to War in 1914: The Ottoman Empire and the First World
           War (review)
    • Abstract: In this short, well researched volume, Mustafa Aksakal, assistant professor at the American University, explores why the Ottoman Empire entered the First World War in 1914. Aksakal asserts that literature dealing with the Ottoman participation in the Great War exclusively blames the Ottoman war minister, Ismail Enver Pasha, depicting him as the hawkish omnipotent leader who single-hand-edly guided the empire into the war. Other historians claim that the Young Turk leadership was seduced by German overtures to join the war. Aksakal, however, takes a new perspective by attributing the misfortune of the Ottoman commitment towards belligerence to the political and military environment surrounding the Ottoman ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Enduring the Great War: Combat, Morale and Collapse in the German and
           British Armies, 1914–1918 (review)
    • Abstract: For more than four years, millions of European lived and died in a narrow zone running from the North Sea to the Swiss border. The experience of the Western Front, in all its brutality, casts a long shadow across the twentieth century. In this ambitious and compelling monograph, Alexander Watson proposes to explain how the personnel of two enemy armies, the British and the German, coped with the stresses of combat. In the end, one of those armies buckled and collapsed under the strain. Watson, in seeking to understand this result, reminds us that such an ending was not foreordained. At the heart of his study is an effort to study soldier behavior from a “psychological rather than sociological or ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • At the Sharp End: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1914–1916, Volume
           One, and: Shock Troops: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1917–1918,
           Volume Two (review)
    • Abstract: Anyone who believes that war is glorious or diplomacy tedious needs to read these books for an understanding of what ‘glory’ looks like and a reminder of who often pays the price for inadequate diplomacy. Tim Cook, Great War historian at the Canadian War Museum, has done readers a great service by managing to publish these volumes in back-to-back years. These studies represent the culmination of over a decade’s research and the combined result is a thorough examination of the Canadian Corps’ combat evolution with an unabashed and well-deserved focus on the ‘poor bloody infantry’. As Cook notes, “with the infantry suffering a little more than four out of five of all battlefield casualties on the Western ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Last Great War: British Society and the First World War (review)
    • Abstract: The Last Great War: British Society and the First World War is Adrian Gregory’s excellent new investigation of the course of the war for Great Britain’s civilian population. It is not a textbook covering all aspects of the war, indeed it shies away from most of the political concerns of the day. Rather it is both a general synthesis examining some of the cultural attitudes and experiences of civilians during the war and, at times, relying on primary research, a captivating analytical study of some of the war’s more controversial social, religious, and economic debates. Although Gregory apologizes for not detailing the concerns of uniformed men directly and neglecting “military history, strictly defined,” The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Borrowed Soldiers: Americans Under British Command, 1918 (review)
    • Abstract: After more than a half century of being nearly ignored, the American military effort in the Great War is finally getting the scholarly attention that it deserves. Recently, scholars have written histories of the Meuse-Argonne offensive and other battles, studies of AEF command and doctrine, as well as numerous divisional histories. We also have enjoyed fine works on Anglo-American strategic cooperation and Franco-American military cooperation. Yet, until Mitch Yockelson’s new work on the American Expeditionary Forces’ (AEF) II Corps, no scholar has provided a monograph on the experiences of the American units that spent all of their time with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). Borrowed ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Treating Trauma of the Great War: Soldiers, Civilians and Psychiatry in
           France, 1914–1940 (review)
    • Abstract: The crucial words in the title of this book are ‘in France’. The historiography of psychological trauma and its treatment during World War One is well advanced in terms of Britain and Germany, but this is probably the first scholarly work that explores the French experience in the English language. As such, it is an overdue publication. Gregory M. Thomas charts how neurologists and alienists came together to provide a network of neuropsychiatric hospitals for soldiers suffering from a range of puzzling but debilitating symptoms. Nevertheless, despite a patriotic spirit of co-operation, little agreement was reached on how such cases should be diagnosed and treated. On the one hand, followers of Joseph ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Naval Warfare, 1919–1945: An Operational History of the Volatile War
           at Sea (review)
    • Abstract: Never at any time in the twentieth century has military history ever been all that popular with the rest of the academic community. Naval and maritime history, though, enjoyed significantly more prestige a hundred years ago than it enjoys now. Today the oppressed minority in military history circles with studies of ground forces dominate the sub-field. Despite these trends, Malcolm Murfett of the National University of Singapore has written an impressive history about naval combat in the Second World War. In highly readable prose Murfett offers a narrative that focuses on the operational level of this conflict. His words show strong familiarity with his subject. He includes an extensive ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Iraq’s Armed Forces: An Analytical History (review)
    • Abstract: Almost twenty years ago Saddam Hussein sent his army into Kuwait, setting off a chain of events that absorbed much of the Pentagon’s budget and intellectual energy for the ensuing years. Yet, despite this long adversarial relationship, which includes two major wars, Americans know very little about the Iraqi Army and its historical role in politics and society. As pointed out by Ibrahim Al-Marashi and Sammy Salama, in Iraq’s Armed Forces: An Analytical History, this ignorance has consequences. The authors, both scholars of the modern Middle East, have mined a wide range of sources to present the western scholar with a holistic view of this complicated institution. They trace the development of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Diplomats in Blue: U.S. Naval Officers in China, 1922–1933 (review)
    • Abstract: This volume is the third in its ninety-one year-old author’s magisterial history of the U.S. Navy in the Pacific since 1897. While its predecessors followed the navy virtually everywhere west of Hawaii and explored naval policy as such, this book focuses on the Asiatic Fleet and its commanders in and around China. It illuminates as never before the role naval officers played in shaping and implementing American East Asian policy in the 1920s and early 1930s. Braisted’s understanding of these men derives from two sources. For fifteen of his early years, he followed his father who served with the fleet, shuttling between the Philippines, China, and occasionally Japan. He saw at first hand the life ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Palestinian Military: Between Militias and Armies (review)
    • Abstract: Hillel Frisch is senior lecturer in the Department of Political Studies and Middle Eastern History at Bar-Ilan University in Israel and is a fellow at the Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies, a conservative forum with close ties to the Israeli military. These links inform, to some degree, his analysis of the Palestinian military and the assumptions that underlie this study. The first chapter, “The Quest for an Army,” surveys some of the scholarly literature on the relationship between war and the rise of the state, especially the work of Charles Tilly. Frisch then turns to examine the Palestine mandate and Palestinian efforts to form militias from 1936 to 1948. Chapter Three discusses ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Intelligence and Anglo-American Air Support in World War Two: The Western
           Desert and Tunisia, 1940–43 (review)
    • Abstract: Tactical aviation came of age in the Second World War. Most accounts emphasize the early German prowess in devising and employing workable airground support procedures, with the Western Allies falling behind. Only in the Mediterranean in 1942–1943 did the Allies belatedly learn the techniques of effective battlefield air support, which were only gradually disseminated to the Royal Air Force (RAF) and United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) at large. In recent years, much excellent scholarship (including fine biographies of the two main RAF protagonists, Sir Arthur Tedder and Sir Arthur Coningham), has appeared. There is a greater understanding of the strides made by Allied tactical air forces in the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dowding of Fighter Command: Victor of the Battle of Britain (review)
    • Abstract: This is another magnificent biography from the prolific pen of Vincent Orange. World War II and air power scholars will be delighted with this study of Dowding as it sheds new light both on the issue of his controversial removal from Fighter Command in November 1940, as well as other senior command dynamics and decision-making. Dowding was described by subordinates, peers and superiors alike as ‘silent, forbidding, aloof, glum and stuffy’, so this is not a human subject lending himself to a biographer’s empathy. Indeed, this seems to have been Vincent Orange’s greatest biographical challenge to date. Dowding, we learn, was an unusual character right from the start. He admitted of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Bloody Triangle: The Defeat of Soviet Armor in the Ukraine, June 1941
           (review)
    • Abstract: Students of World War Two are readily familiar with the images called to mind by the German attack on Russia during Operation Barbarossa in June 1941. The early phases of this attack saw German offensive efficiency at high tide, as their tanks rapidly captured large swaths of Soviet territory and effected huge encirclements of Soviet troops, yielding large numbers of prisoners. The Soviet response in these early days is often perceived as bumbling and inept, with formations rapidly destroyed, commanders unable to control their units, and retreating troops overwhelmed by the speedy German advance. The Bloody Triangle: The Defeat of Soviet Armor in the Ukraine, by Victor Kamenir, provides an ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • West Wind Clear: Cryptology and the Winds Message Controversy–A
           Documentary History. United States Cryptologic History Series IV: World
           War II Volume X (review)
    • Abstract: “There was a Winds message. It meant War–and we knew it meant War.” So claimed Captain Laurance Safford, the former head of the US Navy’s codebreaking section, OP-20-G, before the Joint Congressional Committee (JCC) investigating the Pearl Harbor attack in 1945–46. He was referring to a “Winds Execute” message in a daily Japanese news broadcast which American intelligence had tried to intercept before the attack. In late November 1941, decrypted messages from the Japanese Foreign Ministry (the Gaimusho) to its Washington embassy had disclosed that the repeated phrase Higashi No Kaze Ame (East Wind Rain), or Higashi on its own, would alert Japanese embassies that relations with the United States were in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • D-Day in the Pacific: The Battle of Saipan (review)
    • Abstract: The battle for the island of Saipan from 15 June to 9 July 1944 during the Pacific war was a unique experience for the US marines spearheading the invasion as, for the first time, they faced an enemy defending a large island in depth, on which there were thousands of civilians–around 25,000 Japanese and Korean settlers in addition to some 4,000 local Chamorros and Carolinians. Towards the end of the book under review, Harold Goldberg makes useful comment on the dreadful effects of the battle on the civilians– 10–12,000 perished as ‘collateral damage,’ to employ an awful euphemism-in a chapter dealing with the mass suicides of Japanese civilians at the end of the battle at Marpi Point. The thrust of Professor ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The USS Puffer in World War II: A History of the Submarine and Its Wartime
           Crew (review)
    • Abstract: The submarine USS Puffer is most remembered for suffering one of the worst depth-charge attacks of World War II. On its first war patrol in the Pacific, the Puffer attacked a Japanese merchantman in the Makassar Strait on the morning of 9 October 1943. The Puffer was subsequently pinned down by enemy escorts which claimed they sank the submarine. They were not far wrong. The Puffer spent nearly 38 hours submerged before it finally reached the surface, surviving what was likely the most prolonged dive of the war. The submarine’s atmosphere had been poisoned by increasing carbon dioxide, not to mention the stench of twenty-four defrosting rabbits that had been removed from the cold locker for dinner. Starved ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Through the Maelstrom: A Red Army Soldier’s War on the Eastern Front
           (review)
    • Abstract: There is an enormous amount of material upon which historians of the Second World War can rely when researching and writing. In addition to official documents there are numerous memoirs. Those written by German veterans of the Second World War have been published ever since the end of the war, but until fairly recently there were no memoirs from Soviet veterans, and those which did exist could not be read without great care as to intent, censorship, and a host of issues which made them problematic (some of the same problems can be seen in German memoirs). While still requiring careful reading, many of the memoirs coming from the Soviet veterans of the east have proven to be very valuable in understanding the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Internet Alley: High Technology in Tysons Corner, 1945–2005 (review)
    • Abstract: In Internet Alley, Paul Ceruzzi, curator of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum, explores the development of the Northern Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C. In particular, Ceruzzi addresses the question of how the region achieved its peculiar dynamism when compared to the other suburban areas surrounding the District of Columbia. The author centers his account on the rise of the unincorporated Tysons Corner area of Fairfax County. The author begins the account with a description of the area’s emergence from the Civil War, in which Tysons Corner served as the site of a Union signal tower, as an underdeveloped dairy-farming district whose main infrastructure was the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Atomic Bomb and American Society: New Perspectives (review)
    • Abstract: Atomic bombs both as a fact of military arsenals and as a feature of public consciousness were so ubiquitous to the American experience of the Cold War that it is only now that scholars are truly beginning to get a sense of how strange that cultural phenomenon was. That strangeness is accentuated by the fact that the military stockpiles have not changed, even increased, yet the public consciousness has. The Atomic Bomb and American Society, edited by Rosemary B. Mariner and G. Kurt Piehler, the fruit of a conference held in July 2005 at Oak Ridge, Tennessee––one of the central nodes in America’s nuclear archipelago––gathers some recent scholarship on a huge diversity of topics to “explore the social swath of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The United States and the Making of Modern Greece: History and Power,
           1950–1974 (review)
    • Abstract: Conspiracy theorists generally credit the United States government and its intelligence services with enormous and usually malevolent interference in the domestic affairs of foreign nations. In some instances, such as Guatemala, Iran, and Chile, there has been some truth to this allegation. In other cases, however, Washington was ineffectual at and indeed reluctant to attempt such interference. Diplomatic historian James Miller has given us a case study of this latter type, the frustrating interaction between the United States, Greece, and Cyprus during the Cold War. Miller repeatedly describes instances in which Greek politicians and the general public expected Washington to intervene, criticized ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • History of Operations Research in the United States Army, Volume II:
           1961–1973 (review)
    • Abstract: This is the second of three volumes on the history of operations research in the U.S. Army. Volume I covered the origins of operations research during World War II and followed its progress to 1962. This volume is organized so that it can be read without reference to the first volume. It begins with an overview in chapter one of how the Army’s scientific management techniques evolved from the Root reforms in the first decade of the century to the operations research and systems analysis (ORSA) programs in the late 1950s. It then picks up the story in 1961 when John F. Kennedy became president and takes it to 1973 when U.S. forces pulled out of Vietnam. During that period there was a dynamic tension between ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Military Transformation Past and Present: Historic Lessons for the 21st
           Century (review)
    • Abstract: This is a book with a great deal of promise that, except for one interesting and perhaps even important insight, fails to deliver. The promise stems from the author’s obvious familiarity with issues of national defense formed during his close association with the iconic guru of Pentagon strategic vision, Andrew Marshall, and from the overall design of the work, which sets out to apply insights from history to the vexing problem of merging evolving technologies with diffuse contemporary defense requirements. The falling short comes from a laser-like focus on organizational behavior theory as the dominant and virtually sole explanatory arbiter of success and failure and a consequent neglect of the rich ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Network-Centric Warfare: How Navies Learned to Fight Smarter through Three
           World Wars (review)
    • Abstract: Focusing on the U.S. Navy and the British Royal Navy–leaders in innovation and experimentation and standard setters in network-centric warfare–Norman Friedman suggests that navies have learned to fight smarter using network-centric systems, but only when using them effectively. British and American efforts to do so, particularly post-1945, make up the bulk of this book. The efforts of other navies, especially European and Japanese, are also discussed, as are Soviet efforts during the Cold War. At the outset Friedman sets himself the task of demystifying the arcane subject of network-centric warfare, going about it with common sense language and illuminating historical examples. Network-centric ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Navy Medicine in Vietnam: Oral Histories from Dien Bien Phu to the Fall of
           Saigon (review)
    • Abstract: While trauma care in the civilian environment or the inner city “knife and gun club” has many technical similarities with military or wartime trauma care, there are important differences. The trauma victims in combat are not random or accidental, but are the young healthy victims of deliberate organized violence on a massive scale. Furthermore the caregivers are frequently at great personal risk when they are trying to save life and limb. Lastly there are the “two rules”: In war young people die, and doctors (and other medical personnel) cannot change rule one. These facts shape life for the practitioners of military medicine. In Navy Medicine in Vietnam Jan Herman sets out to use the voices of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Ethiopian Revolution: War in the Horn of Africa (review)
    • Abstract: Academic scholarship on African military history remains underdeveloped within the larger field, but Gebru Tareke has made a major contribution over the last twenty years: his work on the Ethiopia-Somalia war of 1977–78, and in particular on peasant uprisings through Ethiopia’s twentieth century has established his reputation as one of northeast Africa’s foremost historians. The region has been one of the most violent zones anywhere in the world since the wars of liberation and attendant violent upheaval across Africa and Asia in the 1950s and 1960s. In this book, part of the Yale University series on military history, the region’s conflicts between the 1960s and 1990s are finally given the serious treatment ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How World Politics Is Made: France and the Reunification of Germany
           (review)
    • Abstract: It has become commonplace to blame France for many problems in international relations, but when it comes to German unification, Tilo Schabert adamantly disagrees with this cliché. With the original German publication in 2002, he was among the first to argue that France under President François Mitterrand neither obstructed nor delayed unification after the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989. Now non-German readers can decide for themselves whether he succeeded in making his case. The short answer is yes, but at the expense of scholarly rigor. Schabert’s argument unfolds in three parts. First, he demonstrates that Germany occupied a central place in Mitterrand’s thoughts and conversations ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Road to Safwan: The 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the 1991 Persian Gulf
           War (review)
    • Abstract: Unit histories occupy a unique genre of military history. Often more expository than answer-seeking in approach, they make any fan of von Ranke proud—just the facts, please. The Road to Safwan does not disappoint in this regard. Ostensibly there is a thesis, an argument being addressed, in this work. As stated, it is to refute the idea that the Gulf War “was simply a matter of technological superiority.” Additionally, the authors seek to “recapture the fear, concern, and competence of the soldiers of one small US combat unit.” The latter they accomplish; the former not at all, and this is hardly surprising. One would have thought that the straw-man argument of technology winning the Gulf War would have been ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Counterinsurgency and the Global War on Terror: Military Culture and
           Irregular War (review)
    • Abstract: Robert Cassidy’s study of counterinsurgency continues a tradition of Army officers, armed with advanced university degrees, who have wrestled with the topic of irregular warfare in light of the Army’s preference for the regular, conventional kind. The most influential include Andrew Krepinevich’s The Army in Vietnam and the more recent Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife by John Nagl. Cassidy’s goal is ambitious, to: “look at both the cultural impediments and successful techniques for waging counterinsurgency....” His intent is in “incorporating over a century’s worth of survey examples from several different military traditions.” In addition to examining the military cultures of Russia, America, and Britain ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Forever War (review)
    • Abstract: This is an important book about the on-going wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Its strength is that it is about real people–men, women, soldiers, marines, civilians–fighting, dying, enduring, and surviving in the villages, cities, deserts, and mountains of Afghanistan and Iraq. The Forever War is not a narrative of military operations, and is devoid of analysis. It lacks a strategic or operational perspective. Rather, the book is a chronological assembly of stories and vignettes collected by Filkins while working as a foreign correspondent for the Los Angeles Times and New York Times in Afghanistan and Iraq between 1998 and 2007. The result is a worm’s-eye view of life on and off the battlefield that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • More like a Painting – The War: A Ken Burns Film: An Interview with
           Roger Spiller
    • Abstract: The following interview with military historian Roger Spiller has two purposes: first, to examine aspects of the making of the Ken Burns documentary and, second, to discuss the role and ethics of the historian as film advisor. Roger Spiller, now George C. Marshall Professor, emeritus, of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, is the author of An Instinct for War: Scenes from the Battlefields of History (2005) and is an editor of the two-volume anthology Reporting World War II (1995–2007), among other works. A collection of his essays entitled In the School of War is forthcoming from the University of Nebraska Press. From 2004 to 2007, Spiller served as an advisor for The War: A ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Recent Journal Articles
    • Abstract: The bibliography is compiled by the systematic search of approximately four hundred periodicals, a check of several general journal bibliographies, and the welcomed contribution of interested subscribers. Many times older citations will be included simply because the compiler had not come across them earlier or, more frequently, because the periodicals are behind publication schedule. Those wishing to be assured of having their articles listed in this section are urged to notify the compiler. References should include the following: author(s), full title (including subtitle), name of periodical, volume number, issue date, and pagination. Address all contributions to Wendy Swik, Military Affairs Librarian ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Letters to the Editor
    • Abstract: We are always pleased to have letters to the editor because this shows that people are reading our Journal seriously. However, due to space limitations, we ask that letters be kept under 500 words. To the Editor: In my July 2008 article in the JMH on “The ‘Electronic Battlefield’ in the Vietnam War,” I noted that Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara “expressed strong interest in [the Barrier concept], saying it offered a significant change from the bombing campaigns that were apparently not hampering enemy activity in supporting the war in the South [of Vietnam]….[and that although the JASON group of scientists and I told him that there was only a 1 in 20 chance of it working he] ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Index to Volume 73
    • Abstract: Abbenhuis, Maartje: Restaging War in the Western World, revd. by H. Stur, 1350–51 Absolute War: Soviet Russia in the Second World War, by C. Bellamy, revd. by D. Glantz, 313–14 Adams, John A.: If Mahan Ran the Great Pacific War, revd. by D. Moran and J. Sumida, 1295–97; review of Pacific War, The (by W. Hopkins), 1000–2 Adams, Kevin: Class and Race in the Frontier Army, revd. by F. Schubert, 1342–43 Adelberg, Michael S.: “Scope and Severity of Civil Warfare in Revolutionary Monmouth County, New Jersey, The,” 9–47; review of Invasion and Insurrection (by J. Dorwart), 629–31 Afghanistan, books on revd.: Anglo-Afghan War of 1878–80, 962–63; U.S. war in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2016-04-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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