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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 356 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access  
Heart Views     Open Access  
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access  
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0971-9962 - ISSN (Online) 2454-8316
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [356 journals]
  • Demonetization, economic crisis, and social psychiatry: Learning from the
           past?

    • Authors: Nitin Gupta
      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Nitin Gupta
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):1-4

      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):1-4
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200086
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • World health day 2017: Depression-let's talk

    • Pages: 5 - 6
      Abstract:
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):5-6

      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):5-6
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200090
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A gender-specific analysis of suicide methods in deliberate self-harm

    • Authors: Kiran K Kumar, Fiaz Ahmed Sattar, Swapna Bondade, Md. Munnawar S Hussain, Mridula Priyadarshini
      Pages: 7 - 21
      Abstract: Kiran K Kumar, Fiaz Ahmed Sattar, Swapna Bondade, Md. Munnawar S Hussain, Mridula Priyadarshini
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):7-21
      Background: Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is a major public health concern. Gender differences in suicide methods are a controversial realm with various regional and cultural variations. This study compared and assessed the methods used in DSH attempters as undertaken by men and women, and investigated the possible role of gender and other clinical variables in the selection of suicide method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were recruited in the study. The sociodemographic details were recorded in the semi-structured pro forma. Detailed assessment of psychiatric morbidity and DSH was done by clinical interview and validated by Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview-Plus 5.0 and Beck Suicide Intent Scale. Data were analyzed using SAS version 9.2 and SPSS version 17.0. The sample was disaggregated by gender to compare the known correlates of suicide risk on the two most common methods of suicide – poison consumption and drug overdose using multivariate analyses. Results: The analysis revealed that majority of the attempters were in the age group of 11–40 years (91%). Females (63%) outnumbered males (37%); poisoning was the most common type of method (50.5%), followed by drug overdose (35%). There were no statistical differences between the two genders with respect to other sociodemographic variables. Males from urban/semi-urban background (odds ratio [OR] = 4.059) and females living alone (OR = 5.723) had high odds ratio of attempting suicide by poison consumption. Females from urban/semi-urban background (P = 0.0514) and male subjects from nuclear families had an increased odds ratio (OR = 4.482) to attempt suicide by drug overdose. There were no statistical differences when the two genders were compared for other variables such as intentionality, lethality, impulsivity, and number of attempts. Conclusions: It appears that gender differences among DSH attempters appear less pronounced in the Indian setting compared to the worldwide literature on the subject. Nevertheless, the unique, gender-specific characteristics pertaining to DSH attempters in our population emphasize the need for gender-specific interventions in future clinical treatment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):7-21
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200098
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Burden of care in the caregivers of patients with anxiety disorders

    • Authors: Manu Agarwal, Arti Kushwaha, Anil Nischal, Sujita Kumar Kar, Bandna Gupta, Adarsh Tripathi, Anju Agarwal
      Pages: 22 - 28
      Abstract: Manu Agarwal, Arti Kushwaha, Anil Nischal, Sujita Kumar Kar, Bandna Gupta, Adarsh Tripathi, Anju Agarwal
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):22-28
      Introduction: Anxiety disorders are one of the frequently encountered psychiatric disorders in psychiatric clinics which have significant impact on the psychosocial well-being of the patient as well as their caregivers. Study Design and Aims: This study is a non- invasive, cross sectional study of 91 patients with anxiety disorder (except obsessive compulsive disorder) aimed to assess the burden of care on their key-relatives and to study various socio demographic and clinical variables of the patient in relation to burden of care on key-relatives. Methodology: Patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders other than obsessive compulsive disorder and their key relatives satisfying the selection criteria were enrolled in the study. Assessment was done on semi-structured proforma, ICD 10 DCR, SCAN (Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry), International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE), Burden assessment schedule, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). Result: Total adjusted burden score in our study was 40.41 which is suggestive of mild burden. It was found that the burden of care was higher in male gender, married individuals, in joint families, among spouses, urban background, in the age group 41 to 50 years, low income group particularly on farmers and laborers. Generalized anxiety disorder was associated with more burden of care in comparison to other anxiety disorders. Conclusion: Key relatives of patients with anxiety disorder have significant burden of care in different domains along the socio-demographic strata.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):22-28
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200092
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Does gender discrimination transformed its face over few generations?
           exploring gender inequalities among under-6 year children in rural Haryana
           

    • Authors: Kalaiselvi Selvaraj, Anand Krishnan, Sanjeev Kumar Gupta, Chandrakant S Pandav
      Pages: 29 - 37
      Abstract: Kalaiselvi Selvaraj, Anand Krishnan, Sanjeev Kumar Gupta, Chandrakant S Pandav
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):29-37
      Background: Gender differences can be in any stage in the life cycle including before birth (feticide/sex selective abortions) which have been objectively documented. This study tries to identify the gender differentials among the children which is a basic step in cascade process of female discrimination in the society. Objective: To study the gender differentials among children under 6 years in households of rural Ballabgarh, Haryana in terms of nutrition, health care seeking, social aspects and to see whether they differ by socio economic status. Methods: Two hundred households were selected purposively from four villages (50 households each) by multi stage sampling during Mar – June 2010. Pre tested interview schedule was used to assess gender differences in nutrition (breast feeding, 'z' score); in health care seeking and in social aspects (Expenditure on birth related ceremonies and toys and dresses). Differences are measured in means or proportions. Determinants of Gender differentials were identified by logistic regression. Results: Girls were breast fed for five months lesser than boys (P < 0.02). Even though occurrences of common childhood illnesses were equal between the two, expenditures incurred to treat these illnesses were more among the boys (Boys Vs girls: Rs 181.3 Vs Rs 123.9). Proportion of illnesses treated from health facilities located outside the villages was higher among the boys [boys (22.2%), girls (11.4%)]. Expenditures incurred during birth related social ceremonies were higher for boys (Rs 20311 and Rs 2487.5 respectively for boys and girls). Conclusion: In this patriarchal society, socio cultural norms have produced the gender gap which can have adverse impact on health of the female children.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):29-37
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200089
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Reactive donor notification and counseling: Reveals concealed risk factors

    • Authors: Sonam Kumari
      Pages: 38 - 43
      Abstract: Sonam Kumari
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):38-43
      Background and Objective: In spite of newer sensitive screening techniques, blood transfusion is still associated with a small risk of transmitting infectious diseases. A very important and efficient method of curtailing transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs) is notifying and counseling the TTI reactive donors. Materials and Methods: Totally, 4281 donations were screened for TTI, namely, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis, by serology. All TTI reactive donors were retested and notified of their status by telephone or letter and called for repeat testing followed by face-to-face counseling and referral for treatment. Results: We evaluated 116 (2.7%) donors with reactive screening test results, i.e., 41 (1%) HBV, 61 (1.4%) HCV, 12 (0.3%) HIV, and 2 (0.05%) reactive for both HIV and HCV while none of donors were syphilis reactive. Only 35.34% (41) of donors responded to notification. The response from voluntary donors was comparatively less as compared to the replacement donors (34.6% vs. 41.7%). Around 22 (53.7%) of counseled reactive donors revealed history of high-risk behavior/factors which were not disclosed during donor registration and screening. Conclusion: In spite of strict donor screening and self-exclusion option, donors conceal their high-risk behaviors and continue to donate blood. It reflects the need to implement predonation counseling to extract the history of high-risk factors from the donors. Maintenance of privacy during donor screening, predonation education and counseling and postnotification counseling of reactive donors are recommended. National guidelines for notification of reactive donors need to be formulated.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):38-43
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200096
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A case-control study assessing depression in patients with periodontitis

    • Authors: Shiyamali Sundararajan, Santhanakrishnan Muthukumar, Suresh Rangarao
      Pages: 44 - 46
      Abstract: Shiyamali Sundararajan, Santhanakrishnan Muthukumar, Suresh Rangarao
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):44-46
      Background: Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the tooth. One of the important non-oral risk factors for periodontitis is psychosocial stress and depression. Depression affects oral health by affecting the immune system through its effects on hypothalamic pituitary axis system. Periodontal inflammatory surface area (PISA) is a system used to assess inflammatory burden in the periodontal tissue. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between PISA and depression. Settings and Design: The design of the study is case-control study. Materials and Methods: The study design is a case-control study with forty patients each in case and control groups. The periodontal inflammatory level was assessed by PISA system and the levels of depression was assessed by using Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). Statistical Analysis: Student's t-test was used to compare PISA and BDI scores. The BDI score (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) for controls was 12.75 ± 6.82 compared to 22.73 ± 4.40 for the cases. The comparison (t = 7.78) was statistically significant at P < 0.0001. The PISA score (mean ± SD) for controls was 210.47 ± 76.80 compared to the PISA score of 1069.50 ± 204.21 for cases which was statistically significant (t = 24.90; P < 0.0001). Results: Significantly higher BDI scores were observed in patients with chronic periodontitis than healthy controls. Conclusion: This study clearly reveals a significant association between the severity of depression and inflammatory burden.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):44-46
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200091
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Jinn and psychiatry: Beliefs among (muslim) doctors

    • Authors: NA Uvais
      Pages: 47 - 49
      Abstract: NA Uvais
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):47-49
      Background: The belief that jinn can cause mental illness in human through afflictions or possession is widely accepted among Muslims. Belief about jinn in Muslim medical professionals, especially medical doctors has not been studied till date. Aim: To explore the belief among Muslim doctors regarding jinn and psychiatry. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among Muslim doctors using a study questionnaire. Results: Majority of the participants believed in the existence of jinn and a significant proportion of the sample believed in jinn possessing humans and jinn causing mental illness in humans and recommended treatment by doctor and religious figures together for jinn afflictions. Conclusion: The belief in jinn and jinn causing mental illness are common among Muslims and remain intact even after medical education. It deserves attention from practitioners in the field of mental health care and demand strengthening of liaison between religious leaders and mental health services.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):47-49
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200095
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Concepts of spirituality prevailing among undergraduate medical students
           in Delhi

    • Authors: Shantanu Sharma, Panna Lal
      Pages: 50 - 52
      Abstract: Shantanu Sharma, Panna Lal
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):50-52
      Background: Spirituality is considered one of the determinants of health. Various studies have documented its role in the management of psychological illnesses such as schizophrenia, and anxiety disorders. Doctors often lack skills to do spiritual assessment of the patients. Aim: The current study was conducted among the 1st year undergraduate medical students to find out their ideas and thoughts about spirituality using self-administered questionnaire. Methodology: This was a college based cross sectional study wherein 168 students were interviewed using semistructured, self administered questionnaire. Ethical clearance was obtained from Institutional ethical committee.Results: Most of the students (93.5%) believed in spirituality, but only about half (49%) of them had complete knowledge about it. Only psychological disorders and chronic diseases were labeled by students who need spirituality as a modality of treatment. Girls linked spirituality with God more than boys. A formal training in spirituality is not essential according to 43% of the subjects. Conclusion: The undergraduates need to understand the importance of this dimension of health. A mere gain in knowledge about spiritual strength available in some of the textbooks would not be able to orient doctors sufficiently to apply it in their practice. Future Direction: Skill building and practicing the culture of spiritual counseling among health workers is the need of hour.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):50-52
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200088
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The role of regular internet usage on social behavior of students

    • Authors: Nasrin Nazari Talooki, Mostafaa Ataee, Mohammad Ali Heidari Gorji, Nayereh Aghaei
      Pages: 53 - 56
      Abstract: Nasrin Nazari Talooki, Mostafaa Ataee, Mohammad Ali Heidari Gorji, Nayereh Aghaei
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):53-56
      Aim: This study was aimed to investigate the role of internet usage on social behavior of the students. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 175 university students. The samples were selected randomly from 333 Arabic students and divided into low (<8 h a week) and high (>8 h a week) internet user groups. The data were collected via social behavior and demographic questionnaires. To analyze the data, t-test was used. Results: The findings indicated that social behavior and subscales, i.e. participation, interpersonal interaction, social positive and negative consequences of students are significantly different in low and high internet user groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Internet is the strongest communication tool, which affects all aspects of human life. This technology is also related with social behavioral aspects of students who participated in this study. Therefore, in social studies, the effects of internet usage in people's behavior could be considered as an effective variable.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):53-56
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200094
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Overcoming barriers to community participation in drug dependence
           treatment: An ethnography approach

    • Authors: Bir Singh Chavan, Suravi Patra, Nitin Gupta, Abhijit R Rozatkar
      Pages: 57 - 62
      Abstract: Bir Singh Chavan, Suravi Patra, Nitin Gupta, Abhijit R Rozatkar
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):57-62
      Introduction: Substance use and dependence has been a part of Indian society for centuries. However, abuse of more hazardous drugs including intravenous use, younger age of initiation, and high prevalence has made it a major public health issue. Community-based interventions for drug/alcohol use are often hindered by a lack of community participation, which is the result of stigma associated with drug/alcohol use and its treatment. We describe our attempt to address this issue of lack of community participation in a particular community of Dhanas, Chandigarh, using an ethnography approach. Methodology: Despite drug/alcohol use being rampant in their community, the leaders of the community (Sarpanch and Medical Officer of Primary Health Centre) not only denied the problem, but also refused to support community outreach team. In the absence of facilitation by community leaders and prevalent stigma, drug/alcohol users from the Dhanas village did not seek treatment even when the treatment was offered close to their homes. Using an ethnography approach, a 6 point questionnaire was developed to investigate the severity of the problem as well as to engage the community leaders in the delivery of community-based treatment. Results: The questionnaire highlighted that key leaders chose to deny existing drug/alcohol problem whereas those who were aware of the problem did not have a say in the decision-making process. The questionnaire facilitated a thorough understanding of the sociocultural and political ethos of the community which in turn helped in chalking out an action plan in this village. Conclusion: With the help of various individuals such as former and current healthcare workers, community leaders, drug users, and their family members, the community outreach team successfully mobilized the community from denial to activism. This was evident in the number of individuals seeking treatment for drug/alcohol use that showed an increasing trend over the months.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):57-62
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200087
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Psychiatric comorbidity in patients with substance use disorder: A
           hospital-based study

    • Authors: Ab Majid Gania, Mushtaq A Margoob, Hamid U Shah, A Wahid Khan, Abhishek Ghosh, Debasish Basu
      Pages: 63 - 66
      Abstract: Ab Majid Gania, Mushtaq A Margoob, Hamid U Shah, A Wahid Khan, Abhishek Ghosh, Debasish Basu
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):63-66
      Background: Pattern of substance use, profile of substance users, and treatment-seeking differ across cultures and continents. These differences could potentially affect the pattern and perhaps prevalence of dual diagnosis. However, the study of dual diagnosis from de-addiction clinics in India is limited in number and methodology. In this study, we report the prevalence and patterns of psychiatric disorders in subjects attending a de-addiction clinic in a teaching hospital in Srinagar, Kashmir. Methodology: In this cross-sectional study, 300 subjects (>18 years of age) seeking treatment for substance use disorders were screened with Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus for the presence of psychiatric comorbidity. Subjects were assessed after 4 weeks of complete abstinence from psychoactive substances. Results: Cannabis (26%) was the most common single-use substance. It was followed by polysubstance use (22.3%) and opioids (21.3%). Among the 300 subjects assessed for the purpose of the study, 174 (58%) were found to have dual diagnosis. Psychotic disorders (34%) were the most common psychiatric comorbidity, and it was followed by major depressive disorder (16%) and bipolar affective disorder (16%). Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was present in 20 (11.5%) subjects. When the groups with or without dual diagnosis were compared, cannabis and benzodiazepine dependence was found to be significantly common in the dual diagnosis group. Conclusions: A high prevalence of dual diagnoses, especially psychotic disorders and also PTSD, in our predominantly cannabis-using subjects attending hospital located in a distinct sociocultural setting in India, highlights the importance of taking into consideration the sociocultural context in which substance use as well as dual diagnoses should be understood.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):63-66
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200093
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Does opioid and ketamine &#8220;codependence&#8221;
           exist?

    • Authors: Naveen Kumar Srivastava, Sourav Khanra, Christoday Raja Jayant Khess, Sanjay Kumar Munda
      Pages: 67 - 68
      Abstract: Naveen Kumar Srivastava, Sourav Khanra, Christoday Raja Jayant Khess, Sanjay Kumar Munda
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):67-68

      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(1):67-68
      PubDate: Mon,13 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.200097
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2017)
       
 
 
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