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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 356 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access  
Heart Views     Open Access  
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access  
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
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J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
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J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal
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   ISSN (Print) 1110-1148 - ISSN (Online) 2090-9926
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [356 journals]
  • Single-stage versus two-stage revision of total hip replacement for
           contained periprosthetic infection

    • Authors: Ayman M Ebied
      Pages: 101 - 110
      Abstract: Ayman M Ebied
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):101-110
      ObjectiveIn this article, single-stage exchange arthroplasty for periprosthetic hip infection was compared with the two-stage revision protocol in patients without draining sinuses.BackgroundStaged revision for periprosthetic infection of the hip is an accepted and widely used technique by many surgeons. However, single-stage exchange of the hip prosthesis remains an attractive option to some.Patients and methodsFifty-two patients with evidence of periprosthetic infection underwent preoperative aspiration of the affected hip. The organism was identified in 33/52 patients, and single-stage revision was performed. The remaining 19 patients underwent two-stage exchange arthroplasty. All patients had cemented cup and long cementless stem.ResultsAt an average 4 years (range: 2–7 years) postoperatively, only one case of persistent infection was found in the single-stage group, which showed a success rate of 97%, in comparison with 95% success rate in the staged protocol.ConclusionSingle-stage exchange achieves excellent success rates in patients with contained infection when the organism is identified preoperatively.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):101-110
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203142
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Correction of idiopathic congenital clubfoot using the ponseti technique:
           radiologic assessement

    • Authors: Hosam M Khairy
      Pages: 111 - 116
      Abstract: Hosam M Khairy
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):111-116
      BackgroundClubfoot is a three-dimensional deformity in which the calcaneopedal complex rotates under the talar–tibial–fibular complex. The deformity includes four components: metatarsus adductus, cavus, hindfoot varus, and equinus. The Ponseti method consists of serial manipulation and casting for the correction of cavus, metatarsus adductus, and hindfoot varus; however, equinus is corrected by means of percutaneous Achilles tenotomy. The Ponseti method depends on clinical assessment. In our study, we used radiological assessment in combination with clinical assessment for the evaluation of correction of the clubfeet using the Ponseti method and early detection of pseudocorrection and lastly for the evaluation of the effect of percutaneous Achilles tenotomy on the correction of equinus deformity.Patients and methodsTwenty-eight patients with clubfoot (20 patients) were included in this study. There were 12 boys and eight girls and their ages averaged 2 weeks (range=1 day to 3 weeks). All of them were treated with weekly manipulation and casting, followed by fluoroscopic evaluation after the fifth to sixth cast. Percutaneous Achilles tenotomy was performed when the foot could be abducted to 70° in relation to the leg with restoration of the anteroposterior talocalcaneal angle to 30° and the foot can be dorsiflexed to less than 10° with the lateral tibiocalcaneal angle more than 70°.ResultsPirani score was used for the assessment of the deformity at presentation, at final removal of cast before bracing, and at latest follow-up. Pirani score improved from average 2.5 at first presentation to 0.5 at final removal of cast, to 0.25 at latest follow-up. At removal of the last cast, the foot could be abducted to an average of 70° in relation to the leg, with restoration of the anteroposterior talocalcaneal angle to an average of 37°, and the foot can be dorsiflexed to an average of 25° above right angle with restoration of lateral tibiocalcaneal angle to an average of 68°. Percutaneous Achilles tenotomy improved equinus by an average of 20° and the lateral tibiocalcaneal angle by an average of 19°. There were no complications such as infection, vascular injury, or recurrence.ConclusionThe Ponseti method is an excellent method for the treatment of clubfoot, and we found that the addition of radiographic to clinical evaluation helps in the better assessment of correction and early detection of pseudocorrection to avoid recurrence or development of rocker bottom deformity. All components of clubfoot would be corrected by stretching, but equinus usually needs percutaneous tenotomy, which helps acute correction of the deformity.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):111-116
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203143
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of combined arthroscopic lateral release and medial
           patellofemoral ligament reconstruction for the treatment of recurrent
           lateral patellar instability

    • Authors: Tarek A.A. Mahmoud
      Pages: 117 - 126
      Abstract: Tarek A.A. Mahmoud
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):117-126
      BackgroundDifferent methods were used for the treatment of recurrent lateral patellar instability (LPI) of the knee and the combined arthroscopic lateral release and medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is an effective method of treatment.AimThis study aimed to evaluate the functional and radiological outcomes of treatment of recurrent LPI using combined arthroscopic lateral release and MPFL reconstruction.Patients and methodsThis prospective study was conducted on 12 patients, two male and 10 female, attending Saudi German Hospital in Saudi Arabia between March 2013 and October 2014, and the mean age was 26 years (range: 20–34) at the time of surgery. Patients with recurrent LPI confirmed by means of history, physical examination, and radiographic examinations were included in the study. Follow-up evaluation of the results after 1 year of surgery was carried out using Kujala score, Lysholm score, Tegner activity score, and the criteria of Crosby and Insall, and the rate of satisfaction was evaluated according to Nelitz.ResultsThe congruence angle improved from 18.3±5.4° preoperatively to −5.0±0.4° at 1-year follow-up. The lateral patellar angle significantly improved from −7.5±4.2° preoperatively to 6.2±3.1° at 1-year follow-up. Moreover, the patellar tilt angle improved from 28.5±6.5° preoperatively to 8.2±0.7° at 1-year follow-up. The mean Kujala score increased significantly from 44.6±2.5 preoperatively to 92.4±3.6 points postoperatively (P<0.05). The mean Lysholm score increased significantly from 42.8±6.4 points preoperatively to 94.4±4.2 points postoperatively (P<0.05). In addition, the Tegner score improved from 2.6±0.8 points preoperatively to 6.6±0.4 points at 1-year follow-up. Evaluation using Crosby–Insall criteria after 1-year follow-up showed that 10 (83%) patients had excellent results and two (17%) patients had good results. According to Nelitz criteria, eight (67%) patients were very satisfied with surgery, three (25%) patients were satisfied, and one (8%) patient partially satisfied. No postoperative vascular or neurological complications were found and no patient had patellar redislocation. One patient had superficial infection that improved with frequent dressing.ConclusionThe double bundle graft technique used in this study for the reconstruction of MPFL provides proper anatomical position of the femoral fixation of the graft and gives stable tendon-to-bone fixation with early healing and offers a successful outcome that allows an early rehabilitation and return to full activity.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):117-126
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203144
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Minimally invasive tension band wiring for displaced transverse patellar
           fractures

    • Authors: Tarek A El Nor, Khaled H Issa
      Pages: 127 - 130
      Abstract: Tarek A El Nor, Khaled H Issa
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):127-130
      BackgroundPatellar fractures account for ∼1% of all fractures. Most are transverse fractures involving the middle third of the patella in patients aged 20–50 years, and affect almost twice as many men as women.Patients and methodsPercutaneous tension band wiring of 18 fresh transverse fractures of the patella with displacement of more than 3 mm in 18 patients was performed as a prospective study. The mean age was 40 years (range: 27–60 years).ResultsThe average follow-up period was 30 months (range: 24–36 months). Radiological evidence of union was apparent in all cases at 8 weeks after surgery, with no hardware migration in 17 cases. Skin problems including superficial abrasions and contusions were encountered in 10 patients, which healed with local care, within the immobilization period. One osteoporotic female patient aged 60 years had proximal migration of one Kirschner wire, which necessitated replacement of the Kirschner wire with a thicker one 3 weeks postoperatively. Two cases had mild postoperative articular step-off but without patellofemoral arthritic changes on radiographs. Two patients encountered hardware irritation of the skin over the knee necessitating implant removal after the fractures were healed.Discussion and conclusionPercutaneous tension band wiring technique has many advantages, including minimal dissection of the soft tissues, good cosmesis, early rehabilitation, and shorter hospital stay.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):127-130
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203145
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Anteromedial portal technique versus trans-tibial technique for anterior
           cruciate ligament single-bundle reconstruction: in-vivo anatomical study

    • Authors: Nasef M Nasef, Ali M Reda Mansour, Yasser A Radwan
      Pages: 131 - 136
      Abstract: Nasef M Nasef, Ali M Reda Mansour, Yasser A Radwan
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):131-136
      PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine, in vivo, − whether drilling the femoral tunnel through the anteromedial portal (AMP), as opposed to drilling the tunnel trans-tibially (TT), will increase the reliability to reach the center of the femoral insertion in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.Patients and methodsFifty-four consecutive patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction with a four-strand hamstring tendon autograft were enrolled in a prospective case series. Cases were divided according to the landmarks used to identify the starting point of femoral tunnel into two groups: group I included patients in whom the ACL stump was used (24 patients), whereas group II included patients in whom the ACL stump was not found and the lateral intercondylar ridge was used (30 patients).ResultsUsing the AMP resulted in a statistically significant higher incidence of reaching the anatomical femoral insertion site of the ACL compared with the TT approach (100 vs. 16.33%, P<0.05). Comparison of the two groups showed that 3/24 patients in group I had an off-center position compared with 6/30 in group II, whereas 21/24 patients in group I had an outside position compared with 24/30 patients in group II, with no statistically significant difference between the two groups [Fisher’s exact test, P=0.72; Relative Risk (RR)=1.4 (95% confidence interval=0.53–3.17)].ConclusionAMP technique allows more accurate positioning of the starting point of femoral tunnel when compared with the TT technique in anatomical single-bundle ACL reconstruction.Level of evidenceLevel IV (case series).
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):131-136
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203146
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Hook plate versus tightrope for acute grade III acromioclavicular
           dislocation

    • Authors: Sherif M Sokkar, Mohamed A Radwan, Ahmed A Toreih
      Pages: 137 - 142
      Abstract: Sherif M Sokkar, Mohamed A Radwan, Ahmed A Toreih
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):137-142
      IntroductionThe different surgical techniques described to treat type III acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation illustrate the fact that the ideal surgery remains controversial. This study aims at comparing two familiar different methods of stabilization of this injury.Patients and methodsBetween May 2013 and February 2015, 20 patients with acute Rockwood type III AC dislocation were divided into two groups, to compare the functional outcome after using either hook plate or tightrope stabilization. Patients were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles Shoulder Scoring System.ResultsNine patients in the hook plate group were reoperated to remove the device, except one who refused to be reoperated. Only one patient in the tightrope group had revision because of rupture of the tightrope in the fourth week with successful and good outcome. The patients of the hook plate group showed significantly higher incidence of complication in comparison with the tightrope group (40 vs. 10%, respectively). Two (20%) cases in the hook plate group suffered from superficial infection and another two (20%) cases showed signs of osteolysis in 1-year follow-up plain radiographs. There was insignificant difference between both groups regarding severity of pain. The majority (70%) of the tightrope patients regained their normal functional activities, whereas only 40% of the hook plate patients did (P<0.001). About half (50%) of the tightrope group in comparison with 30% of hook plate group had active forward flexion more than 150° (P<0.01). Both groups showed no significant differences regarding the degree of muscle strength, patients’ satisfaction, and total outcome of the University of California Los Angeles score (P>0.05).ConclusionOpen reduction and stabilization with either hook plate or tightrope in type III AC dislocations are effective techniques regarding the objective outcome scores, with no significant differences between the two groups. However, tightrope fixation provides a low rate of failure and complications and avoids the need for second surgery to remove the implant.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):137-142
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203147
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Fibular graft for reconstruction of proximal femoral aneurysmal bone cysts

    • Authors: Adel M Salama
      Pages: 143 - 146
      Abstract: Adel M Salama
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):143-146
      BackgroundThe treatment options of aneurysmal bone cyst might change according to patient’s age, location, and type of lesion. Curettage and insertion of bone graft or polymethyl methacrylate are the principal techniques used.Patients and methodsEight patients (five male and three female; aged 8–14 years, with a mean age of 11 years) were treated with fibular autograft and iliac graft for the treatment of aneurysmal bone cyst in the proximal femur. Plain radiography and clinical assessment were performed through the whole follow-up period between 20 and 48 months (with a mean of 36 months). The musculoskeletal tumor society scoring system for limb salvage for the lower limb was used for clinical evaluation.ResultsClinically, seven out of eight patients had excellent results according to the musculoskeletal tumor society scoring system for limb salvage for the lower limb. One case had postoperative pathological fracture after beginning weight bearing. Fibular grafts were fully incorporated into the recipient site within 12–16 months, with a mean incorporation time of 13 months. The graft donor site showed some minor problems such as leg discomfort and heel pain.ConclusionCurettage and an autogenous nonvascularized fibular graft is a good technique to treat benign cystic lesions of the proximal femur in relatively young patients. It is recommended to externally protect the limb with plaster of Paris. Hydrogen peroxide lavage was used to control local recurrence.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):143-146
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203148
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Limited open reduction and elastic intramedullary nailing for mid-shaft
           clavicular fractures

    • Authors: Adham Elgeidi, Mohammed Fahmi, Abd Elrahman Elganainy
      Pages: 147 - 153
      Abstract: Adham Elgeidi, Mohammed Fahmi, Abd Elrahman Elganainy
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):147-153
      BackgroundElastic intramedullary nailing (EIN) of displaced mid-shaft clavicular fractures is a minimally invasive technique, which was reported to be a simple procedure with low complication rate and good functional results. Other studies, however, report on specific problems with this technique. This prospective study reports on EIN in displaced mid-shaft clavicular fracture. We hypothesized that restoration of clavicular length is the primary goal of EIN.Patients and methodsBetween January 2008 and January 2012, 36 patients with simple, wedge or comminuted mid-shaft clavicular fractures were treated with EIN. Clavicular shortening was determined after trauma and after osseous consolidation on true clavicle anteroposterior radiograph with a 20° cephalic tilt with the patient in a standing position. Radiographic union was assessed every 4 weeks. Patient satisfaction was assessed at final follow-up after 1 year.ResultsAmong the 36 patients, 34 fractures healed, and each underwent a planned procedure for nail removal. Complications included two nonunions, one delayed union, two nail migrations and one deep-wound infection. EIN led to restoration of clavicular length in simple and wedge fractures. We were not able to restore length in comminuted fractures through the EIN technique. Patient satisfaction at a mean follow-up of 29.5 months was significantly correlated with the lesser post-traumatic and posthealing shortening, quicker fracture healing and early implant removal.ConclusionIntramedullary nail fixation for acute simple or wedge-type mid-shaft clavicular fractures provides a safe and predictable treatment option. In comminuted fractures, however, EIN does not provide the needed stability to restore clavicular length.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):147-153
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203149
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament avulsion injuries in
           skeletally immature patients by cerclage wire loop technique

    • Authors: Waleed A El Tohamy, Nehad El Mahboub
      Pages: 154 - 157
      Abstract: Waleed A El Tohamy, Nehad El Mahboub
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):154-157
      IntroductionTibial eminence avulsion fracture is the pediatric equivalent to a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. It is most common between the ages of 8 and 19 years.Patients and methodsFrom June 2009 to December 2012, 26 patients with ACL avulsion fractures were submitted to surgical treatment by means of a cerclage stainless steel wire loop. Seventeen patients were male and nine were female. Their ages ranged from 8 to 15 (mean: 12) years, and they were followed up for 6–22 (mean: 16) months.ResultsThe Meyers & McKeever and Zaricznyj classifications were used for evaluating fractures for surgery. Radiographs in two views are often sufficient to establish a diagnosis. Cases were evaluated clinically by means of the anterior drawer test, which was negative in 21 patients, whereas four patients had residual laxity of about 2–3 mm increased manual anteroposterior tibial translation compared with the contralateral knee, without subjective feeling of instability. According to the Lyslholm scoring system excellent and good results were achieved in 24 (92%) cases, two patients showed fair results, and there were no poor results.ConclusionThe use of a stainless steel wire loop cerclage by open technique gives excellent results, with benefits such as capture and control tension on ACL on each side of the avulsed fragment proper and adequate mechanical strength.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):154-157
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203150
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Microscopic decompression for lumbar spinal canal stenosis

    • Authors: Essam M Elmorshidy, Hassan M Ali, Yaser E Khalifa, Hesham A El-Kady, Christoph J Siepe, Michael H Mayer
      Pages: 158 - 164
      Abstract: Essam M Elmorshidy, Hassan M Ali, Yaser E Khalifa, Hesham A El-Kady, Christoph J Siepe, Michael H Mayer
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):158-164
      Study designA retrospective review and prospective follow-up were performed of 106 patients who had undergone microscopic decompressive surgery without fusion in the year 2006 at Munich Spine Center, Germany.ObjectiveThis study aimed to determine the 4–5-year outcome of microscopic unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and to detect the possible predictors of the surgical outcome.Summary of background dataThere is limited information on the impact of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis on symptoms, functional status, and satisfaction, as well as reoperation.Patients and methodsPatients were considered eligible for the study if they had clinical and radiographic evidence of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, including patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis type 1 according to Myerding and patients with degenerative scoliosis. All patients underwent microscopic decompressive surgery without fusion in the year 2006 at the Munich Spine Center, Germany. One hundred and six patients were available for follow-up during the year 2010.ResultsAt 4–5 years after the operation, 76 (71.7%) patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. The overall complication rate was 12.2%. 23 (21%) patients required a second operative procedure, whereas three (2.8%) patients required a third operative procedure after the index operation. Two of the 23 patients who had second operations had presumed instability and underwent fusion.ConclusionUnilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression is an adequate microsurgical technique for decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis that minimizes operative invasiveness and tissue trauma while maximizing preservation of the spinal integrity and stability. Secondary postoperative instability is avoided and excellent long-term clinical outcome could be expected.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):158-164
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203151
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Three-dimensional assessment of pedicular screws in thoracic and lumbar
           fractures using free-hand technique: a single-surgeon experience

    • Authors: Tarek El-Fiky, Amin Abd EL-Razek
      Pages: 165 - 169
      Abstract: Tarek El-Fiky, Amin Abd EL-Razek
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):165-169
      IntroductionSeveral sophisticated image-guided modalities have been developed to improve the accuracy of screw placement; however, such modalities may increase healthcare costs and radiation exposure to the patient, and the clinical efficacy compared with traditional techniques may be questionable. Globally, the free-hand technique of pedicle screw placement was found to be a reliable and safe method with low rates of complications and to be potentially more cost-effective than other sophisticated techniques in treating several spinal disorders.AimThe aim of this work was to assess the accuracy and safety of free-hand pedicle screw placement in thoracic and lumbar fractures using minimal image exposure.Materials and methodsThis is a prospective radiographic review of thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws inserted in patients suffering from unstable fractures. All of the procedures were performed by a single consultant spine surgeon. Screws were inserted at one side and then intraoperative lateral imaging was used to check the level and verify the position of the screws. The same procedure was repeated on the other side. The vertebral bodies were divided into three equidistant horizontal zones (A, B, and C). Positioning of the screw tips was regarded as ideal when located in zones A and B. Multislice computed tomography was used to assess the accuracy.ResultsThere were 669 pedicle screws inserted in 88 consecutive cases from T3 to L5, with a mean of 7.6 screws. The overall number of misplaced screws was nine (1.3%). Intraoperative revision was made in 16 (seven cases, 2.4%) screws. No intraoperative or immediate postoperative complication occurred due to screw placement.ConclusionMinimal revision rate was noticed, and only two lateral images were needed in most of the cases. This is quite important in developing countries, where an image intensifier serves more than one room.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):165-169
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203152
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Treatment of nonunion of neck fracture of the femur in young patients with
           valgus osteotomy

    • Authors: Samir A Elshoura
      Pages: 170 - 174
      Abstract: Samir A Elshoura
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):170-174
      BackgroundNonunion of the femoral neck fractures usually can be diagnosed within 1 year of fracture, although a fairly accurate prediction of healing can be made only after 6 months or less. Valgus osteotomy increases the healing power of femoral neck fractures by translation of the shearing force to compression force.Patients and methodsThis study included 20 patients with ununited femoral neck fractures, with their ages ranging from 22 to 50 years. All patients had fractures with high-angle fractures (Pauwel’s III). They were 16 males and four females. They were treated through valgus osteotomy and internal fixation with dynamic hip screw with angle of 150°.ResultsOverall, 18 fractures were healed and all osteotomies were healed. Two patients with ununited fractures could not walk.ConclusionValgus osteotomy with internal fixation with dynamic hip screw is a very useful solution for treatment of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults with excellent results.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):170-174
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203154
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Entire pectoralis major tendon transfer with the hamstring tendon
           autograft for the treatment of scapular winging due to long thoracic nerve
           injury

    • Authors: Roshdy M Elsllab, Naser M Selim
      Pages: 175 - 179
      Abstract: Roshdy M Elsllab, Naser M Selim
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):175-179
      AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment of patients with scapular winging due to long thoracic nerve (LTN) injury through the indirect transfer of the entire pectoralis major tendon (PMT) using the hamstring autograft.Patients and methodsBetween November 2011 and October 2012, six patients with painful scapular winging due to LTN injury underwent PMT transfer at Mansoura University Hospital and a private hospital. All patients were male with a mean age of 35.2 years at the time of surgery. All patients underwent clinical examination. All patients underwent plain radiography of the shoulder and electromyography and nerve conduction for the LTN. All patients were treated with the indirect transfer of the entire PMT to the inferior angle of the scapula using the hamstring autograft.ResultsThe mean preoperative to postoperative results included increases in active forward flexion from 142.5° to 167.5° and active external rotation from 50° to 65°, and improvement in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score from 30 to 71.6 and Visual Analog Scale pain score from 6.3 to 1.8.ConclusionEntire PMT transfer with the hamstring tendon autograft is effective for restoring shoulder function, relieving shoulder pain, and treating scapular winging caused by serratus anterior paralysis due to electromyography-confirmed LTN injury.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):175-179
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203155
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Lateral approach to the humeral shaft: approach for special situations

    • Authors: Yehia E Bassiouny, Hatem S.A. Elgohary
      Pages: 180 - 185
      Abstract: Yehia E Bassiouny, Hatem S.A. Elgohary
      The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):180-185
      BackgroundIn situations where simultaneous exploration of the anterior, the lateral, and the posterior surfaces of the shaft of the humerus is needed, or when radial nerve exploration is required, it is beneficial to find an approach that allows good exposure of the humeral surfaces and good exploration of the radial nerve. The objective of this study was to assess the results of using the lateral approach of the humerus in such situations.Patients and methodsBetween January 2008 and December 2010, 18 displaced humeral shaft fractures in 18 patients were treated in Mansoura University Hospitals with open reduction and plate fixation using lateral approach. Fractures were classified according to the OTA classification, and preoperative and postoperative assessments of the radial nerve were done. The follow-up included assessment of the range of motion of shoulders, elbows, and wrists; the muscular strength of the shoulders; and hand grip were assessed as compared with the other uninjured side.ResultsAll fractures healed within a mean time of 14 weeks (11–17 weeks). Of 11 patients with preoperative radial nerve palsy, nine (82%) had complete spontaneous recovery within few months after surgery, and the other two had near-complete recovery. There was one case of superficial infection that resolved after wound debridement and antibiotic therapy. No patient had delayed union, nonunion, or implant failure.ConclusionLateral approach for the humerus is an excellent way for radial nerve exploration and for cases where the lateral, the anterior, and the posterior surfaces of the humerus needed to be approached simultaneously. This approach allows supine positioning of the multiply injured patients and proper visualization of the radial nerve without muscle splitting; however, it does not allow exploration of the radial nerve in the proximal third of the humerus.
      Citation: The Egyptian Orthopaedic Journal 2016 51(2):180-185
      PubDate: Tue,28 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1110-1148.203153
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2017)
       
 
 
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