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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 356 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access  
Heart Views     Open Access  
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access  
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Health Sciences
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2349-5006 - ISSN (Online) 2349-6681
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [356 journals]
  • No compromise to ethical research and publications

    • Authors: Kusal K Das
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Kusal K Das
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):1-2

      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):1-2
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198571
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Journey of dengue in Rajasthan in the last 15 years (2001-2015) with
           special reference to 2015

    • Authors: Monika Rathore, Amita Kashyap, Priyanka Kapoor
      Pages: 3 - 8
      Abstract: Monika Rathore, Amita Kashyap, Priyanka Kapoor
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):3-8
      Introduction: Dengue is an underestimated and under-reported disease. We have analyzed the last 15 years data of dengue reported in Rajasthan with special reference to the year 2015 to assess the trends. Materials and Methods: This observational, descriptive study was conducted during January 2016-August 2016. Secondary data were collected from Integrated Disease Surveillance Programme (IDSP) Cell, Directorate, Medical and Health, Jaipur, the website of National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme, Census 2011. Reports of P form and L form and line listing of dengue cases of 2015 were collected. Results: Rajasthan had 1452 laboratory-confirmed cases in 2001 and 1850 in 2006 after a gap of 6 years. The next surge came only after 3 years gap. Recently, there was a fourfold increase (>4000 cases/year) during 2013 and 2015. There were substantial dengue deaths till 2009, but thereafter, it never crossed the figure of 10. Surprisingly five districts, i.e., Bhilwara, Chittorgarh, Jhalawar, Pali, and Sirohi, did not report a single case of dengue during 2015. There was fourfold increase in dengue cases but paradoxically fourfold decrease in malaria cases in the last 5 years.Conclusion: Dengue was the new emerging disease with 1452 confirmed cases in Rajasthan in 2001. Thereafter, there was a constant high load of dengue; however, case-fatality rate is below one after 2010. Recently, there was a fourfold increase (>4000 cases/year) during 2013 and 2015. Zero reporting of dengue in a few districts indicates the need for improvement in IDSP reporting in these districts.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):3-8
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198572
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Contraceptive practice among married women in urban areas catered by a
           medical college in Belagavi, Karnataka

    • Authors: K Kruthika, Chandra S Metgud, MD Mallapur
      Pages: 9 - 11
      Abstract: K Kruthika, Chandra S Metgud, MD Mallapur
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):9-11
      Introduction: Population explosion is one of the most hazards to the development of India. The most effective way to control this is by reducing birth rate using contraception. Objective: To know the prevalence of contraceptive use among married women. Methodology: Community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among married women aged 15-44 years residing in three urban areas of Belagavi using predesigned and pretested questionnaire after obtaining informed consent. Results: The prevalence of contraceptive use in the present study was 353 (58.8%), among them 96 (16.0%) were condom user, 113 (18.9%) were using intrauterine device, 26 (4.3%) were practicing rhythm method, 20 (3.3%) of them were using oral contraceptive pill, and 98 (16.3%) were practicing sterilization method.Conclusion: Prevalence rate of contraceptive use was relatively less. Improving female literacy and proper counseling of couples for family planning would help improve the prevalence rate.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):9-11
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198573
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Visual and instrumental evaluation of reliability of clinical ceramic
           restoration with dental shade guide by two distinct observer population:
           An observational study

    • Authors: Dolly Gupta, Mahantesh Bembalagi, Raghunath Patil
      Pages: 12 - 18
      Abstract: Dolly Gupta, Mahantesh Bembalagi, Raghunath Patil
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):12-18
      Context: Dental ceramics are the most natural appearing replacement material for missing tooth substance available in a range of shades and translucencies to achieve a life-like result. Ceramic restorations are fabricated with porcelain layers of different opacity, shade, and thickness to provide a natural appearance. Since the ceramic layer thickness is important for shade development, utmost precision and control are required for a predictable and reproducible result. Shade guides provided by various companies are of 2.5 mm thickness, but clinically all-ceramic crown restoration requires a maximum thickness of 1.5 mm. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shade of clinical ceramic restorations with dental shade guide by two distinct observer population. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 individuals aged 23-45 years participated in this observational study. Two hundred were dental professionals (DPs) and other 200 were nonprofessionals (NPs), a random passerby in the vicinity of the dental school. Evaluation was done between a shade guide and ceramic restorations of thickness 1.5 mm. For visual evaluation, observers were asked to take one shade tab from a box containing eight shades and to select the matching clinical ceramic restoration, and a number of correctly matched shades were recorded. Same experiment was repeated after 1 month for half of the observers. For instrumental evaluation, spectrophotometer was used, and three readings were taken per sample. Results: The results from the present study showed that there was a significant difference for number of correct shades matched by two observer groups. Percentage of correctly matched shades by instrumental evaluation was 37%. Good visual-instrumental shade agreement was observed.Conclusions: The present study concluded that there was significant difference for number of correct shades matched by two observer groups - DP and NP. Good visual-instrumental agreement was found.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):12-18
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198575
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Clinical significance of microalbuminuria and hypoxemia in patients with
           chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    • Authors: J Sujay, Gaude S Gajanan
      Pages: 19 - 24
      Abstract: J Sujay, Gaude S Gajanan
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):19-24
      Background: Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly in patients with mild to moderate severity. Microalbuminuria (MAB) has a strong association with cardiovascular events and death, and it reflects generalized endothelial dysfunction. There is evidence of vascular dysfunction in patients with COPD. Objectives: (a) To study the prevalence of MAB in stable COPD patients. (b) To determine the relationship of MAB with clinical and physiological descriptors of COPD severity and cardiovascular risk factors. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study in 150 COPD patients over a period of 1 year. Lung function, 6-min walk distance, smoking history, arterial blood pressure (BP), BODE index, and arterial blood gases were measured. Screening for MAB was done by measuring urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio in a random spot urine collection. Stepwise logistic regression was performed using MAB as the dependent variable. P < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: Forty-six patients (30.0%) had MAB. There was negative association between hypoxemia and MAB. Stepwise logistic regression analysis with MAB as the dependent variable showed smoking (odds ratio [OR]: 2.29; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.54-3.41), lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s % (OR: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.98-1.10), and PaO2 (OR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.57-0.83) as independent predictors of MAB.Conclusions: MAB in severe COPD patients should be examined in regular periods for risk of cardiovascular morbidity or mortality.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):19-24
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198577
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence of substance use among adolescents in urban slums of Belagavi

    • Authors: Ravikiran Padmakar Kamate, Girija S Ashtagi, MD Mallapur
      Pages: 25 - 28
      Abstract: Ravikiran Padmakar Kamate, Girija S Ashtagi, MD Mallapur
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):25-28
      Introduction: The recent years have witnessed a substance abuse epidemic with serious health, social, economic, and political repercussions. Initially, a problem of the developed countries, but now has assumed alarming dimensions even in developing countries. India too has been caught in this vicious circle of substance abuse. Materials and Methods: Six hundred adolescents of age group between 10 and 19 years in the area of UHC Ram Nagar and Rukmini Nagar were interviewed with the help of predesigned and pretested questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: Out of 600 participants, 505 were males and 95 were females. The prevalence of substance use was found to be 71 (11.8%), with females having the highest prevalence (17.9%) than males (10.7%). Smokeless form of tobacco (78.87%) being the most common substance use followed by smoke form of tobacco (15.49%) and least (2.82%) with alcohol and ganja.Conclusion: Smokeless form of tobacco and smoke form being the most common form of substance abuse among adolescents in urban slum. Females had a higher prevalence of substance use than males.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):25-28
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198578
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Correlation of serum albumin with ischemia modified albumin in acute
           stroke patients with or without diabetes mellitus

    • Authors: Jayaraj G Gudi, Anil Malleshappa, Karkal Ravishankar Naik
      Pages: 29 - 33
      Abstract: Jayaraj G Gudi, Anil Malleshappa, Karkal Ravishankar Naik
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):29-33
      Introduction: Stroke is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is most commonly associated with the acute stroke. Abnormalities in serum albumin are known to occur in acute stroke patients. Ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is a novel marker of acute stroke and hence, it is important to know the factors affecting IMA estimation. The objective of this study was to find out the correlation between serum albumin and IMA in acute stroke with or without DM. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised sixty acute stroke patients (thirty with DM, thirty without DM) and thirty healthy controls. The blood sample was collected from the patients soon after the clinical diagnosis of stroke. IMA and albumin were measured. IMA concentration was expressed in absorbance units. Pearson's correlation coefficient was estimated. Results: In stroke with DM (r = -0.103, P = 0.58) and control (r = -0.007, P = 0.96) groups, there was a negative correlation between IMA and serum albumin which was statistically not significant. In stroke without DM group, there was a positive correlation between IMA and serum albumin which was again statistically insignificant (r = 0.111, P = 0.56).Discussion and Conclusion: There was no statistically significant correlation between IMA and serum albumin levels in all the three groups. Hence, it can be concluded that IMA concentration is independent of serum albumin concentration and probably, it depends on the severity and duration of ischemia or oxidative stress in acute stroke patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):29-33
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198579
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Assessment of plasma homocysteine as a marker of acute renal injury in
           patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for renal stone
           disease - 1-year cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Shruti G Raikar, Siddalingeshwar I Neeli, Veerendra M Uppin, Shashi M Uppin
      Pages: 34 - 40
      Abstract: Shruti G Raikar, Siddalingeshwar I Neeli, Veerendra M Uppin, Shashi M Uppin
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):34-40
      Context: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) commonly used procedure for treating upper urinary tract stones may result in acute kidney injury (AKI) with release of biomarkers. Association of plasma total homocysteine (tHCy), serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and serum creatinine with renal dysfunction and their role as acute renal injury markers is to be assessed. Aim: The study aims to assess plasma tHCy as a marker of AKI in patients undergoing ESWL for renal stone disease and compare the same with other markers, i.e., serum creatinine and serum hs-CRP. Setting and Design: One-year cross-sectional study at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Subjects and Methods: Sixty-four patients undergoing ESWL for renal stone disease were investigated for plasma tHCy, serum creatinine, and serum hs-CRP 24 h before and after ESWL procedure. Patients were divided into AKI and non-AKI group. Statistical Analysis: SPSS statistical software, rates, ratios, percentages, and mean ± standard deviation. A P ͳ 0.05 at 95% confidence interval was considered as statistically significant. Results: Following ESWL, AKI developed in 56.25% of the patients. Post-ESWL mean plasma tHCy levels were significantly high in patients with AKI (21.01 ± 7.67 vs. 16.93 ± 7.44 μmol/L; P = 0.036) compared to those who did not develop AKI. The post-ESWL mean serum creatinine levels and mean change were significantly high in patients with AKI. The post-ESWL mean serum hs-CRP levels were comparable in patients with AKI and those who did not develop AKI. However, 72.22% of the patients with AKI had significant rise of serum hs-CRP (≥2-fold of baseline) level following ESWL which was the only insult on kidney in 24 h.Conclusion: Plasma tHcy, Serum hs-CRP, and Serum creatinine can be used as acute renal injury markers following ESWL in patients with renal stone disease.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):34-40
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198581
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Awareness of demand generation schemes among pregnant women in rural area
           of Belagavi

    • Authors: Nilesh Narayan Jadhav, MS Shivaswamy, MD Mallapur
      Pages: 41 - 43
      Abstract: Nilesh Narayan Jadhav, MS Shivaswamy, MD Mallapur
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):41-43
      Background: Mothers and children are one of the most vulnerable or special risk groups, and the risk for this group is associated with pregnancy, childbirth, and also in postnatal period. A number of demand generation schemes have been launched by the Government of India for the welfare of the pregnant women, but still a significant reduction in maternal mortality and morbidity has not been achieved yet. Objective: To assess the awareness of various demand generation schemes among pregnant women. Methodology: A community-based cross-sectional study was done among 540 pregnant women in Primary Health Centre area of Handiganur, Belagavi. Results: Among 540 study participants, 373 (69.1%) participants knew about Prasuthi Araike, 206 (38.1%) participants knew about Janani Suraksha Yojana, 396 (73.3%) knew about Madilu kit, and only 104 (19.3%) knew about Thayi Bhagya Plus.Conclusion: The awareness about demand generation schemes is very high, which has successfully promoted women's preference to institutional deliveries.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):41-43
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198582
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Clinical effectiveness of anticholinergic tiotropium bromide as an add-on
           therapy in patients with severe bronchial asthma: A randomized controlled
           trial

    • Authors: VG Santhosh, Gajanan S Gaude, Jyothi Hattiholi
      Pages: 44 - 49
      Abstract: VG Santhosh, Gajanan S Gaude, Jyothi Hattiholi
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):44-49
      Background and Objectives: Severe asthma seen in substantial proportion of patients has been a poorly controlled disease, with recurring symptoms and exacerbations despite the use of inhaled glucocorticoids (ICS), long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs-2), leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA), and theophyllines. A potential alternative approach is addition of a second bronchodilator with an alternative mode of action, the anticholinergic tiotropium bromide. Hence, the present study was undertaken to evaluate clinical effectiveness of tiotropium bromide 18 mcg as add-on therapy in severe asthma patients. Methodology: A single-blinded randomized study was carried in patients with severe asthma. The patients were randomized into two groups. The study group received an addition of 18 mcg of tiotropium while both groups were continued on LABA and high dose ICS combination, theophyllines, and LTRA. Improvement in lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and peak expiratory flow rate [PEFR]), clinical symptoms, and quality of life were assessed by mini asthma quality of life questionnaire (mini-AQLQ) at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Results: Seventy patients were included in the study, of which 63 completed the study period. Baseline characteristics were well matched between the groups. At the end of 12 weeks, the tiotropium group showed a mean improvement in FEV1 and FVC of 450 ml and 560 ml, respectively, as compared to the control group (P < 0.0001). PEFR showed mean difference of 16.8 L/min in the study group at the end of 12 weeks as compared to the control group and it was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Quality of life as assessed by mini-AQLQ was statistically significant in study group as compared to control group (3.42 vs. 3.07; P < 0.0001). In study group, about 21 patients (65.62%) had no exacerbations compared to eight patients (25.8%) in the control group (P = 0.045).Conclusions: The addition of once-daily tiotropium to severe asthma treatment regimen including high-dose ICS plus LABA, theophyllines, and LTRA significantly improves lung functions and quality of life over 12 weeks of therapy.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):44-49
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198588
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Formulation and evaluation of gastroretentive-floating multiparticulate
           system of lisinopril

    • Authors: Manasa Moganti, HN Shivakumar
      Pages: 50 - 56
      Abstract: Manasa Moganti, HN Shivakumar
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):50-56
      Aim and Objective: The main objective of this research was to formulate and evaluate gastroretentive-floating multiparticulate system of lisinopril to prolong the gastric residence time. Materials and Methods: Gastroretentive system of lisinopril was developed by ionotropic-gelation technique using isabgol (Plantago ovata F.) husk mucilage (IHM) as a floating agent, sodium alginate as a mucoadhesive polymer, and sodium bicarbonate as a gas-generating agent. Results: The beads were evaluated for entrapment efficiency (EE), in vitro drug release, and ex vivo mucoadhesion. The beads of batch F-2 exhibited high-EE (96.04 ± 0.74%), complete drug release (95.27 ± 0.12%), and good mucoadhesion (50% in 8 h). The in vitro drug release from these beads exhibited first-order kinetics that followed Higuchi diffusion model.Conclusion: The beads by virtue of the high EE, complete drug release, and good mucoadhesivity that exhibit prolonged gastric residence time are likely to improve the bioavailability of the drugs having the absorption window in proximal stomach.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):50-56
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198589
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Comparative prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in patients
           attending Okelele Health Centre, Okelele, Ilorin, Nigeria

    • Authors: Olatunji Matthew Kolawole, Olugbenga A Mokuolu, Yetunde A Olukosi, Tolulope O Oloyede
      Pages: 57 - 62
      Abstract: Olatunji Matthew Kolawole, Olugbenga A Mokuolu, Yetunde A Olukosi, Tolulope O Oloyede
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):57-62
      Background: In Okelele, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria, malaria remains an important public health concern with a little information about its prevalence. Objective: To determine the prevalence of malaria infection at Okelele Health Centre, Okelele, Ilorin. Methodology: A cross-sectional descriptive study in which patients were diagnosed clinically with severe or uncomplicated malaria at the study site was conducted. Rapid diagnostic testing (RDT) for malaria and microscopy using Giemsa staining by thick and thin blood smears were done for study patients. Results: In this study, 200 malaria patients attending Okelele Health Centre, Okelele, Ilorin, were tested for malaria infection, with females having the highest prevalence rates and parasitemia density. The highest positivity rates were found in children
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):57-62
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198590
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effect of storage and temperature on two biochemical analytes (creatinine
           and urea) in pooled serum samples stored at -20°C

    • Authors: Nilesha Vilas Vernekar, Vanishree Basavraj Jabannavar
      Pages: 63 - 67
      Abstract: Nilesha Vilas Vernekar, Vanishree Basavraj Jabannavar
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):63-67
      Introduction: Creatinine and urea are nonprotein nitrogenous compounds which are eliminated from the body. Creatinine is a word obtained from a Greek term "Kreas" meaning flesh. An anhydrous form of creatine is creatinine. Around 0.5% of total muscle weight constitutes creatine. Muscle, brain, blood, etc., are the tissues, in which creatinine is present as high-energy compound, phosphocreatine, and creatine as free compound. Optimal storage of serum specimens in biobanks for long time for multicenter reference interval studies remains to be determined. Hence, in this context, the present study was undertaken to determine the effect of storage time and temperature on the laboratory results of urea and creatinine in pooled serum samples. Objective: To determine the effect of storage and temperature on two biochemical analytes (creatinine and urea) in pooled serum samples stored at -20°C. Materials and Methods: The study comprised ten pooled serum samples. Each pooled serum sample was prepared by mixing ten individual serum samples. The serum samples were used for the estimation of effect of storage and temperature on two biochemical analytes (creatinine and urea) in pooled serum samples stored at -20°C in semi-automated analyzer by kit method. Results: The results of the present study on creatinine concentration were found to increase above the normal levels in ten pooled serum samples after storage for 10 days at -20°C. Concentration of urea was found to increase above the normal levels (>20-40 mg/dL) in two samples out of ten, whereas other eight samples were found to be within the normal range.Conclusion: The levels of creatinine were affected due to storage at -20°C for 10 days. However, urea retained its stability when stored at -20°C for 10 days. Thus, to ensure valid results, the samples should be analyzed within 24 h of collection.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):63-67
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198591
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A comparison of standard and rotational techniques for ease of insertion
           of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway in adult patients: A 1-year
           hospital-based randomized clinical trial

    • Authors: Sachinkumar H Shet, KS Kedareshvara, R Mane, MG Dhorigol
      Pages: 68 - 73
      Abstract: Sachinkumar H Shet, KS Kedareshvara, R Mane, MG Dhorigol
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):68-73
      Title: A prospective randomised clinical trial for comparison of two techniques of insertion of proseal laryngeal mask airway in adults - index finger insertion technique versus 90 degree rotational technique. Introduction: ProSeal laryngeal mask airway is not easy to be inserted due to its larger cuff especially in Indian population.The 90 degrees rotation technique for inserting the PLMA is reported to be better than the standard index finger insertion technique to improve the insertion success rate. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the ease of insertion through the rotational and standard insertion technique in terms of number of attempts, duration of insertion and occurrence of complications. Methods: 120 adult patients were allocated to either a standard technique or a rotation technique group with 60 patients in each group. In the rotation technique group the entire cuff of the PLMA was placed in the patient's mouth in a midline approach without finger insertion, rotated 90 degrees counter clockwise around the patient's tongue, advanced and then rotated back until resistance was felt. The outcomes measured were success rate at first insertion, insertion time, haemodynamic changes and complications. Results: For the rotation technique group the success rate at first insertion was greater (98% vs 78%, respectively; P = 0.001), and less time for insertion was required (11.88 +/- 3.62 sec vs 25.98 +/- 10.92 sec, respectively; P
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):68-73
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198592
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A clinical trial to evaluate the effect of Rasayana Avaleha during
           pregnancy W.S.R. to the fetal outcome

    • Authors: K Suprabha, KV Mamatha
      Pages: 74 - 79
      Abstract: K Suprabha, KV Mamatha
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):74-79
      Context: Health of the child depends directly on the environment and state of the fetus in intrauterine life. Supplementing Rasayana (rejuvenating and immunomodulatory) drugs in a Garbhini (pregnant women) provides positive maternal environment which helps the fetus to avoid or overcome diseases. Integrating Rasayana therapy in Garbhini Paricharya (antenatal care) not only benefits the pregnant lady but also the growing fetus in her womb. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Rasayana Avaleha (RA) (Rasayana electuary) on fetal growth and development and its influence on fetal immune system. Setting and Design: Pregnant women fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected from outpatient department of SDM Ayurveda Hospital, Udupi, Karnataka, for the study. The study was a randomized comparative clinical trial. Subjects and Methods: Trial group (n = 15) was administered RA 12 g twice a day with Ksheera (milk) as Anupana (adjuvant) in the 6 th and 7 th month of pregnancy. Control group (n = 15) was given calcium carbonate 500 mg and ferrous sulfate 200 mg once in a day during 6 th and 7 th month. Statistical Analysis: Paired t-test was used to compare within the group and unpaired t-test to compare between two groups. Results: With the overall effect of the study, fetus of the Rasayana group showed statistically significant increase in the ultrasonography parameters biparietal diameter and estimated fetal birth weight. Significant results were also seen in fetal birth weight and fetal immunoglobulin G when compared to control group.Conclusion: Administering RA in Garbhini (pregnancy) acts as a complete micronutrient providing positive effect on the fetal growth and nourishment and also in enhancing the fetal immunity level.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):74-79
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198594
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Accuracy of measurements of foramen magnum and occipital condyle as an
           indicator for sex determination using computed tomography

    • Authors: Harshita Rai, Vaishali Keluskar, Santosh Patil, Anjana Bagewadi
      Pages: 80 - 83
      Abstract: Harshita Rai, Vaishali Keluskar, Santosh Patil, Anjana Bagewadi
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):80-83
      Background and Objectives: The determination of sex in forensic investigation is an important and crucial step. Unidentifiable crania are very common due to warfare, mass disasters, intentional attempt to obscure facial identity in criminal attacks, or physical injury caused by weapons, explosives, or fire. In such a situation, the determination of sex becomes extremely complicated and challenging. Aim: The present study was undertaken to provide data on foramen magnum and occipital condyle (OC) for the purpose of sex determination for establishing the identity in cases of unknown fragmentary skulls. Settings and Design: Retrospective. Subjects and Methods: The study group included computed tomography scan images of 200 patients (100 males and 100 females) in the age range of 21-80 years fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Seven variables were used to measure the dimensions of foramen magnum and OC. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics, discriminate analysis, and unpaired t-test. Results: Significant differences were observed in all the metric variables in male and female population. The dimensions of foramen magnum and OC were significantly larger in male population. Discriminant function analysis revealed an accuracy of 94% (91% in male and 97% in female population).Conclusion: The dimensions of foramen magnum and OC can be accurately used for sex determination thus opening avenues for new research in the field of anthropology and forensic sciences.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):80-83
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198595
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of the glottic view during intubation using Airtraq and
           Macintosh laryngoscopes in adult patients undergoing surgeries under
           general anesthesia with a simulated cervical spine immobilization: A
           1-year hospital-based randomized controlled trial

    • Authors: Avinash Rayavarapu, MG Dhorigol
      Pages: 84 - 89
      Abstract: Avinash Rayavarapu, MG Dhorigol
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):84-89
      Background and Objectives: The present study was undertaken to compare the glottic view during intubation using Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes in adult patients undergoing surgeries under general anesthesia with a simulated cervical spine immobilization. Methods: This 1-year randomized clinical study was conducted between January 2015 and December 2015 on 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade I and II patients of either gender, aged between 18 and 60 years. The study population was randomly divided into two groups. Group A (n = 30): intubation performed using Airtraq laryngoscope. Group L (n = 30): intubation performed using Macintosh laryngoscope. Results: In the present study, 76.67% of patients in Group A had a Cormack-Lehane Grade 1 view of glottis compared to 13.33% in Group L. While most of the patients (56.67%) in Group L had Cormack-Lehane Grade 2 view of glottis compared to 23.33% in patients of Group A. Thus, Airtraq laryngoscope had better Cormack-Lehane grade of glottic view with P = 0.001. It was observed in our study that the mean heart rate, mean systolic blood pressure, mean diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure were higher in Group L compared to Group A at 1 min, 3 min, and 5 min intervals.Conclusion: These findings suggest that tracheal intubation with Airtraq offers better view of glottis with minimal changes in hemodynamic parameters in patients with a simulated cervical spine immobilization compared to Macintosh laryngoscope.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):84-89
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198596
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence/syndrome - An insight into the
           ultrasonographic features for prenatal diagnosis and review of literature
           with obstetric importance: Case series of two reports

    • Authors: Mohd Ilyas, Arshad Bhat
      Pages: 90 - 93
      Abstract: Mohd Ilyas, Arshad Bhat
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):90-93
      We present two case reports of twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence - a rare type of twin-twin transfusion syndrome, wherein there maldevelopment of one twin and is supplied by the normal twin. Then, we discuss the importance of this entity and various measures required if such a situation is encountered.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):90-93
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198597
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Palatal ulceration: A local anesthetic complication

    • Authors: Urvashi Sharma
      Pages: 94 - 96
      Abstract: Urvashi Sharma
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):94-96
      The hard palate is one of the common sites of local complications following administration of local anesthetics. The hard, unyielding palatal tissues coupled with either forceful or excessive administration of solution, induction of trauma, use of contaminated solutions, or reactivation of latent viruses may present or aggravate local complications in the palatal area. Ulceration and necrosis is unusual and a rare complication of local anesthesia. Presented is such an uncommon case in a 16-year-old girl.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):94-96
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198598
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Chromobacterium violaceum causing community-acquired urinary tract
           infection

    • Authors: D Paul Vincent, CG Meghana, Vanditha Mohan, KM Resmi
      Pages: 97 - 99
      Abstract: D Paul Vincent, CG Meghana, Vanditha Mohan, KM Resmi
      Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):97-99
      Chromobacterium violaceum is an opportunistic pathogen in humans. Nearly 150 cases have been reported worldwide. The usual presentation is with an initial localized skin lesion and progression to multiple liver and lung abscesses and finally fatal septicemia. Progression is usually seen in immunocompromised individuals or when appropriate antimicrobial therapy was delayed. Mortality ranges up to 60% if not promptly treated. A 73-year-old male presented with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). His urine culture grew C. violaceum. Neither was he immunocompromised nor was he having any risk factor for this infection. He was not admitted in any hospital in the recent past. He did not have any urological intervention in the past. He was treated successfully with culture sensitive antibiotics. He responded well and he continues to be asymptomatic at 6 months of follow-up. The incidence of UTI by C. violaceum is on the rise. Only three cases of UTI caused by C. violaceum have been reported so far worldwide. This is the second case of symptomatic UTI caused by C. violaceum from the Indian subcontinent. The early recognition of this infection and prompt treatment with appropriate antibiotic go a long way in the prevention of sepsis and its associated morbidity.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU) 2017 10(1):97-99
      PubDate: Wed,18 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198599
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 1 (2017)
       
 
 
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