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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Delta Journal of Ophthalmology
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   ISSN (Print) 1110-9173 - ISSN (Online) 2090-4835
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Ophthalmic complications of targeted therapies: a review

    • Authors: Deepti Sharma
      Pages: 117 - 122
      Abstract: Deepti Sharma
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):117-122
      Recently, there has been an increase in the use of targeted therapies for cancer treatments. Nevertheless, the ocular side effects of the commonly used targeted agents are generally under-reported and not well studied in the literature. The aim of this study was to review common targeted therapies leading to ocular side effects and their management. A database search was conducted on Google scholar, PubMed and Medline using phrase words, ‘targeted therapy’, ‘ocular toxicity’, ‘antineoplastic agent’ and ‘management’. Ocular toxicity has been described with numerous approved targeted agents and also seems to be associated with several classes of agents currently being tested in early-phase clinical trials. It is important for oncologists to be aware of the potential for ocular toxicity, with prompt recognition of symptoms that require referral to an ophthalmologist. The ocular side effects of targeted therapy are clinically relevant and can be present in up to 70% of patients depending on the medication used. Because no screening protocol is recommended, ophthalmologists and oncologists should be vigilant; however, a dose reduction or cessation of therapy is only rarely necessary.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):117-122
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_23_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Correlation of tear film-specific immunoglobulin E assay with the skin
           prick test in allergic conjunctivitis

    • Authors: Basem M Ibrahim, Randa S Abdel-Latif
      Pages: 123 - 132
      Abstract: Basem M Ibrahim, Randa S Abdel-Latif
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):123-132
      Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation and validity of tear film allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in relation to the skin prick test in diagnosing different types of allergic conjunctivitis.Design The study design was a prospective randomized case series.Patients and methods One hundred and twenty patients with allergic conjunctivitis were included in this study and were classified into four groups according to the type of allergy. Group 1 included 48 patients with perennial allergic conjunctivitis. Group 2 included 35 patients with seasonal allergic conjunctivitis. Group 3 included 30 patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC), and group 4 included seven patients with atopic keratoconjunctivitis. All patients were subjected to the skin prick test, which was performed with aeroallergen panel using kits containing different inhalant allergens, positive control (histamine 1 mg/ml), and negative control (saline 0.9%). Tear samples were collected using the microcapillary method for the quantitative determination of specific IgE using immune blot assay. Data were evaluated and statistically analyzed.Results In this study, the skin prick test and specific IgE were performed to 11 different allergens and the results revealed that the most common mixed allergens were mixed pollen, mixed mould, and mixed mite. Validity of tear film-specific IgE in the detection of allergens was assessed against the skin prick test (gold standard). There was IgE specificity of 100%, whereas the sensitivity ranged from 50 to 100% to the three common allergens in the four groups. There was a statistically significant correlation between specific IgE and the skin prick test for the most common allergens in patients with perennial allergic conjunctivitis, seasonal allergic conjunctivitis, and VKC (except for mould allergens in the VKC group). There was only a statistically significant correlation between specific IgE and the skin prick test for mite allergen in patients with atopic keratoconjunctivitis.Conclusion Tear film-specific IgE has a statistically significant correlation and validity when compared with the skin prick test in diagnosing the causative allergen in different types of allergic conjunctivitis. It could be a good alternative to the skin prick test in the diagnosis of allergic conjunctivitis with high sensitivity and specificity and fewer complications and limitations.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):123-132
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_30_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of fibrin glue and autologous serum for conjunctival autograft
           fixation in pterygium

    • Authors: Saurabh Shrivastava, Priyanka Patkar, Reshma Ramakrishnan, Minal Kanhere, Zahna Riaz
      Pages: 133 - 137
      Abstract: Saurabh Shrivastava, Priyanka Patkar, Reshma Ramakrishnan, Minal Kanhere, Zahna Riaz
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):133-137
      Aim The aim of the study was to compare the outcome of conjunctival autograft (CAG) surgery for pterygium using autologous serum versus fibrin glue.Materials and methods A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was carried out on 40 patients over a period of 2 years. Twenty eyes underwent CAG with fibrin glue and another 20 eyes underwent CAG with autologous serum. Postoperatively, the parameters noted in both groups were the time taken for surgery in both groups, postoperative outcome like redness and discomfort during blinking, outcome of the graft (graft edema, graft retraction, graft rejection, graft displacement, and graft loss) and pterygium recurrence.Results In the CAG group with autologous serum, the mean surgical time was 34.8 min (SD=3.66), whereas in the group of CAG with fibrin glue the mean surgical time was 22.95 min (SD=3.09), a statistically significant difference (P=0.0000). The intensity of postoperative discomfort was greater in the group with autologous serum than the group with fibrin glue; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Graft rejection was observed in one patient belonging to the fibrin glue group, after 1 month postoperatively, which eventually by the end of the third month, led to graft loss.Conclusion The operating time in the fibrin glue group was significantly less as compared with the autologous serum group. The cost of surgery was more with fibrin glue. Graft edema, graft loss, graft retraction, and displacement of the graft were more with the use of fibrin glue. However, the difference was not statistically significant.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):133-137
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_18_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Combined sutureless gluefree conjunctival autograft with subconjunctival
           bevacizumab for treatment of primary pterygium

    • Authors: Mona M Aly, Doaa A Mahmoud, Heba M Abd Al Rahman
      Pages: 138 - 142
      Abstract: Mona M Aly, Doaa A Mahmoud, Heba M Abd Al Rahman
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):138-142
      Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of subconjunctival bevacizumab injection as adjuvant therapy in the prevention of recurrence following excision of pterygium and application of sutureless gluefree conjunctival autograft (SL/GF CAG).Patients and methods A prospective randomized comparative study was performed on 20 eyes of 20 patients with primary pterygium. They were divided into two groups: group A (10 eyes) had pterygium excision with SL/GF CAG and received subconjunctival 2.5 mg/0.1 ml of bevacizumab at the end of the surgery and group B (10 eyes) had pterygium excision with SL/GF CAG only followed by eye pressure patching for 24 h in both groups.Results SL/GF CAG was successful in all cases except in one (10%) eye in group B that developed conjunctival graft retraction on the first postoperative day necessitating resurgery. Adjuvant subconjunctival bevacizumab injection used in group A was well tolerated with no systemic or local side effects but in the term of recurrence, no statistically significant difference was reported between the two groups in the postoperative 6 months follow-up period.Conclusion SL/GF CAG is a novel technique for the treatment of primary pterygium. Augmentation of this technique with a single injection of bevacizumab by the end of surgery aiming at reducing the recurrence rate did not seem to provide any statistically significant difference than SL/GF CAG alone, although bevacizumab injection was well tolerated as an adjuvant therapy.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):138-142
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_29_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Results of pupil dilatation using Oasis ring in eyes with narrow pupil
           during phacoemulsification

    • Authors: Ahmed M Ghoneim, Tamer E Wasfy
      Pages: 143 - 148
      Abstract: Ahmed M Ghoneim, Tamer E Wasfy
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):143-148
      Purpose To compare the results using Oasis ring for mechanical dilatation of the pupil during phacoemulsification in cases of narrow pupil with nonmechanical dilatation.Patients and methods This study included 80 eyes of 67 patients with cataract with narrow pupil. They were divided into two groups, each including 40 eyes. In one group, Oasis ring was used to achieve adequate pupillary dilatation, whereas in the other group, nonmechanical device methods such as bimanual stretching with partial sphincterotomies were used. Both groups were compared regarding achieved pupil size, additional time for dilatation, intraoperative difficulties, and postoperative pupil characters at 1-month follow-up.Results The mean pupil size was 6.00±0.00 mm in the Oasis ring group, whereas it was 4.26±0.48 mm in the nonmechanical device dilatation group, with statistically significant difference. Additional intraoperative time needed for pupil dilatation was significantly longer in Oasis ring group where it ranged from 83 to 117 s, whereas in the nonmechanical device dilatation group, it ranged from 48 to 76 s. There was more liability for intraoperative difficulties as iris prolapse, minimal bleeding, and iris trauma in the nonmechanical device dilatation group. Postoperative pupil characters after 1 month were rounded, central, and reactive in the Oasis ring group with oval-shaped pupil found only in one (2.5%) eye and minute tears in two (5%) eyes, whereas oval pupil was found in seven (17.5%) eyes and minute tears in five (12.5%) eyes in the nonmechanical device dilatation group. Statistically significant differences were found between the two studied groups.Conclusion Pupil dilatation with Oasis ring increases the intraoperative additional time for pupil dilatation, but it provides stable and sufficiently dilated pupil, with less liability for intraoperative complications when compared with non-mechanical device dilatation methods.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):143-148
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_15_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Combined intravitreal bevacizumab and posterior sub-Tenon’s
           triamcinolone acetonide injections for persistent diabetic macular edema

    • Authors: Mona M Aly, Abd Elmagid M Tag Eldin
      Pages: 149 - 153
      Abstract: Mona M Aly, Abd Elmagid M Tag Eldin
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):149-153
      Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of posterior sub-Tenon’s triamcinolone acetonide injection (PSTI) in conjunction with intravitreal bevacizumab for the treatment of persistent diabetic macular edema (DME).Patients and methods In a prospective, nonrandomized, interventional study, 30 eyes of phakic diabetic patients were diagnosed with persistent DME after being treated with at least two intravitreal bevacizumab injections. Eyes with a residual central macular thickness more than 300 µm were administered PSTI of 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide in conjunction with intravitreal bevacizumab. Best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and foveal thickness were measured.Results Significant improvements in the mean central macular thickness measurements were observed at the 1-month and 3-month follow-up visits. Best-corrected visual acuity improvement in eyes with extrafoveal hard exudates (83.3%) was significant at the follow-up intervals of 1 and 3 months, although it was insignificant in eyes with subfoveal hard exudates (16.7%).Conclusion The combined use of intravitreal bevacizumab and PSTI of triamcinolone acetonide was effective in treating persistent DME.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):149-153
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_19_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Efficacy of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide with thermal combination
           therapy versus intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide monotherapy on diffuse
           diabetic macular edema

    • Authors: Ashraf M Gad Elkareem
      Pages: 154 - 159
      Abstract: Ashraf M Gad Elkareem
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):154-159
      Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) monotherapy with IVTA plus macular grid laser photocoagulation combination therapy on the treatment of diffuse diabetic macular edema.Patients and methods Fifty eyes of 38 patients exhibiting diffuse diabetic macular edema were evaluated in this prospective comparative study. The patients were divided into two groups: IVTA monotherapy group and combination therapy group (IVTA plus grid laser). The main outcome measures of the study were best-corrected visual acuity (VA) scored in logMAR and the central macular thickness (CMT) as estimated at 3 and 6 months after treatment. The study further assessed the potential complications associated with IVTA injection.Results The baseline logMAR VA and CMT were 0.46±0.22 and 445.2±123.91 µm for the IVTA monotherapy group and 0.57±0.27 and 456.91 ±134.32 µm for the combination therapy group, respectively. The post-treatment logMAR VA at 3 and 6 months were 0.24±0.12 and 0.28±0.09 for the IVTA monotherapy group and 0.22±0.13 and 0.18±0.16 for the combination therapy group, respectively. The CMT values at 3 and 6 months were 305.5±115.30 and 310.8±86.8 µm for the IVTA monotherapy group and 280.9±43.9 and 254.2±45.95 for the combination therapy group. Improvement in VA and CMT after treatment was statistically significant in both groups. Approximately 10% of patients developed cataract after 5 months of intravitreal injection. The mean pretreatment intraocular pressure and the mean post-treatment intraocular pressure were 15.49±2.47 and 14.56±2.26 and 14.92±2.80 and 13.55±2.02 mmHg in both the IVTA monotherapy and combination therapy groups, respectively.Conclusion Macular grid laser photocoagulation after IVTA effectively maintains the VA and macular thickness of the patients included in this study during the first 6 months of treatment.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):154-159
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_22_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Retinal ellipsoid zone/external limiting membrane restoration after
           diabetic macular edema treatment

    • Authors: Nehal M. Samy El Gendy
      Pages: 160 - 165
      Abstract: Nehal M. Samy El Gendy
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):160-165
      Purpose The aim of this study was to determine which clinically significant diabetic macular edema treatment modality results in early restoration of the ellipsoid zone and external limiting membrane (EZ/ELM).Patients and methods This was a retrospective study where the medical records of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and clinically significant diabetic macular edema were reviewed. Patients who had valid scans before treatment and 6 months after treatment were included. Disruption of EZ/ELM was graded and compared. Patients were divided into six groups according to the treatment received: group A received argon laser treatment; group B received micropulse diode laser treatment; group C received antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment; group D received anti-VEGF+laser therapy; group E received triamcinolone acetonide injection (TAI); and group F received TAI+laser therapy.Results A total of 293 eyes of 200 patients were included (group A: 47, group B: 40, group C: 52, group D: 54, group E: 51, and group F: 49 eyes). Improvement in EZ/ELM integrity was 38.3% in group A, 45% in group B, 59.6% in group C, 37% in group D, 54.9% in group E, and 44.9% in group F. The difference between groups A and B was not statistically significant (P=0.3). The differences between group A and groups C, D, and E were statistically significant (P=0.002, 0.006, and 0.02, respectively). The difference between groups A and F was not significant (P=0.2). The difference between groups C and D was significant (P=0.001), whereas the difference between groups E and F was not significant (P=0.15).Conclusion Anti-VEGF monotherapy showed the highest percentage of early EZ/ELM restoration. Argon laser alone or argon laser combined with anti-VEGF delayed EZ/ELM healing. Micropulse laser therapy was equivalent to argon laser therapy. TAI results were comparable with anti-VEGF results. Laser addition did not compromise TAI results.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):160-165
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_13_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of the lamina cribrosa morphology in correlation to retinal
           nerve fiber layer thickness

    • Authors: Ayser Abd El-Hameed Fayed
      Pages: 166 - 169
      Abstract: Ayser Abd El-Hameed Fayed
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):166-169
      Aim The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between lamina cribrosa (LC) morphology and glaucoma severity using spectral domain optical coherence tomography.Patients and methods This is a comparative cross-sectional study that included 40 eyes divided into 20 eyes having primary open-angle glaucoma and 20 normal control eyes. Serial horizontal B-scan images of the optic nerve head were obtained using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. Images were analyzed using the Cirrus HD software. Statistical analysis was conducted to compare the lamina cribrosa depth (LD) and lamina cribrosa thickness (LT) with retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and visual field mean deviation.Results The mean±SD values of the LD, LT, and visual field mean deviation were 533.5±66.8, 188.4±15.8 µm, and −4.3±3.4 dB, respectively. On linear regression analysis, LD, LT, and intraocular pressure were significantly correlated with RNFL thickness (P<0.001, 0.001, and 0.01, respectively). The mean LD was significantly greater in the glaucoma group compared with the normal control group (P<0.001). In eyes with glaucoma, the LC was thinner and located more posteriorly compared with the normal control eyes.Conclusion There was a generalized decrease in LT and posterior displacement of the LC in the glaucomatous patients compared with healthy controls. Thus, the LC morphology can help differentiate glaucomatous from normal eyes.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):166-169
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_21_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Optical coherence tomography (OCT) changes after achieving target
           intraocular pressure

    • Authors: Mohamed Y.S Saif, Mohamed O Abd Elkhalek, Moustafa M Tawfeek
      Pages: 170 - 175
      Abstract: Mohamed Y.S Saif, Mohamed O Abd Elkhalek, Moustafa M Tawfeek
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):170-175
      Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect the changes in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) after reaching target intraocular pressure (IOP) in glaucomatous patients.Patients and methods Thirty-two (58 eyes) patients with a clinical diagnosis of primary open-angle glaucoma were assessed as regards peripapillary RNFL thickness and optic nerve head parameters by 3D-OCT for a follow-up period of 6 months. The drugs used to reach target IOP were Twinzol (dorzolamide 2%/timolol 0.5%) eye drops 5 ml and Ioprost (Latanoprost) 0.005% (50 mcg/ml) eye drops 3 ml. Eleven patients were treated with Twinzol only and reached target IOP after adding Ioprost. Eight patients were treated with Ioprost only and reached target IOP after adding Twinzol, and 13 patients had no added treatment, where four reached target IOP by Ioprost only, six reached target IOP by Twinzol only, and three reached target IOP by both drugs. OCT was done for all patients after achieving target IOP and was repeated after 6 months of medical control.Results The mean IOP before treatment was 29.89 mmHg and decreased significantly (P<0.001) after treatment to 12.17 mmHg. There was a significant (P<0.05) difference regarding the superior RNFL thickness before and after treatment (100.31 vs. 101.15). There was also a significant (P<0.05) difference in the nasal RNFL thickness before and after treatment (73.37 vs. 74.34). The cup-to-disc area ratio (CDR) mean had decreased significantly (P<0.01) after treatment (0.51 before treatment vs. 0.47 after treatment). Vertical CDR and cup volume had the same trend (0.69 vs. 0.66 for vertical CDR and 0.42 vs. 0.39 for cup volume). There was a highly significant (P<0.01) strong positive correlation between IOP changes and rim volume (r=0.81).Conclusion Achieving target IOP in patients with glaucoma results in a significant change in the RNFL and ganglion cell complexes layer as shown by spectral-domain OCT.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):170-175
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_7_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Suspension recession of inferior oblique versus graded recession technique
           in V-pattern strabismus with primary inferior oblique overaction

    • Authors: Reham H Taha, Heba A El Gendy, Mahmoud A Kamal, Fadia M El Guindy
      Pages: 176 - 181
      Abstract: Reham H Taha, Heba A El Gendy, Mahmoud A Kamal, Fadia M El Guindy
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):176-181
      Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of inferior oblique suspension recession ‘modified hang-back’ in cases with V-pattern strabismus and primary inferior oblique overaction (IOOA), compared with standard graded recession technique.Patients and methods Thirty patients (60 eyes) presenting with V-pattern strabismus with primary IOOA were enrolled and randomized for inferior oblique weakening intervention − that is, suspension recession (group A), or standard graded recession (group B).Results In group A, the mean postoperative V-pattern exotropia was 4.8±2.7 PD as compared with a mean of 26.42±6.26 PD preoperatively (P≤0.001). Meanwhile, for the esotropic subgroup, the values were 2.57±1.13 and 15.62±4.17 PD, respectively (P≤0.001). For group B patients, the mean V-pattern exotropia was 2±1.5 PD, compared with a preoperative mean value of 23.12±10.66 PD (P≤0.001), and the mean pattern esotropia was 2.28±1.79 PD, compared with a preoperative mean value of 17.14±3.93 PD (P≤0.001), with a highly significant statistical difference between patients within the same group (P≤0.001), as well as between the two groups as regards the exotropic subgroups (P≤0.02). A significant improvement in IOOA was noted in group B, whereas the postoperative hypertropia in lateral gaze was 0.97±1 PD, compared with 5.06±2 in group A (P≤0.001).Conclusion Although considerable results were achieved with the suspension recession technique, the postoperative impact of the procedure as regards the control of IOOA may be still questionable, with significant superior results of the standard recession technique.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):176-181
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_3_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Misinterpretation of topographic early keratoconus, with consequent post
           small-incision lenticule extraction ectasia

    • Authors: Sherif A Eissa
      Pages: 182 - 184
      Abstract: Sherif A Eissa
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):182-184
      The purpose of this paper is to describe an infrequent complication of small-incision lenticule extraction. Bilateral corneal ectasia that was discovered 6 months postoperatively is described here. The case has shown that the procedure can aggravate early keratoconus cases without any advantage over laser in-situ keratomileusis or surface ablation procedures. Placido disk imaging with correct scaling and color coding of Scheimpflug images is essential in the preoperative assessment of small-incision lenticule extraction patients.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):182-184
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_1_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Hypertensive uveitis: an initial presentation for primary antiphospholipid
           syndrome

    • Authors: Riham S.H.M Allam, Basma Medhat Ali
      Pages: 185 - 189
      Abstract: Riham S.H.M Allam, Basma Medhat Ali
      Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):185-189
      The authors aim to report a case of hypertensive uveitis-associated primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). A 25-year-old woman presented with unilateral painless diminution of vision. Examination revealed right chronic anterior uveitis, complicated cataract, and appositional angle-closure glaucoma uncontrolled with medications, for which sequential phacoemulsification–trabeculectomy was performed. Rheumatological consultation revealed the diagnosis of primary APS according to revised Sapporo criteria. Accordingly, systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine were prescribed. The patient experienced an attack of posterior uveitis 2 years later, which necessitated a maintenance dose of an immunomodulator. Following systemic treatment and intravitreal triamcinolone, the patient’s vision improved from hand motion good projection to 0.3 with no inflammation 8 months following the last relapse. We conclude that hypertensive uveitis can be a presenting feature of primary APS. Antiphospholipid laboratory profile could be added to the workup of uveitis whenever clinical suspicion is present. Thromboprophylaxis could be added when antiphospholipid is positive.
      Citation: Delta Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 18(3):185-189
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/DJO.DJO_4_17
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 3 (2017)
       
 
 
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