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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access  
Heart Views     Open Access  
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access  
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2347-5625 - ISSN (Online) 2349-6673
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Retinoblastoma: Making a difference together

    • Authors: Mary Elizabeth Davis
      Pages: 181 - 183
      Abstract: Mary Elizabeth Davis
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):181-183

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):181-183
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_33_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Management of retinoblastoma in Zambia

    • Authors: Biemba K Maliti
      Pages: 184 - 186
      Abstract: Biemba K Maliti
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):184-186

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):184-186
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_24_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Influence of socioeconomic and cultural factors on retinoblastoma
           management

    • Authors: Bhavna Chawla, Kiran Kumar, Arun D Singh
      Pages: 187 - 190
      Abstract: Bhavna Chawla, Kiran Kumar, Arun D Singh
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):187-190

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):187-190
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_19_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Psychosocial factors influencing parental decision to allow or refuse
           potentially lifesaving enucleation in children with retinoblastoma

    • Authors: Rolando Enrique D. Domingo, Maria Socorro W. Toledo, Beverlee Verona L. Mante
      Pages: 191 - 196
      Abstract: Rolando Enrique D. Domingo, Maria Socorro W. Toledo, Beverlee Verona L. Mante
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):191-196
      Objective: Retinoblastoma is the most common malignancy of the eye and ocular adnexa in the Philippines. It is curable when treated early, but delay in enucleation is common due to the parental refusal of surgery for varied reasons. The aim of this study is to identify the psychosocial barriers and facilitating factors for accepting versus refusing enucleation as treatment for retinoblastoma. Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study utilizing structured interviews and a questionnaire. It was conducted at the Retinoblastoma Clinic of the Philippine General Hospital. A questionnaire using the Likert scale was constructed after performing key informant interviews and focus group discussions. It was pretested and revised before parents of patients with retinoblastoma were invited to participate in the study. Descriptive statistics, quantitative item analyses using inter-item correlations and item-total correlations was performed. Results: Factors that correlate with refusal to enucleate are the beliefs that cancer is a fatal illness, the fear of unacceptable esthetic outcome of the surgery, and the cost of treatment. Favorable factors include value of life, high regard for the opinion of medical practitioners, and appreciation of the efficacy of treatment. Conclusions: There are several favorable factors and barriers that health practitioners must consider in facilitating parental decision-making toward enucleation for retinoblastoma.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):191-196
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2347-5625.207736
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Neonatal retinoblastoma

    • Authors: Tero T Kivelä, Theodora Hadjistilianou
      Pages: 197 - 204
      Abstract: Tero T Kivelä, Theodora Hadjistilianou
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):197-204
      From 7% to 10% of all retinoblastomas and from 44% to 71% of familial retinoblastomas in developed countries are diagnosed in the neonatal period, usually through pre- or post-natal screening prompted by a positive family history and sometimes serendipitously during screening for retinopathy of prematurity or other reasons. In developing countries, neonatal diagnosis of retinoblastoma has been less common. Neonatal retinoblastoma generally develops from a germline mutation of RB1, the retinoblastoma gene, even when the family history is negative and is thus usually hereditary. At least one-half of infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have unilateral tumors when the diagnosis is made, typically the International Intraocular Retinoblastoma Classification (Murphree) Group B or higher, but most germline mutation carriers will progress to bilateral involvement, typically Group A in the fellow eye. Neonatal leukokoria usually leads to the diagnosis in children without a family history of retinoblastoma, and a Group C tumor or higher is typical in the more advanced involved eye. Almost all infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have at least one eye with a tumor in proximity to the foveola, but the macula of the fellow eye is frequently spared. Consequently, loss of reading vision from both eyes is exceptional. A primary ectopic intracranial neuroblastic tumor known as trilateral retinoblastoma is no more common after neonatal than other retinoblastoma. For many reasons, neonatal retinoblastoma may be a challenge to eradicate, and the early age at diagnosis and relatively small tumors do not guarantee the preservation of both eyes of every involved child. Oncology nurses can be instrumental in contributing to better outcomes by ensuring that hereditary retinoblastoma survivors receive genetic counseling, by referring families of survivors to early screening programs when they are planning for a baby, and by providing psychological and practical support for parents when neonatal retinoblastoma has been diagnosed.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):197-204
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_18_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Ophthalmic artery chemosurgery: A nursing perspective

    • Authors: Mary Elizabeth Davis, Edith Guarini, Lindsey Eibeler, Kimberly A Salvaggio
      Pages: 205 - 208
      Abstract: Mary Elizabeth Davis, Edith Guarini, Lindsey Eibeler, Kimberly A Salvaggio
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):205-208
      Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary cancer to affect the eyes in children with approximately 350 cases/year in the United States and 8000 worldwide. Today, sadly, 50% of children with RB worldwide die from their disease. In our experience, utilization of ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) has transformed the treatment plan for patients; with over 1500 procedures performed, our survival rate exceeds 98%. It is now our standard first-line therapy for RB. OAC is a surgical outpatient procedure which delivers concentrated doses of chemotherapy directly to the tumor without the toxicities of systemic chemotherapy. Our team approach and nursing management of these patients are the focus of this article. Nursing navigation and collaboration after OAC is vital and requires a combined effort by the nurses along with physicians, interventional radiologists, and the patient's families to ensure appropriate follow-up is established. Proper patient education throughout the process is crucial as is open and available communication for parents of patients with the nursing staff. The success in our treatment of this disease can be much accredited to the multidisciplinary team approach, with nursing playing an integral part in the support and management of these patients.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):205-208
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2347-5625.207737
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Cancer and palliative care in the United States, Turkey, and Malawi:
           Developing global collaborations

    • Authors: Deborah Kirk Walker, Rebecca L Edwards, Gulcan Bagcivan, Marie A Bakitas
      Pages: 209 - 219
      Abstract: Deborah Kirk Walker, Rebecca L Edwards, Gulcan Bagcivan, Marie A Bakitas
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):209-219
      As the global cancer burden grows, so too will global inequities in access to cancer and palliative care increase. This paper will describe the cancer and palliative care landscape relative to nursing practice, education, and research, and emerging global collaborations in the United States (U.S.), Turkey, and Malawi. It is imperative that nurses lead efforts to advance health and strengthen education in these high-need areas. Leaders within the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, through a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Nursing Collaborating Center, have initiated collaborative projects in cancer and palliative care between the U.S., Turkey, and Malawi to strengthen initiatives that can ultimately transform practice. These collaborations will lay a foundation to empower nurses to lead efforts to reduce the global inequities for those with cancer and other serious and life-limiting illnesses.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):209-219
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_31_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Living with the effects of cutaneous toxicities induced by treatment

    • Authors: Andreas Charalambous
      Pages: 220 - 223
      Abstract: Andreas Charalambous
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):220-223
      The introduction of targeted therapies in cancer treatment was accompanied with promising results including tumor control and patients survival benefits. However, these drugs just like their predecessors were associated with systemic side effects, including frequent and various cutaneous effects. Targeted therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, kit, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and BCR-ABL inhibitors as well as mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors can induce cutaneous toxicities of varying severity. There are scarce studies on the actual impact of these toxicities on the patients' lives including the physical, social, and psychological aspects and overall quality of life. Patient's perspective in living with and beyond these toxicities remains largely uncharted but essential in optimizing care provided to those receiving treatment with targeted therapies.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):220-223
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2347-5625.207729
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Chemotherapy and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes and
           cancer: A comparative case analysis

    • Authors: Denise Soltow Hershey, Sarah Hession
      Pages: 224 - 232
      Abstract: Denise Soltow Hershey, Sarah Hession
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):224-232
      Objective: Individuals with diabetes who develop cancer have a worse 5-year overall survival rate and are more likely to develop an infection and/or be hospitalized when compared to those without diabetes. Patients with diabetes and cancer receiving chemotherapy have an increased risk for developing glycemic issues. The relationship between chemotherapy and glycemic control is not completely understood. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between glycemic control, symptoms, physical and mental function, development of adverse events, and chemotherapy reductions or stoppages in adults with Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cancer. Methods: A prospective 12-week longitudinal cohort study recruited 24 adults with T2D, solid tumor cancer, or lymphoma receiving outpatient intravenous chemotherapy. Eighteen individuals completed baseline data and were included in the analysis. A comparative case analysis was performed to analyze the results. Results: Potential predictors of occurrence of an adverse event include sex (relative risk [RR] = 1.5), treatment with insulin (RR = 2.17), years with diabetes (RR = 3.85), and baseline glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (odds ratio [OR] = 1.67). Baseline body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.16) and HbA1c (OR = 1.61) were potentially predictive of a chemotherapy stoppage. Conclusions: Level of glycemic control at the time an individual begins treatment for cancer appears to contribute to the occurrence of an adverse event, developing an infection and/or being hospitalized during treatment, and the increased risk of having a chemotherapy reduction or stoppage. Clinicians working with patients receiving chemotherapy for a solid tumor cancer who have pre-existing diabetes, need to be aware of how the patients glycemic level at the start of treatment may impact successful treatment completion.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):224-232
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_22_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Emotional responses to persistent chemotherapy-induced peripheral
           neuropathy experienced by patients with colorectal cancer in Japan

    • Authors: Kiyoko Kanda, Keiko Fujimoto, Ayumi Kyota
      Pages: 233 - 240
      Abstract: Kiyoko Kanda, Keiko Fujimoto, Ayumi Kyota
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):233-240
      Objective: For patients who wish to continue treatment for persistent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (PCIPN) while maintaining the quality of life (QOL), the only effective way appears to be the stop-and-go strategy. The objective of the present study was to analyze emotional responses of Japanese patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) experiencing PCIPN for the first time and to consider effective ways of providing supportive nursing care. Methods: In all, 25 patients with metastatic CRC who had completed more than six courses receiving first-line therapy with modified FOLFOX6 were included. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Results: Emotional responses to PCIPN experienced by patients with CRC fell into the following categories: (1) suffering from an inability to cope with the previously unknown sensation of numbness, (2) inability to perform daily living activities activities of daily living [ADL]/instrumental activities of daily living [IADL] independently and feeling fear for physical safety, (3) feeling a sense of relief at being able to live the same life as before, and (4) facing the threat of cancer and tolerating the numbness caused by the life-supporting treatment. Fear, helplessness, dismay and other uncomfortable feelings represented 72.5% of all emotional responses, probably reflecting the lack of effective intervention for PCIPN. Conclusions: These results suggest that both subjective and objective assessments of PCIPN and proper use of a stop-and-go strategy are essential for treatment continuation and maintenance of patient's QOL; therefore, an integrated approach is desirable.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):233-240
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_12_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The effect of reflexology on chemotherapy-induced nausea, vomiting, and
           fatigue in breast cancer patients

    • Authors: Afitap Özdelikara, Mehtap Tan
      Pages: 241 - 249
      Abstract: Afitap Özdelikara, Mehtap Tan
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):241-249
      Objective: Patients receiving chemotherapy struggle with the side effects of this treatment. These side effects obligate the patients to use not only the pharmacological methods but also non-pharmacological relaxing methods. This study was conducted to determine the effect of reflexology on chemotherapy-induced nausea, vomiting, and fatigue in breast cancer patients. Methods: The study was conducted as a pretest–posttest experimental design. The study was conducted with sixty patients, thirty as the control and thirty as the experimental groups. A sociodemographic form, Rhodes index of nausea, vomiting, and retching (INVR), and Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) were used to collect the data. Analysis of variance, t-test, percentage calculations, and Chi-square methods were used to evaluate the data. The data obtained were assessed using the “Statistical Package for Social Science 21.0” software. Results: It was determined that the difference between the total mean scores of INVR in the experimental and control groups was significant on the onset and first and second measurements, and the difference between total mean scores of development and distress between the groups was statistically significant in the third measurement (P < 0.05). The results of the study showed that the BFI mean scores of patients in the experimental group gradually decreased in the first, second, and third measurements (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study proved that reflexology decreased the experience, development, distress of nausea, vomiting, and retching as well as fatigue in the experimental group. Hence, the use of reflexology is recommended for chemotherapy-induced nausea, vomiting, and fatigue.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):241-249
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_15_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Women experiences of using external breast prosthesis after mastectomy

    • Authors: Zohra Asif Jetha, Raisa B Gul, Sharifa Lalani
      Pages: 250 - 258
      Abstract: Zohra Asif Jetha, Raisa B Gul, Sharifa Lalani
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):250-258
      Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the experiences of breast cancer patients using external breast prostheses (EBP) in the context of the Pakistani society. Methods: A qualitative descriptive exploratory design was used in the study. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with 15 postmastectomy women using EBP. A semi-structured interview guide with open-ended questions was used for the interviews. The analysis of the data was organized into four categories according to the study questions including reasons for using EBP, feeling about EBP, challenges for using EBP, and coping with lost breast. Each category was further divided into subcategories. Results: Women used EBP because they felt strange, incomplete, and embarrassed in front of other people, due to the asymmetrical shape of the chest after mastectomy. They faced several challenges with regard to obtaining and using the EBP. While EBP was used as an alternative of their lost breast, they experienced sadness and embarrassment. They found it challenging to take care of the EBP and were required to make changes in their lifestyle. However, they accepted living with their lost breast, either through rationalization, family support, or faith and prayers, which helped them to cope. Conclusions: The study findings have given insight into some real experiences of mastectomy patients. Mastectomy not only affects women's physical health but also their psychological health, as a result of which they become reluctant to socialize. Using EBP can help them to improve their body image and body posture. Health-care providers' support is very important to the families of the patients specifically where patients are very shy to openly seek information due to cultural constraints.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):250-258
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_25_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Identification of symptom clusters in cancer patients at palliative care
           clinic

    • Authors: Gülçin Senel Özalp, Ne&#351;e Uysal, Gonca O&#287;uz, Nesteren Ko&#231;ak, &#350;erife Karaca, Nihan Kad&#305;o&#287;ullar&#305;
      Pages: 259 - 264
      Abstract: Gülçin Senel Özalp, Neşe Uysal, Gonca Oğuz, Nesteren Koçak, Şerife Karaca, Nihan Kadıoğulları
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):259-264
      Objective: Cancer patients often experience a large number of symptoms together. The aim of this study is to determine the symptom clusters in cancer patients at palliative care clinic. Methods: Hundred and seventy consecutive patients were enrolled in the study. Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used for symptom assessment of the patients. Results: The most experienced symptoms by the patients during the past week before hospitalization in palliative care clinic were lack of energy (95.4%), weight loss (91.2%), lack of appetite (89.4%), pain (88.2%), dry mouth (87.6%), feeling sad (87.6%), feeling nervous (82.9%), worrying (81.2%), and feeling irritable (80.6%). Five symptom clusters were defined. First cluster: pain, feeling nervous, dry mouth, worrying, feeling irritable, weight loss; second cluster: feeling drowsy, numbness/tingling in hands/feet, difficulty in sleeping, dizziness, constipation, I do not look like myself; third cluster: nausea, vomiting; fourth cluster: shortness of breath, difficulty in swallowing, cough, change in the way food tastes; and fifth cluster: feeling bloated, problems with urination, diarrhea, itching, mouth sores, hair loss, swelling of arm or legs, change in the skin. Conclusions: We encountered various symptom clusters in advanced cancer patients. Identification of symptom clusters and knowledge of cluster composition in oncological population may particularly contribute individualization of the treatment.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):259-264
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_17_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A patient with cancer and her family in caring partnership based on
           Margaret Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness

    • Authors: Yoshimi Fujiwara, Emiko Endo
      Pages: 265 - 268
      Abstract: Yoshimi Fujiwara, Emiko Endo
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):265-268
      The purpose, on the basis of Margaret Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness in a unitary perspective, was to practice the caring partnership with a client who could not share their desires and find their future direction at a gear change period and document the process of their relational changes within this process. The design was research as praxis. The participant was a patient with cancer and her family in the midst of a difficult health situation. Through caring partnership, a nurse researcher asked to tell “the meaningful events and relationships in their lives” over four in-depth dialogue meetings. Data were collected from the tape-recorded dialogue transcriptions. In the process of caring partnership, the patient and each family member recognized their own pattern and family pattern of “being closed off,” their approach to the situation, and found a new direction through this process. The finding suggested that caring partnership as a nursing intervention would be helpful for nurses as well as for patients and their families in difficult health situations.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):265-268
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_20_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Follicular thyroid carcinoma presenting as large solitary vertebral
           metastasis: Report of two unusual cases treated with radiotherapy

    • Authors: Neelam Sharma, Abhishek Purkayastha
      Pages: 269 - 272
      Abstract: Neelam Sharma, Abhishek Purkayastha
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):269-272
      Solitary spinal metastasis with cord compression as the presenting feature of follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) is extremely unusual with <10 cases reported in world literature. We hereby present two such cases in a 39-year-old male with lytic lesion left sacral bone with biopsy showing metastatic carcinoma with morphology and immunophenotype of thyroid gland and a 35-year-old female with thoracic vertebral lesions suggestive of metastatic deposit of FTC. Subsequently, both patients were found to have a solitary nodule in the thyroid lobe. They were treated with local radiotherapy (RT) with significant symptomatic relief. The present cases highlight the rarity of FTC to present as upfront solitary vertebral metastases with significant morbidity in young individuals although a slow indolent course with metastases in late stages of disease is more common, debilitating the effect of metastatic lesion requiring RT for pain palliation and the role of supportive nursing care for patient rehabilitation.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(3):269-272
      PubDate: Fri,9 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_26_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 3 (2017)
       
 
 
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